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Abstract book for the 16th MIKLÓS IVÁNYI INTERNATIONAL PHD & DLA SYMPOSIUM


Abstract book for the 16th MIKLÓS IVÁNYI INTERNATIONAL PHD & DLA SYMPOSIUM

ARCHITECTURAL, ENGINEERING AND INFORMATION SCIENCES

Edited by Prof. Dr. Péter IVÁNYI

Pollack Press Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology University of Pécs


© University of Pécs, Hungary published 2020 by Pollack Press Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology University of Pécs Pécs, Boszorkány u 2, H-7624, Hungary Pollack Press is an imprint of University of Pécs ISBN 978-963-429-578-5

Cover page: Gábor Sipos


Contents Salute Foreword International Scientific Committee Conference program

I

Architecture

1

Possibilities and limitations of 2D moisture monitoring when conducting investigations in historical masonry based on impedance measurements M.A.A. AL-MOALMI

2

Case study of neglected façades and their adaptive reuse T. ZHAO, S.M. MAITEH, C. LU, J. GYERGYÁK, E.S. ZOLTÁN, Á. BORSOS

3

Glazed façade surfaces in the construction of office buildings in Hungary S. PATYI, B. NOVÁK

4

Investigation of magnesium-containing fillers effecting the microbial colonization of façade coatings H. HEINRICH

5

Space organisation and facade strategies in pioneer green high rise office buildings: Myths and truth about energy and comfort efficiencies B. NAILI, I. KISTELEGDI, I. HABER

6

Options for reducing the carbon footprint during home renovations T.Z. DÁNYI

7

Energy efficiency scenarios of residential building blocks, case study of New Minia, Egypt S. ELHADAD, B. BARANYAI, I. KISTELEGDI, J. GYERGYÁK

8

Passive air conduction system analysis in a modern industry building Á.L. KATONA, I. KISTELEGDI i


9

Industrial application of the energia design synthesis method K. HORVÁTH, I. KISTELEGDI

10

Assessment of morphological impact on energy performance for migrant shelters R. IBRAHIM, B. BARANYAI, T. KATONA

11

Geometry-based analysis for natural ventilation in high-rise office buildings M. ALI, I. KISTELEGDI

12

The influence of physical factors on light design and its perception N. SADOUD, E.S. ZOLTÁN

13

The green, the greener, the greenest G. YU, J. GYERGYÁK, E.S. ZOLTÁN

14

Fire protection and energy saving in public municipal building design in Northeast China J. HE, B. BACHMANN

15

Examination of the effect of indoor fires on thermal insulation materials in simulation environment F. HAJDU, G. LÁSZLÓ, R. KUTI

16

Analysis on forms of behavior in social design practice through examples K. VARJÚ, P. ZILAHI

17

The complex role of water in architecture G. HECKENAST, M. FERENCZ, A.T. KERTÉSZ

18

Intervention and renewal: Interpretation of installation art in urban public space H.H. HE, J. GYERGYÁK

19

Design and development of B&Bs in the post-epidemic era Z.K. HUANG, H. CAO, H.W. PAN, G. ZOBOKI

20

Application of environmental psychology in kindergarten architectural design H. CAO, A.M. TAMÁS, G. SZTRANYÁK

21

Integration of sustainable street furniture in Tunisian urban public spaces: Recycling design O.B. DHAOU, N. VASVARY NADOR, A. GALL

22

Re-construction place script to awake the general public’s memories C. REN, G. MEDVEGY

23

Preliminary research on spatial narratology in architecture X. KANG, G. MEDVEGY, Y.F. ZHOU

24

To create a “box”space in building: modular building Q. GU, E.S. ZOLTÁN ii


25

Research on the relationship between contemporary Korean catering space and traditional Korean folk houses Z. NAN

26

Harmonious architecture and interior design through components of adaptive reuse: Urban Gastrolounge in Prishtina T. JASHARI-KAJTAZI, R. ZOGIANI

27

Interior renovation possibilities of large-panel building apartments focusing on costs and prices O. RÁK, N. BAKAI, Á. BORSOS, P. IVÁNYI

28

Teaching freeform modelling for architects K. SZOMMER, R. SÁRKÖZI, A.B. SZÉLL

29

Possibilities of linking BIM and DFMA methodologies: Literature review N. BAKAI, O. RÁK, M.B. ZAGORÁCZ, B. FÜREDI

30

Development by event: Branding for small cities D. HADŽIC, T. MOLNÁR

31

Dreaming back in good old times: Multi-functional facility design for rural areas in China D.P. ZHAO, Á. HUTTER, Y.R. LIU

32

Conservation and utilization of vernacular architecture in chinese traditional villages: A case study in Gantian village, Chongqing S. YONGTING, A.M. TAMÁS, G. SZTRANYÁK

33

Analysis of the ancient city pattern of Wula street Manchu town , Jilin city Z. LIANGYU, A.T. KERTÉSZ

34

Sustainability education based on value propositions E.ZS. PANCSA

35

Shaping our movements in architecture N. RAMOS GONZALEZ, G. MEDVEGY

36

The value of 4x4 experimental teaching project for the University of Pécs X. JIN, W. TIE

37

Synchronous exploration T. WANG, X. JIN

38

Urban morphological research: The classical and modern research methodologies Á. BERTYÁK

39

AI technology on the urban street landscape design Z.X. LIANG

40

Re-shaping Budapest: Large housing estates and their (un)planned centers A.K. LOSONCZY, R. BALLA, H. ANTYPENKO, M. BENKŐ iii


41

Strengthen walkability by pedestrian way: The fragmented greenery approach T. ZHAO, S.M. MAITEH, C. LU, J. GYERGYÁK, E.S. ZOLTÁN, Á. BORSOS

42

Segregated neighbourhoods: Towards a graphical evaluation index for slum-upgrading projects T. CSABA

43

The impact of contemporary cohousing model on urban quality of life: Case studies from Vienna, Berlin, Zürich, and Budapest A. BABOS, M. BENKŐ, A. ORBÁN

44

Research on the connection and strengthening of the place spirit in the city: The application of modular installations in the terrain vague M. WU, B. BACHMAN

45

Adaptive-reuse of strategies for urban heritage to improve community resilience S.S. LIU, S.Z. ZHANG, K. KOVÁCS-ANDOR

46

Collective residential spaces in sustainable development: San Francisco housing units within co-living understanding C. LU, S.M. MAITEH, T. ZHAO, Á. BORSOS, J. GYERGYÁK, E.S. ZOLTÁN

47

Architectural adaptation to existing living communities of asylum seekers: The case of Mexico S.M. MAITEH, C. LU, T. ZHAO, E.S. ZOLTÁN, J. GYERGYÁK, Á. BORSOS

48

Sensing and mapping the city: Szigony utca, Budapest B. BENE, M. BENKŐ

49

Urban regeneration scenarios: Strategies for industrial brownfields redevelopment Q.C. HE, A. REITH

50

Architecture site preservation and display from a visual narrative perspective: Case study of the Long Wang Jian site at Wuhan in the middle of China C. KUN, K. KOVÁCS-ANDOR

51

Renovation of research strategies on conservation and development of Qingdao historic district T. HU

52

Heritage and innovation: Research on the design of new residence in Yi township, China F.X. MENG, T. WANG

53

Practical tricks of making heritage place inventory through the example of the Museum of Applied Arts K. SEIDL

54

Renewal project of an old community based on the symbiosis concept: A case study on Feng Ye Shan community renewal in Huang Shi city H.W. PAN, Á. HUTTER iv


55

Criteria for successful and livable city in Jordan, based on the traditional city of Salt as a case study S.J. ALAMOUSH, A.T. KERTÉSZ, T. KATONA

56

Digital nomad-conqueror-settler Z. ZRENA, B. KÓSA, T. KONDOR

57

Earthen heritage architecture as sustainable refugee shelters: A case study of the domes of northern Syria S. IBRAHIM, M. ALI,B. BARANYAI, I. KISTELEGDI

58

Regenerative architecture in Kosovo B. JAGXHIU, F. BEJTULLAHU

59

Resilient design of vernacular educational community center in the Philippines: An investigation in recovery after natural disasters S. IBRAHIM, D. KASSAM, T. MOLNÁR, I. KISTELEGDI

60

A parametric design approach for post-disaster settlements S.M. MAITEH, E.S. ZOLTÁN

61

Lightweight post disaster shelter made of membrane and wood A. GUEROUI, M. HALADA

62

Architectural design for people with dementia: Case study analysis and literature review F. MARX, D. RÉTFALVI

63

Evaluation and optimization of medical and health facilities in Wuhan under the regular epidemic prevention K. TU, A. REITH

64

COVID-19 and recent trends in educational services: Case study in Egypt A.H. ABDEL WAHID, A.N. ABDEL HAKIM, A.M.R. ELHADAD

II

Civil engineering

65

Optimization of drilling performance using various metaheuristics S. ALSAMIA, D.S. IBRAHIM, H.N. GHAFIL

66

DEM modeling of crushable grain material under different loading condition M.A. BENMEBAREK, M.R. MOVAHEDI

67

Numerical study on the influence of imperfections in the buckling resistance of steel beam-columns with welded class 4 cross-section at elevated temperatures S. NEMER, F. PAPP

68

Towards green concrete and sustainable construction for better environment S. KASHKASH, Z. ORBÁN

69

Effect of supplementary materials on transport properties of cementitious materials Z.A. ABDULHUSSEIN, K. KOPECSKÓ v


70

Optimization of geopolymer concrete using industrial waste A.A. KHALAF, K. KOPECSKÓ

71

Using steel fibre in concrete types, methods for improving the properties of recycled aggregate concretes and multiple recycled aggregate M. SHMLLS, T. HORVÁTH

72

Expected impact of climate change on the physical properties and load-bearing capacity of timber structures M. KHERAIS, A. CSÉBFALVI, A. LEN

73

Modeling the early- and latewood growth rings as orthotropic material for FE-calculation of Norway spruce timber beams using the rule of mixture T. KIRÁLY, R. POLGÁR, A. KRISZTIÁN

74

Three-phase comparative modeling to identify critical infrastructure by analyzing the operational risk of rail transport: Case study of Iran railway A. TAHERI, M. KAZEMIAN, F. ASTARAKI, M.M. RAD

75

Comparison of railway lines located in different regions of Poland with regard to their use in freight transport W. KAMIŃSKI

76

Analysis of traffic accidents in Hungary using stochastic modeling A. GHADA, L. KISGYÖRGY

77

Impact of autonomous trucks on pavement response M. FAHAD, R. NAGY

78

Pedestrian’s behavioural adaptation to AVs and its effect on road capacity S. PHETOUDOM, E. MAKÓ

79

Autonomous cars and traffic calming G. SZÜCS, C. KOREN, K. MACSINKA

80

Conflict analysis of vehicle-pedestrian interactions A. KIZAWI, Á. BORSOS

81

Sight distance analyses for autonomous vehicles in Civil3D K. KHASKA, D. MILETICS

82

PROMETHEE method in transportation: Literature review L. OUBAHMAN, S. DULEBA

83

A systematic review of the latest advancements on Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) technique focusing on applications in transportation planning K. ISMAEL, S. DULEBA

84

Error sources of laser trackers R. CHOLEVA, A. KOPÁČIK vi


85

Evaluating the effect of different weather input datasets and model configuration (area threshold value) uncertainty on streamflow simulations using SWAT model A. FIRAS, K. BENE

86

Transfer of the rainfall-runoff model parameters for modeling runoff under future climate change M. ALEKSIC

87

Water management solution of run-off conditions from minimum discharge point of view L. ČUBANOVÁ, A. ŠOLTÉSZ, J. MYDLA

88

Groundwater flooding on the lower part of the Rye Island M. ČERVEŇANSKÁ, D. BAROKOVÁ, A. ŠOLTÉSZ

89

Comparison of water balance of North Algeria and South-Western Hungary A. SALEM, M. MIHOUB, D. LÓCZY

90

Investigation of scour development at the Hricov weir using photogrammetry M. PAVÚCEK, J. RUMANN

91

Assessment of selected combined sewer system in the city of Trnava M. CSÓKA, I. MARKO, G. RÓZSA, Š. STANKO

92

The impact of COVID-19 on the amount of municipal waste G. RÓZSA, R. WTTMANOVÁ, M. ŠUTÚŠ, I. ŠKULTÉTYOVÁ

93

CFD as a tool for design optimalization of sewer systems M. ŠUTÚŠ, J. HRUDKA, M. CSÓKA, S. ŠTANKO

94

Operational challenges of a sequencing batch reactor applied in wastewater treatment B. BÁBA, T. KARCHES

95

Adsorption of simazine with two different granular activated carbons M. MARTON, J. ILAVSKÝ, D. BARLOKOVÁ

96

Evaluation of the current state of small water reservoir from a landscape and ecological side Z. SABOVÁ, Z. NÉMETOVÁ, T. KALETOVÁ, S. KOHNOVÁ

97

PIV measurements on a hydraulic model of a shaft intake of a SHPP L. BYTCANKOVÁ, J. RUMANN, P. DUŠICKA

98

Dynamic behavior of soil under irregular loading patterns A. MAJD, R. RICHARD

99

Behaviour of embankments on soft soil reinforced by rigid inclusions R. ALSIRAWAN

III

Electrical engineering vii


100

Selection criterias of power filters for EMC chambers D. MAKLÁRI, B. TAMÁS

101

Multi source simulations in ANSYS HFSS D. ERDOSY, A. VÁRADINÉ SZARKA, T. BODOLAI

IV

Mechanical engineering

102

Reducing shrinkage at welded steel and aluminium beams K. JÁRMAI, M. PETRIK

103

The effect of the mesh size during the determination of GTN parameters Y. CHAHBOUB, S. SZAVAI

104

Thermal performance investigation of inserting hybrid nanofluid of Ceria oxide and MWCNT-based oil in the receiver tube of parabolic trough collector: Numerical study O. AL-ORAN, F. LEZSOVITS

105

3D and 2D simulation of residual stress developed during welding of dissimilar pipes M. ALHAFADHI, G. KRALLICS

106

Measuring the effects of heated windows on thermal comfort D. LOVIG, A. ÓZDI, B. CAKÓ

107

Comparison of the compressive properties of lattice structures used in medical implants R. ALKENTAR, T. MANKOVITS

108

Reducing computation time using GPU based parallelization of FPA algorithm for optimization S. NAGY, K. JÁRMAI

109

Scratch resistance and morphological analysis of CrN and DLC coatings on duplex treated X42Cr13 plastic mould tool steel S.A. SIDDIQUI, M.B. MAROS

110

Effect of heat source temperature on ORC and TFC efficiency A.M. AHMED, A.R. IMRE

111

Dynamic modelling of internal tool holder considering different fixations W.T.A. da SILVA, Z. FÜLÖP, A. SZILÁGYI

112

Development of third generation advanced high strength steels for automotive applications R.F. MEKNASSI, M. TISZA

113

Design and experimental investigation on natural convective solar dryer for woodchips EN 14961-4 B. KUMAR, Z. SZAMOSI, G. SZEPESI

114

Macromechanical study of a glass/epoxy laminate S. ALSARAYEFI, K. JÁLICS viii


115

Vehicle occupant safety development with finite element method L. PORKOLAB, I. LAKATOS

116

Automatic controlling system of surface roughness A. SHARIPOV, C. FELHO

117

Specific energy consumption of the booster pumps M. EÖRDÖGHNÉ MIKLÓS

118

Some characteristics of surfaces machined with abrasive waterjet turning K. KUN-BODNÁR, Z. MAROS

V

Informatics

119

Global/local non-intrusive coupling method for elliptic problems A. EL KERIM, P. GOSSELET, F. MAGOULES

120

Exact scheme for solving second order linear differential equations Z. VÍZVÁRI, Z. SÁRI, M. KLINCSIK, P. ODRY

121

Colour correction analysis of images B. SEBŐK, G. VÁRADY

122

The challenges of visualizing DMLA models M. HIDVÉGI, G. MEZEI, S. BÁCSI

123

Measuring the effectiveness of physiotherapy treatment P. MÜLLER, Á. SCHIFFER

124

Novel Levy flight stochastic optimization algorithm for different engineering problems H.N. GHAFIL, S. ALSAMIA, K. JÁRMAI

125

The effects of reference signature selection approaches in online signature verification benchmarking C.L. SZÜCS, B. KŐVÁRI

126

An alignment-based multi-perspective online conformance checking technique Z. NAGY, Á. WERNER-STARK

127

Closed domain template based question generation W.T. SEWUNETIE, K. LÁSZLÓ

128

Mitigating the spear phishing using multi-layer approach A.G. GANIE, D. SAMAD

129

A dual authentication to detect phishing & pharming attacks at the client side A.G. GANIE, D. SAMAD

130

Private network optimization A.G. GANIE, D. SAMAD ix


131

A survey on ethologically oriented fuzzy behavior-based system implementations M.A. LONE, S. KOVÁCS

132

Towards a DISSECT-CF extension for simulating Function-as-a-Service D.H. SALLO, G. KECSKEMÉTI

133

Challenges of the modelling of a complex scheduling problem with mixed-integer linear programming S. ERDŐS, B. KŐVÁRI

134

Comprehension of thread scheduling for the C++ programming language A. GYEN, N. PATAKI

135

Classification approaches in online signature verification M. SALEEM, B. KOVARI

136

Optimizing the heat equation solver on GPU Z. FRIED, S. SZÉNÁSI, I. FELDE

137

Performance analysis of software renovation tools and practices N. SOMOGYI, G. KÖVESDÁN

138

Optimization of city logistics considering energy efficiency M.Z. AKKAD, T. BÁNYAI

139

Graph-based approach to motion planning in a distributed setting C. HAJDU

140

The trade-off problem in distributed telemedicine systems: A case-study Z.R. JÁNKI

141

Classification of RAMAN spectra for chemical component identification G. KNYIHÁR, K. CSORBA

142

Predicting students academic performance without subjective nominal variables encoding M. JAWTHARI, V. STOFFOVÁ

143

Switch to the new switch in Java M.A. ALQARADAGHI, T. KOZSIK

144

Policy enforcement in telemedicine with the deployment of multiple enforcement points Z. SZABÓ

145

Github crawling for software architecture identification: An AI supported high level architecture extractor U. SHAKIKHANLI, V. BILICKI

146

The impact of the software architecture on the developer productivity G. KOKREHEL, V. BILICKI x


147

User-defined types for programming serverless applications Á. RÉVÉSZ, N. PATAKI

148

Using convolutional neural network-based activity monitoring in indoor localization methods L. ÁRVAI

149

Macro level evaluation of road network in Western Hungary by fuzzy signature rulebase algorithm G.C. MIKULAI, L.T. KÓCZY

VI

Other engineering fields

150

Modelling challanges of a parametric 3D-printed orthosis R. SÁRKÖZI, P. IVÁNYI, K. SZOMMER, P. NOVÁK

151

Algorithm for multiple spherical shape-based segmentation of point clouds R. HONTI

152

RPA progression throughout the years and futuristic aspects G. AHSAN, C. SIPOS

153

Morphological and structural properties of Yittrium-modified SrTiO3 ceramics fabricated by Sol-gel method M. TIHTIH, J. F. M. IBRAHIM, E. KUROVICS, L.A. GÖMZE

154

Research underpinning the design of an optical sorting facility: The study of quantity, size and composition of the selectively collected mixed packaging waste from households entering the manual sorting plant A. GYORFI, C. LEITOL, T. KISS

155

Automated verification of building structures G. BARICZOVÁ, J. ERDÉLYI

156

Eco-friendly ceramic specimens with enhanced thermal insulation properties produced from Zeolite-Poor Rock J.F.M. IBRAHIM, E. KUROVICS, M. TIHTIH, L.A. GÖMZE

157

Effect of tuff material on the properties of the lightweight expanded clay aggregates M. ABDELFATTAH, I. KOCSERHA, R. GÉBER

158

Waste-to-reuse foam glasses produced from bottle glass, CRT glasses and aluminium dross M. SASSI, A. SIMON

159

Development and investigation of Ti-layer on the surface of ceramic specimens made from kaolinite and IG-017 bio-original additive M. KHALILI, E. KUROVICS, L.A. GÖMZE xi


160

Multivalued dependencies in incomplete databases with limited domain: Properties and rules A. MUNQATH, A. SALI

161

Corrosion consequences of both stable and activated international simple glass ISG influenced by Ankerite A.A. DABBAS, K. KOPECSKĂ“

162

Lightweight manufacturing of dual phase automotive parts T. DOMOKOS, M. TISZA

Author Index

Keyword Index

xii


Salute The 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium is one of the most important scientific events at the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs. The Faculty hosts the meeting for young researchers and their professors. After the loss of the founder of this Symposium, Prof. Miklós Iványi, it has been decided to honour his memories and therefore this event will be named as “Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium”. This is the 16th year that the PhD & DLA Symposium gives an opportunity to present the achievements of young researchers, to exchange information about the researches of the international partner institutions and to exchange valuable professional experiences and cultivate real friendships. At the end let me greet the participants of the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium and express my thanks to the organizers for their activity and to the participants of the former and this year’s PhD & DLA Symposium to present papers. At the same time I wish you the best to continue with successful work.

Prof. Dr. Habil Gabriella MEDVEGY, DLA Dean Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology University of Pécs

xiii


xiv


Foreword The 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium is organized because it is thought that PhD&DLA students need a special forum in addition to their PhD&DLA program to present the results of their ongoing research. Furthermore the results should be discussed collecting proposals how to continue the work. The First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Nineth, Tenth Eleventh, Twelfth, Thirteenth and Fourteenth International PhD&DLA Symposia were organized in 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019 and it is important to continue this tradition. Objectives of the PhD&DLA Symposium: • to provide a forum for PhD&DLA students in engineering to present the progress of their work; • to discuss the results of the ongoing PhD&DLA studies in order to support the future activity; • to give the opportunity for PhD&DLA students to establish contact for international communication; • to compare PhD&DLA studies in various countries. The system of this symposium is to have oral presentations by the PhD&DLA students themselves, which are immediately followed by discussions that are scheduled in the program. Main results of the studies are summarized in the Pollack Periodica (an International Journal for Engineering and Information Sciences) published by Akadémiai Kiadó. On behalf of the Organizing Committee, I would like to express thanks to the University of Pécs, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology for hosting the Symposium. Prof. Dr. Habil Péter IVÁNYI, PhD

xv


xvi


International Scientific Committee BACHMANN, Bálint BANIOTOPOULOs, Charalampos BÍRÓ, Oszkár BORSOS, Ágnes BRUGGI, Matteo BUJNAK, Jan CSÉBFALVI, Anikó DEVETAKOVIC, Mirjana FOLIC, Radomir FÜLÖP, Attila GYERGYÁK, János HELEREA, Elena HUTTER, Ákos JÁRMAI, Károly JASHARI, Teuta JUTILA, Aarne KARCHES, Tamás KATONA, Tamás KISTELEGDI, István KMET, Stanislav KÓCZY, László KOPECSKÓ, Katalin KOREN, Csaba

Hungary Greece Austria Hungary Italy Slovakia Hungary Serbia Serbia Hungary Hungary Romania Hungary Hungary Kosovo Finland Hungary Hungary Hungary Slovakia Hungary Hungary Hungary

xvii

KOSEC, Gregor KOVÁCS, György KŐVÁRI, Bence KOZAK, Drazan KREJCI, Tomas KRÉSZ, Miklós KRUIS, Jaroslav KUCZMANN, Miklós LOGÓ, János LUNGOCI, Carmen MAGOULES, Frederic MEDVEGY, Gabriella MOLNÁR, Tamás ORBÁN, Zoltán PERJÉSINÉ HÁMORI, Ildikó RÉTFALVI, Donát SCHIFFER, Ádám SIERPINSKI, Grzegorz SOLTÉSZ, Andrej SZŰCS, István TÍMÁR, András TOPPING, Barry VÁRADY, Géza

Slovenia Hungary Hungary Croatia Czech Republic Hungary Czech Republic Hungary Hungary Romania France Hungary Hungary Hungary Hungary Hungary Hungary Poland Slovakia Hungary Hungary United Kingdom Hungary


Conference program On this page time is only approximate. For exact starting and end time please check at the session! Day 1, Monday Time 09:30-10:45

Design 1 page 3

Concrete, steel, rock and timber 1 page 6

Mechanical engineering 1 page 9

11:00-13:00

Design 2 page 3

Concrete, steel, rock and timber 2 page 6

Mechanical engineering 2 page 9

13:00-14:15

Design 3 page 4

Transport engineering 1 page 6

Material engineering 1 page 10

14:30-15:45

Architecture 1 page 4

Transport engineering 2 page 7

Material engineering 2 page 10

16:00-17:15

Architecture 2 page 4

Soil and water 1 page 7

Material engineering 3 page 11

17:30-18:30

Architecture 3 page 5

1

Software engineering, GPU and mathematics 1 page 12 Software engineering, GPU and mathematics 2 page 12 Software engineering, GPU and mathematics 3 page 13 Automation, electrical and bio-engineering 1 page 13 Automation, electrical and bio-engineering 2 page 13


Conference program On this page time is only approximate. For exact starting and end time please check at the session! Day 2, Tuesday Time 09:00-10:30 10:45-12:00

13:00-14:15

14:30-15:30

Energy design 1 page 15 Energy design 2 page 15

Urban design 1 page 17 Urban design 2 page 17

Energy design 3 page 16

City and heritage 1 page 18 City and heritage 2 page 18

2

Soil and water 2 page 19 Soil and water 3 page 19

Optimization page 20 Computer networks, security and cloud computing page 20


Day 1: Monday, 26 Oct 2020

09:30-10:45 Design 1 Chaired by Prof. Dr. G. MEDVEGY https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/pro-ahi-gm9-pah P-16 Analysis on forms of behavior in social design practice through examples K. VARJÚ, P. ZILAHI P-17 The complex role of water in architecture G. HECKENAST, M. FERENCZ, A.T. KERTÉSZ P-18 Intervention and renewal: Interpretation of installation art in urban public space H.H. HE, J. GYERGYÁK P-19 Design and development of B&Bs in the post-epidemic era Z.K. HUANG, H. CAO, H.W. PAN, G. ZOBOKI P-20 Application of environmental psychology in kindergarten architectural design H. CAO, A.M. TAMÁS, G. SZTRANYÁK

11:00-12:15 Design 2 Chaired by Dr. Á. BORSOS https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--byy-wyh-oet P-21 Integration of sustainable street furniture in Tunisian urban public spaces: Recycling design O.B. DHAOU, N. VASVARY NADOR, A. GALL P-22 Re-construction place script to awake the general public’s memories C. REN, G. MEDVEGY P-23 Preliminary research on spatial narratology in architecture X. KANG, G. MEDVEGY, Y.F. ZHOU P-24 To create a “box” space in building: modular building Q. GU, E.S. ZOLTÁN P-25 Research on the relationship between contemporary Korean catering space and traditional Korean folk houses Z. NAN

3


Day 1: Monday, 26 Oct 2020 13:00-14:00 Design 3 Chaired by DR. M.B. ZAGORÁCZ https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--jsu-mqs-kob P-26 Harmonious architecture and interior design through components of adaptive reuse: Urban Gastrolounge in Prishtina T. JASHARI-KAJTAZI, R. ZOGIANI P-27 Interior renovation possibilities of large-panel building apartments focusing on costs and prices O. RÁK, N. BAKAI, Á. BORSOS, P. IVÁNYI P-28 Teaching freeform modelling for architects K. SZOMMER, R. SÁRKÖZI, A.B. SZÉLL P-29 Possibilities of linking BIM and DFMA methodologies: Literature review N. BAKAI, O. RÁK, M.B. ZAGORÁCZ, B. FÜREDI

14:30-15:45 Architecture 1 Chaired by Dr. T. MOLNÁR https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--08f-zod-gas P-30 Development by event: Branding for small cities D. HADŽIC, T. MOLNÁR P-31 Dreaming back in good old times: Multi-functional facility design for rural areas in China D.P. ZHAO, Á. HUTTER, Y.R. LIU P-32 Conservation and utilization of vernacular architecture in Chinese traditional villages: A case study in Gantian village, Chongqing S. YONGTING, A.M. TAMÁS, G. SZTRANYÁK P-33 Analysis of the ancient city pattern of Wula street Manchu town, Jilin city Z. LIANGYU, A.T. KERTÉSZ P-34 Sustainability education based on value propositions E.ZS. PANCSA

16:00-17:15 Architecture 2 Chaired by Dr. Á. HUTTER https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--kz7-i3g-hws

4


Day 1: Monday, 26 Oct 2020 P-35 Shaping our movements in architecture N. RAMOS GONZALEZ, G. MEDVEGY P-36 The value of 4x4 experimental teaching project for the University of Pécs X. JIN, W. TIE P-37 Synchronous exploration T. WANG, X. JIN P-62 Architectural design for people with dementia: Case study analysis and literature review F. MARX, D. RÉTFALVI P-64 COVID-19 and recent trends in educational services: Case study in Egypt A.H. ABDEL WAHID, A.N. ABDEL HAKIM, A.M.R. ELHADAD

17:30-18:30 Architecture 3 Chaired by Dr. E.S. ZOLTÁN https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--rl5-8fu-6mf P-59 Resilient design of vernacular educational community center in the Philippines: An investigation in recovery after natural disasters S. IBRAHIM, D. KASSAM, T. MOLNÁR, I. KISTELEGDI P-60 A parametric design approach for post-disaster settlements S.M. MAITEH, E.S. ZOLTÁN P-61 Lightweight post disaster shelter made of membrane and wood A. GUEROUI, M. HALADA P-63 Evaluation and optimization of community-level medical and health facilities in Wuhan under the regular epidemic prevention K. TU, A. REITH

5


Day 1: Monday, 26 Oct 2020

09:30-10:30 Concrete, steel, rock and timber 1 Chaired by Dr. A. FÜLÖP https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--kqb-w6e-saa P-65 Optimization of drilling performance using various metaheuristics S. ALSAMIA, D.S. IBRAHIM, H.N. GHAFIL P-66 DEM modeling of crushable grain material under different loading condition M.A. BENMEBAREK, M.R. MOVAHEDI P-67 Numerical study on the influence of imperfections in the buckling resistance of steel beam-columns with welded class 4 cross-section at elevated temperatures S. NEMER, F. PAPP P-68 Towards green concrete and sustainable construction for better environment S. KASHKASH, Z. ORBÁN

11:00-12:00 Concrete, steel, rock and timber 2 Chaired by Prof. Dr. A. CSÉBFALVI https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/pro-nqx-x1k-pls P-70 Optimization of geopolymer concrete using industrial waste A.A. KHALAF, K. KOPECSKÓ P-71 Using steel fibre in concrete types, methods for improving the properties of recycled aggregate concretes and multiple recycled aggregate M. SHMLLS, T. HORVÁTH P-72 Expected impact of climate change on the physical properties and load-bearing capacity of timber structures M. KHERAIS, A. CSÉBFALVI, A. LEN P-73 Modeling the early- and latewood growth rings as orthotropic material for FE-calculation of Norway spruce timber beams using the rule of mixture T. KIRÁLY, R. POLGÁR, A. KRISZTIÁN

13:00-14:15 Transport engineering 1 Chaired by Prof. DR. CS. KOREN https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/pro-dsb-qex-mus

6


Day 1: Monday, 26 Oct 2020 P-74 Three-phase comparative modeling to identify critical infrastructure by analyzing the operational risk of rail transport: Case study of Iran railway A. TAHERI, M. KAZEMIAN, F. ASTARAKI, M.M. RAD P-75 Comparison of railway lines located in different regions of Poland with regard to their use in freight transport W. KAMIŃSKI P-76 Analysis of traffic accidents in Hungary using stochastic modeling A. GHADA, L. KISGYÖRGY P-77 Impact of autonomous trucks on pavement response M. FAHAD, R. NAGY P-78 Pedestrian’s behavioural adaptation to AVs and its effect on road capacity S. PHETOUDOM, E. MAKÓ

14:30-16:00 Transport engineering 2 Chaired by Prof. DR. CS. KOREN https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/pro-gvi-zsg-mie P-79 Autonomous cars and traffic calming G. SZÜCS, C. KOREN, K. MACSINKA P-80 Conflict analysis of vehicle-pedestrian interactions A. KIZAWI, A. BORSOS P-81 Sight distance analyses for autonomous vehicles in Civil3D K. KHASKA, D. MILETICS P-82 PROMETHEE method in transportation: Literature review L. OUBAHMAN, S. DULEBA P-83 A systematic review of the latest advancements on Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) technique focusing on applications in transportation planning K. ISMAEL, S. DULEBA P-84 Error sources of laser trackers R. CHOLEVA, A. KOPÁČIK

16:00-17:15 Soil and water 1 Chaired by Dr. T. KARCHES https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--gaz-fxv-iqi P-85 Evaluating the effect of different weather input datasets and model configuration (area threshold value) uncertainty on streamflow simulations using SWAT model A. FIRAS, K. BENE 7


Day 1: Monday, 26 Oct 2020 P-86 Transfer of the rainfall-runoff model parameters for modeling runoff under future climate change M. ALEKSIC P-87 Water management solution of run-off conditions from minimum discharge point of view L. ČUBANOVÁ, A. ŠOLTÉSZ, J. MYDLA P-89 Comparison of water balance of North Algeria and South-Western Hungary A. SALEM, M. MIHOUB, D. LÓCZY P-88 Groundwater flooding on the lower part of the Rye Island M. ČERVEŇANSKÁ, D. BAROKOVÁ, A. ŠOLTÉSZ

8


Day 1: Monday, 26 Oct 2020

09:30-10:45 Mechanical engineering 1 Chaired by Prof. Dr. K. JÁRMAI https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/pro-0dz-jgr-mle P-106 Measuring the effects of heated windows on thermal comfort D. LOVIG, A. ÓZDI, B. CAKÓ P-117 Specific energy consumption of the booster pumps M. EÖRDÖGHNÉ MIKLÓS P-114 Macromechanical study of a glass/epoxy laminate S. ALSARAYEFI, K. JÁLICS P-113 Design and experimental investigation on natural convective solar dryer for woodchips EN 14961-4 B. KUMAR, Z. SZAMOSI, G. SZEPESI P-107 Comparison of the compressive properties of lattice structures used in medical implants R. ALKENTAR, T. MANKOVITS

11:00-12:30 Mechanical engineering 2 Chaired by DR. M. EÖRDÖGHNÉ MIKLÓS https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--joi-jpy-quv P-115 Vehicle occupant safety development with finite element method L. PORKOLAB, I. LAKATOS P-162 Lightweight manufacturing of dual phase automotive parts T. DOMOKOS, M. TISZA P-105 3D and 2D simulation of residual stress developed during welding of dissimilar pipes M. ALHAFADHI, G. KRALLICS P-103 The effect of the mesh size during the determination of GTN parameters Y. CHAHBOUB, S. SZAVAI P-111 Dynamic modelling of internal tool holder considering different fixations W.T.A. da SILVA, Z. FÜLÖP, A. SZILÁGYI P-102 Reducing shrinkage at welded steel and aluminium beams K. JÁRMAI, M. PETRIK

