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2 Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine

Senior Life 2012


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Inside this issue: 6 | Bluegrass pioneer:

18 | Homemade ice cream:

Mac Martin talks about his music.

What is summer without this cool treat?

8 | Sister Catherine Meinert:

19 | St. Patrick Church:

Leading the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill that she joined more than 50 years ago.

Members of founding families visit St. Patrick (est. 1806), first English-speaking Catholic church west of the Alleghenies.

12 | Key to healthy aging: Retired carpenter John Feitl finds the exercise program at Bodytech fits him well.

14 | Fireworks: If it’s summer in Pittsburgh, it must be fireworks.

16 | Blue skies: Still smiling after 50 years of flying for Capt. Larry Schaefer.

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20 | Divine Mercy: The shrine, the chaplet and a seminar.

24 | Have fun and keep active: Pitcher Bob Zajac keeps them swingin’ in over53 softball league.

26 | Pud Galvin: Jude Ostrowski has fond memories of the Baseball Hall of Fame great-grandfather from North Side.

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Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine 3


PITTSBURGH

Catholic MAGAZINE elcome, to r e ade r s , t s r th is fi rgh e P it tsbu th f is sue o ife S e n ior L C atholic It conti nues e. Mag a z in of hea lt h es m the the d a nd ir it , m in p s e r ies for th to s tu r in g r ou g h b o dy, fea idu a ls who g r a m s , th of o r p iv e d is ab out in g h e xe r c rov ince ve th rou d in g a p ke e p ac ti in g mu sic or lea lay . f ly in g, p iou s li fe the reli g in d ays of siste r s y, c r a z y z a h “ e s , home n iz in g th ab out fi rework g o c e r d s A nd in at-relate e a r tic le avoid he ,” we h av su m me r ea m a nd how to cr m ade ice oble m s . r of p h lt a he ht th in k , you m ig a r n in g more ts n e m o , or le u iete r m ine in d b o ok s For the q ome go o plet a nd the sh r s h it w a in h g C n y li c s ett Me r e D iv ine ab out th e, Ma s s . idg a n fi nd Sto c kbr p e yo u c o h e w , e yo u re nce