9


Day 1: Monday, 26 Oct 2020 13:00-14:15 Material engineering 1 Chaired by Dr. K. KOPECSKÓ https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/pro-nxh-rlx-zd3 P-141 Classification of RAMAN spectra for chemical component identification G. KNYIHÁR, K. CSORBA P-157 Effect of tuff material on the properties of the lightweight expanded clay aggregates M. ABDELFATTAH, I. KOCSERHA, R. GÉBER P-158 Waste-to-reuse foam glasses produced from bottle glass, CRT glasses and aluminium dross M. SASSI, A. SIMON P-153 Morphological and structural properties of Yittrium-modified SrTiO3 ceramics fabricated by Sol-gel method M. TIHTIH, J. F. M. IBRAHIM, E. KUROVICS, L.A. GÖMZE P-156 Eco-friendly ceramic specimens with enhanced thermal insulation properties produced from Zeolite-poor rock J.F.M. IBRAHIM, E. KUROVICS, M. TIHTIH, L.A. GÖMZE

14:30-15:45 Material engineering 2 Chaired by Dr. K. KOPECSKÓ https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/pro-wsk-hae-p3k P-159 Development and investigation of Ti-layer on the surface of ceramic specimens made from kaolinite and IG-017 bio-original additive M. KHALILI, E. KUROVICS, L.A. GÖMZE P-161 Corrosion consequences of both stable and activated international simple glass ISG influenced by Ankerite A.A. DABBAS, K. KOPECSKÓ P-110 Effect of heat source temperature on ORC and TFC efficiency A.M. AHMED, A.R. IMRE P-109 Scratch resistance and morphological analysis of CrN and DLC coatings on duplex treated X42Cr13 plastic mould tool steel S.A. SIDDIQUI, M.B. MAROS P-69 Effect of supplementary materials on transport properties of cementitious materials Z.A. ABDULHUSSEIN, K. KOPECSKÓ

10


Day 1: Monday, 26 Oct 2020 16:00-17:15 Material engineering 3 Chaired by Prof. Dr. L.A. GĂ–MZE https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--lqr-94w-irv P-104 Thermal performance investigation of inserting hybrid nanofluid of Ceria oxide and MWCNT-based oil in the receiver tube of parabolic trough collector: Numerical study O. AL-ORAN, F. LEZSOVITS P-112 Development of third generation advanced high strength steels for automotive applications R.F. MEKNASSI, M. TISZA P-116 Automatic controlling system of surface roughness A. SHARIPOV, C. FELHO P-118 Some characteristics of surfaces machined with abrasive waterjet turning K. KUN-BODNĂ R, Z. MAROS

11


Day 1: Monday, 26 Oct 2020

09:30-10:45 Software engineering, GPU and mathematics 1 Chaired by Dr. Z. SÁRI https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--rm4-vqw-4vu P-121 Colour correction analysis of images B. SEBŐK, G. VÁRADY P-122 The challenges of visualizing DMLA models M. HIDVÉGI, G. MEZEI, S. BÁCSI P-134 Comprehension of thread scheduling for the C++ programming language A. GYEN, N. PATAKI P-143 Switch to the new switch in Java M.A. ALQARADAGHI, T. KOZSIK P-139 Graph-based approach to motion planning in a distributed setting C. HAJDU

11:00-12:15 Software engineering, GPU and mathematics 2 Chaired by Dr. G. VÁRADY https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--y3s-e8l-0hp P-137 Performance analysis of software renovation tools and practices N. SOMOGYI, G. KÖVESDÁN P-145 Github crawling for software architecture identification: An AI supported high level architecture extractor U. SHAKIKHANLI, V. BILICKI P-146 The impact of the software architecture on the developer productivity G. KOKREHEL, V. BILICKI P-147 User-defined types for programming serverless applications Á. RÉVÉSZ, N. PATAKI P-160 Multivalued dependencies in incomplete databases with limited domain: Properties and rules A. MUNQATH, A. SALI

12


Day 1: Monday, 26 Oct 2020 13:00-14:15 Software engineering, GPU and mathematics 3 Chaired by Prof. Dr. F. MAGOULES https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/pro-225-djy-res P-151 Algorithm for multiple spherical shape-based segmentation of point clouds R. HONTI P-120 Exact scheme for solving second order linear differential equations Z. VÍZVÁRI, Z. SÁRI, M. KLINCSIK, P. ODRY P-119 Global/local non-intrusive coupling method for elliptic problems A. EL KERIM, P. GOSSELET, F. MAGOULES P-136 Optimizing the heat equation solver on GPU Z. FRIED, S. SZÉNÁSI, I. FELDE P-108 Reducing computation time using GPU based parallelization of FPA algorithm for optimization S. NAGY, K. JÁRMAI

14:30-15:45 Automation, electrical and bio-engineering 1 Chaired by Dr. Á. SCHIFFER https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--cj8-ovi-ze5 P-101 Multi source simulations in ANSYS HFSS D. ERDOSY, A. VÁRADINÉ SZARKA, T. BODOLAI P-152 RPA progression throughout the years and futuristic aspects G. AHSAN, C. SIPOS P-155 Automated verification of building structures G. BARICZOVÁ, J. ERDÉLYI P-154 Research underpinning the design of an optical sorting facility: The study of quantity, size and composition of the selectively collected mixed packaging waste from households entering the manual sorting plant A. GYORFI, C. LEITOL, T. KISS P-123 Measuring the effectiveness of physiotherapy treatment P. MÜLLER, Á. SCHIFFER

16:00-17:15 Automation, electrical and bio-engineering 2 Chaired by Dr. Á. SCHIFFER https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--giv-ag9-3rk

13


Day 1: Monday, 26 Oct 2020 P-150 Modelling challanges of a parametric 3D-printed orthosis R. SÁRKÖZI, P. IVÁNYI, K. SZOMMER, P. NOVÁK P-140 The trade-off problem in distributed telemedicine systems: A case-study Z.R. JÁNKI P-144 Policy enforcement in telemedicine with the deployment of multiple enforcement points Z. SZABÓ P-100 Selection criterias of power filters for EMC chambers D. MAKLÁRI, B. TAMÁS

14


Day 2: Tuesday, 27 Oct 2020

09:00-10:30 Energy design 1 Chaired by Prof. Dr. I. KISTELEGDI https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/pro-jik-vui-i5k P-1 Possibilities and limitations of 2D moisture monitoring when conducting investigations in historical masonry based on impedance measurements M.A.A. AL-MOALMI P-3 Glazed façade surfaces in the construction of office buildings in Hungary S. PATYI, B. NOVÁK P-4 Investigation of magnesium-containing fillers effecting the microbial colonization of façade coatings H. HEINRICH P-5 Space organisation and facade strategies in pioneer green high rise office buildings: Myths and truth about energy and comfort efficiencies B. NAILI, I. KISTELEGDI, I. HABER P-15 Examination of the effect of indoor fires on thermal insulation materials in simulation environment F. HAJDU, G. LÁSZLÓ, R. KUTI P-2 Case study of neglected façades and their adaptive reuse T. ZHAO, S.M. MAITEH, C. LU, J. GYERGYÁK, E.S. ZOLTÁN, Á. BORSOS

10:45-12:00 Energy design 2 Chaired by Prof. Dr. I. KISTELEGDI https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/pro-n3z-tdh-7qx P-7 Energy efficiency scenarios of residential building blocks, case study of New Minia, Egypt S. ELHADAD, B. BARANYAI, I. KISTELEGDI, J. GYERGYÁK P-8 Passive air conduction system analysis in a modern industry building Á.L. KATONA, I. KISTELEGDI P-9 Industrial application of the energia design synthesis method K. HORVÁTH, I. KISTELEGDI P-10 Assessment of morphological impact on energy performance for migrant shelters R. IBRAHIM, B. BARANYAI, T. KATONA P-11 Geometry-based analysis for natural ventilation in high-rise office buildings M. ALI, I. KISTELEGDI 15


Day 2: Tuesday, 27 Oct 2020 13:00-14:00 Energy design 3 Chaired by Dr. B. BARANYAI https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--tik-saa-aad P-12 The influence of physical factors on light design and its perception N. SADOUD, E.S. ZOLTÁN P-13 The green, the greener, the greenest G. YU, J. GYERGYÁK, E.S. ZOLTÁN P-14 Fire protection and energy saving in public municipal building design in Northeast China J. HE, B. BACHMANN P-6 Options for reducing the carbon footprint during home renovations T.Z. DÁNYI

16


Day 2: Tuesday, 27 Oct 2020

09:00-10:30 Urban design 1 Chaired by Dr. J. GYERGYÁK https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--td6-pok-2qj P-38 Urban morphological research: The classical and modern research methodologies Á. BERTYÁK P-39 AI technology on the urban street landscape design Z.X. LIANG P-40 Re-shaping Budapest: Large housing estates and their (un)planned centers A.K. LOSONCZY, R. BALLA, H. ANTYPENKO, M. BENKŐ P-41 Strengthen walkability by pedestrian way: The fragmented greenery approach T. ZHAO, S.M. MAITEH, C. LU, J. GYERGYÁK, E.S. ZOLTÁN, Á. BORSOS P-43 The impact of contemporary cohousing model on urban quality of life: Case studies from Vienna, Berlin, Zürich, and Budapest A. BABOS, M. BENKŐ, A. ORBÁN P-42 Segregated neighbourhoods: Towards a graphical evaluation index for slum-upgrading projects T. CSABA

10:45-12:15 Urban design 2 Chaired by Dr. A.M. TAMÁS https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--wuc-pbw-iaa P-44 Research on the connection and strengthening of the place spirit in the city: The application of modular installations in the terrain vague M. WU, B. BACHMAN P-45 Adaptive-reuse of strategies for urban heritage to improve community resilience S.S. LIU, S.Z. ZHANG, K. KOVÁCS-ANDOR P-46 Collective residential spaces in sustainable development: San Francisco housing units within co-living understanding C. LU, S.M. MAITEH, T. ZHAO, Á. BORSOS, J. GYERGYÁK, E.S. ZOLTÁN P-47 Architectural adaptation to existing living communities of asylum seekers: The case of Mexico S.M. MAITEH, C. LU, T. ZHAO, E.S. ZOLTÁN, J. GYERGYÁK, Á. BORSOS

17


Day 2: Tuesday, 27 Oct 2020 P-48 Sensing and mapping the city: Szigony utca, Budapest B. BENE, M. BENKŐ P-49 Urban regeneration scenarios: Strategies for industrial brownfields redevelopment Q.C. HE, A. REITH

13:00-14:15 City and heritage 1 Chaired by Dr. J. GYERGYÁK https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--wbe-rvd-c1j P-50 Architecture site preservation and display from a visual narrative perspective: Case study of the Long Wang Jian site at Wuhan in the middle of China C. KUN, K. KOVÁCS-ANDOR P-51 Renovation of research strategies on conservation and development of Qingdao historic district T. HU P-52 Heritage and innovation: Research on the design of new residence in Yi township, China F.X. MENG, T. WANG P-53 Practical tricks of making heritage place inventory through the example of the Museum of Applied Arts K. SEIDL P-57 Earthen heritage architecture as sustainable refugee shelters: A case study of the domes of northern Syria S. IBRAHIM, M. ALI,B. BARANYAI, I. KISTELEGDI

14:30-15:30 City and heritage 2 Chaired by Prof. Dr. Á. HUTTER https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--776-eng-ek8 P-54 Renewal project of an old community based on the symbiosis concept: A case study on Feng Ye Shan community renewal in Huang Shi city H.W. PAN, Á. HUTTER P-55 Criteria for successful and livable city in Jordan, based on the traditional city of Salt as a case study S.J. ALAMOUSH, A.T. KERTÉSZ, T. KATONA P-56 Digital nomad-conqueror-settler Z. ZRENA, B. KÓSA, T. KONDOR P-58 Regenerative architecture in Kosovo B. JAGXHIU, F. BEJTULLAHU

18


Day 2: Tuesday, 27 Oct 2020

09:00-10:15 Soil and water 2 Chaired by Prof. Dr. A. ŠOLTÉSZ https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/pro-hhv-qhp-xot P-90 Investigation of scour development at the Hricov weir using photogrammetry M. PAVÚCEK, J. RUMANN P-91 Assessment of selected combined sewer system in the city of Trnava M. CSÓKA, I. MARKO, G. RÓZSA, Š. STANKO P-92 The impact of COVID-19 on the amount of municipal waste G. RÓZSA, R. WTTMANOVÁ, M. ŠUTÚŠ, I. ŠKULTÉTYOVÁ P-93 CFD as a tool for design optimalization of sewer systems M. ŠUTÚŠ, J. HRUDKA, M. CSÓKA, S. ŠTANKO P-94 Operational challenges of a sequencing batch reactor applied in wastewater treatment B. BÁBA, T. KARCHES

10:45-12:00 Soil and water 3 Chaired by Prof. Dr. A. ŠOLTÉSZ https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/pro-dip-zbg-d8r P-95 Adsorption of simazine with two different granular activated carbons M. MARTON, J. ILAVSKÝ, D. BARLOKOVÁ P-96 Evaluation of the current state of small water reservoir from a landscape and ecological side Z. SABOVÁ, Z. NÉMETOVÁ, T. KALETOVÁ, S. KOHNOVÁ P-97 PIV measurements on a hydraulic model of a shaft intake of a SHPP L. BYTCANKOVÁ, J. RUMANN, P. DUŠICKA P-98 Dynamic behavior of soil under irregular loading patterns A. MAJD, R. RICHARD P-99 Behaviour of embankments on soft soil reinforced by rigid inclusions R. ALSIRAWAN

19


Day 2: Tuesday, 27 Oct 2020

09:00-10:45 Optimization Chaired by Dr. ZS. ERCSEY https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--bwk-zgx-ywm P-148 Using convolutional neural network-based activity monitoring in indoor localization methods L. ÁRVAI P-133 Challenges of the modelling of a complex scheduling problem with mixed-integer linear programming S. ERDŐS, B. KŐVÁRI P-131 A survey on ethologically oriented fuzzy behavior-based system implementations M.A. LONE, S. KOVÁCS P-124 Novel Levy flight stochastic optimization algorithm for different engineering problems H.N. GHAFIL, S. ALSAMIA, K. JÁRMAI P-149 Macro level evaluation of road network in Western Hungary by fuzzy signature rulebase algorithm G.C. MIKULAI, L.T. KÓCZY P-138 Optimization of city logistics considering energy efficiency M.Z. AKKAD, T. BÁNYAI P-142 Predicting students academic performance without subjective nominal variables encoding M. JAWTHARI, V. STOFFOVÁ

11:00-13:00 Computer networks, security and cloud computing Chaired by Dr. B. KŐVÁRI https://bluepill.mik.pte.hu/b/dr--yym-a1s-wu1 P-132 Towards a DISSECT-CF extension for simulating Function-as-a-Service D.H. SALLO, G. KECSKEMÉTI P-127 Closed domain template based question generation W.T. SEWUNETIE, K. LÁSZLÓ P-126 An alignment-based multi-perspective online conformance checking technique Z. NAGY, Á. WERNER-STARK P-129 A dual authentication to detect phishing & pharming attacks at the client side A.G. GANIE, D. SAMAD 20


Day 2: Tuesday, 27 Oct 2020 P-128 Mitigating the spear phishing using multi-layer approach A.G. GANIE, D. SAMAD P-125 The effects of reference signature selection approaches in online signature verification benchmarking C.L. SZÜCS, B. KŐVÁRI P-135 Classification approaches in online signature verification M. SALEEM, B. KŐVÁRI P-130 Private network optimization A.G. GANIE, D. SAMAD

21


Architecture


Paper 1

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 1, 2020.

Possibilities and limitations of 2D moisture monitoring when conducting investigations in historical masonry based on impedance measurements M.A.A. AL-MOALMI Marcel Breuer Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: impedance measurement, moisture monitoring, measurement, tomogram When classic masonry walls are to be analyzed according to its case of moisture penetration, measurement methods should be considered to determine the moisture distribution at all heights and depths and to show its graphically form of tomograms in 2D cross-sections. The depth-graded measurement of the specific electrical resistance and the calibration of this process creates 2D cross-sections of the degree of moisture penetration. This how’s sufficient accuracy where the boundaries are between moist and dry masonry zones lie and how intense the moisture penetration actually is. Vertical and horizontal moisture gradients are shown graphically. A significant number of damage occurred in buildings due to the effects of moisture. The moisture measurements on building materials plays a great role in building diagnosis and quality assessment of repair measures. There are many moisture measurement methods. Most procedures require intensive interventions in the masonry building and take a long time to get the results. Based on this constellation, the electrical method for the tomographic representation of the moisture distribution in the masonry building is being investigated. In this work we are looking for a method in which the moisture: • measured almost non-destructively, • established in depth, • shown in 2D form, • can be controlled over time. This method should also be able to work in a practical, inexpensive and sufficient precise manner. The impedance method with its tomographic representation of the moisture distribution has the chance to meet such criteria. Tomographic representations are layer recordings of the interior of a component that are possible unnecessarily to open the body itself. A moisture measurement method working in the low frequency range offers the possibility of achieving the goal. The procedure must be tested both in the laboratory and practically in order to prove its suitability.


Paper 2

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 2, 2020.

Case study of neglected façades and their adaptive reuse T. ZHAO, S.M. MAITEH, C. LU, J. GYERGYÁK, E.S. ZOLTÁN, Á. BORSOS Marcel Breuer Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: adaptive reuse, neglected façades, urban rehabilitation, built stock The current globe is a gross world with variety of built environment. In spite of the built heritages which are richly value embedded, modern buildings make up the majority of today’s urban context. The buildings themselves, inner space, adjacent outer space and the surfaces (facades and roofs) they generate and make up the “built stock”. Blank and poor conditioned facades can be found easily in developed urban context. The paper focuses on the study of poor-value façade part of the built stock, which are the neglected façades. Case study of façade intervention projects is carried out for the analysis of adaptive functions and context application.


Paper 3

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 3, 2020.

Glazed façade surfaces in the construction of office buildings in Hungary S. PATYI1 , B. NOVÁK2 1

Department of Engineering Studies, Institute of Smart Technology and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Breuer Marcell Doctoral School of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: facade, glass, office building, curtain wall Transparent building façade design is one of the innovative façade solutions of contemporary technological development. Its use is closely related to the performance of the construction industry, modern and affordable solutions, the increase of the confidence index, which all contribute to quality and precise work. In addition to the dominance of stick curtain wall systems, modular façade systems allow factory-level prefabrication in the workshops and weatherproof installation. These systems can be implemented quickly and cost-effectively in accordance with the design, practically in any possible size. In addition to their creative form and graceful optical appearance, they contribute to the optimization of the building’s contemporary architectural attitude and energy level. The research, above all, highlights the current situation of public building construction in Hungary, whereby it explains the main issues and methodological correlations arising in the design of building façades. It describes the test methodology as well as the distribution of glazed façades in the construction market. In addition to the existing built environment, the scope of design, construction and operation of the façades of newly built buildings is also an important issue. The study pays special attention to the elaboration of decision-making classifications of structures. By comparing the main structural systems, it presents the role of factors contributing to the reduction of construction time, the advantages and disadvantages of installation, the possibilities of reducing human labour demand and construction time through real-life examples and the comparison to traditional stick curtain wall systems by means of information collected during our research.


Paper 4

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 4, 2020.

Investigation of magnesium-containing fillers effecting the microbial colonization of façade coatings H. HEINRICH Marcel Breuer Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: algae, façades, fillers, magnesium, microbial colonization The connection between magnesium-containing fillers and microbial colonization of façade coatings is an important result of the present work. On one hand magnesium is an important nutrient for photosythetic microorganisms (core-ion of Chlorophyll) and on the other hand it is contained in many mineralic building materials. Some of these minerals origin from prehistoric sediments and, due to the mining of these deposits, reach today’s building products. Talc and dolomite are just two examples of such compounds, these two are among the top 10 fillers for façade paints worldwide. Fly ash from coal-fired power plants dominates the list of possible additives for cement-bound building materials. The mineral composition of all these extenders correspond exactly to the needs of future microorganisms on façades due to its prehistoric vegetable or microbial origin. Water is the basis for all life, even on façades. In combination with the hydrophobic organic binders and its thermal decoupling from the building, an excellent substrate for the development of microorganisms is created. Cyanobacteria, algae and fungi open up these habitats through intelligent cooperation. Without magnesium there is no photosynthesis. The bioavailability of the essential magnesium sources in the building materials depends on their manufacturing conditions. Different materials like concrete, brick and lime sandstones were analysed by non-destructive fluorescence spectroscopy and EDX. For this purpose, a method using a mobile fluorescence spectrometer was developed from water research for use on façades. The device differentiates between green algae, cyanobacteria and diatoms. Additional information on the microbial colonization of building materials is thus available. In order to avoid condensation effects on façades, complex measures and methods are being developed. An alternative possibility is to be shown in the present work. Instead of elaborately avoiding the dew water, this should become the subject of a control strategy. In addition to the connection between magnesium-containing fillers and the microbial colonization, this research work is to investigate a new control strategy with a dew-activated functional filler (Project W.I.S.M.A.R. Water Induced Surface Material for Algae Reduction). Architectural engineering not only takes place on a large scale but begins on the micro scale of a functional filler, whose creative architecture has the potential to solve problems on a bigger scale. Understanding these mechanisms can help to avoid causes rather than fighting symptoms of microbial colonization with biocides and high environmental risks.


Paper 5

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 5, 2020.

Space organisation and facade strategies in pioneer green high rise office buildings: Myths and truth about energy and comfort efficiencies B. NAILI1 , I. KISTELEGDI1 , I. HABER2 1

Institute of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: high-rise office building, space organisation, facade strategies, comfort, energy efficiency, temperate climate The design and the construction of new high rise office buildings is increasing in response to the several needs and challenges of today’s modern society. New implementation plans are found all over the world. However, there are a few well-performing built examples. Although, a poorly designed high rise can considerably augment the building energy consumption, only a few studies dealt with the architecture design strategies that can make tall buildings more energy efficient. There is thus still a lack of in-depth studies into the space organisation based design optimisation strategies in terms of comfort and energy efficiency. Therefore, this study aims to explore the main architectural space organisation and facade strategies integrated into sustainable high-rise office buildings in temperate climates. In this regard, a comparative energy and comfort analysis of reference tall office buildings, which applied various innovative passive measures (e.g. Commerzbank Frankfurt, Post Tower, Bonn, EWI Delft. etc.) is performed, in order to gain performance feedback. Afterward, The effectiveness of the different space organisation strategies regarding comfort and energy efficiency is evaluated. Finally, a general discussion of the findings and lessons learned from these buildings is provided.


Paper 6

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 6, 2020.

Options for reducing the carbon footprint during home renovations T.Z. DÁNYI University of Pécs, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, Hungary

Keywords: apartment, renovation, carbon footprint, upcycling According to the latest national housing survey, 13% of the current 4,400,000 dwellings in Hungary are vacant, which means more than 570,000 homes. At the same time, 60% of the residents of inhabited dwellings are more or less dissatisfied with their housing conditions. Based on all this, it is particularly important to pay more attention to the renovation of vacant flats and the improvement of living conditions. The condominium apartment presented in the case study was built with traditional technology 50 years ago and has not undergone any internal renovation since then. The goal was to design a modern home, in line with the needs of the 21st century, while keeping intervention’s carbon emissions as low as possible. An important aspect of the work was to generate as little waste as possible, so from the glass and frame of old windows through the interior doors to the windowsill, many raw materials were recycled, not once in a bold and unusual way. The study highlights how solutions can be applied after a thorough examination of the circumstances and possibilities that make available the comfort expected of a modern home in the early 21st century, even with significantly lower environmental impact.


Paper 7

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 7, 2020.

Energy efficiency scenarios of residential building blocks, case study of New Minia, Egypt S. ELHADAD1,2,3 , B. BARANYAI2 , I. KISTELEGDI2 , J. GYERGYÁK4 1

Department of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering, Minia University, Minia, Egypt Marcel Breuer Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 3 Energia Design Building Technology Research Group, Szentágothai Research Centre, Hungary 4 Department of Architecture and Urban Planning, Faculty of Engineering and Information, Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2

Keywords: energy efficiency, simulation, one building block, thermal comfort It is important to know the capability of the simplification method in achieving the design objectives with less preparation and simulation effort in time and complexity, which helps the designers to choose an appropriate method among a number of approaches. While the optimal solution is traditionally identified through “trial-and-error”, for complex optimization problems that consists of a great number of design variables, it might require extensive hours of computation even at the early design stage. This paper provides a comparative analysis of energy scenarios with distributed blocks options including (1) different modeling methods; (2) Energy: heating and cooling demand; and (3) comfort: thermal (PMV) and daylight in representative residential blocks in New Minia, Egypt. The goal of this study is to measures the different model scenarios with energy performance and thermal comfort, taking into account outdoor climatic and local conditions and indoor climate requirements. For this purpose, it is very important to define the internal conditions in terms of indoor temperatures and rates of ventilation. At the same time, the outdoor conditions are of extreme importance, leading to different design and operating decisions. Present simulation techniques are either over-simplified and use only a deterministic method, or are highly complex stochastic models. Thus, the scenarios for the model simplification are simulated to obtain the acceptable model based on the comparison of energy performance and thermal comfort with the original detailed model for the same period with hourly weather data. The results will show that the differences in each scenario for heating demand and thermal comfort. The integrated approach of model simplification presents effective efficiency for thermal building simulation.


Paper 8

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 8, 2020.

Passive air conduction system analysis in a modern industry building Á.L. KATONA, I. KISTELEGDI Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: wind catcher, natural ventilation, down drought air conduction, updraft air conduction, CFD supported architectural design A huge portion of energy consumption in buildings comes from heating, ventilation and air conditioning. Numerous publications assessed the potential of passive air conduction systems (PACS) compared to mechanical ventilation (MV), and proved their justification on the field. Nevertheless, much fewer examples can be found in the literature about which alternatives could be the best solution in the same occurrences. This paper has investigated the natural ventilation variations in the design phase of a new winery’s cellar and production hall in Villány, Hungary. From the comparison of updraft and downdraught PACS, the latter was found to be more efficient during computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Its ventilation performance possessed less amplitudes, but the air change (ACH) value distribution was more balanced under different wind incident angles, thus this version was chosen for construction.

Figure 8.1: Airflow streamlines in one proposed Passive Air Conduction System’s version


©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 9, 2020.

Paper 9

Industrial application of the energia design synthesis method K. HORVÁTH1 , I. KISTELEGDI2 1

Breuer Marcell Doctoral School of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 János Szentágothai Research Centre and Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: thermal building simulations, design methodology The Energia Design Synthesis (EDS) method applies high-tech engineering simulations to establish a sustainable architectural built environment. The current research/methodology was applied in an in-situ industrial application. A modular (design) system was developed to generate a wide range of applicable solutions for prefabricated wooden family house structures. The basic elements were assorted with the help of a sensitivity analysis, concerning roof shapes and the position of the thermal insulation. Two sets of buildings were developed considering geometries, number of storeys and the inclusion of a greenhouse. 15 one-storey geometries and 12 2-storey geometries were selected to combine them into a total of 90 building geometries by applying three different wall-window ratios, and three orientations. The building cases have undergone a series of dynamic thermal and lighting buildings physics simulations. The calculation results were evaluated to create an order of the building versions in terms of comfort and energy. The 5 best performing 1-storey and 5 best performing 2-storey models were selected to represent a reasonable palette for the R+D client to identify versions, which will be adopted for construction planning and industrial implementation.

Figure 9.1: The selected buildings


Paper 10

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 10, 2020.

Assessment of morphological impact on energy performance for migrant shelters R. IBRAHIM1 , B. BARANYAI2 , T. KATONA3 1

Univesity of Duhok, College of Engineering, Architectural Department, Kurdistan Region, Iraq Energia Design Building Technology Research Group, Szentágothai Research Centre, Hungary 3 Marcel Breuer Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2

Keywords: post-disaster shelters, bottom-up constructions, core shelters, zone formations and setting, delivered energy, thermal comfort Unsolved conflicts and in addition global warming and natural disasters are vital issues that led to increasing number of displaced people throughout the world that requires construction of temporary or even permanent dwellings for migrants. For ensuring the reasonable level of comfort for migrants and minimizing energy consumption of shelters, questions to what extent morphological and zone setting factor can affect energy performance of shelters prototypes should be answered. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of morphological and zone setting on material performance of four migrant’s shelter types with total area 50 m2 for each one for occupants in average of five persons. The study has also been extended to a set of variation of low impact materials. The (IDA-ICE) software program has been applied for the analysis. Results demonstrated that formation, size and setting of zones have notable influence on the material performance, furthermore bottom-up method and low impact construction materials and techniques that have a crucial influence on the prototype performance over conventional one. It seems reasonable to extend the study to undertake various location and orientation in term to obtain comprehended results. The findings could be eventually offered to the Board of Relief and Humanitarian Affairs (BRHA) in Kurdistan region north of Iraq and could be implemented as the basis of selection of a refugee core shelter, while the methodologies and results can be adopted and applied for various places of the world affected by migration issue.


Paper 11

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 11, 2020.

Geometry-based analysis for natural ventilation in high-rise office buildings M. ALI1 , I. KISTELEGDI2 1

Breuer Marcel Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Department of Building Constructions and Energy Design, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: energy design, natural ventilation, office building, energy efficiency Buildings consume about 40% of the total global energy use. Comparing to other building sectors, the sector of high-rise office buildings is one of the highest regarded energy consumer. This is mainly due to the high electricity use per square meter and the high cooling loads. Building natural ventilation could reduce cooling-related energy consumption by 56% to 86%. The induced airflow in natural ventilation contributes to buildings’ energy efficiency and safety. Furthermore, HVAC systems in high-rise office buildings are typically account for 30-40% of the total building energy intensity. This research aims to optimize the office building design process in terms of aerodynamics by realizing ways for increasing indoor air quality, raising the role of natural ventilation against mechanical ventilation systems. The investigation focuses on passive air conduction system (PACS) development by investigating different building ventilation related structure and space geometries, combinations of vent openings with the help of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Tests are conducted to reach the most feasible solution(s) and result analysis serves as a basis to create design guidelines for planners and researchers.


Paper 12

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 12, 2020.

The influence of physical factors on light design and its perception N. SADOUD1 , E.S. ZOLTÁN2 1

Breuer Marcel Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: comfort, hygiene, lighting design, colors, finishing materials, addiction centers It is crucial to consider comfort and hygienic aspects of an institution that takes care of patients with mental disorders. The research started with the focus on ensuring visual comfort through a lighting design that also delivers identity to the spaces. However, the lighting itself must interact with other surrounding factors to create a complete visual atmosphere and give each place an adequate impression. This study aims to identify the roles of the factor of colors and finishing materials in addiction centers’ lighting design, as it sheds light on the variables of these factors that must be adopted in such installations to respect the principle of hygiene, as well as the psychological concept.


Paper 13

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 13, 2020.

The green, the greener, the greenest G. YU, J. GYERGYÁK, E.S. ZOLTÁN Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, China

Keywords: high-rise residential building, vertical greening, ecological environment Green is the color of most plants in nature, and it is the symbol of life, especially pointing to the important characteristics of plant life, such as absorption of CO2 to produce O2 self-energy storage and transformation of energy and materials, relying on natural factors to maintain life operation, and fully integrated into the natural environment in the life cycle. The combination of “green” and “building” is to expect that the building can also have some functions similar to the green plant body, so that the building and the environment can coexist harmoniously. “Green building” essentially contains the metaphor of the relationship between architecture and natural environment. Just like the positive effect of green plants on the environment, the “green” of green buildings is mainly reflected in the contribution to the environment, rather than the demand for the environment.


Paper 14

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 14, 2020.

Fire protection and energy saving in public municipal building design in Northeast China J. HE, B. BACHMANN Breuer Marcell Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: municipal building, fire protection, energy saving Reasonably plan the orientation and orientation of heating buildings in the plant area to ensure sufficient sunshine in winter and avoid the dominant wind direction, maximize the use of natural energy to obtain heat and reduce heat loss. The external wall of the building adopts external thermal insulation structure. Lightweight aggregate concrete hollow block and EPS thermal insulation material with small heat transfer coefficient, low heat storage capacity and low strength are used in the wall, so that the thermal performance of the external wall of the building can meet the specified energy-saving standard. The roof energy consumption accounts for a considerable proportion of the total energy consumption of the enclosure structure. Therefore, the roof of the project adopts high-efficiency thermal insulation roof. According to the form of the roof, different thermal insulation materials are selected, and the heat transfer coefficient and thermal inertia index shall meet the local standards. External doors and windows are the most active and sensitive parts of building heat exchange and heat conduction. Their thermal insulation performance and air tightness performance have a significant impact on heating energy consumption, which is 5-6 times of the wall heat loss. Therefore, it is the key part of energy saving, and also an important link to improve the indoor thermal environment quality and improve the building energy saving. In order to reduce the energy consumption of external doors and windows, according to the specific situation of the project, the thermal insulation performance of doors and windows can be improved by improving the air tightness of doors and windows, adopting appropriate window wall area ratio, adding window glass layers and other measures.


Paper 15

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 15, 2020.

Examination of the effect of indoor fires on thermal insulation materials in simulation environment F. HAJDU1 , G. LÁSZLÓ2 , R. KUTI1 1

Department of Mechatronics and Machine Design, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Informatics and Electrical Engineering, Széchenyi István University, Győr, Hungary 2 Doctoral School of Multidisciplinary Engineering Sciences, Széchenyi István University, Győr, Hungary

Keywords: insulating materials, indoor fires, fire simulation Investigation of fires in buildings, including the effect of heat load during combustion on building structures and built-in materials, is a particularly important issue. In recent years several tenders have supported the modernization of the thermal insulation of older buildings in Hungary in order to increase their energy efficiency. In the case of monumental buildings thermal insulation is only allowed inside the building, therefore thermal insulation materials are placed inside the walls. In this research the effects of indoor fire on thermal insulation materials are investigated. In order to study the phenomena computer simulation is carried out. In this presentation first the literature of indoor fire simulations is reviewed, which is followed by the description of insulation materials and the performed computer simulation. The presentation concludes with further research tasks. The aim of the research is to contribute to this field and to increase the fire safety of buildings.


Paper 16

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 16, 2020.

Analysis on forms of behavior in social design practice through examples K. VARJÚ1 , P. ZILAHI2 1

Breuer Marcell Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Institute of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: social design, designer behavior, rural design, architectural context The global popularity of social design was caused by the 2008 global economic crisis. At that time, the emphasis was on architectural design in response to social crises arising from the economic situation, and architectural practice has raised the issue and importance of social responsibility. From this point on, social design has grown into an ever-evolving discipline. Unlike most disciplines related to design, a comprehensive design methodology in the field of social design has not yet been formulated. The basic reason for this is that social design starts from the specific social contexts of a given place, so the multitude of changing factors does not allow the formulation of a general methodology. The definition given by the European Commission also suggests that social design is experimental and local. Based on these, we can declare that instead of a general methodology we can talk about the different ways of designer mindset and forms of behavior. This paper examines projects that respond to different societal problems and the associated design attitudes. The aspects of the analysis were to explain the causes of social tension in the community, to formulate the applied planning methods and concept, and to examine the long-term social impacts of the projects. The research concludes that the examination of the context in the architectural sense must also cover not only the built environment but also the precise definition of social problems. Furthermore the fundamental success of social design projects can be ensured by a design process based on a local presence. In this regard, it is essential, that a qualitative dialogue is established between the designer and the community.


Paper 17

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 17, 2020.

The complex role of water in architecture G. HECKENAST1 , M. FERENCZ2 , A.T. KERTÉSZ1 1

Breuer Marcell Doctoral School of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Ybl Miklós Faculty of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Óbuda University, Hungary

Keywords: architecture, water, design method, urban planning, sustainability The focus of this research is the exploration of the relationship between - one of the most unique natural elements in the universe - water and - the environment shaping creations of the human mind - architecture. Exploring the connection between the water and architecture helps to understand the complexity of the interdependence between natural and built environment, which are the key of providing a sustainable future for the next generations. Over time, with technical advances and changes in attitudes, the role of water has changed in shaping the built environment. It is becoming a significant tendency in architecture to build reimagined ways around, on or in water, which are new areas in many aspects. There are even more water related facilities than it used to be: e.g. office buildings, hotels, restaurants, museums, high-rise buildings, recreation parks, forests, sports fields, parking garages and even agricultural buildings in many different approaches. Promoting the symbiosis of the natural and built environment are leading to create a sustainable built environment with the help of water, which has beneficial effects to the climate change, environmental conditions and even economic changes at small and large scale with rethinking the architectural design methods in connection with water. In the 21st century the role of water in the sustainability of cities and buildings are essential to maintain development in an ethical and beneficial way in harmony with nature.


Paper 18

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 18, 2020.

Intervention and renewal: Interpretation of installation art in urban public space H.H. HE, J. GYERGYÁK Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: installation art, urban public space, urban renewal, art intervention The continuous development of urban public art has shown a diversified development trend, and the fields involved are becoming more and more extensive. Art intervention in urban public space has become a strategy for urban renewal, and urban public art also provides multiple forms of expression for the strategy. In the current urban development, installation art has achieved unprecedented development in the design and renewal of urban public spaces. More and more designers and artists pay attention to the application of installation art and urban public space design. Installation art brings new vitality to the neglected and aging urban space environment in the past. In urban public spaces, the current installation art manifestations are becoming more and more diversified and closer to the citizens, and it forms a public art interactive environment with urban residents. The research explores the relationship between installation art and urban renewal from the perspective of art intervention in urban public spaces. First, the paper outlines the development context of installation art, and summarizes the strategy of installation art’s intervention in urban public spaces. Next, the paper explains the specific manifestations and characteristics of installation art in urban public spaces. In addition, it analyzes the role and influence of installation art in urban public spaces. Finally, the paper summarizes the value that installation art brings to urban renewal, and explains the inevitable trend of installation art into urban renewal.


Paper 19

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 19, 2020.

Design and development of B&Bs in the post-epidemic era Z.K. HUANG, H. CAO, H.W. PAN, G. ZOBOKI Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: B&B design, post-epidemic era, innovation The B&B (Bed and Breakfast) business model originated from the United Kingdom, that gradually spread to China in the 1980s. Since 2016, with the continuous development and update of business models and concepts, the number of B&Bs in China has shown explosive growth. The successive births of B&B brands such as Yun She and Qian Li Zou Dan Qi, also reflect the improvement of the overall quality of the industry. However, the COVID19 epidemic has disrupted everything and the severe situation almost destroyed the industry. Many B&Bs have been forced to close their businesses or even close down. After the heavy blow, many problems have also been exposed, such as the living environment lacks diversified experience, the competitive homogeneity is more serious, and single B&B lacks competitiveness. Today, the COVID-19 in China has been effectively controlled and has entered the “post-epidemic era”. The gradual recovery of the tourism industry drives the development of the B&B industry. How to solve problems and seize opportunities has become the focus of innovation in B&Bs design.

Figure 19.1: Gubei Yunzhu in Beijing


Paper 20

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 20, 2020.

Application of environmental psychology in kindergarten architectural design H. CAO, A.M. TAMÁS, G. SZTRANYÁK Breuer Marcell Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: kindergarten, environmental psychology, interactive experience, sustainability, architectural design With the reform of China’s childbirth policy in recent years, a unique “baby boom” phenomenon has emerged in China. The number of newborns has increased rapidly in a short period of time. The problem of infants and young children has become the focus of attention in cities, especially their educational environment has risen to the level of social problems. At present, China is in an important stage of urban transformation and development. Under this background, the complex urban environment has a significant impact on the psychology and physiology of infants and young children. The past kindergarten architectural design model and environmental aesthetic experience can no longer adapt to the current situation and the social development needs. Thus, how to realize the sustainable development of the kindergarten architectural design has become a social problem that needs to be solved urgently. Under the background of environmental psychology, this paper summarizes the aspects related to environmental psychology in the architectural design of kindergarten. First of all, this paper analyzes the characteristics of the kindergarten’s architectural design, clarifies the relationship between the kindergarten’s architectural design and environmental psychology, and conducts extensive social research on the current situation of the urban kindergarten’s architectural design, and analyzes the results. Secondly, the paper from the five aspects of physical and mental needs, emotional needs, cognitive processing, spatial patterns and architectural design, children’s behavior and architectural design, combined with the author’s actual projects explore the application of environmental psychology in the architectural design of kindergartens. Finally, the paper puts forward five evaluation principles of kindergarten architectural design, including safety, functionality, experience, innovativeness and sociality, so as to explore a new paradigm of kindergarten architectural design in China in the future.


Figure 20.1: Application of environmental psychology in kindergarten architectural design


Paper 21

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 21, 2020.

Integration of sustainable street furniture in Tunisian urban public spaces: Recycling design O.B. DHAOU1 , N. VASVARY NADOR1 , A. GALL2 1 2

Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary Ybl Miklós Faculty of Architecture, Óbudai University, Hungary

Keywords: urban development, sustainable design, recycling design, eco-friendly street furniture, ecological design In order of developing the quality of urban spaces, street furniture seems to be the major element that defines the city’s social attraction points. It stimulates outdoor spaces because of its location buildings and sidewalk meets. This study explores the issues of design criteria that introduce sustainability into street furniture design in urban public space in Tunisia. This research is based on the street furniture role and its importance in urban public spaces, then the possibilities of supplementing an ecological and recycling design. This paper aims to explore the necessary criteria to design sustainable street furniture in order to present its importance in a way that help to ameliorate the quality of living in the urban areas and cities.


Paper 22

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 22, 2020.

Re-construction place script to awake the general public’s memories C. REN, G. MEDVEGY Breuer Marcel Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: place script, placemaking, general public’s memories, landscape architecture design At present, many great Chinese cities are undergoing changes in urban development models, from focusing on speed construction to quality construction. China has experienced rapid urban construction and has now entered a later stage of adjustment. People pay more attention to the improvement of construction quality, from the perspectives of culture, spirit, urban image and function optimization. The creation of place scripts is an important method of modern urban space, and in specific place to design, deepen, and arrange certain procedures and content, so that people can experience different feelings, learn more stories, or cultivate sentiment through various experiences, inherit diverse memories. This paper is based on design projects to analyze, research and build place scripts to summarize the expressions that shape memory.


Paper 23

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 23, 2020.

Preliminary research on spatial narratology in architecture X. KANG1 , G. MEDVEGY2 , Y.F. ZHOU3 1

Breuer Marcel Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 3 School of Architecture, China Central Academy of Fine Arts, China

Keywords: narratology, spatial narrative, situationism, spatial implication With the development of economic globalization and the information age, architecture has gradually become a kind of seal of politics, capital and culture, and is divorced from the spirit and life experience of the existing places in the region. The modern space production pays attention to the relation of material function and ignores the relation of social and cultural emotion. However, consumers and users in the information age are more enthusiastic about the diversified emotional experience under the aesthetic vision of daily life. At the same time, the functional paradigm of modern architecture is insufficient to measure or interpret the complex relationship and semantic characteristics of pioneer architecture. Therefore, the field of architecture constantly seeks new research paradigm from the interdisciplinary perspective and reconsiders the creative activities of architecture. From the late last century, with the introduction of architecture by postmodern philosophy, semiotics, geographical psychology, phenomenology and cultural anthropology, there has been a cross-research between architecture and narratology. It was in the 1960s, with Robert Venturi’s “Complexity and milling in Architecture (1966)” as the landmark starting point, that architects began to reflect and widely discuss the significance in which modernism has created uninteresting stereotype spaces in the living environments of different cultures, regions and ethnic groups. Among many theories that reflect on the connotation of space, space narrative provides a new research direction as a multidisciplinary cross-disciplinary architecture theory.


Paper 24

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 24, 2020.

To create a “box” space in building: modular building Q. GU1 , E.S. ZOLTÁN2 1

Breuer Marcell Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: Green Building Technology, modular building This project tries to create a “box” space in the building by using modular building. Modular building is to be a building body divided into several building modules. Decoration and cleaning will be completed in the factory and then it will be shipped to site. The assembly of it will be like building blocks. Modular building technology is combined with design, factory manufacturing, site construction and acceptance. There are many spaces between each module using this technology, it will increase efficiency. By inserting a small “box space” in the building space different visual spots in the area can be created. The combination of traffic flow and cultural modeling will use visual spots and specific cultural structures to attract people’s attention.


Paper 25

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 25, 2020.

Research on the relationship between contemporary Korean catering space and traditional Korean folk houses Z. NAN Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: Korean, dining space, traditional dwellings, relationship This paper is focused on contemporary Korean nationality dining space and the problem of the relationship between the traditional Korean houses, through sorting, analysis, comparison, both in the spatial entity elements and the differences and similarities in terms of the relation between the indoor space design, summed up the Korean traditional residence is the prototype of contempor- ary Korean nationality dining space, is the cause of the Korean nationality dining space uniqueness, is the knowledge to solve the problem of indoor space design basis, finally promotes the traditional culture, regional culture, national culture as the support rationally constructing the cultural diversity of the restaurant interior space design.


Paper 26

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 26, 2020.

Harmonious architecture and interior design through components of adaptive reuse: Urban Gastrolounge in Prishtina T. JASHARI-KAJTAZI, R. ZOGIANI Faculty of Architecture, University of Prishtina

Keywords: adaptive reuse, harmony in styles, material symbiosis Urban, architectural and technological aspects of the city of Pristina have been changed constantly, meaning the following: politically, ecologically, economically and culturally, especially in areas as the downtown, planned to have more density, taller office buildings and commercial spaces or congestion of residential areas. Urban locations have changed rapidly, though their original functions have been abandoned or new uses have emerged. One of the examples is Urban Gastrolounge in a very specific centrally located area in the city, previously used for trading automotive parts, while using the strategy of adaptive reuse has been turned in one of a very interesting and attractive gastronomy examples. Therefore, choosing the strategy of adaptive reuse of the entire building or interior, aiming revitalization of urban and architectural areas towards sustainable development of the city in general can be considered as one of the necessary and most useful possibilities of intervention.


Paper 27

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 27, 2020.

Interior renovation possibilities of large-panel building apartments focusing on costs and prices O. RÁK, N. BAKAI, Á. BORSOS, P. IVÁNYI Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: large-panel building, renovation, costs The increasing interest in large-panel building apartment renovation has heightened the need for a cost-based refurbishment program. This research provides support to owners and investors through a cost analysis. The optimal amount for renovation has been determined based on market prices in the case of different initial conditions. The value of the property can be maintained or even increased by using and distributing the budget. The required works could be brought into line with the cash flow based on the renovation costs. The analysis covers the common quality renovation possibilities of rooms with different functions and their cost implications.


Paper 28

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 28, 2020.

Teaching freeform modelling for architects K. SZOMMER, R. SÁRKÖZI, A.B. SZÉLL Department of Building Structures and Energy Design, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: geometry, teaching geometry, education, parametric thinking, parametric architecture The aim of this presentation is to introduce a new teaching method for architects, which includes every necessary preliminary knowledge for parametric design, like geometry of freeform surfaces, parametric thinking and the history of parametric design. Descriptive geometry is a mainly theoretical subject and as such it is often both complicated, so it can look unnecessary for the students. Parametric design on the other hand is a relatively new design method with clearly visible new opportunities, but it requires a new point of view from the students. The world of parametric forms is based on geometry. That is why it is important to learn and understand the basics of geometry. The research is based on the analysis of teaching methods of different related subjects, like space vision, geometry and parametric design. The goal is to improve students spatial vision and to bring more practical thinking into prominence. That can help to evolve more creative thinking.


Paper 29

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 29, 2020.

Possibilities of linking BIM and DFMA methodologies: Literature review N. BAKAI, O. RÁK, M.B. ZAGORÁCZ, B. FÜREDI Institute of Smart Technology and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: Building Information Modeling, Design for Manufacture and Assembly Interests in Building Information Modelling (BIM) methodologies are becoming more and more popular in the Architectural, Engineering, and Construction industry. Methods can cover the full spectrum of construction processes and throughout the entire life cycle of assets. A large number of studies demonstrate that by applying BIM methods, extra time and energy must be invested in the design phase to achieve later goals that may relate to construction support, simplified processes, high-quality plans, and increasing efficiency. Several papers examined the possibility of linking BIM to DfMA (Design for Manufacture and Assembly) methodologies. This research aims to investigate international examples to explore how to connect these methodologies and to define the advantages and disadvantages of their joint application.


Paper 30

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 30, 2020.

Development by event: Branding for small cities D. HADŽIC1 , T. MOLNÁR2 1

Breuer Marcell Doctoral School of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: event, development, small cities, branding, impact of events People and places are connected in multiple cases. Towns and cities are in the main memory of our life and they remind us on our common heritage. Like beacons in our memory they relate to us, home towns or places we visited or just pass through on holiday stay in our vision forever. We live, visit and work in these places, and we consider them our own. This is an added value when considering a community event, branding or a place to a marketing practice to development of a destination. No matter whether we are a resident or a visitor, we have a special connection to a place or an event. This event is a tool for good practice of “only a place worth living is a place worth visiting”. Vision and values of places are images of their inhabitants, these places want to increase the economy and status by means of tourism and development needs to become the main topics about: • We want to be famous by? • We are best at? • When they say the name of our town they think about? • We have this and this, how can we use it? Questions like these are the main points of this topic, or how to manage the full potential brand of a town, city or a destination. Small cities need to be focused on tourists, planning and open, and by far intelligent to produce the branding of a town that will produce positive view, consideration and return of tourist and a resident. The first thing is realization of what a town is, what it makes, what can be interesting inside and around it and why it can be appealing to specific group of people. Places are not the same. Branding of these entities are not a simple task, it takes time and planning and have no universal recipe for the success. A thing that can work for branding of one place may not work for another. Branding of destinations is a term that have appeared in the 90’s, while product branding has been with us for centuries.


Paper 31

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 31, 2020.

Dreaming back in good old times: Multi-functional facility design for rural areas in China D.P. ZHAO1 , Á. HUTTER2 , Y.R. LIU1 1 2

Faculty of Art and Design, Beijing Forestry University, China Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: COVID-19, rural areas, modular application, multi-functional facility, livelihood improvement The Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) rages around the whole world at the beginning of 2020. As one of the countries seriously affected by this virus outbreak, China has suffered significantly in its national economy and people’s livelihoods. Especially in the rural areas of China where fewer sources are allocated in comparison to the urban cities, these places are facing numerous threats under the attack of the pandemic. Therefore, the author intends to create a specific kind of multi-functional facility with modular application for rural areas, mainly aiming at growing rural economy by the concept of Chinese modern agriculture and improving the Emergency Response Capacity. In the mean time the standard of inhabitants’ lives are expected to be promoted with the application of the facility incrementally.

Figure 31.1: Image of the facility


Paper 32

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 32, 2020.

Conservation and utilization of vernacular architecture in Chinese traditional villages: A case study in Gantian village, Chongqing S. YONGTING1 , A.M. TAMÁS2 , G. SZTRANYÁK2 1

Breuer Marcel Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs

Keywords: vernacular architecture, Chinese traditional villages, cultural heritage “Chinese Traditional Villages” is a survey and selection campaign jointly launched by the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development, the Ministry of Culture, National Cultural Heritage Administration, and the Ministry of Finance in April 2012 to systematically investigate and protect China’s cultural heritage. According to the Evaluation and Identification Index System of Traditional Villages (Trial), traditional villages with protection values are selected in a qualitative and quantitative way based on vernacular architecture, site selection, and pattern of villages and intangible cultural heritage carried by villages. Up to now, a total of 4,153 villages have been listed. So Traditional villages refer to those villages with rich culture and natural resources, which were formed earlier and have certain historical, cultural, scientific, artistic, economic, and social values. As the core component of traditional villages, Vernacular architecture comprises a vast variety of construction forms that have developed regionally over the centuries by trial and error and handed down the generations through local traditions. It responds to local climate, geography, and social norms through its long evolution. With the rapid development of urbanization, traditional villages are in serious damage and decline, so it is necessary and urgent to protect it. However, what kind of conservation and development is sustainable, and how to avoid constructive destruction of villages has become the focus of rural architects’ research. In this context, taking the protection and utilization design of vernacular architecture in Gantian village, Pengshui, Chongqing as an example, this study put forward the idea and methods of local protection and utilization of rural architecture. Based on the comprehensive and systematic site study, the design integrates the principles and concepts of cultural heritage protection and puts forward the protection strategy and management mechanism combining with the actual situation. On the basis of protecting the integrity and authenticity of vernacular architecture, this design integrates the industrial orientation of the village and utilizes rural architecture in an innovative and sustainable way.


Paper 33

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 33, 2020.

Analysis of the ancient city pattern of Wula street Manchu town, Jilin city Z. LIANGYU1 , A.T. KERTÉSZ2 1

Breuer Marcel Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: city pattern, space contour, historical features Wula Street Manchu town Jilin province of China has a long history, with “a Wula City, half of the northeast China history” historical status. It has an important relationship with the dynasties in many dynasties. It is one of the important origins of the Manchu people, the Qing Dynasty called Wula Street as “the origin of the land of the Dynasty”. It is a true continuation of the history of Manchu history, it has great historical and scientific value to reflect the developing history of ethnic minorities in northeast China and study the political, economic and cultural characteristics of the Manchus. The existing ancient city pattern of Wula Street mainly includes the city pattern, the street pattern and the space outline.


Paper 34

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 34, 2020.

Sustainability education based on value propositions E.ZS. PANCSA1 , F. KISS2 1

Marcell Breuer Doctoral School of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Budapest Metropolitan University, Hungary

Keywords: ecosystem, design, education, sustainability, value proposition, generation-specific These days, designers and architects need to join together to become what might be called ecosystem designers. Our design work and the ways in which we create and affect our environment now have ecological, societal, and economic significance. Urban planning is becoming increasingly complex. By 2050, 70 percent of the world’s population will live in cities, and a UN study claims that, by the year 2030, 60 percent of the urban population will be under 18 years of age. The playful educational development of children creates a framework for certain sensitivities and ways of thinking which can lead to the emergence of a community that cares for one another and for their environment in new and better ways. The consequences of this can also be measured economically. As an environmental planner, and later as a product designer, I have regularly encountered real-life situations where we could offer solutions to special-needs users that promoted both their psychological and economic integration into society. Accessibility and freedom of choice are two of the fundamental essences of urban life. Art can be used as a framework to make new, innovative scientific developments easily understood. The “art” option warrants a more conscious interdisciplinary fusion in which researchers can present their findings to various communities in necessarily simpler forms. For designers, this ongoing state-of-the-art collaboration frees up different paths of thought thanks to the freedoms that are offered by new materials and technologies. The result of such holistic and organic development and collaboration can be a varying set of beneficial solutions: an emergent process where the introduction of themes and expertise is not an incremental crawl, but a developmental outward spiral. Steps toward sustainability preserve the dignity of everyday life because they uphold and promote a liveable environment, depending on each community’s local needs, available opportunities, and grass- roots goals. When a community takes care of its environment, then the municipal authorities can concentrate more on development and innovation and less on conservation and optimization. The perfect manifestation of design is when its results are built into their setting in a mutually supportive and self-sustaining way. During my studies in the Netherlands, I learned the expression homo ludens (“the playing human”) from Johan Huizinga’s 1938 book of that name. In it he asserts that play is an indispensable element in the formation of society and culture. Our culture is shaped through the carefree cultivation of play. At the intersection of Huizinga’s way of thinking with my artist-to- entrepreneur career path, I would like, in this research and in the methodologies formulated as a result of it, to use design and its underlying modes of thought as a call to the children for their help. I would like to participate in the formulation and methodology of play in which reality is expressed, agegroup-specifically and based on the needs of the generation, in the form of a game that lays the communal foundations for a more liveable and sustainable future.


Paper 35

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 35, 2020.

Shaping our movements in architecture N. RAMOS GONZALEZ, G. MEDVEGY Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: furniture, interior space, architecture, domestic space, workplace, COVID-19 The interior space is where the people can build their own cosmos. It is the place which can be dominated by them, it can create order and perfection. However, the outside world is the unknown. It is constantly in movement and conflict. In between of these two worlds there is the architecture. Shelters that human being has built since thousands of years ago have been the places where the men have found refugee from chaos. The interior living space has played a fundamental role since the beginning of civilizations and have given shape to our cultures and behavior. The architecture surrounds human activities, defined by Julio Vilamajó as our third skin, far from our body which allows our movements and express our senses. So, as clothing gives us a first protection, the architecture provides another layer and in between the skin it can find the presence of the furniture. This micro universe assists our activities, and they are the closer contact with the habitants of the space. The aim of this study was to analyses the relationship between architecture and furniture, how working trends of the last five years have modified the way of living the interior spaces of people around the world. In consequence, through the analyses of two contemporary projects, in which the author participated, the study provides a novel approach to the working from home and working from the office. This thesis seeks to understand and explain the role of furniture within the interior space and how the way that the people uses as a support of their spatial practices. As a conclusion the research presented here confirms that designing our working environments in order to promote a healthier and safer working place is fundamental. Nowadays, due to COVID-19 pandemic, a special attention is needed to put focus on the promotion of wellness and comfort in workplaces, whether it is in residential or office buildings. The findings can contribute to a better understanding of the interior working living spaces and in which way the refurbishment of a space can help us to achieve a better life.


Paper 36

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 36, 2020.

The value of 4x4 experimental teaching project for the University of Pécs X. JIN1 , W. TIE2 1 2

Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology,University of Pécs, Hungary Architecture Design and Research Institute, Central Academy of Fine Arts, China

Keywords: international exchange, 4x4, experimental teaching, thought collision, open vision Since 2014, the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology of Pecs University has participated in the 4x4 experimental teaching project, and this year is the seventh year. Over the past six years, I have witnessed the growth of students, the growth of young teachers in various universities, and the continuous growth of the 4x4 teaching group. Looking back at the fruitful results of the participation of the University of Pécs in the 4x4 project, both in the academic and teaching fields of architecture and in the educational cooperation between China and Hungary, satisfactory results have been achieved. Under the guidance of the “One Belt, One Road” policy proposed by the Chinese government, supported by and sponsored by China Building Decoration Association, China Foundation Fund and China’s well-known enterprises, Professor Wang Tie, the leader of the 4x4 team, led the Chinese teachers and students of more than a dozen universities and to go abroad and introduce European high-quality teaching resources. They cooperated deeply with the University Pécs of Hungary and together explore and created an experimental teaching model for the Chinese and Hungarian students of architecture and environmental design field. Together, we have created an educational platform for international exchanges and cooperation, which has created a green channel for students from both countries to study, and also introduced European teaching resources and teaching teams for Chinese universities. Over the years, undergraduate and postgraduate students from more than a dozen Chinese and Hungarian universities who participated in the project have received careful guidance from senior professors of the 4x4 teaching group and practical tutors from well-known enterprises, laying a solid professional and technical foundation for the students to go abroad for further study and enter the workplace. At the same time, it also opened up the international perspective of students.


Figure 36.1: Final presentation in China in 2014


Paper 37

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 37, 2020.

Synchronous exploration T. WANG1 , X. JIN2 1 2

Architectural Design and Research Institute, China Academy of Fine Arts, China Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: experimental teaching, community, linear thinking, higher education, 4x4, cooperative exploration With the advent of 5G, the world has entered a transition period and entered the era of science and technology. A clear boundary line marks the end of the era of popular science. As the epidemic spreads around the world, artificial intelligence and 5G networks have joined the fight against the epidemic and become new tools and partners for mankind to cure diseases. Human beings should unite to solve the current predicament. Simultaneous exploration is the only way for scientific exchanges and objective justice. The vision of a community with a shared future for mankind is driving the fight against the epidemic, and no one on earth can be immune from it. At the same time, international exchanges and cooperation in higher education have opened up new thinking in the epidemic. Serving students and helping them to have a bright future, which is always the pursuit of 4x4 experimental teaching project. In 2019, China has entered the new era of 5G network technology. It is self-evident that China has exerted great influence on the world. In the face of the opportunities and challenges, China is particularly proud that it has demonstrated the vigor and vitality of a great power in the east from multiple perspectives. In the face of the global epidemic, China has demonstrated its institutional advantages, tried our best to help other countries, and saved lives at all costs. This is the moral character of Chinese culture, which has been widely praised in the world. At the same time, China also faces challenges and pressures from all aspects of the world. The impact of international public health events on higher education is unprecedented. How to deal with it? How to cultivate the talents that needed by the times? This is an opportunity for our group. Over the past 11 years, we have been seeking to cultivate outstanding talents in China architecture and decoration field. The 4x4 team worked with the University of Pécs, Hungary for five years, which is a “One Belt and One Road” friendly country. Now, the subject has a new content, we always adhere to the priority of science, put forward synchronous exploration, multi-track. The new 4x4 experimental teaching topic has the value of the times, so higher education cannot rest on outdated thinking.


Paper 38

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 38, 2020.

Urban morphological research: The classical and modern research methodologies Á. BERTYÁK Faculty of Architecture, Csonka Pál Doctoral School, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary

Keywords: urban morphology, urban typology, classical research methods, modern research methods As a first-year doctoral student, my aim is to explore and compare Hungarian and foreign urban morphological studies - as a basis for my later research topic, where I would like to analyze the specific settlement structure elements and endowments, analyze the history and changes of Őrség in Western-Hungary. My goal is to develop an investigation methodology of my own that can follow, but at the same time innovate existing methods. For this, the exploration of the currently used and known models is essential. The incipience of the urban morphological research date back to the end of the 19th, and the beginning of the 20th century, when the “classical” studies of settlements from a geographical and architectural approach were born. The researchers dealt with the structural and morphological relations, historical development, functional division and changes of the settlements, as well as with the typology of buildings and squares, streets in order to learn about the processes taking place in the settlements and also to establish their design work. Prominent representatives of the field in Hungary are: Tibor Mendöl, Jenő Major, Tamás Meggyesi; internationally among others are: Christofer Alexander, Kevin Lynch, the Krier brothers, M. R. G. Conzen and Karl Kropf. By the turn of the millennium, with the development of technology and the arise of new phenomena and problems that affecting the whole world, a number of new, “modern” urban morphology research methodologies had emerged. With the help of computer analysis, satellite images, statistical data and modeling programs, such research which presents the examined elements of a particular settlement with maps, graphs and tables (e.g. Space Syntax, multi scalar system, skyline, GIS, Metlab) can now be done. Inter- and multidisciplinary morphological studies have also been established, combining together among other things with sustainable development, urban ecology or sociology. Examining classical and modern urban morphological methodologies is an important step for my later scientific work, and can provide useful methodological overview for others as well.


Paper 39

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 39, 2020.

AI technology on the urban street landscape design Z.X. LIANG Marcel Breuer Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: AI, algorithm model, street landscape, pedestrian simulation Since China’s reform and opening up, China has been advancing urbanization at an unprecedented speed and scale, which has also led to a large number of people moving from rural to urban areas every year. In this case, people have put forward higher and more urgent needs for the urban environment and urban architecture. With the development of AI and information technology, the application of intelligent technology in the field of architecture has become possible. Now, China’s architecture industry inevitably needs to undergo transformation. In this development trend, the urban street landscape is an element that is closest to people’s lives, and changes in design methods can more directly improve people’s quality of life. Therefore, this research is focus on the applying of AI technology in street landscape design. We will use the algorithm model to combine pedestrian behavior data to construct a behavior predictor, and apply this technology to design practice. Comparing the data recorded in reality with the simulation data of the algorithm model proves that the algorithm model can infer the direction of the pedestrian based on the information such as the current position and direction of the pedestrian, and obtain the simulation accuracy of the algorithm model. Later, we will apply the algorithm model to actual design practice to prove that the algorithm model can guide street landscape design and improve street efficiency. Using algorithmic models to predict pedestrian behavior, compared with traditional computer simulation experiments, more combination of pedestrian psychological factors and external environmental factors can more accurately guide street landscape design and provide a better street environment for the city. This technology has very broad development prospects in the future.


Paper 40

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 40, 2020.

Re-shaping Budapest: Large housing estates and their (un)planned centers A.K. LOSONCZY, R. BALLA, H. ANTYPENKO, M. BENKŐ Department of Urban Design and Planning, Faculty of Architecture, Budapest University of Technology and Economics

Keywords: Budapest, mass housing, large housing estates, centrality, development planning, comparative study The core of the theoretical reflection is the modern large housing estate as a spatial unit, its subdivision, and center. The comparative study presents Budapest’s 13 large housing estates (with more than 6000 dwellings) realized during the two 15-year mass housing programs between 1960 and 1990. That time, most of the urban land was publicly owned, planned and developed. Although, the city officially was divided into 22 districts and informally it had inherited quarters with various characteristics. How did these large housing estates re-shape the territory of the city? What was the relationship between them and the surrounding quarters? How their centers were (un)planned? What was the relationship between the new modern and the old centers? The research proposes a classification that could be used for a better understanding of actual spatial, functional and development challenges related to modern large housing estates.


Paper 41

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 41, 2020.

Strengthen walkability by pedestrian way: The fragmented greenery approach T. ZHAO, S.M. MAITEH, C. LU, J. GYERGYÁK, E.S. ZOLTÁN, Á. BORSOS Marcel Breuer Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: walkability, pedestrian way, greenery, urban study, built environment Besides the architectural and urban structure approach, pedestrian network of the city of Pécs has also been developed. The cultural and historical value of the city has gained reputation through tourism. Potentials of the local pedestrian ways in enhancing the urban environment and residents’ experience, the walkability, is to be discovered. The research started with a literature review and then an experimental study on a chosen junction in the city specifically with regard to greenery application has been performed creating a proposal that maximizes the advantage of applying greenery to the designated pedestrian ways. Contribution to a more greenly equipped locality and more pleasant and prosperous urban environment is expected.


Paper 42

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 42, 2020.

Segregated neighbourhoods: Towards a graphical evaluation index for slum-upgrading projects T. CSABA Faculty of Sciences, Institute of Geography, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: participatory slum-upgrading, urban rehabilitation, informal settlements, sociospatial exclusion, Roma integration As the proliferation of informal settlements has gained pace around the world, often coupled with spatial and social segregation, the global community has made efforts to provide a set of norms to tackle the issue. From the UN Sustainable Development Goals, a clear message takes shape for urban experts and decision makers: the focus is from now on social inclusion and community building; a priority before infrastructural intervention. The offered tool, named Participatory Slum-upgrading Program (PSUP) draws up a guide suitable not only for the Global-South but for urban rehabilitation projects of segregated areas in the developed world, too. The challenge is not only to implement global recommendations to local context but to measure the projects’ effectiveness in order that we can learn from each other: to be able to decide at a glance whether a project supports social integration and strengthens communities. To answer this need, a tentative index is tested on two case studies. One that had begun as an urban experiment but at the end turned out to be a model of social urban rehabilitation in Pécs (HU), and the second one in Siklós (HU) implementing the former model, is a live project, still running. The background and process of the two cases are analyzed according to the index to demonstrate their conformity to the PSUP principles. On the side, the importance of process-design will also be examined.


Paper 43

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 43, 2020.

The impact of contemporary cohousing model on urban quality of life: Case studies from Vienna, Berlin, Zürich, and Budapest A. BABOS1 , M. BENKŐ1 , A. ORBÁN1,2 1

Department of Urban Planning and Design, Faculty of Architecture, Budapest University of Technology and Economics BME, Hungary 2 Department of Sociology and Communication, Faculty of Economic and Social Sciences, Budapest University of Technology and Economics BME, Hungary

Keywords: cohousing, urban housing, urban sustainability, sharing, participation, quality of life, social impact Today, 55% of the world’s population lives in urban areas, and expected to increase to 68%, therefore the liveability of cities is an important question both at the moment and in the future. In recent years European cities are often unhealthy living habitats, both physically and mentally. Solutions to the problems of urban liveability are today: social innovations, cultural changes, alternative architectural and housing forms, etc. which make our cities more sustainable, the citizens more satisfied with their life. The methods of the contemporary cohousing model (participatory design process, neighborhood design, etc.) may contribute to establishing social and physical sustainability in urban areas, and create a healthy mix of common and private areas in a high-density urban form as well. The aim of the research is to measure and analyze the impact of the cohousing model on urban quality of life. The focus area is European cities with alternative housing developments: Vienna, Berlin, Zürich, and Budapest The research method is analyzing the international and national context of the cohousing developments and the existing quality of life measurement systems. Part of the research is to invent an innovative quality of life measurement system based on a new collective housing categorization. Finally, it is important to test the measurement system on case studies: measure the impacts of shared features in housing on urban quality of life.


Paper 44

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 44, 2020.

Research on the connection and strengthening of the place spirit in the city: The application of modular installations in the terrain vague M. WU, B. BACHMAN Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: place spirit, terrain vague, modular installations, leftover space The development of social economy has led to the adjustment and reorganization of the original layout structure and spatial functions of the city, which has triggered changes in human lifestyles and settlement patterns. The city has a type of leftover space that carries historical stories. They have unique spatial value and potential. The connection with the city may have temporarily sealed the glorious story due to the passage of time, but when we once again close to it, a new chapter may open which gives the development a different plot. This paper discusses the many connections between leftover space and the city and the potential of this type of space itself. I chose to use industrial heritage as the object to explore these “imbalanced supply and demand” spaces in the city when citizens are the reference object, and analyze their space quality and use efficiency. Finally, it is proposed to try to reconnect the leftover space with the city through artistic modularization corresponding to the diversified space, and make good use of its unique location and internal potential.


Paper 45

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 45, 2020.

Adaptive-reuse of strategies for urban heritage to improve community resilience S.S. LIU1 , S.Z. ZHANG2 , K. KOVÁCS-ANDOR3 1

Breuer Marcel Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 College of Arts, Jiangxi University of Finance and Economics, China 3 Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: urban heritage, resilient community, adaptive reuse, community renewal Many cities worldwide seek the transformation of sustainable urban development to face rapid urbanization and climate change. In the transformation of urban development, several urban life heritage communities develop over time, which have unique social values and spatial attributes gradually. These communities are usually located in the center of the city or the city’s old districts. Today, urban heritage renewal faces unprecedented challenges: the aging of building structure and infrastructure, the influx of new immigrants, the aging population in a community, and climate change. From the perspective of adaptive reuse design strategies, this paper explores enhancing community resilience to improve the urban heritage communities, through literature reviews and case studies, in terms of the low-carbon and resilient community environment to seek corresponding planning tools for the city and community. Besides, this will play an active role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and improving cities’ ability to respond to climate change.


Paper 46

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 46, 2020.

Collective residential spaces in sustainable development: San Francisco housing units within co-living understanding C. LU1 , S.M. MAITEH1 , T. ZHAO1 , Á. BORSOS2 , J. GYERGYÁK2 , E.S. ZOLTÁN2 1

Marcel Breuer Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: co-living, residential design, housing unit, living futures Housing models that target rather typical family structures are increasingly failing to meet the needs of the new social changes regarding the rapid urbanization due to the mass-migration to cities, and the lack of affordable housing. As an architectural counterpart of sustainable development, co-living is introduced as a connected way of living, enabling sustainable living practices through efficient use of resources and space while sharing consumption. The reflection of the requirements of changing social and economic structures on urban settings can be seen in major cities housing. This research focuses on co-living environments in San Francisco, the United States, that were transformed from typical single-family housing units by its residents. Through investigating these housing, the research aimed to contribute to the current understanding of co-living practices, explore the spatial, economic and social underpinnings of these living models, and their relevance to sustainable development while presenting initial findings regarding spatial use that can be of guidance for future co-living design processes.


Paper 47

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 47, 2020.

Architectural adaptation to existing living communities of asylum seekers: The case of Mexico S.M. MAITEH1 , C. LU1 , T. ZHAO1 , E.S. ZOLTÁN2 , J. GYERGYÁK2 , Á. BORSOS2 1

Marcel Breuer Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: asylum community living, collective living, resilient community A humanitarian crisis along the borders of US-Mexico escalated in the past years and almost 20000 people are waiting on the street of Mexico. Asylum seekers are living in inhumane living conditions in migrant camps, facing systematic discrimination and continually increasing crime rate. This research aims to propose a liveable community for asylum seekers through enhancing the design of existing transitional urban border spaces, such as Eagle Pass–Piedras Negras International Bridge. The research is concentrating on contextual research and community-based living scenarios, proposing a design of an immigrant respite centre that functions as a temporary accommodation facility for 1500 asylum seekers - over a pedestrian vehicular border bridge. The proposed design model helps to solve the consequences of displaced people by using creative architectural and urban solutions, that provides an affordable, safe and secure community that proffers supportive community features which endorse personal independence of asylum seekers and foster residents to engage in the community’s social life.


Paper 48

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 48, 2020.

Sensing and mapping the city: Szigony utca, Budapest B. BENE, M. BENKŐ Csonka Pál Doctoral School, Department of Urban Planning and Design, Faculty of Architecture, BME, Hungary

Keywords: urbanism; Budapest, society, sensing, diversity “Architecture is the will of an epoch translated into space.” Mies van der Rohe The society - and thus its architecture of the 8th District, Budapest is divers. This diversity was present many, many years ago and obviously has changed since then - but has not lost out, moreover, it has grown with new elements. Analysing buildings and houses, perhaps we can consider Mies van der Rohe’s statement that those buildings do not want to be more or less, just as much as the spatial (materialized) manifesto of its society. But what if we look at the built environment in a broader sense? We want to understand not only an independent building, but a street, a neighbourhood, a city. In such cases, the will of different epochs prevails at the same time - sometimes as equal partners, sometimes in a subordinate relationship, sometimes in chaos, sometimes in order. The wills of different eras are organized into a common system of inertia which determines the will of today’s epoch. The research focuses on the social will of different epochs reflecting by actual facades and the public spaces, their shape, and usage along the really heterogeneous Szigony Street in Budapest. Based on the dramatically and fastly changing reality of this neighbourhood, several questions come to the front. What would be called the will of our present society? Could an architect, planner, or landscape architect aware of it? Could the will of the future local users of the street be determined? Is it possible to plan the future of a street?


Paper 49

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 49, 2020.

Urban regeneration scenarios: Strategies for industrial brownfields redevelopment Q.C. HE, A. REITH Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: Brownfield redevelopment, urban regeneration, adaptive reuse, economic function, environment remediation As a special product of the industrial age, brownfield has been restricting the realization of urban sustainable development. It has been regarded by many urban designers as an underlying resource for urban regeneration, which holds potential to generate environmental, economic and social values when reintegrated into urban setting; for instance, alleviating the land shortage of urban expansion, enhancing aesthetic quality of surrounding environment, increasing job opportunities and conserving industrial heritage, etc. This study is concerned with the strategies of urban industrial brownfields redevelopment and the ways to reintegrate them into urban fabric. The strategies are explored from environmental, social and economic aspects. Environment remediation contains removal of pollutants, preserving original vegetation and restoring the ecological functions. Adaptive reuse is the most sustainable behaviour of reutilization, which built on maximum protection of built resources, minimizing materials consumption and maintaining site identification. In addition, adaptive reuse requires the site to restore its productive environment with flexibility based on the needs of neighbourhood urban development. Lastly, the original productive environment is restored by adding economic functions, but the combination of innovation is needed making the site to have the flexibility to cope with any social and economic changes.


Paper 50

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 50, 2020.

Architecture site preservation and display from a visual narrative perspective: Case study of the Long Wang Jian site at Wuhan in the middle of China C. KUN1,2 , K. KOVÁCS-ANDOR1 1 2

Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology,University of Pécs, Hungary Hu Bei University, China

Keywords: stone architecture site, Long Wang Jian site, visual narrative perspective, cultural significance In the section of architecture site preservation and display from a visual narrative perspective focuses on “Walls” as a construction form. The reason is that elements of ruins left over at a site are walls at most; and walls can form different types of space by enclosure. Architecture is a subject investigating buildings and their environment and the core of it is the research on space. As for architectural narratology, it aims at analyzing, interpreting and creating buildings by selecting narratology as an alternative method, so that strategy and relevance among intrinsic element attributes, space structures and semantic orders of buildings can be reexamined. In other words, architecture is translated into another possible language system for the purpose of effectively constructing social and cultural significance of buildings. The Long Wang Jian site which has a history of 400 years, is a stone plate built to build the wall. Mulan stone is an intangible cultural heritage in Hubei Province, and this cultural heritage is also on the verge of extinction. The Long Wang Jian site has well preserved this technique. It is basically stone dry laying masonry, showing a very rich functional layout. Based on point cloud mapping and manual mapping that is unique, typical and representative functional layout is of great significance to the study of the military, political, cultural, artistic and folk customs of the Ming and Qing Dynasties.


Figure 50.1: Long wang jian Site and restoration Design


Paper 51

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 51, 2020.

Renovation of research strategies on conservation and development of Qingdao historic district T. HU School of Architecture, Central Academy of Fine Arts, China

Keywords: historic district, protection, development, value orientation, innovation, technology, management, critical, strategy update In recent years, the process of urban development in China has entered the stage of incremental transformation to stock. This paper studies the concept and method of the protection and development of Qingdao historical blocks as a concrete response to the urbanization development and the construction of smart cities in China at the present stage. By reading and sorting out the literature on the protection and development of Qingdao historical blocks in recent years and combining with the materials obtained from practical tests, the core value of Qingdao historical blocks is firstly clarified, and the existing literature are analyzed in accordance with the requirements of the times and the deficiencies of current practice, so as to provide new ideas of criticism and repair. Finally, the conclusion is drawn that the theory of the current situation of the protection and development of Qingdao historical block should not only reflect on the rationality of its own value orientation, but also actively introduce new technology and innovative management mechanism, so as to scientifically innovate its methodology.


Paper 52

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 52, 2020.

Heritage and innovation: Research on the design of new residence in Yi township, China F.X. MENG1 , T. WANG2 1

Breuer Marcel Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 School of Architecture, Central Academy of Fine Arts, China

Keywords: Yi township, traditional residence, cultural heritage, innovation, residential design At present, there is a large gap in the quality of human settlements between cities and villages in China. There is a serious loss of rural population, and traditional houses are old and dilapidated. Under the background of the national rural revitalization policy, the production and lifestyle of the Yi ethnic area has gradually changed from traditional farming to a compound model of rural tourism. The diverse needs have prompted traditional houses to be upgraded and developed urgently. This paper takes the construction of a new village in Lifang Village, Chuxiong, Yunnan, Yi Township, China as an example, and fully studies the functional space, structural form, planning layout, decorative colors, traditional materials, etc. of traditional houses, and combines the new features of indigenous family structure, production and lifestyle, and rural tourism. Through new village planning, innovating residential design, exploring the contemporary reconstruction of traditional culture, ethnic elements, and lifestyle, trying to establish a construction model that meets current development needs and cyclic adaptation, in order to provide a reference for the design practice of new residence in Yi Township.

Figure 52.1: Aerial view of Li Fang Village planning and design


Paper 53

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 53, 2020.

Practical tricks of making heritage place inventory through the example of the Museum of Applied Arts K. SEIDL Breuer Marcell Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: built heritage, heritage place inventory, heritage protection, monuments A well-prepared heritage place inventory is a guideline which helps the architect while renovate a monument. The document draws attention to the building’s truly important and retained elements, it can help to put the focus on the essential parts, as well as it gives an image about the condition of the items. The inventory of the elements based on two layers of research. The production of the document is preceded by thoughtful preparation. Finding and studying the original plans is the base of the process, which also includes drawings and descriptions of individual details and decorations. The second step is on-site research, during which everything should be counted and systematized – if it is possible. Considering these two steps it is worth drawing conclusions as well, because real treasures can be hidden in places what are invisible to the eyes. I want to demonstrate a method of a heritage place inventory through the example of the Museum of Applied Arts.


Paper 54

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 54, 2020.

Renewal project of an old community based on the symbiosis concept: A case study on Feng Ye Shan community renewal in Huang Shi city H.W. PAN, Á. HUTTER 1

Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: Feng Ye Shan Community, renewal strategy, symbiosis theory The concept and technology of old community renewal projects had matured in many metropolises in China. The pace of communities’ renovation is accelerating year by year in those cities. At the same time, many small and medium-sized cities in China have also begun to speed up the pace of renovation projects for old communities. First, the renewal process of the Feng Ye Shan community will be discussed in this report, besides some common problems and renewal measures under the concept of symbiosis also will be discussed in this paper. The remodeling project of the Feng Ye Shan community is taken as the research object, which includes carrying out a field research under the guidance of the “symbiosis” theory and according to the design and renewal strategies to improve the residents’ life quality and the landscape environment of community. Moreover, the renewal measures under the concept of symbiosis are put forward. In the end, this essay offers some remodeling measures for old communities to improve residents’ life qualities and achieve the harmony of the city and the community.


Paper 55

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 55, 2020.

Criteria for successful and livable city in Jordan, based on the traditional city of Salt as a case study S.J. ALAMOUSH, A.T. KERTÉSZ, T. KATONA Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: successful cities, livable cities, walkable, heritage cities Livability of the city is through a good planning by providing a vibrant, attractive, walkable and secure environment for people to live, work and play. At the same time livable successful cities it’s a place that have a strong and locally distinctive identity that reflect the heritage and culture in their built form. This research focuses on the factors of livable successful cities in Jordan, taking a heritage city of Salt as a case study, by connecting the factors of livable cities with the physical elements which can be under three main categories: landscape, building and street linkage. As Jordan cities currently are losing a great part of its heritage due to the rapid development, demolition in the name of progress, vandalism and misuse. Most planning projects have been conducted without a clear reference or benchmark to guide practice.


Paper 56

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 56, 2020.

Digital nomad-conqueror-settler Z. ZRENA, B. KÓSA, T. KONDOR Breuer Marcell Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: architecture, digitalism, digital nomad, pandemia, rural areas, working spaces Urbanization is constantly emptying the rural areas in our country , not only in population but also in architectural quality from the middle of the 20th century. In addition, our cities will be overcrowded, as the spatial extent of their growth cannot be achieved by pushing their borders farther and farther. We often pay with our private lives for well-paying jobs, community experiences, sparkling life, what we didn’t even notice until 2020. However, the direction of progress becomes questionable by coronavirus pandemic quarantine mode, because we can not take advantage the indisputable benefits of cities or we have to reorganize them into the virtual space because of pandemia. It has been shown that digitalism is already so advanced that certain occupations can be done online even in long term. Digital nomads have realized this possibility for half a decade, but now wide strata had to take advantage of this opportunity out of compulsion. However, it offers new opportunities in the future, because the rural areas will be in a better position by the possibility of digital employment, and the old benefits of cities are available from anywhere in the online space and their expansion is expected in the future. Why could not digital nomads, conquerors or settlers appear in the rural areas of the future? What are their potential needs for their living and working spaces? Why can our rural architecture improve in this situation? How can we incorporate these new needs into our vernacular architectural values, how could it be a worthy continuation?


Paper 57

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 57, 2020.

Earthen heritage architecture as sustainable refugee shelters: A case study of the domes of northern Syria S. IBRAHIM, M. ALI, B. BARANYAI, I. KISTELEGDI Breuer Marcel Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, Szentágothai Research Centre, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: earthen heritage domes, corbelled domes, refugee shelter, energy analysis, numerical thermal simulations, comfort Syria has been struggling through a continuous conflict for more than nine years so far. This conflict has had a disastrous consequence, for not only Syrian urban areas but also its world heritage and historical sites. Moreover, the ongoing conflict resulted in the displacement of over 13 million people that is more than half the population; including more than 6.1 million internally displaced. This long-term encampment is a growing aspect of a growing refugee crisis. The Syrian refugees have to face another crisis in the camps due to a significant shortage of resources and support. One solution was using earthen buildings that have been a traditional architectural style in Syria for 11 thousand years. As a part of the cultural heritage, it depends on community participation and achieves environmental and economic efficiency in addition to preserving memory and identity of the place. This paper discusses the creation of sustainable shelters through the revival of heritage vernacular earthen architecture in northern Syria. A comparative analysis was conducted between the humanitarian agencies shelters (HAS) and different historical vernacular dwellings (HDS) from the same region with an arid steppe climate (hot summer and a short cold winter). They were modelled in a numerical thermal simulation framework as a means to assess the shelters’ building energy demand and indoor comfort quality. The comparison resulted in the superiority of the heritage dwelling. The paper is concluded with passive approach optimization to the different historical earthen domes with consideration of the historical characteristics and background.


Figure 57.1: Earthen heritage domes in Syria


Paper 58

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 58, 2020.

Regenerative architecture in Kosovo B. JAGXHIU1 , F. BEJTULLAHU2 1

Faculty of Construction Engineering and Infrastructure, University for Business and Technology, Kosovo 2 Faculty of Architecture and Spatial Planning, University for Business and Technology, Kosovo

Keywords: regenerative architecture, Kosovo, environment, inhabitants Kosovo, as a country in transition, has undergone rapid urbanization, where the highest percentage of buildings are designed and built specifically for the circumstances and needs of the moment regardless of environmental conditions, ecology, or the needs and activities of residents. Architecture in Kosovo, in general, is quite static, not interacting with the inhabitants and the surrounding urban environment. Therefore, this concept of traditional architecture should replace with new concepts of regenerative architecture, where the architecture should interact with the environment and its inhabitants. This research aims to promote the regenerative architecture in Kosovo. It discusses the principles of the built environment design, aimed at achieving a regenerative architecture.


Paper 59

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 59, 2020.

Resilient design of vernacular educational community center in the Philippines: An investigation in recovery after natural disasters S. IBRAHIM1,2 , D. KASSAM3 , T. MOLNÁR4 , I. KISTELEGDI1,5 1

Energia Design Building Technology Research Group, Szentágothai Research Centre, Pécs, Hungary Marcel Breuer Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 3 Architectural Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, International University for Science & Technology, Syria 4 Department of Visual Studies, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 5 Department of Building Constructions and Energy Design, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2

Keywords: sustainability, SDGs, passive design, risk reduction, building resilience, bunker An accrescent trend in the phenomenon of natural disasters is expecting that climate change will increase the destructive results of disasters. The severity and recurrence of climate-related extreme events make it critical that buildings after disasters should be recognized through the lens of reducing risk and building resilience, rather than a reaction to the event. Moreover, it is a challenge for designers and planners to create a built environment that is resilient for disasters as millions of lives are in danger. Therefore, the paper introduces a sustainable design of an (academic- social) centre. The new design archives a balance between creating its own identity, providing a flexible space for students, and interactive gathering space for communities recovering from a disaster. The design transforms the school from a traditional learning space into an inviting resilient and flexible space that corresponds with the vulnerable post-disaster environment. The designed simple modular prototype achieved resilience by four criteria; reducing the initial damage to the building, using passive design principles to increase building resilience, reducing the risk for people by implementing a bunker, and the flexibility in the modular design to be replicated and reused with different functions. The passive design principles reflected the community adaptable techniques like natural ventilation, daylighting, using local materials (local bamboo) and flexible walls to create courtyards and open spaces. In vernacular areas, there is a shortage of building materials and public services, so the academic community centre is able to create the connection and transition point between relief phase and post-disaster development phase and be the first project to start recovery. In addition, the strategies and the adaptive design principles of the prototype can be applied in post-disaster design approaches to ensure high resilience ability after a disaster.

Acknowledgments The first and second author would like to thank Dr. Ivan Shumkov for an informative and insightful course. The first and second author would like to thank Open Online Academy, New York Architecture for Humanity and Manila Harvard Architectural and Urban Society_Alumni for organizing the course and the competition.


Figure 59.1: The modular prototype


Paper 60

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 60, 2020.

A parametric design approach for post-disaster settlements S.M. MAITEH, E.S. ZOLTÁN Marcel Breuer Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs

Keywords: parametric design, post-disaster, settlement The after effects of climate change, environmental pollution, natural disasters, violent conflicts are leaving more than 70 million people forcibly-displaced. Displaced people on borders are in great need for essential needs as housing both immediate temporary and long-term shelters. Existing systems are failing to keep up with the increasing numbers of newly displaced people. The design of settlements is an indisputable phase of establishing post-disaster settlements, design layout has numerous impacts on refugees and host communities while creating comprehensive solutions require analyzing massive date in a short period. The traditional design process becomes an incompetent tool that results in producing inhuman living conditions. Instant response and reliable design can eliminate design errors, decrease design period and control design parameters. This research paper aims to address the importance of developing parametric and generative design tools that focus on the needs of displaced people and propose new design paradigms that provide a systematic design process with reliable outcomes.


Paper 61

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 61, 2020.

Lightweight post disaster shelter made of membrane and wood A. GUEROUI, M. HALADA Marcel Breuer Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and information technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: Accumoli earthquake, membrane, wood, lightweight, shelter Central Italy mainly the village of Accumoli has been hit by numerous earthquakes since 24 August 2016 which caused life loss, destroyed buildings with huge numbers of homeless people. In response, the Italian government provided tents as emergency relief for people who lost their homes, but these tents are not suitable for all months of the year, especially that the village is located in the mountain and people will be exposed to the weather conditions (snow, rain, cold) which means that they are not appropriate for long residence. Now, four years after the earthquake, the village has not yet been reconstructed, and even the rubble of the houses has not been removed from the site. The significance of this research is to consider all the aspects and provide some scenarios to develop novel solutions that are cheap, environmentally friendly, and lightweight structures that can be transported and assembled easily by using wood and membrane materials in order to provide housing in Accumoli for the existing population in a new settlement next to the destroyed village. Theses proposed design projects are part of the consortium of the “Scuola di Ricostruzione di Accumoli”.


Paper 62

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 62, 2020.

Architectural design for people with dementia: Case study analysis and literature review F. MARX, D. RÉTFALVI Marcel Breuer Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: architectural design, people with dementia, built environment The aging of world population is seen as one of the greatest social accomplishments of the 20th Century. Demographic change is an important issue in many regions in Europe, the increase of life expectancy and a constantly low birth rate are the main causes of aging societies. There are a high number of active elderly people with preserved functional capacity, but there is also a prevalence rate of patients with chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. People with this illness are extremely limited in their daily competence and need an increasing support for their daily life. In the architecture field, it is necessary to create and develop appropriate infrastructure that includes alternative environments for healthcare with a greater concern regarding the needs and expectations of people with dementia which it could improve their well-being and increase their ability to be more independent and self-confident. The main objective of the study is to identify and analyze architectural design aspects adopted in order to enhance the quality of life and well-being of people living with dementia in a building. For the study it was analyzed well-known case studies and a literature review. As a result, humanized spaces, way finding, plan layout, materials, colors and contrast were among the aspects that should be taken into consideration while designing specifically for people with dementia. This knowledge is fundamental to understand the needs, expectations and difficulties of occupants with dementia in the physical environment.


Paper 63

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 63, 2020.

Evaluation and optimization of community-level medical and health facilities in Wuhan under the regular epidemic prevention K. TU1,2 , A. REITH1,3 1

Marcell Breuer Doctoral School of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Faculty of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Environment, Hubei University of Technology Wuhan, China 3 Advanced Building and Urban Design, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: COVID-19, medical and health facilities, Wuhan With the global outbreak of COVID-19, public health is back at the top of the list of concerns for all cities. As the direct department responsible for public health in the city, medical and health facilities construction and service level have been fully manifested in the epidemic situation. Cities with complete medical facilities and efficient diagnosis and treatment systems have fared well in the epidemic, while those facing a run on medical resources have suffered. The regular epidemic prevention and control in the “post-COVID-19” period requires all cities to re-examine the construction of their medical and health facilities. Taking Wuhan city as an example, POI data analysis, Kernel density analysis, Standard deviation ellipse method and field investigation were used to analyze the number, the system and the layout of its community-level medical and health facilities. It was found that there were spatial differences in its service coverage level and it was inefficient in integrating with the overall medical system, which made it unable to meet the requirements of regular epidemic prevention. On this basis, some planning suggestions are put forward, such as establishing hierarchical medical system, optimizing the allocation of medical resources, and formulating emergency response and reconstruction measures for public health. In this way, the city’s defense system can be optimized in responding to emergent event of public health, providing positive implications for other cities around the world.


Paper 64

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 64, 2020.

COVID-19 and recent trends in educational services: Case study in Egypt A.H. ABDEL WAHID, A.N. ABDEL HAKIM, A.M.R. ELHADAD Urban Planning, Al Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt

Keywords: COVID-19, educational institutions, educational services, theoretical axis, analytical axis COVID-19 has a significant effect on all walks of life, and among the most important of these sectors is the education sector. All educational institutions around the world were closed, which caused a major defect in the planning and architectural rates of educational services. Thus, other alternatives were sought to overcome this ordeal and provide service. For students, it has been completely dependent on modern trends in education. Given that the governments of some Western countries were using these modern trends in education, and an integrated infrastructure of information technology was available with them, the situation was quickly remedied. On the other hand in some Arab countries, there was a big gap and it took some time. To bridge the gap, governments should adapt and peoples should deal with these trends, whether via distance education, self-education, or home education. The research follows two axes: the theoretical axis with the aim of studying the experiences of countries in the methods of providing educational service before and after the emergence of the COVID-19, and monitoring the changes that occurred in the planning and architectural rates currently used in educational services. While the analytical axis aims to analyze the planning and architectural rates of educational services followed before and after the spread of the COVID-19.


Civil engineering


Paper 65

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 65, 2020.

Optimization of drilling performance using various metaheuristics S. ALSAMIA1 , D.S. IBRAHIM2 , H.N. GHAFIL3 1

Department of Civil Engineering, University of Kufa, Iraq Petroleum and Natural Gas Institute, Faculty of Earth Science and Engineering, University of Miskolc, Hungary 3 Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, University of Miskolc, Hungary 2

Keywords: optimization algorithms, formation rocks, penetration rate, drilling performance, dynamic differential annealed optimization Many works have conducted the reduction of the cost of the drilling wells, and this operation depends on many parameters related to the bit as well as the field properties. The most crucial function in drilling wells is the rate of penetration (ROP) which is modelled by many researchers, and the best one is Young-Bourgyen model which is used in this study. ROP is pointed from the field and research experts and depends on several variables such as properties of rock formation, bit type and size, weight on bit, rotation speed, rheology of drilling fluid, hydraulic system, and depth of the formation. Nine factors affecting ROP have been studied and approved in developing a mathematical equation that shows the combined effects of these variables on ROP optimization. This paper presents an efficient way to find the optimum values for parameters of the YoungBourgyen model using metaheuristic algorithms. An actual drilling data was used from Khangiran field to calculate the difference between the actual penetration rate and the predicted one by particle swarm optimization (PSO). Also, the predicted penetration rate from PSO was compared with another work used genetic algorithm (GA) to find (ROP). Remarkably, PSO has predicted a rate of penetration that coincide precisely with the actual RPO from the field. Also, PSO has overcome GA in the prediction rate of penetration, and GA has returned values far from the real data from the field. While ROP is a nonlinear function, it is worth to use it as a benchmark for different optimization algorithms. PSO was compared on ROP with other optimizers namely, dynamic differential annealing optimization, artificial bee colony, gray wolf optimization, harris hawks optimization, flower pollination algorithm, firefly algorithm, whale optimization algorithm, and sine cosine algorithm.

Acknowledgments The research was supported by the Hungarian National Research, Development and Innovation Office - NKFIH under the project number K 134358.


Paper 66

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 66, 2020.

DEM modeling of crushable grain material under different loading condition M.A. BENMEBAREK, M.R. MOVAHEDI Széchenyi István University, Hungary

Keywords: grain breakage, micro-grains, macro-grain, DEM simulation, fragmentation patterns Crushing mechanisms in granular materials are important processes for many geotechnical engineering applications. Under high stresses, grain breakage alters the grain size distribution and is usually accompanied by a reduction of the void space in the grain skeleton. The mechanisms of grain fragmentation are complex and depend closely on the stresses transmitted through particle contacts. In this study, a three-dimensional discrete element method (DEM) model, using the particle flow code (PFC3D), is proposed to investigate the effect of particle contacts on the fragmentation of a single cylindrical macro-grain. For this purpose, to check the validity of the proposed model, we perform some Brazilian Tests on discs made of artificially crushable material. Then the DEM model is calibrated based on the experimental results. In DEM model a 3D crushable granular material is built up from a large number of micro-grains which are connected according to crushable parallel bond properties. The forcedisplacement curve from model results agrees qualitatively well with the laboratory test data. Also, the damage profile right at the point when the force-displacement curve reaches its maximum was seen to replicate the same crack patterns observed in our Brazilian test experiments. This satisfactory agreement between experiments and numerical results suggests that the proposed DEM approach can be used to investigate the behaviour of the single crushable grains. The response of the single crushable macro-grains for different contact number, location and shape of the contact points are investigated. The DEM simulation results show that the type of contact configuration and load position can influence the fragmentation patterns and the loading capacity.


Paper 67

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 67, 2020.

Numerical study on the influence of imperfections in the buckling resistance of steel beam-columns with welded class 4 cross-section at elevated temperatures S. NEMER, F. PAPP Department of Structural and Geotechnical Engineering, Faculty of Architecture, Civil Engineering and Transport sciences, Széchenyi István University, Hungary

Keywords: steel, fire design, finite element analysis, imperfections, residual stress This paper presents an investigation on the influence of structural imperfections on the ultimate load capacity of steel welded beam-columns with class 4 cross-section under elevated temperatures. This is done by considering different amplitudes for the global and local (plate) imperfections, and different residual stresses distributions available in the literature. To this purpose, a geometrically and materially non-linear finite element model using ABAQUS software has been used to determine the buckling resistance of a steel welded beam-column at elevated temperatures, using the material properties of EN1993-1-2. The imperfection sensitivity of beam-columns is reported: the influences of the amplitudes of the geometric imperfection and the patterns of the residual stress on the load capacity are compared.


Paper 68

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 68, 2020.

Towards green concrete and sustainable construction for better environment S. KASHKASH1 , Z. ORBÁN2 1

Breuer Marcel Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Department of Civil Engineering, Institute of Engineering and Smart Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: green concrete, sustainable construction, recycled materials Concrete is the most used construction material worldwide. Thus, it has a high environmental impact concerning its raw materials, especially cement production, which considered as a significant source of CO2 emissions. Besides that, construction and demolished waste forms around 30% of the total solid wastes. These facts have increased the research efforts to reduce the negative impact of the construction industry on the environment. Turning waste materials into valuable raw materials to produce green concrete reserves the natural resources from depletion and reduces the numbers of landfills. Different types of waste materials (crushed glass, recycled aggregate, and fine rubber debris from worn tiers), and industrial by-products (Blast Furnace Slag) were used in previous experiments as replacement of natural aggregates. This report was carried out to evaluate the different alternatives from the environmental point of view with considering the mechanical and physical properties of concrete.


Paper 69

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 69, 2020.

Effect of supplementary materials on transport properties of cementitious materials Z.A. ABDULHUSSEIN, K. KOPECSKÓ Department of Engineering Geology and Geotechnics, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Budapest University of Technology and Economics BME, Hungary

Keywords: supplementary cementation material (SCMs), cementitious materials, transport properties, chloride diffusion coefficient Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) have many beneficial properties and can reduce the amount of cement used (clinker) and reduce the carbon footprint of the cement industry, such as fly ash, slag, silica fume, and metakaolin and other natural pozzolans. The SCMs have a significant impact on the ability of concrete to resist the penetration of chloride ions. This benefit is largely ascribed to the refined pore structure that results from the appropriate use of SCMs, which, in turn, results in reduced permeability and ionic diffusivity. Chlorides are well-known as aggressive species for rebars of RC structures. Thus, one of the most important factors influencing the durability of reinforced concrete structures is the penetration of chloride ions up to the steel reinforcement. The transport of chloride is a very complex phenomenon potentially involving different mechanisms, including permeation, diffusion, and absorption. Depending on the conditions, transport of chloride may be driven by one mechanism or a combination of these three mechanisms. The permeation is very important for concrete structures underwater like offshore structures. This research focuses on the influence of supplementary cementitious materials on the cement mixture under the effect of the ion chloride permeability and aims to determine the optimum relationship between supplementary cementitious materials and aggregate types and dosages, as well as the transport properties of concrete. The investigation of the concrete resistance to the penetration of chloride ions will be implemented with different water to mixture ratio and different air contents by using short-term chloride diffusion (rapid non-steady state) in comparison to results obtained with different methods. The mixtures included Portland cement meet the requirements with various replacement levels of SCMs including ternary blends. It is expected that the research will yield new scientific results as well as proposals for the industrial application of various auxiliary materials by studying the transport process of chloride ions to the concrete and penetration resistance of concrete under the effect of different types and levels content of the SCMs and implement the latest methods of chloride penetration results in the literature to develop a research topic.


Paper 70

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 70, 2020.

Optimization of geopolymer concrete using industrial waste A.A. KHALAF, K. KOPECSKÓ Department of Engineering Geology and Geotechnics, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Budapest University of Technology and Economics BME, Hungary

Keywords: geopolymer concrete, industrial waste, controlling factors The production of cement is considered one of the highest contributions of the emission of CO2 . It is reported that one ton of cement production emits about one ton of CO2 gas. Thus, seeking alternatives to replace cement has been the primary concern in the construction field to contribute the production of environmentally friendly construction materials. Since Davidovits introduced the term of geopolymer, extensive research has been conducted. However, geopolymer concrete is still under investigation to evaluate and optimize the mechanical and physical properties of being comparative to conventional concrete properties. Interestingly, there have been some industrial waste materials, which are classified as geopolymer precursors. Therefore, utilizing geopolymers in the construction industry will help to build a sustainable environment. The aim of our research study is to come up with the best combination of the controlling factors that govern the mechanical and physical properties of geopolymer concrete by utilizing industrial waste. In this paper, a review study on the controlling factors has been conducted. The purpose is to identify and select the controlling factors namely chemical composition, alkali activation solution, water content, and curing condition. These factors are analyzed to the mix proportion components such as binder content, sodium hydroxide molarity, sodium silicate to sodium hydroxide ratio, alkali activation solution to binder ratio, water to geopolymer solid ratio, curing temperature, curing duration. The effect of aggregate has been taken into account by applying the absolute volume method in mixture design. Not to mention, the addition of superplasticizer has been also considered. Based on the results of the planned study, it is expected to determine the optimal mix proposition of setting time, workability, compressive strength, and hardened density. Experiments will be conducted with the selected controlling factors. The controlling factors will be selected in different levels. The number of experiments will be determined by design of experiments.

Acknowledgments Stipendium Hungaricum Scholarship Programme is highly acknowledged for supporting the PhD study and research work.


Paper 71

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 71, 2020.

Using steel fibre in concrete types, methods for improving the properties of recycled aggregate concretes and multiple recycled aggregate M. SHMLLS, T. HORVÁTH Department of Architecture and Building Construction, Széchenyi István University, Hungary

Keywords: recycled coarse aggregate, steel fibre, silica fume, fly ash, multiple recycled aggregate concrete (MRAC) If all concrete is to be recycled in a future scenario, recycled concrete will be needed. It is nevertheless understood that concrete recycling causes loss of properties, which is not accurate, the truth with all the mixtures. This paper shows a kind of comprehensive knowledge of using steel fibres with concrete and the ability to recycle the concrete. In addition, it includes a summary of multiple recycling aggregate concrete (MRAC) of previous studies. Results showed that adding the steel fibres caused a positive effect on the compressive and flexural strength, toughness, and fewer cracks on the surface. In (RAC) air content increased from 3.8% to 9.8% after adding steel fibre. The RA’s (Recycled aggregate) replacement ratio has a low effect on carbonate strength, freeze-thaw resistance and SFRCAC (steel fibre recycling coarse aggregate concrete) anti-chloride permeability with the same compressive strength and steel fibre volume fraction. The paper also shows that the coupling effect of steel fibre and silica fume (10%) on RAC (Recycling aggregate concrete) can lead to a future structural material with less crack in the RAC, reduction in the water permeability, increasing in both compressive strength and flexural strength. The fly ash (15%) increased the compressive strength of RAC at the age of 90 and 270 days. In addition the second generation of concrete also can be useable in the future, if its properties are improved with unprocessed materials.


Paper 72

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 72, 2020.

Expected impact of climate change on the physical properties and load-bearing capacity of timber structures M. KHERAIS, A. CSÉBFALVI, A. LEN Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: climate change, temperature, humidity, moisture content, timber, heritage In the last twenty years the climate change has become an important problem with social and economic impact. Sadly, there are plenty of events - such as the heat wave which crossed Europe in 2003, increasing sea level, floods and heavy rainfalls - that evidence the risks that the climate-change carries on our own lives. Various research groups are committed to find the causes and consequences of the high-impact weather events. Architects and structural engineers study these changes as well, because they have serious influence on the building construction materials. One of the most important and oldest building material used by humans is the timber which has been used in bridges, churches and different heritage sites. Since the timber is a natural material originating from the forests, it has a direct interaction with the climate factors which play a significant role in the mechanical and physical properties of the timber. As a consequence of the climate - thus the climate-change – characteristics, like strength, stiffness, hardness, shrinkage, and appearance etc. show are also changing. Some of these properties are directly related to the moisture content of the wooden cells, which is also related to the main climate factors temperature and humidity percentage in air. The changing in the moisture content leads to undesired effects on the structural properties, which will cause different types of failures like cracks, high deformation values, appearance of biologically active compounds. In order to protect these structures we need to understand the nature of these changes and setup a series of methods without damaging the cultural heritage sites in order to be able to predict and prevent irreversible processes.

Acknowledgments This research was supported by “The Stipendium Hungaricum scholarship program of the Hungarian Government.”


Paper 73

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 73, 2020.

Modeling the early- and latewood growth rings as orthotropic material for FE-calculation of Norway spruce timber beams using the rule of mixture T. KIRÁLY1 , R. POLGÁR2 , A. KRISZTIÁN1 1 2

Institute for Applied Mechanics and Structures, University of West Hungary, Hungary Universitas Fidelissima Kft., University of West Hungary

Keywords: Norway spruce (picea abies), finite element method (FEM), 4-point bending test, early- and latewood, orthotropic material, rule of mixture (ROM), statistical evaluation, HSV color spectrum The purpose of this research is to determine the material properties of the Norway spruce (picea abies) with 4-point bending tests performed on timber beams and to develop a finite element modeling technique that, when applied to an individual specimen, can properly predict the outcome of the measurement results (i.e. deflection or warping by a predefined loading) by simulation only. The research is based on performing 4-point bending tests on Norway spruce timber beams with dimensions of 20x20x400 mm and 40x40x800 mm. For the evaluation of the measurement results the weight of the specimens, the force-displacement diagrams and pictures of their end-grain were taken into account. The timber beams are examined at the macro level. Hence, for the development of the finite element models, the main geometrical features of the specimens and their unique annual ring patterns are considered. The HSV color spectrum of the pictures of the end-grain patterns are analyzed with a photo analytical algorithm in order to separate the phases (early- and latewood). This procedure makes it possible to determine the surface ratio of the early- and latewood, which ratio is used to hypothesize that the volume and surface ratios of the earlyand latewood are equal. For the finite element calculations an orthotropic material model is used, in which the material properties of early- and latewood are distinguished. For the exact description of the wood as an orthotropic material, the rule of mixture typically considered for fiber-reinforced materials is used. The constants of the orthotropic material model are determined by 4-point bending tests performed for this research, and by using and modifying the relationships between the material constants of the early- and latewood determined empirically in existing researches. The effect of the 9 orthotropic material constants per phase on the deflection of timber beams is analyzed based on the Pareto principle by using specimens with different alignment of growth rings in the cross-section. This study shows that the longitudinal elastic modulus can be determined with high accuracy, while the longitudinal-transverse as well as the longitudinalradial shear moduli can be determined much less accurately by the performed 4-point bending tests only. Additional tensile and torsional tests are required to precisely determine the remaining orthotropic material constants.


Figure 73.1: a.) Obtaining a FE-mesh from a picture of the end grain, b.) some generated FE models of the timber beams


Paper 74

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 74, 2020.

Three-phase comparative modeling to identify critical infrastructure by analyzing the operational risk of rail transport: Case study of Iran railway A. TAHERI1 , M. KAZEMIAN2 , F. ASTARAKI3 , M.M. RAD3 1

Shahroud Azad University, Iran Iran Railways Company, General Administration of Khorasan Railway, Iran 3 Széchenyi István University, Hungary 2

Keywords: critical infrastructure, risk analysis, crisis management, railway transport In this paper, the critical infrastructure identification process is studied in three phases: fivestage identification, three-stage security risk assessment, and critical infrastructure identification, operational plan development and planning. A two-stage operation, emphasizing one of the critical infrastructures, describes the rail transportation industry. In order to implement the steps of the third phase, a four-level model of crisis management was described, including normal operations to the recognition of a crisis that leads to the activation of the crisis management program. By collecting and interpreting the results of the questionnaires, the operational risks of rail transportation were identified as an important element of the crisis management program of railway infrastructure. It should be clarified that the outcomes obtained which were based on the opinions of managers and engineers in the field of railway transportation resulted in the identification of 52 risk factors with higher RPN (Risk Priority Number) among 219 identified risk.


Paper 75

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 75, 2020.

Comparison of railway lines located in different regions of Poland with regard to their use in freight transport W. KAMIŃSKI Department of Logistics and Transport Technologies, Faculty of Transport and Aviation Engineering, Silesian University of Technology, Poland

Keywords: railway transport, freight transport, multi-criteria analysis The volume of freight transport on a railway line depends mainly on the location of large plants, that can send full train shipments, close to it. This study considers factors such as the number of sidings (both station and route) and the occurrence of transit traffic and presents a comparison of selected railway lines in terms of their use in freight transport. For calculations, weights of individual factors determined earlier using partial correlation coefficients were used. Then, multi-criteria analysis methods were used, such as the zero unitarization method and the TOPSIS method. 32 railway lines located in different regions of Poland were analyzed, one main line and one local line were selected from each voivodship. The analyzed railway lines are in different technical condition and have different speed limits. The comparison made it possible to arrange the selected railway lines in the order from the most to the least useful in freight transport. In addition, the obtained results showed that the zero unitarization method allows comparing lines only on which transit traffic is carried out or only lines without transit traffic. The comparison of all lines is possible using the TOPSIS method, however, the obtained ratings for lines without transit traffic are slightly lower than for lines on which transit traffic is carried out.


Paper 76

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 76, 2020.

Analysis of traffic accidents in Hungary using stochastic modeling A. GHADA, L. KISGYÖRGY Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Highway and Railway Engineering, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary

Keywords: neural networks, traffic accidents, Principal Component Analysis Traffic accidents are considered as random events, making their prediction one of the most heated debates in transportation research. Therefore, it is crucial to develop prediction models capable of providing surrogate precautionary measures to avoid the high cost of accidents. The ability and accuracy of accident prediction model relies heavily on the set of explanatory factors utilized in the model. Also, considering new approaches and techniques to predict unsafe behavior, detect high risk locations. This research effort presents an analysis of the traffic accidents in Hungary during the years 2015 to 2019. During this period 9171 accidents records have been processed, cleaned and coded to perform dimension reduction techniques i.e Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to determine the significance of each factor. These factors are elaborated in stochastic model framework for traffic safety analysis purposes in Hungary. This paper also highlights some open issues in the field of traffic safety prediction.


Paper 77

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 77, 2020.

Impact of autonomous trucks on pavement response M. FAHAD, R. NAGY Department of Transport Infrastructure and Water Resources Engineering, Szechenyi Istvan University, Hungary

Keywords: autonomous trucks, lateral wander, FEM, ABAQUS, fatigue life, rutting, truck platooning Technological advancements in automotive industry are bringing new changes and considerable impacts on transport infrastructure system. Whether the effect be on traffic safety, geometric design or the pavement design, all these impacts need to be addressed. The most prominent effect so far discovered is the wheel wander for autonomous trucks. It is believed that the ATs would require less lane width and there will be zero wander with a variation of 2 mm. Fatigue failure for widely distributed loads will happen much later than for the loads that are concentrated along the wheel path. The decreased lane width would result in less construction costs however, with the concentrated wheel path loading, the pavement wear will be accelerated. Previous literature indicates that in case of a zero wander scenario by an AT, the rutting may advance by 1.56 years and fatigue damage at the bottom of asphalt layer would increase by 146%. However by controlling the wander, the mode suggested as a ’two-section uniform distribution’, delays the maintenance years time by 2,3 years. This paper deals with studying and analyzing the effect of lateral wandering of autonomous trucks on the pavement performance. Three different lateral wander modes have been considered: Zero Wander, Normal Distribution and Uniform Distribution. A study on optimum truck platooning configuration with specified mix of truck type based on various loading and axle configurations and the headway distance will be conducted in order to ensure the longevity of the pavement under cyclic loadings. With an optimum control of vehicle’s lateral movements within the lane, pavements life can be increased in such cases. Such assumption is based on the fact that the autonomous vehicles would follow a uniform distribution path of lateral movements within a lane. Moreover, in this research the optimum lane width for the designated lane of ATs will be calculated. If the ATs follow uniform distribution along the lane, the width of the lane can be increased slightly in order for the load to be distributed in a larger area thereby decreasing the required design thickness of the pavement. The effects on ATs on pavement performance shall be calculated under all possible traffic and climatic conditions in Hungary. Results of this study would highlight the best performing pavement crossection along with optimum platooning pattern, optimum autonomous truck lane width, optimum traffic speed under all lateral wander and traffic combination modes.


Paper 78

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 78, 2020.

Pedestrian’s behavioural adaptation to AVs and its effect on road capacity S. PHETOUDOM, E. MAKÓ Department of Transport Infrastructure and Water Resources Engineering, University of Győr, Hungary

Keywords: road design, pedestrian, level of service, road capacity, VISSIM, autonomous vehicles The development of automated vehicles has shown a rapid pace in the recent years, however less attention has been paid to the implications of vehicle automation on safe infrastructure design. Autonomous vehicles are able to move closer to each other (shorter headways, higher density), at a more homogeneous speed, resulting in fewer shock waves and congestion at higher traffic volumes, and a reduction in delay which is a determining factor of LOS. Automated vehicle technology has mainly focused on the detection and recognition of pedestrians and cyclists by the vehicle and even though good progress has been made, many difficulties are yet to be overcome (e.g. reliable operation in adverse weather conditions). Behavior of pedestrians and cyclists is also crucial for safe interactions between automated vehicles and pedestrians/cyclists. One of the questions concerns the safe interaction of automated cars with pedestrians and cyclists, and in particular how pedestrians and cyclists react to automated vehicles and whether this would affect their expectations and their behavior. Autonomous vehicles will prioritize the safety of pedestrians (and other vulnerable road users) over traffic flow. As a result, pedestrians would receive all of the benefits of automated vehicles and would interrupt traffic flow, while the technology is rendered increasingly unattractive to drivers. To what extent will the capacity of the different road categories be affected by the interactions of pedestrians and automated vehicles? In this paper I am going to examine the effects of pedestrian – conventional vehicle interactions by means of traffic simulations for basis of comparison for the future steps of the research, in which automated vehicle interactions are going to be analyzed. In this study I have investigated the influences of pedestrian crossing flow on road capacity at four selected undesignated pedestrian crossings located in the city of Győr. Based on video recordings the behaviour of pedestrians has been analyzed by the software PTV VISSIM to simulate pedestrian flow characteristics in order to reveal the results of the drivers and pedestrian behaviour. Later on the study will also exam the geometrics and environmental factors whether they affect the variation of pedestrian crossing and vehicle movement.


Paper 79

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 79, 2020.

Autonomous cars and traffic calming G. SZÜCS, C. KOREN, K. MACSINKA Institute of Transport Infrastructure and Water Engineering, Faculty of Architecture, Civil Engineering and Transport Sciences, Széchenyi István University of Győr, Hungary

Keywords: traffic calming, autonomous cars, road planning, residential street, traffic safety Traffic calming has been becoming a more and more important issue in the last 10-15 years. A lot of different traffic calming devices (lateral shifts, narrowing traffic lanes, speed humps etc.) and their combinations are used, mainly in residential areas. Autonomous cars have developed by leaps and bounds in the last decades. Developers and computer scientists have been achieved valuable results at their field. Some research dealt with the digital infrastructure environment (V2I – I2V vehicle to infrastructure communication), but a few was concerned about the road parameters and the passenger feeling. There is a research gap, as we do not know the behavior of human drivers (speed choice, lateral position, strategies when meeting other vehicles) in the various traffic calming situations. Therefore, there is no basis of sound strategies for autonomous vehicles how to behave safely in the huge variety of traffic calming surroundings. The goal of the research is twofold: • on one hand to learn about human driver behavior around various traffic calming devices, • on the other hand, to give recommendations for autonomous vehicles for safe driving parameters (speed profile, lateral position, meeting strategies at road width reductions). In this paper we investigate the traffic calming tools designed for human drivers, from the aspect of self-driving vehicles. As a result of a research process, we would like to make a design-guide for traffic calming tools suitable for autonomous cars and humans at the same time.


Paper 80

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 80, 2020.

Conflict analysis of vehicle-pedestrian interactions A. KIZAWI, Á. BORSOS Faculty of Architecture, Civil Engineering and Transportation Sciences, Multidisciplinary Doctoral School of Engineering Sciences, Széchenyi István University, Hungary

Keywords: traffic conflict, surrogate measures of safety, traffic safety, pedestrian Pedestrians and vehicles often share the road in complex inner city traffic. This leads to interactions between vehicles and pedestrians affecting each other’s motion. While vehicle trajectories are more predictable, there are several issues regarding pedestrian movements. Pedestrians tend to make more sudden decisions and more prone to hectically change their speed and trajectory. Several studies aimed to collect traffic conflict data through field observations, computer vision technique, or naturalistic driving. Studies also found that traffic safety analysis based on surrogate safety measures has advantages compared to crash-based analyses because it is more proactive (and thus more ethical as there is no need to wait for crashes to happen), and in some conditions more time-efficient, informative and even more accurate. Because of the limitations of using crash data approach to evaluate safety, the use of non-crash events has gained a great deal of attention. By using surrogate measures of safety we can identify and localize the most critical elements on the road network and proactively determine the probability of accident at a location before it would happen. In order to estimate crash probability recently the Extreme Value Theory has been used in the traffic safety community. My PhD research aims to analyze pedestrian-vehicles interactions at unsignalized crossings and evaluate the severity/safety of the conflicts observed. Surrogate safety indicators will be calculated by means of the T-Analyst Software and Extreme Value Theory will be applied for in-depth analysis based on which appropriate recommendations can be made for improving the safety of road users. The aim of this paper is to summarize the state-of-the-art research in the field, to introduce the research gap, and to illustrate how surrogate measures of safety and T-Analyst can be used coupled with Extreme Value Theory for the analysis of vehicle-pedestrian interactions.


Paper 81

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 81, 2020.

Sight distance analyses for autonomous vehicles in Civil3D K. KHASKA, D. MILETICS Transport Infrastructure and Water Resources Engineering, Széchenyi István University, Hungary

Keywords: road design, sight distance, Civil3D, autonomous vehicles Nowadays, we hear more and more about self-driving vehicles, many manufacturers are developing their own autonomous vehicles (AVs). These vehicles are equipped with various sensors that are placed at several points in the car. These sensors provide information to control the vehicle (partially or completely, depending on the automation level). Sight distances on roads are defined according to various traffic situations (stopping, overtaking, crossing, etc.). These distances are required by safety reasons and they are calculated from human factors (e.g. reaction time), vehicle characteristics (e.g. eye position, brakes), road surface properties and other factors. Required sight distances are important inputs in current road design guidelines to determine certain geometric parameters (radii of vertical curves, with of the clear field in horizontal curves, clear sight fields at intersections, etc.). Autonomous vehicles are different from human driven vehicles e.g. in terms of reaction time and eye (sensor) height. Therefore, the reconsideration of required sight distances and minimum geometric parameters is a relevant issue. The Autodesk Civil 3D is commonly used in designing or modeling roads in the case of conventional vehicles. In this paper I would present some modeling results, particularly checking the road visibility in the case of AVs versus the conventional vehicles. This modeling depends on changing the main influenced parameters such as height eye, location of the eye, the height of the target (object), location of the target. I have created a virtual model as a first step for checking visibility, and in the next steps, I would create a comprehensive model for an actual roadway. Some of the expected results are the sight distance (range of sight) of a LiDAR, camera, or radar, and compare this sight distance with the design values which are calculated for conventional vehicles and normal drivers in American AASHTO standards. After that, I would make some suggestions depending on the modeling results and the initially proposed research questions, such as: Are AVs safer than a human driven vehicle? Do current guidelines satisfy the AVs requirements?


Paper 82

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 82, 2020.

PROMETHEE method in transportation: Literature review L. OUBAHMAN, S. DULEBA Department of Transport Technology and Economics, Faculty of Transportation and Vehicle Engineering, BME, Hungary

Keywords: transportation planning, PROMETHEE, MCDA The significance of decision support techniques has been constantly growing in the field of transportation planning in the recent decades. PROMETHEE Method (Preference Ranking METHod for Enrichment Evaluation) is an efficient decision-making support, that is simple to deploy in the case of a finite number of criteria, it provides partial ranking through PROMETHEE I and complete ranking with PROMETHEE II. This outranking methodology is characterized by three pillars: the enrichment of the preference structure via six different preference functions, the enrichment of the dominance relation between alternatives for each criterion, and the decision aiding after the partial and complete ranking. However, PROMETHEE does not provide guidance to assign weights to criteria and assumes that decision makers are able to allocate weights. In the case of non-well weighing reasoning, the final results are impacted. Furthermore, positive and negative interactions between criteria is not covered by PROMETHEE, omitting this feature in decision making process influences models’ outputs. In this study, we present an overview of PROMETHEE (I&II) models applied in transportation, as well as our contributions to cope with its drawbacks and come up with new models to improve transportation service quality in future researches.


Paper 83

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 83, 2020.

A systematic review of the latest advancements on Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) technique focusing on applications in transportation planning K. ISMAEL, S. DULEBA Department of Transport Technology and Economics, Faculty of Transportation Engineering and Vehicle Engineering, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary

Keywords: Structure Equation Modelling (SEM), transportation planning, application, tendency, systematic literature review Finding methods to develop transportation planning and accordingly attract more people to use sustainable transportation is one of the most important subjects for transport planners and decision makers in current studies. Structural Equation Model (SEM) is a statistical approach to examine the relationship between observed variables and latent variables. SEM is not only a single process, but also a cluster of related statistical techniques. Recently, SEM approaches have been commonly used in different research fields of engineering. The potential of SEM techniques is the essence of several issues in transportation planning and using as a guide for authorities. The main aim of this study is to present a systematic review of the application of the Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) methods in the assessment of transportation planning / sustainable transportation in the past decades, consequently, to encourage researchers for further investigation. After conducting a review of 60 papers published in high-quality journals, in the time interval of 2005-2020, the recorded papers are clustered in three main groups; the first cluster is perception, the second cluster is satisfaction and loyalty, and the third cluster is behavior mode choice. Then, these three groups are classified according to numerous key perspectives, containing author name and year, the title of the study, the area of application, type of transport mode, sample size, method of analysis, and software used in the analysis. In the final step, the comprehensive review integrates for all clusters. The result of this review paper shows that since 2018 using SEM approaches have significantly increased for evaluation of public transport service quality. Moreover, according to the provided guideline framework, this may help future researchers for the application of SEM in different field of transportation planning. Furthermore, recall findings in this paper are recommended for researchers such as the improvement of the application and practice of SEM utilize methods in terms of transportation planning research to avoid imprecisions in a future study, particularly addressing the problems related to public transport service quality.

Acknowledgments Supported by the ÚNKP-20-5 New National Excellence Pprogram of the Ministry for Innovation and Technology from the source of the National Research, Development and Innovation Fund.


Paper 84

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 84, 2020.

Error sources of laser trackers R. CHOLEVA, A. KOPÁČIK Department of Surveying, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovak Republic

Keywords: kinemetic measurement, Leica AT960, precision, uncertainty For each measuring device, it is necessary to know the error sources that affect the measurement result. If the error sources are known, it is possible to eliminate or minimize their influence on the measured quantities, resulting in lower uncertainty in the measurement result. In the case of a laser tracker, two types of measurement can be distinguished - measurement on a static target and measurement on a moving target. The error sources that arise when measuring on a stationary target are well-known and described in various publications. On the other hand, in the case of kinematic error sources, their further specification, determination, or modeling is absent. Kinematic error sources are related to the measured target’s motion in time and space and are difficult to distinguish from static error sources. Upon closer examination of the issue from a theoretical point of view, it is possible to identify several kinematic error sources. These include synchronization of measured angles and lengths, internal clock errors, position-sensitive device errors, and influences of atmospheric parameters.

Acknowledgments This publication was created with the support of the Scientific Grant Agency of the Ministry of Education, science, research and sport of the Slovak Republic and the Slovak Academy of Sciences for the project VEGA-1/0506/18.


Paper 85

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 85, 2020.

Evaluating the effect of different weather input datasets and model configuration (area threshold value) uncertainty on streamflow simulations using SWAT model A. FIRAS, K. BENE Department of Transport Infrastructure and Water Resources Engineering, Faculty of Architecture, Civil and Transportation Engineering, Széchenyi István University, Hungary

Keywords: modeling, Cuhai-Bakonyér watershed, SWAT, weather input data, uncertainty Performance of the watershed modeling studies is closely associated with the model input datasets. Currently, numerous weather databases exist and freely available to the modelers in global or regional scale. However, these datasets provide required input data to run models, their resolution and accuracies are needed to be investigated. This study is conducted to evaluate the impact of the different weather input datasets and model configuration (in the context of subbasin number) on streamflow simulations by using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). For this purpose, Cuhai-Bakonyér watershed which is located in northern-western Hungary is chosen as a study area. Two climate databases (CFSR, CARPTCLIM), and four subbasin discretization variations levels (57, 27, 17, 11) were evaluated. The levels depend on the drainage area threshold values and they were used to build model combination scenarios. 8 different models configurations (4 subbasin levels for every weather dataset) are performed between the years 1998 and 2005 taking three years as a warm up period. Calibration and validation procedure are conducted manually after selecting the best combinations based on monthly streamflow data. Model performance was evaluated by comparing simulated and measured streamflow data in the watershed, using Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), and percent bias (PBIAS) statistics. The model predicted slightly different streamflow values for the subbasins discretization level scenarios. The climate datasets showed significant differences in streamflow estimations results for the application SWAT model in Cuhai-Bakonyér watershed.


Paper 86

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 86, 2020.

Transfer of the rainfall-runoff model parameters for modeling runoff under future climate change M. ALEKSIC Faculty of Civil Engineering STU in Bratislava, Slovak Republic

Keywords: rainfall-runoff model, TUW model, calibration, validation, transfering model parameters, future climate change Rainfall-runoff models are widely used in the field of water management and hydrology. Often, it is used as a methodology and a tool of estimating of future climate change. The necessity for the more detailed research of the transfer of the rainfall-runoff parameters for the future time periods lays down in a great need to create the hydrological prediction models for the estimation of the hydrological regime. Thereby, to contribute to the protection of future climate developments and its monitoring, it is essential to get acquainted with the basic concept of modeling. When it comes to modeling, equal emphasis is given to the model input data and the process of the model calibration. The essential of having quality data is needed to get reliable and most prosperity data. For the intent of transferring the rainfall-runoff model parameters, the “lumped” version of the TUW model was used. In this version, all of the input and output data or the model parameters are constant for the river basin’s whole area. The input data include the precipitation data in the catchment area, the air temperature, and the potential evapotranspiration values. The input data are provided in the daily time step. The measured flow values were used for comparison with the simulated data within a model. In the calibration process several objective functions were used. The practical part of the research includes a selection of the farthest periods within the measured data and performance of calibration and validation to evaluate the parameters of the model. As a consequence of the transfer parameters to the farthest time period, it is expected that the most suitable parameters will be selected for the modeling of runoff under the future climate change.

Acknowledgments This work was supported by the Slovak Research and Development Agency under the Contract no. APVV-19-0340.


Paper 87

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 87, 2020.

Water management solution of run-off conditions from minimum discharge point of view L. ČUBANOVÁ, A. ŠOLTÉSZ, J. MYDLA Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovakia

Keywords: hydrological assessment The contribution deals with analysis of water management of the 38.5 km long Gidra River where several water take offs into small reservoirs and fish ponds are realized. Detailed hydrological assessment of daily discharge data for last 10-year period coming from the only gauging station on the Gidra River in Pila and own hydrometric measurement of discharges at each uptake structure were performed. Based on the obtained data the operation rules of uptake structures were checked to ensure the minimum required discharge Q355 in the river bed of the Gidra River anytime and anywhere. The greatest problem of the water management on the Gidra River is the fact that take off operators have their own operation rules which are sometimes in contradiction with the environmental demand put on minimum required discharge in the river bed, especially in dry months (august) during the year. Therefore, a master operation plan for the whole Gidra stream is required which will guarantee the spatial and temporal harmony among take offs to mentioned reservoirs and fish ponds with respect to environmental aspects (minimum discharge and water level) on the Gidra River.


Figure 87.1: Discharge measurement on the Gidra River under the sluice gate


Paper 88

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 88, 2020.

Groundwater flooding on the lower part of the Rye Island M. ČERVEŇANSKÁ, D. BAROKOVÁ, A. ŠOLTÉSZ Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovak Republic

Keywords: GMS, groundwater flooding, MODFLOW, numerical modelling During the flood situations in May and June 2010 in the lower part of the Rye Island, the culmination of the Váh River and the Danube River was accompanied by the groundwater level rising, in some boreholes even to their maximum measured levels. The increased groundwater level caused major problems, e.g. flooded cellars and underground spaces (garages), contaminated drinking water in wells, flooded railways and farmlands. As a part of the research concentrating on the groundwater flooding phenomena in the lower part of the Rye Island, the flood situation from the year 2010 was reconstructed, establishing the basis for a construction of the flood hazard maps. The problem was solved using a MODFLOW numerical model using the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS) and concentrated mainly on the previously mentioned flood situation in 2010.


Paper 89

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 89, 2020.

Comparison of water balance of North Algeria and South-Western Hungary A. SALEM1,2 , M. MIHOUB2 , D. LÓCZY3 1

Doctoral School of Earth Sciences, University of Pécs, Hungary Civil Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Minia University, Egypt 3 Institute of Geography and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, University of Pécs, Hungary 2

Keywords: climate classification, Hungary, Algeria, Mediterranean influence, climate change The Köppen Climate Classification System recognizes five major climatic types on the basis of annual temperature and precipitation. With regard to the assumed strengthening of Mediterranean influence, the categorization of Southern Transdanubia is debatable. The present paper investigates whether the climate of this region meets the criteria of Mediterranean climate based on hydro-meteorological parameters: precipitation regime, actual evapotranspiration (ETR), runoff (R), and especially infiltration (I) in northeastern Algeria (the cites of Guelma and Annaba) and southwestern Hungary (Pécs) using time series of rainfall and temperature of through 16 years. The meteorological parameters are almost the same for the cities where the rainfall for Annaba and Pécs takes a similar trend in the months in November, December, January, May, June, and July at the level of the precipitation. Thus, we can conclude that Pécs is clearly influenced by the Mediterranean climate. The research also has practical implications since it is intended to give a look of climate change that affects the agriculture activities, and to what extent the region is affected by the Mediterranean climate.


Paper 90

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 90, 2020.

Investigation of scour development at the Hricov weir using photogrammetry M. PAVÚCEK, J. RUMANN Faculty of Civil Engineering, Slovak Technical University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovak Republic

Keywords: scour, energy dissipation, photogrammetry, 3D model The research of the Hricov water structure is focused on minimizing the scour development behind the stilling basin. The problem of scour development at the bottom of the riverbed is related to the shortened stilling basin built at the weir. This is a long-term problem at the water structure and the scours must be refilled in almost all cases of flow discharges. Moveable gates and their operation have a great effect on the flow character in the river downstream. There is a significant erosion at the bottom of the riverbed during asymmetrical operation of the control gates at the weir. A 3D model of the water structure at a scale of 1:50 was built in hydraulic laboratory. The simulations based on the operational manual were used for investigating the current state of the water structure without any fortifications at the riverbed and subsequently for the design of the secondary fortification. The worst conditions at the weir were determined according to the operation manual, when a 100-year flow flows through the water structure with various variants of asymmetrical operation – one field is not operational. To evaluate the size of the scours in the riverbed, photogrammetric method was used in the study. A precise digital model was created from created photographs, from which the deepest places of the scours and their location caused by the flow were determined. The investigation and its results are described in the paper.


Paper 91

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 91, 2020.

Assessment of selected combined sewer system in the city of Trnava M. CSÓKA, I. MARKO, G. RÓZSA, Š. STANKO Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovakia

Keywords: rain, design rain, combined sewer system, restoration of sewer system The goal of this work is the hydraulic capacity assessment of selected combined sewer systems in the city of Trnava. The selected sewer system constitutes from 160 sections 3,3 km long. Hydraulic capacity assessment will test sewer system, created in SeWaCAD program with design rainfall events with varied frequencies. The results of assessment showed that hydraulic capacity of combined sewer system did not met requirements to properly work. Malfunctioning sewer pipelines must be changed. Design rain with frequency at least one in two years will be used as restoration model.


Paper 92

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 92, 2020.

The impact of COVID-19 on the amount of municipal waste G. RÓZSA, R. WTTMANOVÁ, M. ŠUTÚŠ, I. ŠKULTÉTYOVÁ Faculty of Civil Engineering, STU in Bratislava, Slovak Republic

Keywords: municipal waste, waste management, landfill, COVID-19 Imagine the situation, garbage trucks would stop collecting garbage, and our daily and perhaps contaminated waste would heap in front of our homes. The pandemic caused by the disease COVID-19 also had an impact on waste management. The measures introduced in Slovakia during the “first wave” have stopped or limited many companies’ functions and limited the operation of landfills. For a period, landfills had to limit the quantities of brought waste from companies and private entities. Therefore, the quantity of waste for further treatment has been temporarily reduced. On the other hand, most residents have stayed during the lockdown in their households, producing several kilograms of waste per day. Before the pandemic in Slovakia, one resident produced approximately 1,2 kg of mixed municipal waste per day. Protective equipment such as drapes, respirators, protective gloves, disposable handkerchiefs, or wipes from households and the work environment are disposed of as regular mixed municipal waste. When collecting, transporting, sorting, recovering, and recycling the municipal waste, it is necessary to follow the Public Health Authority of the Slovak Republic hygiene procedures. The paper deals with the amount of mixed municipal waste produced in a selected locality during the pandemic lockdown, also known as a “first wave”. This location includes 27 villages and one town that carries mixed waste to the same landfill in Cukárská Paka. The obtained data will be compared with data from previous years to determine whether the selected locality inhabitants were producing more or less waste during the “first wave” of Slovakia’s pandemic lockdown.


Paper 93

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 93, 2020.

CFD as a tool for design optimalization of sewer systems M. ŠUTÚŠ, J. HRUDKA, M. CSÓKA, S. ŠTANKO Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovakia

Keywords: 3D model, combined sewerage overflow chamber, hydrodynamic model The combined sewer overflow (CSO) contains various pollutants including gross solids, fine suspended solids and solutes. The solids in CSO could lead to operation problems. The understandings of flow characteristics and behaviours of suspended solids in a combined sewer system (CSS) are important to reduce the risk of municipal wastewater effluent to the human health and environment. To comply with strict contemporary environmental regulations, existing CSO structures need be rehabilitated or replaced to reduce the discharge and the frequency of the overflows, and the existing CSS often requires modifications of the flow diversion structures such as CSO chamber. The design of the urban sewage system is site specific, and it makes the use of three-dimensional (3D) model an alternative to a field study or a laboratory experiment. Well-posed 3D CFD models can accurately predict the flow characteristics and could assist as cost effective tool in the design optimization of a municipal sewage system.


Paper 94

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 94, 2020.

Operational challenges of a sequencing batch reactor applied in wastewater treatment B. BÁBA, T. KARCHES Faculty of Water Science, University of Public Service, Hungary

Keywords: activated sludge, batch reactor, hydrodynamic model, sedimentation While in the case of continuous-feed wastewater treatment systems, biological treatment and sedimentation requires different structures, in the case of batch technology, all processes take place in a single reactor. The stages of a cycle includes filling, reaction, sedimentation, decantation and sludge removal in order. The aim of the study is to determine these cycle times using biokinetic relationships, with optimal treatment efficiencies and economically sound operation. On-site measurements of sedimentation characteristics were performed, and sludge deposition was also examined applying computational fluid dynamics (CFD) capable of mapping flow structures and describing multiphase flows. The applied volume of fluid (VOF) model solves the continuity, momentum equation with turbulence closure for both the sludge and water phases, and introduces a so-called phase ratio equation. This reveals the boundary layer between the thickened sludge and the supernatant and allows to determine the optimal decantation rate. As a result of this study, cycle times were calculated for dry and rainy periods.


Paper 95

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 95, 2020.

Adsorption of simazine with two different granular activated carbons M. MARTON, J. ILAVSKÝ, D. BARLOKOVÁ Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, STU, Slovakia

Keywords: pesticides, adsorption, activated carbon, water treatment Simazine belongs to the group of pesticides used to control broadleaf weeds and grass in agriculture. This herbicide was commonly used for growing asparagus, berries, hops, maize, and many other crops. Although the use of simazine was banned in the European Union, some traces of this herbicide can still be found there. Since simazine has a complex organic structure, it is persistent in the nature and difficult to remove by conventional water treatment processes. Therefore, more complex processes are required for its removal. This paper will be focused on the adsorption of simazine by using two different types of granular activated carbon, WG12 (Gryfskand, Poland) and Filtrasorb F400 (Calgon Carbon, USA). Experiments were performed in batch reactors, with continuous stirring and constant laboratory temperature at 22°C. From reaction kinetics it is clear, that 0th and 1st order kinetics reaction best describe these experiments.


Paper 96

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 96, 2020.

Evaluation of the current state of small water reservoir from a landscape and ecological side Z. SABOVÁ1 , Z. NÉMETOVÁ1 , T. KALETOVÁ2 , S. KOHNOVÁ1 1 2

Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovak Republic Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Slovak Republic

Keywords: small water reservoir, water quality, landscape, ecological evaluation, technical state, chemical analysis, terrain measurement, laboratory measurement The objective of the study is an assessment of a small water reservoir by using two main aspects, i.e. landscape and environmental aspects. The importance of the assessment of the water reservoir can be seen in the technical condition of water reservoirs. Nowadays, technical maintenance is mainly performed on large water reservoirs, but the small water bodies remain without attention. The small reservoirs are inconspicuous, but they can create several problems that can endanger not only the surroundings of the reservoir but also human lives. The evaluation of the actual state of small water reservoir is solved in a complex way. From the ecological point of view, the quality of surface water and indicators of water quality (water temperature, salinity, hydrogen ion activity, electrolytic conductivity, the total amount of solutes, nitrogen and its compounds, phosphorus and its compounds, chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon) were evaluated. Three sampling points were chosen in order to perform the terrain measurements on the regular basis. Based on the terrain measurements we can control the quality of the surface water as an important process and monitor if the surface water quality indicators meet the requirements of government regulation. In addition to terrain measurements, the laboratory measurements were performed. The small water reservoir was also evaluated from a safety point of view. The results of the terrain and laboratory measurements were processed and compared with the actual government regulation considering the sampling points. The results also point to assessment the actual state of the small water reservoir in a complex way including the water quality assessment with the proposal of measures in order to improve the condition of the water reservoir.


Paper 97

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 97, 2020.

PIV measurements on a hydraulic model of a shaft intake of a SHPP L. BYTCANKOVÁ, J. RUMANN, P. DUŠICKA Faculty of Civil Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovakia

Keywords: shaft intake structures, physical model, flow velocity field, PIV method Recently, the construction of shaft intake structures in Slovakia has increased. The shaft intake structures overcome significant vertical height over short horizontal distance. In their front horizontal section, the water flows with free surface (pressureless flow), then in the vertical section the flow changes its direction and character to a pressurized flow. Before the turbine intake the water changes its direction and is fully pressurized. The flow of water in these shaft intake structures is therefore very complicated. A hydraulically suitable design of the intake structure is associated with achieving the required parameters of the small hydropower plant (SHPP), but due to the reduction of project costs, the shapes of shaft intake structures of SHPP are often not correctly hydraulically designed. This fact leads to operational problems of these power plants caused by problematic water flow conditions. One of the important aspects is the distribution of flow velocity of these intake structures. Uneven distribution of flow velocity causes negative effects on turbine performance, reduced efficiency or uneven mechanical loading of turbine parts, resulting in reduced service life. Therefore, the investigation of the effects of shaft intake structure design on flow velocity distribution has been realized. The velocity field at a shaft intake of a small hydropower plant was investigated on a physical model in a hydraulic laboratory using the PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) method. The PIV is one of the most modern optical methods for measuring the velocity field of liquids and gases. The PIV method was calibrated and verified based on the measurement using the UVP method. The PIV measurements were realized for different shaft heights and proved negative effects of the design on the flow homogeneity in the turbine intake. The methodology is to be used for complex investigation of the influence of the geometric characteristics of the shaft intake structure on the flow homogeneity at the turbine inlet.


Paper 98

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 98, 2020.

Dynamic behavior of soil under irregular loading patterns A. MAJD, R. RICHARD Faculty of Architecture, Civil and Transport Sciences, Széchenyi István University, Hungary

Keywords: torsional simple shear test, shear modulus, damping, Ramberg-Osgood model, Midas GTS NX This study focuses on the effect of irregular dynamic patterns of loading on soil behavior. Many researchers in the last few decades concentrated their studies on the behavior of soils when subjected to cyclic loading patterns, and the effect of different factors on the dynamic properties of soils. However, for this paper, earthquake loading records are generated by using the Torsional Simple Shear test to study the nonlinear stress-strain behavior of sand and the two main dynamic parameters, shear modulus, and damping ratio. This study also uses a model for Torsional Simple Shear test created on the finite element software Midas GTS NX, to assess the ability of two widely used soil models (Ramberg-Osgood and Hyperbolic material models) to predict the behavior, shear modulus degradation curve and energy dissipation curve of soils subjected to irregular loading patterns, and compare the results between the laboratory test and the finite element software to evaluate the soil models’ applicability for such types of loading patterns. So far, progress has been made in processing and interpreting the laboratory tests using Visual Basic for Applications in Excel, which saves a lot of time and provides better understanding of the graphs and parameters. Furthermore, the Ramberg-Osgood model was verified in Midas GTS NX, by obtaining a perfect match between the Stress-Strain curves from the software, and the curves created in excel using the conventional Ramberg-Osgood model equations.


Paper 99

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 99, 2020.

Behaviour of embankments on soft soil reinforced by rigid inclusions R. ALSIRAWAN Doctoral School of Multidisciplinary Engineering Sciences, Széchenyi István University, Hungary

Keywords: rigid inclusions, maximum settlement, bearing capacity Embankment construction on soft soil with unfavourable characteristics is considered a common problem especially in the coastal regions and around river estuaries where soft soil has high compressibility and low shear strength. Rigid inclusions (RI) system is used to overcome the problems resulting from the soft soil such as insufficient bearing capacity and large settlements. This paper presents a comparison between embankments on soft soil with and without rigid inclusions as well as a parametric study of the most important parameters affecting the behaviour of supported embankment by rigid inclusions. The results show the effect of rigid inclusions in reducing the maximum settlement at the embankment surface.


Electrical engineering


Paper 100

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 100, 2020.

Selection criterias of power filters for EMC chambers D. MAKLÁRI1 , B. TAMÁS2 1 2

?????, Hungary EMC Laboratory, Hungary

Keywords: EMC, EMC chamber, power line filter, earthing resistance, four-wire connection, five-wire connection The EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) is one of the most important sectors in electronic industry and in the retail area as well. The more devices and “gadgets” are connected to the network via wireless communication the more challenges arise to avoid any malfunctioning. The main focus is to determine how much noise come from our devices and for how much noise they are immune without causing any problem in their normal operation. The first step is to measure the released electromagnetic noise of all, but needs to be kept in mind, as the numbers of the devices are growing, the limits are coming closer and closer, even if the forbidden band is wide. Nowadays many new EMC chambers are installed in very different circumstances. Results of emission and immunity measurements of devices highly depend on the parameters of the chambers in which tests are performed. Even in two accredited chambers different results can be experienced. Because this high sensitivity, reaction and interaction of the environmental factors - building - EMC chamber – measurement equipment and UUT (unit under test) as a whole system should be deeply understood and analyzed. One of the most important such problems is the earthing of the chamber and the building. The earthing resistance value is a strong requirement from many EMC developer companies. Design a new building for an EMC chamber give the opportunity to achieve the requirements. However, it depends not only on the design. The supply network connects directly to a transformer, but most likely the transformer supplies other buildings too. As it is defined in standards in Hungary the transformer must be earthed directly with a strong earthing resistance requirement. The Buildings have two options to connect to the supplier transformer, which are “four wire connection” and as “five wire connection”. The physical difference between these two is, that we can use PEN wire or separate to PE and N wires at the transformer. To determine the best solution for a Building, which built directly for an EMC Chamber is a complex question, because in many cases the earthing resistance requirement can be achieved by connecting the PEN wire to the transformer, as it has strong earthing requirement, but through the PEN wire we could face such noises - which come from the other buildings, connected to the same transformer – that can make our system worse than develop an earthing net with permissive earthing resistance. The whole system performance will depend on weather, near buildings behavior according to electricity activity (research). Because of the above questions, I try to give solutions for the possible solutions like pro and contra, what is the best solution about EMC chambers, if the building design is in initial phase.


Paper 101

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 101, 2020.

Multi source simulations in ANSYS HFSS D. ERDOSY, A. VÁRADINÉ SZARKA, T. BODOLAI Research Institute of Electronics and Informatics, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: multi source, simulation, ANSYS, multiple sources Electromagnetic compatibility is getting more and more important as soon we are speaking about electronic devices. EMC must be planned, calculated, simulated, and measured to ensure that the device can work in the environment of other devices and does not disturb other devices by unwanted interference. In complex devices, simulation methods due to the large number of elements and complicated operations can be extremely costly and time consuming. We should consider how is it possible to reduce these costs, for example with simplifying our simulation terminology. One possible way is to not simulate every component in each iteration, but previously calculated data should be used in other calculations. For example, we have to simulate the behaviour of two antennas. We simulate both to achieve the effect on each other, but it is easier to calculate when we use the previously made data and use only that. With this procedure we can cut off simulation time in the different iterations. Due to our plans simulations in this way can result in an easy to calculate complex system analysing method.


Mechanical engineering


Paper 102

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 102, 2020.

Reducing shrinkage at welded steel and aluminium beams K. JÁRMAI, M. PETRIK Institute of Energy Engineering and Chemical Machinery, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: welded structures, optimization, welding shrinkage, steel, aluminium When steel structures are constructed by welding, deformations and welding residual stresses could occur as a result of the high heat input and subsequent cooling. The welding process can create significant locked-in stresses and deformations in fabricated steel structures. The residual stresses and initial imperfections can have an important influence on the behaviour of the structure under the variable loading. It is well known that these initial imperfections due to welding, reduce the ultimate strength of the structure. Even though various efforts have been made in the past to express the deflection of panels from experimental aspects and measurements of actual structures, it may be said that there are few investigations from the theoretical point of view. To find out a practical estimation method for the welding distortion of a panel, a relatively simple analysis has been carried out by Okerblom, and we found that to elaborate optimization, it is advantageous. A calculation system has been developed to determine the optimum dimensions of asymmetric I-beams for minimum shrinkage. The objective function is the minimum mass; the unknowns are the I-beam dimensions; the constraints are the stress, local buckling and deflection. We have made a parametric search considering different material grades, different span-lengths and different loadings. We have considered different steel grades (235, 355, 460 MPa yield stress) and different aluminium alloys (90, 155, 240 MPa yield stress). The span length range is 5-10 m, and the dead load was between 1000-10000 kg. It is shown, that using optimum design, one can reduce the welding shrinkage with prebending and can save material cost as well.


Paper 103

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 103, 2020.

The effect of the mesh size during the determination of GTN parameters Y. CHAHBOUB1 , S. SZAVAI2 1

Institute of Products and Machine Design, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, University of Miskolc, Hungary 2 Bay Zoltán Alkalmazott Kutatási Közhasznú Nonprofit Kft, Hungary

Keywords: GTN, mesh size, simulation The Gurson–Tvergaard–Needleman (GTN) model is widely used to predict the failure of materials based on lab specimens. The Gurson model is based on the micro-mechanical behaviour of ductile fracture, containing void nucleation, growth, and coalescence. To predict the failure of a component, we need to determine eight parameters. The determination of GTN parameters is not an easy task, as we have to find the correct combination between eight parameters, in addition to this, we need to find the most suitable mesh size that can lead us to get results which will be comparable to the experiments. The crack propagation and initiations are the most sensitive areas, which means the mesh size in these areas has to be very small to compare mechanical behaviour during the simulation and the experiment. After many simulations using Notch Tensile Specimen with different diameters we found out that the change of the mesh size affects our determination of GTN parameters, and the mesh size dimensions which were the most practical have been defined.


Paper 104

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 104, 2020.

Thermal performance investigation of inserting hybrid nanofluid of Ceria oxide and MWCNT-based oil in the receiver tube of parabolic trough collector: Numerical study O. AL-ORAN, F. LEZSOVITS Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary

Keywords: hybrid nanofluids, numerical study, Nusselt number, heat transfer coefficients, parabolic trough collector In this work, the thermal performance of using hybrid nanofluid of Ceria oxide and MWCNTbased MOL 68 in the receiver tube of parabolic trough collector is simulated numerically. The influence of using this nanofluid under various volume concentration and different Reynold number is solved numerically using computational fluid dynamic (CFD). The turbulent model’s analysis is carried out based on k–e RNG is employed to find Nusselt number and heat transfer coefficients. The model results were validated with the previous correlations that were used to evaluate the Nusselt number. The results show that hybrid nanofluid enhances heat transfer characteristics of the parabolic trough collector in comparison with base fluid. Furthermore, the enhancement results increase with increasing the modified nanofluids’ volume concentration.


Paper 105

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 105, 2020.

3D and 2D simulation of residual stress developed during welding of dissimilar pipes M. ALHAFADHI, G. KRALLICS Institute of Physical Metallurgy, Metal Forming, and Nanotechnology, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: numerical simulation, welding pipe, hardness test This study deals with the effects of weld parameters on residual stress developed during welding of dissimilar pipes. Circumferential arc welding is widely used in industries such as piping and power stations, etc. The 2D and 3D numerical simulation MSC Marc software is used to predict the residual stress distribution developed during circumferential welding. Due to the non-uniform distribution of plastic and thermal strains in and around the weld pool, large amounts of residual stresses and deformations are present in all-welded structures. The simulated results are validated using hardness test. The effects of welding parameters such as current and pipe thickness on residual stress and temperature fields at different locations were investigated.


©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 106, 2020.

Paper 106

Measuring the effects of heated windows on thermal comfort D. LOVIG, A. ÓZDI, B. CAKÓ Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: heated window glass, thermal glazing, thermal manikin, comfort theory During our research project, we examined how a heated window affects the thermal comfort parameters of permanently occupied spaces. A thermal manikin and a TESTO 400 multifunctional air conditioning measuring instrument were used for the tests. To characterize the space, we used the PMV-PPD method accepted and applied in international practice. The examination of the comfort index took place in the vicinity of the electrically heated window glass. During the measurements we changed the surface temperature of the glazing and the distance from the glazing. In addition, the temperature of the surrounding surfaces was measured, which made it possible to analyze the effects of radiant temperature asymmetry which is a form of local discomfort factor.

Acknowledgments The project was realized through the assistance of Dalma Lovig and András Ózdi, students of University of Pécs Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology. The project has been supported by the European Union, co-financed by the European Social Fund.; Application number: EFOP-3.6.1.-16-2016-00004; Application title: Comprehensive Development for Implementing Smart Specialization Strategies at the University of Pécs.

Figure 106.1: Measuring installation


Paper 107

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 107, 2020.

Comparison of the compressive properties of lattice structures used in medical implants R. ALKENTAR, T. MANKOVITS Debrecen University, Hungary

Keywords: topology optimization, lattice, finite element Results of five different cylindrical lattice structure properties under compression experiment are presented in this paper. The specimen are of 10 mm diameter and 15 mm height, with porosity of 3%. ANSYS software is used to simulate and analyse the experiment using the Finite Element Method (FEM). The material used with the work piece is TI alloy. The paper comes to the result that the structure of the material, - and how it is distributed - affect the endurance of the implant.


Paper 108

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 108, 2020.

Reducing computation time using GPU based parallelization of FPA algorithm for optimization S. NAGY1 , K. JÁRMAI2 1 2

Emerson Automation Solutions Magyarország, Hungary Institute of Energy Engineering and Chemical Machinery, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: optimization, parallel computation, overhead travelling crane Evolutionary optimization algorithms are very powerful tools for solving non-linear problems. The population-based calculations are used for better and more reliable solutions. This sometimes require tremendous computation capability, and they may be slow. In this lecture, we propose a possible parallelization method for computation of a base algorithm and one group of fitness functions using the flower pollination algorithm. This method is tested with some standard test functions and a real engineering problem - optimization of the welded box girder of an overhead travelling crane. Test functions show, that the approach is very efficient, reducing the computational time. The parallel computations can lead to a significant reduction in computational time if the population size is large and the number of variables is also large.


Paper 109

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 109, 2020.

Scratch resistance and morphological analysis of CrN and DLC coatings on duplex treated X42Cr13 plastic mould tool steel S.A. SIDDIQUI, M.B. MAROS Institute of Materials Science and Technology, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: scratch test, adhesion, duplex treatment, critical load The research deals with the characterisation of surface mechanical response of two different ceramic coatings – DLC and CrN – deposited on X42Cr13 plastic mould tool steel under increasing normal load during instrumented scratch test. The aim of the study is to analyse the effect of duplex treatment, surface preparation and coating material on the failure mechanism and degree of damage of the coated material system, in addition to characterize the scratch resistance by the critical normal load and the friction coefficient at the failure of coatings. Morphological analysis of the scratch tracks was accomplished using optical microscope. The most important results of the research work are as follows: • Duplex treatment can improve efficiently the scratch resistance of the coated plastic mould tool steel; • Scratch morphology and quantitative characteristics of the scratch resistance strongly depend on coating material, heat treatment condition and surface preparation of the substrate. Based on the obtained results performance of the coated material systems can be improved efficiently.


Paper 110

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 110, 2020.

Effect of heat source temperature on ORC and TFC efficiency A.M. AHMED1,2 , A.R. IMRE1 1

Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary 2 Technical College of Kirkuk, Northern Technical University, Iraq

Keywords: hybrid system, ORC, TFC, critical temperature, heat source Thermodynamic, economic, and environmental parameters have significant role to find the optimal ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) system to utilize a given heat source. Among all of these parameters, the thermal efficiency has special role. Most of the studies indicated that the efficiency increased with increasing heat source temperature in a hybrid system by merging two or more of renewable energies or other sources, especially when merge low - temperature heat source as geothermal with the high-temperature heat source as solar. Although it is true in most cases, but when the heat source temperature is close to the critical temperature, increasing the heat source temperature can decrease the efficiency. Therefore, in some case, increase the source temperature by added solar heat can have double negative effect by decreasing the efficiency while increasing the installation costs. In this paper, a comparison of ORC and TFC (Trilateral Flash Cycle) with a wet working fluid (carbon dioxide) will be presented to show the negative effect of heat source temperature increase.


Paper 111

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 111, 2020.

Dynamic modelling of internal tool holder considering different fixations W.T.A. da SILVA, Z. FÜLÖP, A. SZILÁGYI Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, Institute of Machine Tools and Mechatronics, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: overhang, boring bar, natural frequency, dynamic stiffness Internal turning is an operation where tool vibration is capital, as the tool works in overhang while removing material from the inner surface of a hole. That limits the use of internal turning in the machining of hardened steels, where tight tolerances and low surface roughness are always desired. Tool vibration is more critical in the machining of deep holes, where the tool overhang (the tool length protruding from the turret) is greater, and, consequently, is the tendency to chatter. Furthermore, the interface between the boring bar and the clamping house has a significant influence on the dynamic properties of the clamped boring bar. In this paper, based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and Krylov-Duncan functions, the distributed parametric differential equations of internal tool holder are presented. The dynamic characteristics of boring bar with two different conditions including, pinned-pinned-free and spring-spring-free are investigated. The corresponding frequency equations are given. The natural frequency and dynamic stiffness of the composite boring bar are obtained by numerical calculation. The results show that the supporting conditions, support spring stiffness and overhang have an important effect on the dynamic characteristics of the boring bar.

Acknowledgments This research was supported by the European Union and the Hungarian State, co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund in the framework of the GINOP-2.3.4-15-201600004 project, aimed to promote the cooperation between the higher education and the industry.


Paper 112

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 112, 2020.

Development of third generation advanced high strength steels for automotive applications R.F. MEKNASSI, M. TISZA Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Information Sciences, Institute of Mechanical Engineering, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: AHSS, mechanical properties, automotive industry, microstructure The modern vehicles demand a better fuel economy, decrease in ozone harming substance outflows, and superior safety requirements led to a new development of steel grades with higher strength and good formability. Third generation of advanced high strength steels is the next stage for the automotive companies in steel sheets development. The principle concept of the third generation of AHSS is to reap the mechanical properties benefits from first and second generation of AHSS at the cost neither too high nor too low. The current work reviews the main types of this new generation including quenching and partitioning (Q&P), TRIP bainitic ferrite (TBF), medium manganese, density reduced TRIP and nano steels for the modern automotive industry, with the emphasis on their main characteristics, processing and applications.


Paper 113

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 113, 2020.

Design and experimental investigation on natural convective solar dryer for woodchips EN 14961-4 B. KUMAR, Z. SZAMOSI, G. SZEPESI Institute of Energy Engineering and Chemical Machinery, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: solar dryer, woodchip drying, energy efficiency, biofuels Solid biofuels such as woodchips have always been a major source of fuel in the field of renewable energy. However, the drying of wood chips has been a challenge in the preparation of biofuels and for other applications as well. The water content of 15% in the wood chips of grade EN 14961-4 is considered as the premium wood chip material. Solar drying emerged as a leading solution for the drying of the wood chips. The paper investigates the comparison of open sun drying and natural convective solar dryer developed at Miskolc, Hungary. Modeling of the dryer along with consideration of various parameters such as mass, moisture content, moisture ratio was analyzed on different days. Depending on the drying rate and time calculations, the efficiency of the solar dryer was calculated. These investigations led to the conclusion that natural convection dryer provides better efficiency of drying than open sun drying for the woodchips.


Paper 114

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 114, 2020.

Macromechanical study of a glass/epoxy laminate S. ALSARAYEFI, K. JÁLICS Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, Institute of Machine and Product Design, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: macromechanics, composite laminate, Glass/Epoxy This study carries out macromechanical analysis of composite laminate. Specifically it investigates the structural properties of the final laminate and those of the laminae and their orientations. To deal with this issue, determining the macromechanical structural behavior of a fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) laminate is executed using plate theories and based on the mechanical properties that were previously obtained from a homogenization process of the representative volume element (RVE). The investigation is carried out on glass/epoxy laminate with different glass fiber types and different volume fractions. Theoretical model is introduced to analyze the mechanical behavior of a laminate. Computer Aided Design Environment for Composites (CADEC) software is used to do the numerical calculations. Macromechanical study of a laminated composite material simplify the analysis for the designer when optimizing the material structural system by developing relationships between the forces and moments applied to a laminate and the strains and stresses.


Paper 115

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 115, 2020.

Vehicle occupant safety development with finite element method L. PORKOLAB, I. LAKATOS Department of Road and Rail Vehicles, Széchenyi István University, Hungary

Keywords: crash test, occupant safety, finite element method, electric vehicles, autonomous driving Crash tests of vehicles are specified by Government programs such as North America Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) or in Europe the ECE regulations (Economic Commission for Europe). The laws include only minimum requirements for individual components therefore additional consumer protection load cases have been developed by independent private institutes. The NCAP institutes (New Car Assessment Program) and the IIHS (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety) are among the most important organizations. A challenge in the design and optimisation of the vehicle structures is the high costs required for crash analysis. Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations can reduce development periods and the time-to-market for a product. The goals of our calculations are the early detection of component failure, the protection of occupants or pedestrians and the reduction of cost-intensive real crash tests. The Hybrid III 50th Percentile Male Crash Test Dummy is the most widely used crash test dummy in the world for the evaluation of automotive safety restraint systems in frontal crash testing. The interaction of airbags and belt systems with the dummy by the electric vehicles - which has the concept of autonomous driving function - is the biggest challenge of the future in the field of vehicle occupant safety.


Paper 116

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 116, 2020.

Automatic controlling system of surface roughness A. SHARIPOV, C. FELHO Institute of Manufacturing Science, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: controlling roughness, automatic system inspection, laser polarization One of the important tasks in mechanical engineering is the use of control. Not as a means of dividing finished products into suitable and defective products, but as a means of control in order to obtain the required quality parameters, prevent and eliminate defects, and also to establish optimal processing conditions that ensure high performance at the required quality of processing. To achieve the desired result, an active control system (ACS) may be used, which is able to adjust the process parameters according to current data. The main task of the ACS is to determine deviations from the desired result on the path to product formation, also identifying the causes, which are influenced on the detail, such as cutting tool wear, temperature and force deformations, etc. This work presents an alternative method of measuring roughness by utilizing non-contact optical metrology. It briefly presents a description of the planned automatic controlling system. The developed laser beam method based on analysis of polarization of laser beam is introduced. The general structure of the device prototype in presented.


Paper 117

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 117, 2020.

Specific energy consumption of the booster pumps M. EÖRDÖGHNÉ MIKLÓS Institute of Smart Technology and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: pump control, energy efficiency of pumps, pump part load, specific energy consumption The booster pumps operate at part load for a significant part of their operating time. A properly selected control mode that takes into account both the drive mode and the variable load can achieve significant energy savings in the power consumption of the motors. By defining a parameter describing the specific energy consumption of the system, the individual pump systems can be compared in terms of energy efficiency, and this parameter can help to assess the energy impact of the regulation or to decide on the need for energy rationalization.


Paper 118

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 118, 2020.

Some characteristics of surfaces machined with abrasive waterjet turning K. KUN-BODNÁR, Z. MAROS Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, Institute of Manufacturing Science, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: abrasive waterjet turning, surface roughness This paper presents an experimental study of abrasive waterjet turning (AWJT) of an extrusion aluminium alloy (AlMg0,7Si). The aim of the paper is to determine differences of two methods - radial and tangential waterjet turning - from the point of view of machined surface quality and the depth of penetration (DOP), i.e. the diameter of the parts after the turning process. During the experiments the traverse speed (vf ) of the cutting head and the rotation of the turned parts (n) were changed, other parameters, like pressure of the water (p), abrasive mass flow rate (ma ) were kept constant. Diameter and some surface roughness parameters of the test parts were measured after the machining. On the base of experimental results, advantages and disadvantages of two methods are explained in the paper.


Informatics


Paper 119

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 119, 2020.

Global/local non-intrusive coupling method for elliptic problems A. EL KERIM1,2 , P. GOSSELET3 , F. MAGOULES2,4 1

Université Paris-Saclay, ENS Paris-Saclay, CNRS/LMT, France Université Paris-Saclay, CentraleSupelec/MICS, France 3 Université de Lille , CNRS, Centrale Lille / LaMcube 4 Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2

Keywords: domain decomposition method, global/local non-intrusive coupling, parallel computation We study the parallel implementation of the non-intrusive method Global/local coupling method, with application to thermal and structure mechanics problems. This method can be viewed as an exact version of the submodeling technique which allows using a coarse description of a structure and enriching the modeling of some zones of interest with enhanced geometry, refined mesh, complex material laws. The method can also be employed as a simple way to derive a non-overlapping domain decomposition method. Mathematically, the method is a stationary iteration which proved to be particularly robust to solve nonlinear structure mechanics problems (plasticity, crack propagation). One key feature of the method is that it only makes use of standard operations so that it can be implemented as a python script driving reference industrial software like Abaqus, Code_Aster. Our study focuses on the convergence properties of the method, the possibilities to accelerate it and the various parallel implementations, with the final aim to derive a robust scalable asynchronous version of the method. The method will be illustrated on 2D and 3D cases, in its exact submodeling and domain decomposition versions.

Acknowledgments This work is partially supported by French National Research Agency (grant# ANR-18-CE460008).


Paper 120

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 120, 2020.

Exact scheme for solving second order linear differential equations Z. VÍZVÁRI1 , Z. SÁRI2 , M. KLINCSIK3 , P. ODRY4 1

Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Department of Information Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology University of Pécs, Hungary 3 Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 4 Institute of Information Technology, University of Dunaujvaros, Hungary

Keywords: exact scheme, local Green-function, discretization, boundary value problem A special system of linear equations is constructed whose solution vector gives the accurate discretized values of the exact solution of second order linear inhomogeneous ordinary differential equation (ODE) in case of 1D space variable x with arbitrary coefficient function κ(x) and arbitrary source function f (x) at each grid point under Dirichlet or/and Neumannboundary conditions. This new exact scheme is constructed by recurrence relations between the variables, thus it is similar to those of obtained by finite difference, finite element, or finite volume methods, however this new scheme provides the exact solution without any error. We have determined the adequate test-functions providing the accurate values of the solution of the ODE at arbitrarily located grid points, thus the errors originating from discretization and numerical approximation can be avoided.

Acknowledgments The research project is conducted at the University of Pécs, Hungary, within the frameworks of the Biomedical Engineering Project of the Thematic Excellence Programme 2020 (TUDFO/20204.1.1-TKP2020) and the project “Sustainable Raw Material Management Thematic Network RING 2017” EFOP-3.6.2-16-2017-00010.


Paper 121

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 121, 2020.

Colour correction analysis of images B. SEBŐK, G. VÁRADY Department of Technical Informatics, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: color correction, reference In this study, we focus on colour correction of images taken of target objects, mainly of some kind of plants – weeds. One application of the method would be to guess the present state of the plant about the colour it has, so we need the true colour values and the correct component values to do it so. When we use a camera that can adjust the white balance and the luminance to create more pleasant photos for the viewer’s eyes, we need to do some – or lots of – changes and adjustments on them to make its colours “real” again. Our goal is to find a method and make an algorithm that can make these adjustments automatically, with little or without human interaction and in a short period of time. The first task is to determine the changes the camera makes on the photos. I use an X-Rite ColorChecker Passport to determine the changes I need to do on the pictures, and I would like to set up a statistical model that can guess the approximate corrections to do these automatically on different images. I have several picture-categories - e.g.: indoor without artificial light, indoor with neon-tube light, cloudy outdoor, sunny outdoor etc. - and I am analysing the values of the input and the output colour parameters as well when I make corrections to see the changes in the pixel values. When we have enough sample and data in our database, I would guess the approximate changes on the photo with just knowing the input values of the colour components. This is just an approximate method. Besides the statistics, we would like to develop a more accurate and feasible method. In the real world, we can’t use a ColorChecker every time and it is probable, that we need more accurate results than the statistical estimation. To do it we plan to develop a model that can fit on drones. We can’t put too much equipment – weight – on them because they need to carry it. The more weight we put on a drone, the less time we can fly it because of extended battery usage. In conclusion, we would like to use the drone’s own camera with a little addition. We plan to use Raspberry microcontrollers that are light and easy to program and also have significant high calculation capacity so they fit our expectations. We also have a theoretical method of the colour checking. We have to find a way – e.g.: 3D printed mount - to fix four LEDs in front of the camera. A red, a green, a blue and a white one. If the camera makes changes on white balance the LEDs’ colours are modified as well, so we have a reduced but useable reference set to make the necessary corrections. The final aim of our work is to have a system developed, that can do all these changes on its own without any user interaction.

Acknowledgments The research is supported by the ÚNKP-20-1-I New National Excellence Program of the Ministry of Human Capacities.


Paper 122

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 122, 2020.

The challenges of visualizing DMLA models M. HIDVÉGI, G. MEZEI, S. BÁCSI Department of Automation and Applied Informatics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary

Keywords: multi-level modeling, metamodeling, visualization The Dynamic Multi-Layer Algebra (DMLA) is a multi-layered metamodeling system that provides great flexibility for domain prototyping. Visualization of models is essential in this field, however, the traditional way of representing entities in UML is not sufficient due to the multi-layer and self-describing nature of DMLA. In this paper, we present a method that can handle partial uncertainty in entity definitions, complex instantiation and validation hierarchies and flexible, customizable constraints attached to entities. The key to our approach is to show the information in a context-driven way. We illustrate the challenges and our solution by using an illustrative example.

Acknowledgments The research has been supported by the European Union, co-financed by the European Social Fund (EFOP-3.6.2-16-2017-00013, Thematic Fundamental Research Collaborations Grounding Innovation in Informatics and Infocommunications.


Paper 123

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 123, 2020.

Measuring the effectiveness of physiotherapy treatment P. MÜLLER, Á. SCHIFFER Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: movement analysis, image processing, Kinect v2 In our research, we are investigating human motion, especially the human gait cycle. In this project, we wanted to investigate the efficiency of the special “therasuit therapy” by using different techniques. We developed a unique measurement system, using a visual-based, markerless environment the Microsoft Kinect v2. For data acquisition and the evaluation process, we have created a self-developed application in Mathworks Matlab. During the acquisition, the sensor is able to send the 3-dimensional coordinates of the human body, which can be stored on a computer. We also developed the measurement circumstances, we recorded the patients in different ways and more than one time. In the evaluation phase, the recorded movements can be filtered, denoised, and can be used for further analysis. Using theoretical methods, we were able to identify the gait cycle phases and a lot of important information during the patient walk, therefore the measured values can be used for statistical calculations. The results of these methods shown the progression of the therapy.

Acknowledgments The research project is conducted at the University of Pécs, Hungary, within the framework of the Biomedical Engineering Project of the Thematic Excellence Programme 2020 (20204.1.1-TKP2020)


Paper 124

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 124, 2020.

Novel Levy flight stochastic optimization algorithm for different engineering problems H.N. GHAFIL1 , S. ALSAMIA2 , K. JÁRMAI1 1 2

Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, University of Miskolc, Hungary Civil Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Kufa, Iraq

Keywords: Levy flight stochastic optimization algorithm, mathematical optimization, particle swarm optimization, computational intelligence, algorithms The matter of the mathematical optimization is dominating a wide range of engineering problems since many years ago because of its reliability, efficiency, and fast convergence. Since optimization is a state of the art and any algorithm can only be perfect for a specific categories of problems, therefore, there are a huge number of algorithms in the literature. This work, presents a novel optimizer called Levy flight stochastic optimization algorithm (LFSO) which is based on levy flight and random search within a search space. The LFSO algorithms is compared with many optimization algorithms on different benchmarks to measure its efficiency and reliability. Also, the proposed algorithm is employed in this work to solve different engineering problems from different field namely welded design problem, spring design, pressure and vessel design. Based on the statistical results, the extensive comparisons have shown that LFSO have overcome its competitive algorithms in many cases. The efficiency and deficiency of the new algorithm is discussed in the respective sections. The overall description of the LFSO is that it is a powerful optimization algorithm that can solve efficiently wide range of problems and guarantee a solution better than what is provided by other optimizers. The complexity, exploitation, and exploration analysis are discussed in details as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the LFSO algorithm.

Acknowledgments The research was supported by the Hungarian National Research, Development and Innovation Office - NKFIH under the project number K 134358.


Paper 125

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 125, 2020.

The effects of reference signature selection approaches in online signature verification benchmarking C.L. SZÜCS, B. KŐVÁRI Department of Automation and Applied Informatics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary

Keywords: online signature verification, reference selection, benchmarking The handwritten signature is one of the most widely used biometrics, therefore, signature verification is an important and actively researched area. The evaluation of different verification systems and approaches can be executed based on some own signature collections, but there are public databases as well. The advantage of the public ones is that they are widely used, so there are many publications containing verification results reached using these databases. Therefore, they are good for benchmarking and comparing different systems. Typically, the available reference set of genuine signatures and the unknown signature which has to be tested, are given during practical usage of signature verification systems, but there are more opportunities during benchmarking. Namely, most public databases contain a number of genuine signatures and a number of forgeries, but it is optional which signatures are used for training and testing. This work discusses some approaches to choose the genuine reference signatures for training and the effects of this on the verification results. The signatures are usually collected in at least two separate sessions for these databases, so the age of the reference signatures can also influence the verification accuracy. The goal is to determine the effects of different signature selection approaches and whether there is a relationship between the age of the selected reference signatures and the verification results.

Acknowledgments Project no. FIEK 16-1-2016-0007 has been implemented with the support provided by the National Research, Development and Innovation Fund of Hungary, financed under the Centre for Higher Education and Industrial Cooperation - Research infrastructure development (FIEK 16) funding scheme.


Paper 126

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 126, 2020.

An alignment-based multi-perspective online conformance checking technique Z. NAGY, Á. WERNER-STARK Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, University of Pannonia, Hungary

Keywords: process mining, conformance checking, alignments, incremental heuristic search, event streams, Data Petri nets Process mining is a relatively young research field, whose aim is to improve real processes by extracting knowledge from their recorded behavior. Conformance checking is an important research area within process mining, whose purpose is to confront event data (i.e., recorded behavior) and process models (hand-made or discovered automatically) of the processes, to detect, locate and explain the deviations between the recorded and the modelled behaviors. Researchers have developed a great variety of conformance checking techniques, however there are not any solutions which allow conformance analysis online and also take into account multiple perspectives. Existing works in online conformance checking focus only on the control-flow perspective and the works in multi-perspective conformance checking only allow a posteriori analysis (i.e., the non-conformant behaviors are detected only after the completion of the case). Taking into account other perspectives (e.g. time, resource, or data) is important, because deviations may not only be in the ordering of the activities. By applying techniques which are able to detect deviations in the process execution (in any perspective) in running processes as soon as they occur, countermeasures can immediately be initiated to reduce the possible negative effects caused by them. Nowadays, the de facto standard technique for calculating conformance checking statistics is the computation of alignments, which provides a “closest path” for completed cases through the process model. In recent years, alignment-based online conformance checking techniques were developed, which can be applied to incomplete cases as well, by using incremental heuristic search. It incrementally expands the search space and reuses previously computed intermediate results when new events are observed. The aim of this study is to create a multi-perspective online conformance checking technique by combining two existing techniques: a balanced multi-perspective conformance checking technique and an alignment-based online conformance checking technique, which uses incremental state-space expansion. The created algorithm incrementally computes optimal balanced prefix-alignments on an event stream and takes into account multiple perspectives by using a Data Petri net (DPN) as the process model. The event stream (apart from the event identifiers) contains case identifiers and attributes related to the events. A DPN is a special type of Petri net, which was developed for modelling multi-perspective processes.

Acknowledgments This work was supported by Széchenyi 2020 under the EFOP-3.6.1-16-2016-00015. The research is part of project TKP2020-NKA-10 that has been implemented with the support provided from the National Research, Development and Innovation Fund of Hungary, financed


under the Thematic Excellence Programme no. 2020-4.1.1.-TKP2020 (National Challenges Subprogramme) funding scheme.


Paper 127

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 127, 2020.

Closed domain template based question generation W.T. SEWUNETIE, K. LÁSZLÓ József Hatvany Doctoral School of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: automatic question generation, template based question generation, spaCy Python libraries, closed domain Artificial Intelligence has seen numerous applications in the area of education. Educational programs need an appropriate method for improving the current e student’s performance evaluation method. Through the use of automatic question generation, it is possible to generate fluent sentences from a given sentence or paragraph. This task could have important implications for the field of education as questions can automatically be generated for reading comprehension materials, thus saving educators time from this tedious task. Automating the process of question generation will help to reduce the workload and human dependence; thereby reducing human error. According to a recent survey paper related to question generation, rare attention has been paid to researching it, so our work provides interesting and new insights. The main focus of this study is to implement a question generation system for close domain materials using spaCy libraries. We have focused on the template-based question generation method from the three methods syntax-based, semantics-based, and template-based methods. The researcher first collects a dataset focusing on Wh question structures from computer science study materials. To implement we created 50 different templates with What, Why, Where, Who, and How to query for question generation. To get a better evaluation we have prepared different 30 human-generated and 40 system questions from 15 sentences and used human-level evaluate techniques. We have selected domain expert evaluators to evaluate the quality (naturalness) of each question by ranking each question 1-5 where 5 is the best. The evaluation result for mixed questions and system-generated questions are 3.75 and 3.36 respectively. We observe that the result of system-generated questions is put on the borderline that means the question might have a problem. In the future, we will extend our template-based question generation system in various domains.


Paper 128

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 128, 2020.

Mitigating the spear phishing using multi-layer approach A.G. GANIE, D. SAMAD József Hatvany Doctoral School for Computer Science and Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: spear phishing, network security, email security, intrusion, phishing filters Phishing means deceiving the user by disguising himself/herself as a trustworthy person, so as to steal sensitive information like account number, credit card details etc. One of the prominently used phishing technique nowadays is spear phishing It is one of the successful phishing attack because of its social, psychological parameters. In this paper we will mitigate the effect of spear phishing by using multi-layer approach. Multi-layer approach is the most effective way of dealing with online intrusion, as the intruder has to go through varies levels. Most of the phishing attacks are carried through emails and more specifically the attachments they carry. Almost all the researchers are working on content of the email but this paper chooses a unique way to counter the phishing emails by working on both the attachments and contents of an email. This paper mainly focuses on the spear phishing emails with attachments, since lot of work has been done to mitigate and spot this menace but researcher mainly focus on content or subject of the email while giving very less attention towards the spear phishing emails with attachments. The inclusion of the emails with attachments makes this paper unique. If there is an attachment with an email it shows more legitimacy than without one. Spear phishing is more dangerous than any other phishing attack as it exploits the people’s trust and results are catastrophic. Social engineering and reverse social engineering attacks make spear phishing attack more precarious. By applying the multi-layer model approach we can mitigate its effect.


Paper 129

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 129, 2020.

A dual authentication to detect phishing & pharming attacks at the client side A.G. GANIE, D. SAMAD József Hatvany Doctoral School for Computer Science and Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, University Of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: authentication, phishing, pharming attack, validation The Internet is becoming an increasingly important resource for people in the modern society. They use it for a variety of purposes ranging from net banking to social networking. The Internet enables people to participate in commercial activities whenever they wish and wherever they live. Today, most of the banks and other financial institutions around the world are using the Web to offer online financial services to their customers. Phishing attacks have the potential of inflicting serious financial damages on individual users. The objectives of the current research are: • To study the dual approach to authenticate a pharming website at the client side. • To provide a pop-up to the user in case of suspicious sites. • To verify whether the website is legitimate or not. • To analyse the contents on the webpage. • To identify DNS based pharming attacks that are very difficult to detect for the user. • To identify the research gap that is still prevailing in this field of study. • To focus on the web browser vulnerabilities as well as web browser implementation issues. • To educate the internet consumer who may be a potential victim. • To focus on the future thrust areas that are being developed by the contributed research work. • To expose the limitations of the study. • To find out the factors which influence internet user’s ability to correctly identify phishing websites.


Paper 130

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 130, 2020.

Private network optimization A.G. GANIE, D. SAMAD József Hatvany Doctoral School for Computer Science and Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: network protocols, network monitoring, optimization, bandwidth The main challenging task in laying a network is not to define its topology but to calculate its cost-benefit analysis, which is a research-oriented work. In any network, be it an intra- or an inter-network, the main focus is always on optimizing cost and bandwidth. PSWAN is a medium-sized network at the Directorate of information technology, India. This networking project provides internet services to many offices, both governmental and private. Optimization was required as the number of devices connected to this network was large. Two parameters that were optimized are: bandwidth, and cost. Cost optimization was achieved by shifting some small networks like school or medium-size office to broadband while as bandwidth optimization was achieved by global load balancing, minimize latency, packet loss monitoring and bandwidth management. During optimization, no hardware change was required. Opnet software was used to calculate the results. The proposed optimized network architecture shows promising results as compared to the existing one


Paper 131

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 131, 2020.

A survey on ethologically oriented fuzzy behavior-based system implementations M.A. LONE, S. KOVÁCS Institute of Information Science, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: ethologically oriented, behavior based robots, Fuzzy interpolation Animal behavior involves all the signs of progress and behaviors by which animals negotiate their interactions with their external environments, such as physical, biotic, and social behavior. A behavior is a reaction to some environmental stimuli or, in short, an acting procedure. The implementation of ethological, or ethologically inspired behavior models in man machine interaction became a popular research topic nowadays. The main goal of this paper to give a short survey first on the main concepts of ethological modelling and the questions of their robotic implementation possibilities. The importance of ethologically inspired robotic behavior’s in man machine interaction is the way as we can reuse these ethological models as examples for proper acting in different fields of social interest in robotic situations. The first part of the paper is a survey of Ethological models that can be found in the literature. The next section is a summary of some popular behavior implementation approaches in robotic environment. In the closing part of the paper some concepts of a Fuzzy behavior modelling techniques will be discussed briefly.


Paper 132

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 132, 2020.

Towards a DISSECT-CF extension for simulating Function-as-a-Service D.H. SALLO1 , G. KECSKEMÉTI1,2 1

Institute of Information Technology, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, University of Miskolc, Hungary 2 Faculty of Engineering and Technology, School of Computer Science and Mathematics, Liverpool John Moores University, United Kingdom

Keywords: cloud computing, serverless computing, Function-as-a-Service (FaaS), DISSECTCF Serverless computing technology allows deploying and executing code represented by Functionas-a-service (FaaS) without infrastructure management. Despite the widespread use of cloud simulators, they are still limited to evaluate and support Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) scenarios, incapable of simulating FaaS. The need to introduce a compatible serverless environment takes responsibility to manage infrastructure and operations is critical to fulfil a user’s request efficiently with minimum resource costs. DISSECT-CF is one of the simulators that is built to accompany modern technology by offering advanced features and architecture that consider any improvement over cutting-edge computing technology. This paper provides a prototype to extend DISSECT-CF for simulating serverless functions, with minimizing serverless provider resource costs meet user’s performance requirements. This prototype exploits the distinct approach of DISSECT-CF to provision demands of cloud resources independently. Moreover, it allows sharing low-level computing resources to mitigate resource consumption that is preferred by serverless environment. We believe that our prototype and DISSECT-CF can imitate the serverless provider to offer affordable costs of resources compared with existing baselines.

Acknowledgments This research was supported by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund under the grant number OTKA FK 131793.


Paper 133

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 133, 2020.

Challenges of the modelling of a complex scheduling problem with mixed-integer linear programming S. ERDŐS, B. KŐVÁRI Department of Automation and Applied Informatics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary

Keywords: scheduling, integer linear programming, operations research, final exam scheduling, optimization The automatic generation of schedules has been in the focus of researches for decades, while a lot of special requirements can restrict the state space. Final exam scheduling is a special subtask of the generation of schedules, where the requirements can even contradict to each other. The (mixed) integer linear programming is a popular method for modelling optimisation problems. The main problem is that a real-word problem can be modelled in many ways. Therefore, the challenge is to find a manageable way of building up the model. The challenge is doubled while finding the right model of the problem, in theory, is not enough. We have found a model, which thoroughly described the final exam scheduling, but testing it in practice was not successful, because the state space has grown so huge. The difficulties of building up a model were collected. Firstly, there is no chance for testing the whole model in advance, since the runtime and the size of the model depend on a lot of factors. After that, the decision variables have to be defined, and the complex constraints and objectives are formulated from them later, which could make some unseen problems. Afterwards, the runtime depends on the solvers too. They use different optimisation methodology to solve these NP-hard problems, and there are not even assumptions to determine, which method is better for a model. The solution opportunities were examined, to find a model which also works in practice. Firstly, there would be an opportunity to find a manageable model if we could test the model with more input data since the solver can adopt for only one input. Secondly, a promising solution would be if the final exam could be defined as a complicated graph, where the shortest path of the exams could be found. The open question is if we could model all requirements in this approach. Afterwards, a solver-independent model could also be a right solution. In this case, a general model is built up, which could be tested in more solvers, so the problem of the dependency from the solver’s optimisation methods could be eliminated. With these methods, we could manage the automated final exam scheduling problem in practice too.

Acknowledgments Project no. FIEK 16-1-2016-0007 has been implemented with the support provided by the National Research, Development and Innovation Fund of Hungary, financed under the Centre for Higher Education and Industrial Cooperation - Research infrastructure development (FIEK 16) funding scheme.


Paper 134

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 134, 2020.

Comprehension of thread scheduling for the C++ programming language A. GYEN, N. PATAKI Faculty of Informatics, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest

Keywords: C++, Clang, threads, code comprehension Nowadays, due to the increasing computing capacity, the demands on software are also increasing. It is no longer satisfactory for a program to “only” function well, it is also expected to make the most of the capabilities of its hardware and the possibilities of the language elements provided by the given programming language. Because expanding a server farm or workstation is not always possible, we may want to look at other alternatives if we want to reduce the runtime of our program or the utilization of the hardware. In such cases, one of the most expedient and obvious things may be to parallelize our program. However, writing a good parallel program is not an easy task because a lot of attention needs to be paid to avoid errors from possible multithreaded programs. This is why in most cases these tasks are entrusted to more trained professionals. The fact that a program uses multiple threads does not necessarily mean that it will be faster or optimal. There may be times when the program has to wait for the end of a thread to run before it can start the next one, and as a result, there is still a quasi-sequential execution of the program we are working with. The aim of our research is to find out if multithreaded programs are “actual” parallelization or if there are cases where threads have to wait for another thread to finish - thus slowing down execution - and ultimately get there to make it a much simpler one, or we could have done it with a sequential program. To do this, we want to create a tool to determine if the problems mentioned earlier occur in our current program, now specified for C++ programming language with the help of abstract syntax tree built by Clang compiler.


Paper 135

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 135, 2020.

Classification approaches in online signature verification M. SALEEM, B. KŐVÁRI Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary

Keywords: classification, online signature verification, k-nearest neighbor Human signature is one of the most common and widely accepted biometrics. Signatures are classified into offline (static) and online (dynamic) signatures based on the acquisition method. During the last decade, several approaches have been used in online signature verification. In our previous works we have reviewed the feature selection and preprocessing steps in conjunction with Dynamic time warping (DTW) based classification. In this work, we evaluate the classification methods that can be used in the field. We put special emphasis on a k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) based classification approach. Our results showed that the accuracy of the online signature classification can be significantly influenced by the correct choice of the classification approach. The jk-nearest neighbor (jk-NN), as a generalized form of the k-NN algorithm was used in the evaluation and showed accuracy improvement between 0.73%-10% for different databases compared to the k-NN algorithm. The jk-NN algorithm has several parameters, our results showed that a promising jk-NN online signature verification system can be built by optimizing these parameters.


Paper 136

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 136, 2020.

Optimizing the heat equation solver on GPU Z. FRIED, S. SZÉNÁSI, I. FELDE John von Neumann Faculty of Informatics, Óbuda University, Hungary

Keywords: GPU, parallel computation, heat equation For a parallelised numerical method which is based on, for example, a bio-inspired algorithm and it has to solve the Inverse Heat Transfer Problem, they should be capable of solving the heat equation as quickly as possible. The heat equation solving is widely documented by several algorithms with several boundary conditions but running these algorithms in different processor architectures (CPU, Nvidia GPU) is not a trivial project in a possible quickest way. The aim of the present study is first to develop the fastest algorithm for solving the heat equation in the above architectures furthermore define the boundary conditions of all possible solutions.


Paper 137

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 137, 2020.

Performance analysis of software renovation tools and practices N. SOMOGYI, G. KÖVESDÁN Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Informatics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary

Keywords: code modernization, modeling, performance analysis With the constant advance of software engineering practices and technologies, thousands of existing software are becoming more and more outdated. In order to effectively make use of the numerous advantages of newer approaches and technologies, incorporating them into the technology stack of the original program is desirable. However, due to time and budget constraints, these modernization steps are rarely taken in practice. To alleviate these efforts, extensive research has been dedicated to automate the modernization of such systems. Numerous methodologies and tools have been proposed and created to potentially reduce the costs of translating outdated software into a more advantageous environment. Among the many challenges of code modernization, the performance of such tools is equally important. If a tool or approach lacks the ability to finish the transformation process within reasonable time and memory consumption, then the solution itself is not applicable in practice. In this paper, we report on our performance analysis of code modernization techniques and tools. We briefly introduce our own code modernization tool and evaluate its average runtime and memory consumption. Based on the results, we discover the most crucial aspects that have considerable impact on the runtime and memory consumption of software renovation tools and estimate future tendencies of performance.


Paper 138

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 138, 2020.

Optimization of city logistics considering energy efficiency M.Z. AKKAD, T. BÁNYAI Institute of Logistics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: city logistics, emission reduction, energy-efficient transportation As the urban population increases, the supply chain operations in urban areas has resulted in increased energy consumption and environmental pollution. City logistics field has been becoming more forked with numerous available solutions within the last few years due to recent successive innovations in transportation and Industry 4.0. The pace of renewable energy developments in transportation such as e-cars and e-bikes is increasing and it has opened wide scope to the possibility of using them, next to the Industry 4.0 technologies that rely on the Internet of Things and artificial intelligence, which help to innovate smart solutions supporting the aim of shortening the needed time and route distance with collecting and saving information, giving the ability to analyze them. After a systematic literature review, this work introduces an optimization model of a multi-echelon collection and distribution system focusing on downtown areas and energy efficiency, sustainability, and emission reduction. The object of the optimization model is to design the optimal structure of the multi-echelon collection and distribution system including layout planning and determination of required transportation resources, like e-cars, e-bikes, and the use of public transportation.


Paper 139

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 139, 2020.

Graph-based approach to motion planning in a distributed setting C. HAJDU Széchenyi István University, Hungary

Keywords: motion planning, hierarchical, distributed system, robotics Motion planning is a critical task in autonomous mobile robots, which handles the navigation of robots in their environment. This task is inherently computationally complex and of a highly composite structure. Currently, there is no fixed approach for environment representation and planning. The behavior of current widespread frameworks is difficult to supervise and extend. This paper presents a motion planning architecture of a flexible graph-based structure and an independent hybrid-system based formalism of interactive signaling interface. The focus of this approach is the use in a distributed setting, flexible extensibility, and vast interactivity with external actors. The paper presents a working prototype, the used planning approach is inspired by Hybrid A*, and the distributed environment representation is based on generalized Voronoi diagrams.


Paper 140

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 140, 2020.

The trade-off problem in distributed telemedicine systems: A case-study Z.R. JÁNKI Department of Software Engineering, University of Szeged, Hungary

Keywords: consistency, telemedicine, cache, distributed system, taxonomy Telemedicine is one of the areas of healthcare that is developing quickly and it is finding a place in modern medicine. Telemedicine Web systems are facing a great challenge because of the increasing number of electronic healthcare records (EHR) and the demand for features. By meeting these requirements, distributed systems have gained ground also in telemedicine. However, the CAP and PACELC theorems state that distributed systems bring their own problems as well. Formerly, we elaborated a telemedicine system specification formally that presented how consistency and availability can be tuned and improved. Of course, if the level of consistency is increased, the availability of a system is reduced. In order to find the appropriate balance between the consistency and availability, we can place configurable caches on the data path. However, we found that the data path can be very complex in a telemedicine system. On the one hand, the different data parts are stored at different places, but on the other hand, the data may go through a lot of computational units, proxies and caches. Lastly, during the system model simulation and evaluation, we examined that external factors like latency that can seriously influence the consistency of such a system. My study seeks to introduce the use of our methodology with an in-depth analysis of a telemedicine application developed by our team. The approach focuses on the solutions that are defined in our taxonomy. The classification was elaborated based on real telemedicine use-cases. I also show that our methodology is not just easily tuneable, but it can be readily adapted to other type of distributed telemedicine systems.

Acknowledgments This work was supported by the construction EFOP-3.6.3-VEKOP-16-2017-00002. The project was supported by the European Union, co-financed by the European Social Fund. This research was also supported by the EU-funded Hungarian grant EFOP-3.6.1-16-2016-00008.


Paper 141

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 141, 2020.

Classification of RAMAN spectra for chemical component identification G. KNYIHÁR, K. CSORBA Department of Automation and Applied Informatics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary

Keywords: RAMAN spectroscopy, Principle Component Analysis, component identification, chemical mapping, multivariate analysis RAMAN spectroscopy is a commonly used method for chemical component identification in pharmaceutical researches. With the use of RAMAN maps, the particles of components on a tablet’s surface can be easily identified in a non-destructive way. The evaluation of the raw spectra is a complicated method and require not only competence but also the pure spectra of the anticipated materials. However, for some applications seeing the distribution of different components itself would have a significant impact without knowing the exact material of the component. For this reason, this paper aims to analyse the power of principle component analysis (PCA) in chemical component classification and to present a stable and reliable method for RAMAN map evaluation. The results show that PCA is a versatile usable technique and have great potential for RAMAN spectra interpretation.


Paper 142

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 142, 2020.

Predicting students academic performance without subjective nominal variables encoding M. JAWTHARI, V. STOFFOVÁ Faculty of Informatics, Department of Media & Educational Informatics, Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary

Keywords: e-learning, student performance prediction, KNN, encoding The target (dependent) variable is often influenced not only by ratio scale variables but also by qualitative (nominal scale) variables in a classification analysis. Data mining techniques accept only numerical inputs; hence, it is necessary to encode these categorical variables into numerical values using encoding techniques. However, the datasets can have numerical, categorical, and mixed attributes. To apply data mining techniques, categorical features need a transforming step that turns them into numerical values. Some attributes show clear ordering such as the economic status variable, with three categories (low, medium, and high). This variable needs to be transformed into a numerical attribute by assigning (1,2,3) to (low, medium, and high), this process is called encoding. Though encoding is not difficult, it can be misleading in cases where non-ordinal attributes like gender needs encoding. In general, gender can take two values (male, female); there is no order in gender variable, so it is a nominal variable. However, it needs to preprocess (encoding), to feed it to a data mining method. If a male is encoded as "1", female as "0", this will mislead the learning algorithm as 1 has a priority over 0. Similarly, encoding female as "1" and male as "0" still cause the same issue. These cases can be called subjectivity. A better technique to handle subjectivity is by applying one-hotencoding to the nominal variables. This technique increases the number of dimensions as it creates a binary column for each value. For example, a color variable that can take categories (red, green, and blue) will have 3 binary columns red, green, and blue. A "1" value is placed in the binary variable for the color and "0" values for the other colors. Hence, the dataset columns increased by 3. This study overcomes this issue by modifying the KNN algorithm that accepts only numeric variables to take mixed variables dataset. This paper presents a modified KNN algorithm that calculates the distances values of categorical variables without pre-encoding. The proposed algorithm utilizes the Euclidean distance function to calculate the similarity of numerical features in addition to the hamming distance that calculates the similarity between object values of categorical (nominal) features. Our similarity measure combines the result of the hamming distance and Euclidean distance. We compare the test sample to the whole training set. Here, we use student’s academic performance dataset for testing the enhanced algorithm. The dataset was split into 80 percent as a train dataset, and 20% as a test dataset. It shows the enhanced KNN outperforms standard KNN that requires nominal variables encoding to calculate the distance between them. The obtained results are quite encouraging i.e., the improved KNN is 9% better than standard KNN in accuracy. The best result of the improved KNN, 0.781, algorithm was obtained from K equals to 1. The best result of standard KNN, 0.698, was obtained from K equals to 2. Also, we applied one-hot-encoding to the categorical variables in the dataset and scaled the numerical variables. Then we applied standard KNN to get the best accuracy as 0.677, which resulted from k as 5. Therefore, the proposed method still overcomes the standard KNN algorithm.


Paper 143

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 143, 2020.

Switch to the new switch in Java M.A. ALQARADAGHI1,2 , T. KOZSIK3 1

Department of Programming Languages and Compilers, Faculty of Informatics, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary 2 Technical College of Kirkuk, Northern Technical University, Iraq 3 Research Group, Martonvásár, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary

Keywords: static analysis, refactoring, code quality, Java, switch-case Java 12 introduced an improved switch statement, which supports structured programming better than the traditional, C-style switch statement. The old switch statement requires the use of explicit break instructions to prevent execution fall through to the next branch. Fall through cases, if used intentionally, allow sophisticated branching, which can be very convenient in certain situations. However, they are in conflict with the principles of structured programming. Moreover, it is easy to use fall through cases unintentionally, which is a source of programming errors. We investigate how compilers and other programming language processing tools can help programmers avoid fall-through-related bugs, and how tools can detect which old switch statements can be refactored to new switch statements in Java. We also report on a lightweight refactoring tool to perform the necessary source-code transformations automatically. The motivation behind our research is that the use of the new switch statement whenever possible allows us to write code which will less probably break due to modifications made during the evolution of the software.


Paper 144

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 144, 2020.

Policy enforcement in telemedicine with the deployment of multiple enforcement points Z. SZABÓ Department of Software Engineering, University of Szeged, Hungary

Keywords: EHR, telemedicine, FHIR, security, access control, policy enforcement The emerging popularity of telemedicine solutions brought with itself an alarming issue due to the lack of proper security solutions and practices handling the access of highly sensitive patient data and medical information. With the involvement of multi-layered, heterogeneous infrastructures containing IoT and edge computing elements, the severity and complexity of the issue became even more alarming, soliciting for an established framework and methodology to control access. The goal of my research is the definition of one such possible solution with a focus on native cloud integration, high adaptability, possible deployment at multiple points on the path of the healthcare data, and the adaptation of the popular Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) standard. To achieve this, I have chosen the Open Policy Agent (OPA) engine as a policy enforcement point implementation, since it can be run as a separate entity in the infrastructure or compiled into WebAssembly and run at any point of the infrastructure. Following some early evaluations which showcased the efficiency of the standalone solution in terms of latency, CPU and memory usage, I have arrived to the point, when it is possible to test the WebAssembly runtime in one of the real-life telemedicine applications of our development team. In this paper, I showcase the current state of my research, including an advanced prototype of the solution with an early evaluation of the effectiveness of policy enforcement by the web application in the browser, and the interpretation of the obtained results.

Acknowledgments This research was supported by the EU-funded Hungarian grants EFOP-3.6.1-16-2016-00008, EFOP-3.6.3-VEKOP-16-2017-00002 and GINOP-2.2.1-15-2017-00073


Paper 145

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 145, 2020.

Github crawling for software architecture identification: An AI supported high level architecture extractor U. SHAKIKHANLI, V. BILICKI Department of Software Engineering, University of Szeged, Hungary

Keywords: software architectures, developer performance, full stack, KIS, CLI, framework, telemedicine Github is a service providing hosting for software development and Git-based version control where developers can upload projects and codes they work on it. The most important feature of Github is its effective robust version control system with more than 190 million repositories. This huge amount also makes Github a perfect open source database for different purposes of research in programming. One can use the Github repo to analyse the productivity of different software architecture styles and programming techniques. The information needed for this kind of study is not present in the metadata capabilities of the Github itself. The information regarding the applied software architecture is there but in a very heterogeneous format: in code repositories. We have developed a methodology and a set of processing scripts using Github API for extracting the high level architecture related information from different repository types. In order to speed up the architecture reconstruction process we have applied a machine learning approach in software development framework methodology classification. In this paper we would like to show our result regarding the AI supported high level architecture reconstruction of a massive set of Github projects.

Acknowledgments This work was supported by the construction EFOP-3.6.3-VEKOP-16-2017-00002. The project was supported by the European Union, co-financed by the European Social Fund. This research was supported by the EU-funded Hungarian grant EFOP-3.6.1-16-2016-00008. This research was also supported by the EU-funded Hungarian grant GINOP-2.2.1-15-2017-00073


Paper 146

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 146, 2020.

The impact of the software architecture on the developer productivity G. KOKREHEL, V. BILICKI Department of Software Engineering, University of Szeged, Hungary

Keywords: software architectures, developer productivity, full stack, KIS, CLI, framework, telemedicine Distinct technological trends seriously influence the modern software architectures. Typically, software developers have to select the best from an enormous variety of possible approaches and extract information from blogs and Git repositories. Unfortunately, these sources are technology-oriented since they focus on the How, not on the Why questions. In this paper, we are going to compare four different software architectures and framework combinations generally. The basis for the analysis is the developer’s productivity. In a 3 years long R&D project, we have efficiently implemented a real-world telemedicine application four times with various software architectures and architectural patterns. More than 5,000 person-hours were spent on carrying out them. At present, we have a unique dataset that provides us the opportunity to compare the cost of spent person-hours in different approaches. We can now answer the questions like this: Is a serverless architecture more efficient than a classical server-based software architecture? The goal of our research is to describe our measurement approach, the dataset and the applied architectures considering the software developer’s productivity.


Paper 147

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 147, 2020.

User-defined types for programming serverless applications Á. RÉVÉSZ, N. PATAKI Faculty of Informatics, Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary

Keywords: serverless programming, functional language, tuples, sum types, production types, Function as a Service In modern software service realm, the microservice architecture is trending among industrial standards. While it gives great tools for scaling and decoupling services by domain on the other hand it demands lot of boilerplate code as the granularity grows. Serverless architecture, also known as Function as a Service architecture gives the opportunity of increasing granularity while keeping boilerplate code well under control. As its name suggests, the unit of this architecture is a function instead of a service. Enabling software teams to develop and deploy commonly used functions as separate services themselves focusing on only the tasks or computations it has to represent instead of additional server codes (request or message handling, etc). As we design and develop LambdaKube, our experimental FAAS-based software platform with its development tools we are developing a functional programming language. Our project goal is to create a cloud-native platform for distributed computations which leverages the powerful toolset of containerization technologies. Currently LambdaKube languages type system supports booleans, integers, strings, lists and implications — functions. For distributed computations it supports composition and map functions (distributed form). The compilation target supported by our current language backend is an archive of generated Python code and a Helm chart. The generated artefact can be deployed to LambdaKube platform with a single command. Our proof-of-concept LambdaKube language has some limitations. In this paper, we present a new language feature for LambdaKube. To improve our language, we provide user-defined types that is a very useful feature that enables more elegant and readable computation expressions.


Paper 148

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 148, 2020.

Using convolutional neural network-based activity monitoring in indoor localization methods L. ÁRVAI Hatvany József Doctoral School of Information Science, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: indoor-localization, convolutional neural network, human activity monitoring Location specific services are widely used in outdoor environment. Recently their indoor counterpart gaining more popularity, with the evolution of indoor localization systems. However, there is no GPS like commonly used technology for indoor localization. One of the very popular method of determining a location of a smart device is using some existing radio infrastructure, like Wi-Fi and using RF signal field strength value to estimate the position. Smart devices are also equipped with several sensors capable of capturing the acceleration, angular speed of the mobile device. This information can be analyzed in order to determine the user’s motion activity and motion type. The real-time result of this motion analysis can be used to increase the stability of the indoor localization system. Detecting the walking step, turn, stairs motion type can refine the indoor position using digital indoor map as a reference. The real-time recognition of the motion type from the sensory data is possible with a precisely constructed and well trained convolutional neural network. The construction and advantages of such a neural network will be explained.


Paper 149

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 149, 2020.

Macro level evaluation of road network in Western Hungary by fuzzy signature rule-base algorithm G.C. MIKULAI1 , L.T. KÓCZY2 1

Doctoral School of Regional and Business Administration Sciences, Széchenyi István University, Hungary 2 Multidisciplinary Doctoral School of Engineering Sciences, Széchenyi István University, Hungary

Keywords: Fuzzy signature, road evaluation, decision preparation Making the decision about an actual road, whether it is properly built, or it needs renovation, or extension is a complex decision. We propose a factual decision algorithm, which helps to make this decision. We use a fuzzy signature in order to take into account all the relevant aspects of the conditions of the road. In the end we help the decision makers to decide properly. The model is using actual traffic data, weather attributes, accident statistics and road condition details in order to increase the accuracy of the model.


Other engineering fields


Paper 150

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 150, 2020.

Modelling challanges of a parametric 3D-printed orthosis R. SÁRKÖZI1 , P. IVÁNYI2 , K. SZOMMER1 , P. NOVÁK2 1

Institute of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary 2 Institute of Information and Electrical Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: parametric design, orthosis, medical devices The aim of this research is to develop a procedure for making 3d printed orthosis for lower arm bracing. It includes the process of 3d scanning the arm, creating a model which can be easily adjusted to the patient, creating the structure and the closure of the orthosis, and the 3d printing process. In this presentation the built-up of the parametric model will be discussed. For creating the model of the orthosis Rhino 3D and Grasshopper is used. The parametric model of the orthosis is based on the 3d scanned mesh of the arm. The model is later forwarded to the finite element modeller software for analysis. The mesh structure is remodelled for the orthosis and currently requires the user to assign some key features of the arm. Grasshopper offers the possibility of creating very effective solutions when a precise algorithm is used. In this case the biggest challenge is the geometrical diversity of the input, so the model has to be rather flexible. To gain this flexibility the geometrical features of the lower arm are analysed and compared to the requirements of the mesh used by the finite element modelling software. As the result of this research a structured model is created, which can be easily transferred to the finite element modelling software, and fulfils its requirements. This model will be modified later based on the results of the analysis. The model performs well with slightly incomplete scanned models, but it still requires refinement in the area of robustness. A further goal is to improve the modelling to run automatically without an operator.


Paper 151

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 151, 2020.

Algorithm for multiple spherical shape-based segmentation of point clouds R. HONTI Department of Surveying, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovak Republic

Keywords: point cloud, sphere segmentation, automated data processing, shape-based segmentation Today huge datasets can be captured in a relatively short time. After collecting these data sets the next step is their processing. Automation of the processing steps can contribute to efficiency increase, to the reduction of the time needed for processing, and to the reduction of interactions of the user. Segmentation is one of the basic steps in point cloud processing since most of the manufactured objects are composed of basic primitives like planes, cylinders, spheres, etc. The work brings a short review of the most reliable methods for sphere segmentation. Next, an innovative algorithm for automated spherical shape-based segmentation of 3D point clouds is introduced. Also, at the beginning of the algorithm to increase the efficiency, a method for the curvature computation of the point cloud in each point is proposed. Based on the curvature information, the subsets of points are selected, where the presence of a spherical shape is assumed. Then, the segmentation process is performed only on these subsets of the point cloud. The proposed algorithm was tested on complex point clouds, the testing is also described. In the last part of the presented work, the implementation of the proposed algorithm to a standalone application in Matlab® software is described.

Acknowledgments This work was supported by the Slovak Research and Development Agency under the Contract no. APVV-18-0247.


Paper 152

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 152, 2020.

RPA progression throughout the years and futuristic aspects G. AHSAN, C. SIPOS Faculty of Engineering, University of Debrecen, Hungary

Keywords: RPA, robotic process automation, automation process, RPA future In this paper we will discuss the robotic process automation in today’s market. RPA has become an essential part of a business. The paper highlights the role of RPA in the modern business environment. One will come to understand about the progression of RPA as modern technologies are progressing throughout the years and how much changes these RPA technologies have brought to the world business leaders. Discussion about different RPA tools and their impact on a business has been explained in detail. Adoption of RPA tools have raised lots of questions when it comes to the deployment of these tools in a business but the outcome of the ROI in business by reducing cost and time taken on repetitive tasks made it easy for firms to deploy RPA tools. Differentiating RPA bot from AI and robotics for the better understanding for lay audience. Discussion on future of RPA is getting more and more important with the evolution of it, many predictions have been flowing around every corner but results are referring to one thing, that RPA is here to stay, evolve and progress.


Paper 153

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 153, 2020.

Morphological and structural properties of Yittrium-modified SrTiO3 ceramics fabricated by Sol-gel method M. TIHTIH, F.M.J. IBRAHIM, E. KUROVICS, L.A. GÖMZE Institute of Ceramics and Polymer Engineering, Faculty of Materials Science and engineering, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: ceramics, Sol-gel, doping, SEM In this work the preparation of pure and Yittrium doped SrTiO3 ceramics by sol-gel process is reported. All the properties of the samples were investigated using TGA/DTA, XRD and SEM. XRD results show that the samples are crystallized in the pure perovskite. The TGA/DTA analysis shows that the phase formation temperature of Y-doped SrTiO3 ceramic is 1000 °C. The lattice parameters produced are 3,909 Å to 3,951 Å so that the crystal structure forms a cube. The analysis of XRD data confirms that the increasing value of Y doping composition will reduce the lattice parameters of SrTiO3.

Acknowledgments Thanks to the University of Miskolc (Hungary) to support this work.


Paper 154

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 154, 2020.

Research underpinning the design of an optical sorting facility: The study of quantity, size and composition of the selectively collected mixed packaging waste from households entering the manual sorting plant A. GYORFI, C. LEITOL, T. KISS Institute of Smart Technology and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary

Keywords: packaging waste, household waste, selective collection, manual sorting, optical sorting, quantity, size, composition Our research was carried out in the Pécs-Kökény manual sorting plant where they are sorting the selectively collected mixed packaging waste from households takes place. The collected waste is sorted here by type of material and transported from there to external companies for recycling. The separated recyclable material is handed over to the recoverers after baling. In the course of the research, we examined the quantitative changes of the waste stream entering the sorting plant and the output materials for the last 5 years, and the composition properties according to the particle size for a quarterly period. The amount of incoming waste and the amount of recovered material have also increased linearly over the years. 40% of the incoming waste comes from different types of paper and 20% from different types of plastic. 5% is glass and metal waste and the remaining 35% is interfering materials. It can be shown that the seasons significantly influence the composition and the amount of material entering the sorting plant. In the warmer months, more waste arrives, with more beverage cartons, PET, iron, and aluminium, while in the colder months, incoming volumes decrease, and the materials mentioned also decrease amongst with paper and cardboard in the waste stream. The aforementioned material streams can be linked to beverages in summer and to their favourable combustion properties in winter. Samples taken to determine the composition properties according to the particle size were separated. The dimensions preferred by the optical sorters was the guiding principle, so the separation limits became the ranges <70 mm, 70 mm - 350 mm, >350 mm. Approximately 60% of all incoming waste falls in the ideal range of 70 mm - 350 mm and 20% in the range of <70 mm and 20% in the range of >350 mm. Manual sorting would still be the most economically viable method for sorting larger wastes, smaller ones are not suitable for sorting further, based on practical experience due to their contamination and low recoverability, but due to their energy properties they can be used energetically after shredding. 60% of the >350 mm fraction is cardboard, 10% is LDPE and 30% is interfering material. The 70 mm - 350 mm range is similar to the incoming material proportions, with 50% paper, 30% plastic, 5% metal, 5% glass, and 10% interfering material. Because there are significant differences in composition and quantities as the seasons and months alternate, they provide important information for engineers when designing a new technology. If all machines were optimized for average quantities, there could be serious operational problems with material accumulation and congestion at peak volumes.


Paper 155

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 155, 2020.

Automated verification of building structures G. BARICZOVÁ, J. ERDÉLYI Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Surveying, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovak Republic

Keywords: BIM, IFC, point cloud, application Nowadays the information technology increasingly influencing the process of the whole lifecycle of buildings from the design to their operation. A suitable tool that has been used in recent years throughout the lifecycle of buildings is Building Information Modelling known as BIM, which results in a virtual model of the building (BIM model). The BIM model is a modern element of the building industry that is updated throughout the building’s lifecycle and is used by all of the stakeholders. Therefore, it is a suitable tool to automate the construction process. In recent years, there is an intensive effort in Slovakia to implement BIM into the building industry, of which the surveyors are also an integral part. The information modelling itself represents a new approach to the performance of geodetic and cartographic works in construction from the phase of preparation of documents for the projection to the phase of asbuilt documentation. BIM model together with innovative methods of spatial data collecting enables a detailed verification of construction. Currently the most used techniques of spatial data collection are terrestrial laser scanning or close photogrammetry, which result in point clouds. The information contained in detailed point clouds and BIM models are suitable tools for quality check of a given structure, often in real time. The paper briefly deals with building information modelling and creation of digital twins of buildings using modern techniques of spatial data collection (TLS). It describes an algorithm for automated verification of the buildings’ structures. In the presentation the author will present the creation of algorithms for automated difference model creation between the BIM model and data obtained from TLS or photogrammetry. The results are used to verify the geometric parameters of structural elements (such as flatness of walls, straightness of pipes, including checking their diameters, etc.), as well as to determine deviations in their location (position and orientation from the project itself). The information obtained is a basis for the qualification and quantification of deviations during construction management.

Acknowledgments This work was supported by the Slovak Research and Development Agency under the Contract no. APVV-18-0247.


Paper 156

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 156, 2020.

Eco-friendly ceramic specimens with enhanced thermal insulation properties produced from Zeolite-poor rock J.F.M. IBRAHIM, E. KUROVICS, M. TIHTIH, L.A. GÖMZE Institute of Ceramics and Polymer Engineering, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Miskolc

Keywords: Zeolite-poor rock„ thermal conductivity, mechanical milling, dry pressing In this study, ceramic specimens were produced based on the zeolite-poor rock (Tokaj) using uniaxial pressing and reactive sintering techniques. The microstructure and morphology of the samples were examined using several characterization methods including, SEM, XRD and XRF. Moreover, the physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the specimens were also investigated. The authors have found that the properties of the final product are highly affected by sintering temperatures. A remarkable change is observed in density, porosity, shrinkage and colour of the produced specimens. The research confirms the potential use of Zeolite-poor rock as environmentally building material.

Acknowledgments The described work was carried out as part of the EFOP-3.6.1-16-00011 “Younger and Renewing University – Innovative Knowledge City – institutional development of the University of Miskolc aiming at intelligent specialisation” project implemented in the framework of the Széchenyi 2020 program. The realization of this project is supported by the European Union, co-financed by the European Social Fund.


Paper 157

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 157, 2020.

Effect of tuff material on the properties of the lightweight expanded clay aggregates M. ABDELFATTAH, I. KOCSERHA, R. GÉBER Institute of Ceramic and Polymer Engineering, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: tuff, lightweight, clay, phase The aim of this work is focused on studying the effect of tuff materials on all properties and mineral phases of expanded clay minerals. The samples were characterized by XRF, XRD, SEM microscopy attached with EDAX and heating microscope. The European standards are applied to determine the physical and mechanical characteristics of the aggregates. Results showed that, the tuffs enhanced the height expansion of the aggregates to 70 % and decrease the densities of the lightweight aggregates to 28%. The mineral mullite phase can enhance the strength of the lightweight aggregates, but decrease the expansion of the lightweight clay aggregates.

Acknowledgments This research was supported by the European Union and the Hungarian State, co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund in the framework of the GINOP-2.3.4-15-201600004 project, aimed to promote the cooperation between the higher education and the industry.


Paper 158

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 158, 2020.

Waste-to-reuse foam glasses produced from bottle glass, CRT glasses and aluminium dross M. SASSI, A. SIMON Institute of Ceramic and Polymer Engineering, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: foam, glass, dross, waste Foam glass is an ultra-light material with high load bearing, chemical stability, thermal and acoustic insulation. The rising concern about ecology and sustainability draws the attempt to use ecofriendly materials. This study deals with the investigation of glass foam properties (physical and mechanical) based on recycled bottle glass material, cathode ray tube (CRT) glass and aluminium dross. The microstructure was examined with special focus on the effect of the glass composition on the cell size and wall thickness. Aluminium dross enhanced the foaming ability, the mechanical properties and homogeneity of the microstructure.


Paper 159

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 159, 2020.

Development and investigation of Ti-layer on the surface of ceramic specimens made from kaolinite and IG-017 bio-original additive M. KHALILI, E. KUROVICS, L.A. GÖMZE Institute of Ceramics and Polymer Engineering, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: ceramic, heat conductivity, kaolin, sintering, porosity, Ti-layer The authors used kaolinite and IG-017 bio-original additive of IGREX Ltd as raw materials, which were mixed to make powder mixtures. Using uniaxially compression, cylindrical discs were made, pre-sintered in oxidation and reduction atmosphere at 1250 °C, then sintered at 1600 °C and titanized to form a more resistant surface layer. Investigating how the physical properties of the produced ceramics like density, porosity, and heat conductivity are changing after titanization. The properties of the pre-sintered samples depend greatly on the kiln atmosphere, but after the titanization in the case of using the same mixture composition for example the porosity values of the samples got closer.


Paper 160

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 160, 2020.

Multivalued dependencies in incomplete databases with limited domain: Properties and rules A. MUNQATH1,2 , A. SALI1,3 1

Department of Computer Science and Information Theory, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary, 2 ITRDC, University of Kufa, Iraq 3 Alfréd Rényi Institute of Mathematics, Hungary

Keywords: Strongly possible multivalued dependencies, null values, data imputation Multivalued dependencies are a generalization of functional dependencies and it extends the understanding of logical database design. The satisfaction of multivalued dependency X  Y provides a sufficient and necessary condition for relation r to be the lossless join of its projections r[XY ] and r[X(R \ Y )] without loss of information. Real-world databases are not always complete, most often, there are some missing data values. In a previous work, we introduced the strongly possible world (spWorld), strongly possible keys (spKeys) and strongly possible functional dependencies (spFD’s) notions. A spWorld T 0 is a possible world of an incomplete table T that results by substituting every occurrence of a NULL with a value shown in its corresponding attribute. Based on the strongly possible world concept, we defined the spkey (spFD) as a key (FD) that is satisfied in some spWorld. The multivalued dependencies show a different behaviour in the incomplete tables then in the complete ones. In the present work, we introduce a new type of multivalued dependencies, strongly possible multivalued dependencies (spMVD’s), for the incomplete databases with limited domain. We provide some properties and implication rules of spMVD.


Paper 161

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 161, 2020.

Corrosion consequences of both stable and activated international simple glass ISG influenced by Ankerite A.A. DABBAS, K. KOPECSKÓ Department of Engineering Geology and Geotechnics, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Budapest University of Technology and Economics BME, Hungary

Keywords: international simple glass, INAA, Silicate Sorption, HLW, Ankerite, R7T7 Corrosion of the nuclear borosilicate glass matrix (R7T7 type glass) in the anaerobic conditions deep in geological repository formations can be closely predicted due to the delay on amorphous protective layer (gel) formation on the glass interface. Formation of the Gel layer is related to silicate saturation condition in the surrounding medium. Sorption of silicate by the near-field minerals could delay creation of the gel amorphous protective layer. A simplified version of the French R7T7 glass is called International Simple Glass (ISG). In our research, this reference glass of nuclear interest was studied. We examined the short-term behavior of International Simple Glass (ISG) with and without the presence of Ankerite mineral. Static leach tests on experimental systems incorporating both stable and activated ISG coupons were executed. Commonly performed static leach tests include the standard Materials Characterization Center leach test for nuclear waste forms (MCC-1a ) as a reference, all systems were reacted in double deionized ultra-pure water at temperatures of 90o C and initial pH value of 6.3. Preparation of the activated ISG coupons was through Industrial Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) implemented in research nuclear reactor. Results of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) showed a highest rate of corrosion on ISG coupons obtained during the first 7 days of reaction, however. The presence of Ankerite was found to reduce slightly the concentration of silicic acid in solution during the first 28 days of reaction while a significant decrease happened at the day 90 of reaction, which may be due to sorption activity on Si by Ankerite. Panoramic scan of the Gamma Spectroscopy measurement with the High Purity Germanium Detector (HPGe) showed more original impurities in the ISG components (Co, La, Ba, Ce, Th, Zn, Sc) in which could be recorded as a new finding for the ISG composition. HPGe detected many radioactive elements in the activated ISG (60 Co, 125 Sb, 144 Ce, 154/155 Eu, 95 Zr–95 Nb, 133 Ba) which are already recorded in the literature for R7T7. Further Gamma spectroscopy measurements with HPGe on the reacted Ankerite (Ankerite cake) revealed that most of the generated radioactive elements in the ISG could be absorbed by Ankerite.

Acknowledgments The Stipendium Hungaricum Scholarship Programme is highly acknowledged for supporting this PhD study and research work. This research was also assisted by the Jordan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC), Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR), Jordan Uranium Mining Company (JUMCO) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), USA.


Paper 162

©University of Pécs, 2020 Abstract book for the 16th Miklós Iványi International PhD & DLA Symposium Péter IVÁNYI (Editor), ISBN 978-963-429-578-5, Paper 162, 2020.

Lightweight manufacturing of dual phase automotive parts T. DOMOKOS1,2 , M. TISZA2 1 2

Sályi István Doctoral School, University of Miskolc, Hungary Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Miskolc, Hungary

Keywords: manufacturing, automotive parts, lightweight Lightweight manufacturing in the automotive industry is one of the main targets due to the ever increasing global competition among car manufacturers all over the World. Therefore, the automotive industry is always a key industry for sheet metal forming. Accordingly, the requirements imposed on the automotive industry are also decisive for sheet metal forming. Among these requirements is the elaboration of innovative manufacturing processes, which are frequently contradictory and challenging, e.g. in order to have a light car the formability of the material can be affected, e.g. increased environment protection can reduce performance. The application of lightweight construction principles has an important role to meet legal and costumers’ demands currently imposed on our society. It is also crucial to predict future needs and together strengthen relationships and partnerships between academia and industry. Using the principles and methods of weight reduction the current and future requirements, such as lower fuel consumption, lower pollutant emissions and quality and safety standards can be met. However, they are the main driving force for the automotive industry and for sheet metal forming, that is derived from these main factors: costumer that requires higher safety, more economical, more comfortable and efficient vehicles. The lightweight and safety are contradictory requirements that also the global market competition faces to meet all the previous solutions. In order to ensure weight reduction, smaller sheet thickness should be applied, however, the requirement to increase safety is also in contradiction. Using high strength materials and decreasing size leads to reduced formability as a not positive consequence. These requirements are the main factors, which support the continuous material and technological developments in sheet metal forming. This paper will focus on concepts both from the side of new, innovative materials and from the side of manufacturing processes. The body design with light weight and enhanced safety is a crucial issue in the car industry. Corresponding to this trend various automotive steel products with advanced performance is developed. Dual Phase Steels are now expanding their application since the steels exhibit higher strength and ductility, hole expansion ratio, deep drawability and many others advantages. Steels including extra- and ultra-AHSS (Advanced High Strength Steels) are believed to be the next generation automotive steels and will replace the high strength steels due to their higher strength and ductility combinations.


Author Index ABDEL HAKIM, A.N., 64 ABDEL WAHID, A.H., 64 ABDELFATTAH, M., 157 ABDULHUSSEIN, Z.A., 69 AHMED, A.M., 110 AHSAN, G., 152 AKKAD, M.Z., 138 AL-MOALMI, M.A.A., 1 AL-ORAN, O., 104 ALAMOUSH, S.J., 55 ALEKSIC, M., 86 ALHAFADHI, M., 105 ALI, M., 11, 57 ALKENTAR, A., 107 ALQARADAGHI, M.A., 143 ALSAMIA, S., 65, 124 ALSARAYEFI, S., 114 ALSIRAWAN, R., 99 ANTYPENKO, H., 40 ÁRVAI, L., 148 ASTARAKI, F., 74 BABOS, A., 43 BACHMANN, B., 14 BAKAI, N., 27, 29 BALLA, R., 40 BARANYAI, B., 7, 10, 57 BARICZOVÁ, G., 155 BARLOKOVÁ, D., 95 BAROKOVÁ, D., 88 BEJTULLAHU, F., 58 BENE, B., 48 BENE, K., 85 BENKŐ, M., 40, 43, 48 BENMEBAREK, M.A., 66 BERTYÁK, Á., 38 BILICKI, V., 145, 146

BODOLAI, T., 101 BORSOS, Á., 2, 27, 41, 46, 47, 80 BYTCANKOVÁ, L., 97 BÁBA, B., 94 BÁCSI, S., 122 BÁNYAI, T., 138 CAKÓ, B., 106 CAO, H., 19, 20 ČERVEŇANSKÁ, M., 88 CHAHBOUB, Y., 103 CHOLEVA, R., 84 CSABA, T., 42 CSORBA, K., 141 CSÉBFALVI, A., 72 CSÓKA, M., 91, 93 ČUBANOVÁ, L., 87 DABBAS, A.A., 161 DHAOU, O.B., 21 DOMOKOS, T., 162 DULEBA, S., 82, 83 DUŠICKA, P., 97 DÁNYI, T.Z., 6 EL KERIM, A., 119 ELHADAD, A.M.R., 64 ELHADAD, S., 7 ERDOSY, D., 101 ERDÉLYI, J., 155 ERDŐS, S., 133 EÖRDÖGHNÉ MIKLÓS, M., 117 FAHAD, M., 77 FELDE, I., 136 FELHO, C., 116 FERENCZ, M., 17 FIRAS, A., 85


FRIED, Z., 136 FÜLÖP, Z., 111 FÜREDI, B., 29 GALL, A., 21 GANIE, A.G., 128, 129, 130 GHADA, A., 76 GHAFIL, H.N., 65, 124 GOSSELET, P., 119 GU, Q., 24 GUEROUI, A., 61 GYEN, A., 134 GYERGYÁK, J., 2, 7, 13, 18, 41, 46, 47 GYORFI, A., 154 GÉBER, R., 157 GÖMZE, L.A., 153, 156, 159 HABER, I., 5 HADŽIC, D., 30 HAJDU, C., 139 HAJDU, F., 15 HALADA, M., 61 HE, H.H., 18 HE, J., 14 HE, Q.C., 49 HECKENAST, G., 17 HEINRICH, H., 4 HIDVÉGI, M., 122 HONTI, R., 151 HORVÁTH, K., 9 HORVÁTH, T., 71 HRUDKA, J., 93 HU, T., 51 HUANG, Z.K., 19 HUTTER, Á., 31, 54 IBRAHIM, D.S., 65 IBRAHIM, F.M.J., 153 IBRAHIM, J.F.M., 156 IBRAHIM, R., 10 IBRAHIM, S., 57, 59 ILAVSKÝ, J., 95 IMRE, A.R., 110 ISMAEL, K., 83 IVÁNYI, P., 27, 150 JAGXHIU, B., 58 JASHARI-KAJTAZI, T., 26

JAWTHARI, M., 142 JIN, X., 36, 37 JÁLICS, K., 114 JÁNKI, Z.R., 140 JÁRMAI, K., 102, 108, 124 KALETOVÁ, T., 96 KAMIŃSKI, W., 75 KANG, X., 23 KARCHES, T., 94 KASHKASH, S., 68 KASSAM, D., 59 KATONA, T., 10, 55 KATONA, Á.L., 8 KAZEMIAN, M., 74 KECSKEMÉTI, G., 132 KERTÉSZ, A.T., 17, 33, 55 KHALAF, A.A., 70 KHALILI, M., 159 KHASKA, K., 81 KHERAIS, M., 72 KIRÁLY, T., 73 KISGYÖRGY, L., 76 KISS, T., 154 KISTELEGDI, I., 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 57, 59 KIZAWI, A., 80 KLINCSIK, M., 120 KNYIHÁR, G., 141 KOCSERHA, I., 157 KOHNOVÁ, S., 96 KOKREHEL, G., 146 KONDOR, T., 56 KOPECSKÓ, K., 69, 70, 161 KOPÁČIK, A., 84 KOREN, C., 79 KOVÁCS, S., 131 KOVÁCS-ANDOR, K., 45, 50 KOZSIK, T., 143 KRALLICS, G., 105 KRISZTIÁN, A., 73 KUMAR, B., 113 KUN, C., 50 KUN-BODNÁR, K., 118 KUROVICS, E., 153, 156, 159 KUTI, R., 15 KÓCZY, L.T., 149 KÓSA, B., 56


KÖVESDÁN, G., 137 KŐVÁRI, B., 125, 133, 135 LAKATOS, I., 115 LEITOL, C., 154 LEN, A., 72 LEZSOVITS, F., 104 LIANG, Z.X., 39 LIANGYU, Z., 33 LIU, S.S., 45 LIU, Y.R., 31 LONE, M.A., 131 LOSONCZY, A.K., 40 LOVIG, D., 106 LU, C., 2, 41, 46, 47 LÁSZLÓ, G., 15 LÁSZLÓ, K., 127 LÓCZY, D., 89 MACSINKA, K., 79 MAGOULES, F., 119 MAITEH, S.M., 2, 41, 46, 47, 60 MAJD, A., 98 MAKLÁRI, D., 100 MAKÓ, E., 78 MANKOVITS, T., 107 MARKO, I., 91 MAROS, M.B., 109 MAROS, Z., 118 MARTON, M., 95 MARX, F., 62 MEDVEGY, G., 22, 23, 35 MEKNASSI, R.F., 112 MENG, F.X., 52 MEZEI, G., 122 MIHOUB, M., 89 MIKULAI, G.C., 149 MILETICS, D., 81 MOLNÁR, T., 30, 59 MOVAHEDI, M.R., 66 MUNQATH, A., 160 MYDLA, J., 87 MÜLLER, P., 123 NAGY, R., 77 NAGY, S., 108 NAGY, Z., 126 NAILI, B., 5

NAN, Z., 25 NEMER, S., 67 NOVÁK, B., 3 NOVÁK, P., 150 NÉMETOVÁ, Z., 96 ODRY, P., 120 ORBÁN, A., 43 ORBÁN, Z., 68 OUBAHMAN, L., 82 ÓZDI, A., 106 PAN, H.W., 19, 54 PANCSA, E.ZS., 34 PAPP, F., 67 PATAKI, N., 134, 147 PATYI, S., 3 PAVÚCEK, M., 90 PETRIK, M., 102 PHETOUDOM, S., 78 POLGÁR, R., 73 PORKOLAB, L., 115 RAD, M.M., 74 RAMOS GONZALEZ, N., 35 REITH, A., 49, 63 REN, C., 22 RICHARD, R., 98 RUMANN, J., 90, 97 RÁK, O., 27, 29 RÉTFALVI, D., 62 RÉVÉSZ, Á., 147 RÓZSA, G., 91, 92 SABOVÁ, Z., 96 SADOUD, N., 12 SALEEM, M., 135 SALEM, A., 89 SALI, A., 160 SALLO, D.H., 132 SAMAD, D., 128, 129, 130 SASSI, M., 158 SCHIFFER, Á., 123 SEBŐK, B., 121 SEIDL, K., 53 SEWUNETIE, W.T., 127 SHAKIKHANLI, U., 145 SHARIPOV, A., 116


SHMLLS, M., 71 SIDDIQUI, S.A., 109 da SILVA, W.T.A.d., 111 SIMON, A., 158 SIPOS, C., 152 ŠKULTÉTYOVÁ, I., 92 ŠOLTÉSZ, A., 87, 88 SOMOGYI, N., 137 ŠTANKO, S., 93 STANKO, Š., 91 STOFFOVÁ, V., 142 ŠUTÚŠ, M., 92, 93 SZABÓ, Z., 144 SZAMOSI, Z., 113 SZAVAI, S., 103 SZEPESI, G., 113 SZILÁGYI, A., 111 SZOMMER, K., 28, 150 SZTRANYÁK, G., 20, 32 SZÉLL, A.B., 28 SZÉNÁSI, S., 136 SZÜCS, C.L., 125 SZÜCS, G., 79 SÁRI, Z., 120 SÁRKÖZI, R., 28, 150 TAHERI, A., 74 TAMÁS, A.M., 20, 32 TAMÁS, B., 100 TIE, W., 36 TIHTIH, M., 153, 156 TISZA, M., 112, 162 TU, K., 63 VARJÚ, K., 16 VASVARY NADOR, N., 21 VÁRADINÉ SZARKA, A., 101 VÁRADY, G., 121 VÍZVÁRI, Z., 120 WANG, T., 37, 52 WERNER-STARK, Á., 126 WTTMANOVÁ, R., 92 WU, M., 44 YONGTING, S., 32 YU, G., 13 ZAGORÁCZ, M.B., 29

ZHANG, S.Z., 45 ZHAO, D.P., 31 ZHAO, T., 2, 41, 46, 47 ZHOU, Y.F., 23 ZILAHI, P., 16 ZOBOKI, G., 19 ZOGIANI, R., 26 ZOLTÁN, E.S., 2, 12, 13, 24, 41, 47, 60 ZOLTÁN, J., 46 ZRENA, Z., 56


Keyword Index 3D model, 90, 93 4-point bending test, 73 4x4, 36, 37 ABAQUS, 77 abrasive waterjet turning, 118 access control, 144 Accumoli earthquake, 61 activated carbon, 95 activated sludge, 94 adaptive reuse, 2, 26, 45, 49 addiction centers, 12 adhesion, 109 adsorption, 95 AHSS, 112 AI, 39 algae, 4 Algeria, 89 algorithm model, 39 algorithms, 124 alignments, 126 aluminium, 102 analytical axis, 64 Ankerite, 161 ANSYS, 101, 107 apartment, 6 application, 83, 155 architectural context, 16 architectural design, 20, 62 architecture, 17, 35, 56 art intervention, 18 asylum community living, 47 authentication, 129 automated data processing, 151 Automatic Question Generation, 127 automatic system inspection, 116 automation process, 152

automotive industry, 112 automotive parts, 162 autonomous cars, 79 autonomous driving, 115 autonomous trucks, 77 autonomous vehicles, 78, 81 B&B design, 19 bandwidth, 130 batch reactor, 94 bearing capacity, 99 behavior based robots, 131 benchmarking, 125 BIM, 155 biofuels, 113 boring bar, 111 bottom-up constructions, 10 boundary value problem, 120 branding, 30 Brownfield redevelopment, 49 Budapest, 40, 48 Building Information Modeling, 29 building resilience, 59 built environment, 41, 62 built heritage, 53 built stock, 2 bunker, 59 C++, 134 cache, 140 calibration, 86 carbon footprint, 6 cementitious materials, 69 centrality, 40 ceramic, 159 ceramics, 153 CFD supported architectural design, 8


chemical analysis, 96 chemical mapping, 141 Chinese traditional villages, 32 chloride diffusion coefficient, 69 city logistics, 138 city pattern, 33 Civil3D, 81 Clang, 134 classical research methods, 38 classification, 135 clay, 157 CLI, 145, 146 climate change, 72, 89 climate classification, 89 Closed Domain, 127 Cloud Computing, 132 co-living, 46 code comprehension, 134 code modernization, 137 code quality, 143 cohousing, 43 collective living, 47 color correction, 121 colors, 12 combined sewer system, 91 combined sewerage overflow chamber, 93 comfort, 5, 12, 57 comfort theory, 106 community, 37 community renewal, 45 comparative study, 40 component identification, 141 composite laminate, 114 composition, 154 computational intelligence, 124 conformance checking, 126 consistency, 140 controlling factors, 70 controlling roughness, 116 convolutional neural network, 148 cooperative exploration, 37 corbelled domes, 57 core shelters, 10 costs, 27 COVID-19, 31, 35, 63, 64, 92 crash test, 115 crisis management, 74

critical, 51 critical infrastructure, 74 critical load, 109 critical temperature, 110 Cuhai-BakonyĂŠr watershed, 85 cultural heritage, 32, 52 cultural significance, 50 curtain wall, 3 damping, 98 data imputation, 160 Data Petri nets, 126 decision preparation, 149 delivered energy, 10 DEM simulation, 66 design, 34 Design for Manufacture and Assembly, 29 design method, 17 design methodology, 9 design rain, 91 designer behavior, 16 developer performance, 145 developer productivity, 146 development, 30, 51 development planning, 40 digital nomad, 56 digitalism, 56 dining space, 25 discretization, 120 DISSECT-CF, 132 distributed system, 139, 140 diversity, 48 Domain decomposition method, 119 domestic space, 35 doping, 153 down drought air conduction, 8 drilling performance, 65 dross, 158 dry pressing, 156 duplex treatment, 109 dynamic differential annealed optimization, 65 dynamic stiffness, 111 e-learning, 142 early- and latewood, 73 earthen heritage domes, 57 earthing resistance, 100


eco-friendly street furniture, 21 ecological design, 21 ecological environment, 13 ecological evaluation, 96 economic function, 49 ecosystem, 34 education, 28, 34 educational institutions, 64 educational services, 64 EHR, 144 electric vehicles, 115 email security, 128 EMC, 100 EMC chamber, 100 emission reduction, 138 encoding, 142 energy analysis, 57 energy design, 11 energy dissipation, 90 energy efficiency, 5, 7, 11, 113 energy efficiency of pumps, 117 energy saving, 14 energy-efficient transportation, 138 environment, 58 environment remediation, 49 environmental psychology, 20 ethologically oriented, 131 event, 30 event streams, 126 exact scheme, 120 experimental teaching, 36, 37 facade, 3 facade strategies, 5 fatigue life, 77 façades, 4 FEM, 77 Feng Ye Shan Community, 54 FHIR, 144 fillers, 4 final exam scheduling, 133 finishing materials, 12 finite element, 107 finite element analysis, 67 finite element method, 115 finite element method (FEM), 73 fire design, 67

fire protection, 14 fire simulation, 15 five-wire connection, 100 flow velocity field, 97 fly ash, 71 foam, 158 formation rocks, 65 four-wire connection, 100 fragmentation patterns, 66 framework, 145, 146 freight transport, 75 full stack, 145, 146 Function as a Service, 147 Function-as-a-service (FaaS), 132 functional language, 147 furniture, 35 future climate change, 86 Fuzzy interpolation, 131 Fuzzy signature, 149 general publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memories, 22 generation-specific, 34 geometry, 28 geopolymer concrete, 70 glass, 3, 158 Glass/Epoxy, 114 global/local non-intrusive coupling, 119 GMS, 88 GPU, 136 grain breakage, 66 Green Building Technology, 24 green concrete, 68 greenery, 41 groundwater flooding, 88 GTN, 103 hardness test, 105 harmony in styles, 26 heat conductivity, 159 heat equation, 136 heat source, 110 heat transfer coefficients, 104 heated window glass, 106 heritage, 72 heritage cities, 55 heritage place inventory, 53 heritage protection, 53 hierarchical, 139


high-rise office building, 5 high-rise residential building, 13 higher education, 37 historic district, 51 historical features, 33 HLW, 161 household waste, 154 housing unit, 46 HSV color spectrum, 73 human activity monitoring, 148 humidity, 72 Hungary, 89 hybrid nanofluids, 104 hybrid system, 110 hydrodynamic model, 93, 94 hydrological assessment, 87 hygiene, 12 IFC, 155 image processing, 123 impact of events, 30 impedance measurement, 1 imperfections, 67 INAA, 161 incremental heuristic search, 126 indoor fires, 15 indoor-localization, 148 industrial waste, 70 informal settlements, 42 inhabitants, 58 innovation, 19, 51, 52 installation art, 18 insulating materials, 15 integer linear programming, 133 interactive experience, 20 interior space, 35 international exchange, 36 international simple glass, 161 intrusion, 128 Java, 143 k-nearest neighbor, 135 kaolin, 159 kindergarten, 20 Kinect v2, 123 kinemetic measurement, 84 KIS, 145, 146

KNN, 142 Korean, 25 Kosovo, 58 laboratory measurement, 96 landfill, 92 landscape, 96 landscape architecture design, 22 large housing estates, 40 large-panel building, 27 laser polarization, 116 lateral wander, 77 lattice, 107 leftover space, 44 Leica AT960, 84 level of service, 78 Levy flight stochastic optimization algorithm, 124 lighting design, 12 lightweight, 61, 157, 162 linear thinking, 37 livable cities, 55 livelihood improvement, 31 living futures, 46 local Green-function, 120 Long Wang Jian site, 50 macro-grain, 66 macromechanics, 114 magnesium, 4 management, 51 manual sorting, 154 manufacturing, 162 mass housing, 40 material symbiosis, 26 mathematical optimization, 124 maximum settlement, 99 MCDA, 82 measurement, 1 mechanical milling, 156 mechanical properties, 112 medical and health facilities, 63 medical devices, 150 Mediterranean influence, 89 membrane, 61 Mesh Size, 103 metamodeling, 122 micro-grains, 66


microbial colonization, 4 microstructure, 112 Midas GTS NX, 98 modeling, 85, 137 modern research methods, 38 MODFLOW, 88 modular application, 31 modular building, 24 modular installations, 44 moisture content, 72 moisture monitoring, 1 monuments, 53 motion planning, 139 movement analysis, 123 multi source, 101 multi-criteria analysis, 75 multi-functional facility, 31 multi-level modeling, 122 multiple recycled aggregate (MRAC), 71 multiple sources, 101 multivariate analysis, 141 municipal building, 14 municipal waste, 92

optimization, 102, 108, 130, 133 optimization algorithms, 65 ORC, 110 orthosis, 150 orthotropic material, 73 overhang, 111 overhead travelling crane, 108

packaging waste, 154 pandemia, 56 parabolic trough collector, 104 parallel computation, 108, 119, 136 parametric architecture, 28 parametric design, 60, 150 parametric thinking, 28 participation, 43 participatory slum-upgrading, 42 particle swarm optimization, 124 concrete passive design, 59 pedestrian, 78, 80 pedestrian simulation, 39 pedestrian way, 41 penetration rate, 65 people with dementia, 62 performance analysis, 137 narratology, 23 pesticides, 95 natural frequency, 111 pharming attack, 129 natural ventilation, 8, 11 phase, 157 neglected faรงades, 2 phishing, 129 network monitoring, 130 phishing filters, 128 network protocols, 130 photogrammetry, 90 network security, 128 physical model, 97 neural networks, 76 PIV method, 97 Norway spruce (picea abies), 73 place script, 22 null values, 160 place spirit, 44 numerical modelling, 88 placemaking, 22 numerical simulation, 105 point cloud, 151, 155 numerical study, 104 policy enforcement, 144 numerical thermal simulations, 57 porosity, 159 Nusselt number, 104 post-disaster, 10, 60 post-epidemic era, 19 occupant safety, 115 power line filter, 100 office building, 3, 11 precision, 84 one building block, 7 Principal Component Analysis, 76 online signature verification, 125, 135 Principle Component Analysis, 141 open vision, 36 process mining, 126 operations research, 133 optical sorting, 154 production types, 147


PROMETHEE, 82 protection, 51 pump control, 117 pump part load, 117 quality of life, 43 quantity, 154 R7T7, 161 railway transport, 74, 75 rain, 91 rainfall-runoff model, 86 RAMAN spectroscopy, 141 Ramberg-Osgood model, 98 recycled coarse aggregate, 71 recycled materials, 68 recycling design, 21 refactoring, 143 reference, 121 reference selection, 125 refugee shelter, 57 regenerative architecture, 58 relationship, 25 renewal strategy, 54 renovation, 6, 27 residential design, 46, 52 residential street, 79 residual stress, 67 resilient community, 45, 47 restoration of sewer system, 91 rigid inclusions, 99 risk analysis, 74 risk reduction, 59 road capacity, 78 road design, 78, 81 road evaluation, 149 road planning, 79 robotic process automation, 152 robotics, 139 Roma integration, 42 RPA, 152 RPA future, 152 rule of mixture (ROM), 73 rural areas, 31, 56 rural design, 16 rutting, 77 scheduling, 133

scour, 90 scratch test, 109 SDGs, 59 security, 144 sedimentation, 94 selective collection, 154 SEM, 153 sensing, 48 Serverless Computing, 132 serverless programming, 147 settlement, 60 shaft intake structures, 97 shape-based segmentation, 151 sharing, 43 shear modulus, 98 shelter, 10, 61 sight distance, 81 silica fume, 71 Silicate Sorption, 161 simulation, 7, 101, 103 sintering, 159 situationism, 23 size, 154 small cities, 30 small water reservoir, 96 social design, 16 social impact, 43 society, 48 sociospatial exclusion, 42 software architectures, 145, 146 Sol-gel, 153 solar dryer, 113 space contour, 33 space organisation, 5 spaCy Python libraries, 127 spatial implication, 23 spatial narrative, 23 spear phishing, 128 specific energy consumption, 117 sphere segmentation, 151 static analysis, 143 statistical evaluation, 73 steel, 67, 102 steel fibre, 71 stone architecture site, 50 strategy update, 51 street landscape, 39


Strongly possible multivalued dependencies, 160 Structure Equation Modelling (SEM), 83 student performance prediction, 142 successful cities, 55 sum types, 147 supplementary cementation material (SCMs), 69 surface roughness, 118 surrogate measures of safety, 80 sustainability, 17, 20, 34, 59 sustainable construction, 68 sustainable design, 21 SWAT, 85 switch-case, 143 symbiosis theory, 54 systematic literature review, 83 taxonomy, 140 teaching geometry, 28 technical state, 96 technology, 51 telemedicine, 140, 144, 145, 146 temperate climate, 5 temperature, 72 Template Based Question Generation, 127 tendency, 83 terrain measurement, 96 terrain vague, 44 TFC, 110 theoretical axis, 64 thermal building simulations, 9 thermal comfort, 7, 10 thermal conductivity, 156 thermal glazing, 106 thermal manikin, 106 thought collision, 36 threads, 134 Ti-layer, 159 timber, 72 tomogram, 1 topology optimization, 107 torsional simple shear test, 98 traditional dwellings, 25 traditional residence, 52 traffic accidents, 76 traffic calming, 79

traffic conflict, 80 traffic safety, 79, 80 transfering model parameters, 86 transport properties, 69 transportation planning, 82, 83 truck platooning, 77 Tuff, 157 tuples, 147 TUW model, 86 uncertainty, 84, 85 upcycling, 6 updraft air conduction, 8 urban development, 21 urban heritage, 45 urban housing, 43 urban morphology, 38 urban planning, 17 urban public space, 18 urban regeneration, 49 urban rehabilitation, 2, 42 urban renewal, 18 urban study, 41 urban sustainability, 43 urban typology, 38 urbanism, 48 validation, 86, 129 value orientation, 51 value proposition, 34 vernacular architecture, 32 vertical greening, 13 VISSIM, 78 visual narrative perspective, 50 visualization, 122 walkability, 41 walkable, 55 waste, 158 waste management, 92 water, 17 water quality, 96 water treatment, 95 weather input data, 85 welded structures, 102 welding pipe, 105 welding shrinkage, 102 wind catcher, 8


wood, 61 woodchip drying, 113 working spaces, 56 workplace, 35 Wuhan, 63 Yi Township, 52 Zeolite-poor rock, 156 zones formation and setting, 10


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Abstract book for the 16th MIKLÓS IVÁNYI INTERNATIONAL PHD & DLA SYMPOSIUM  

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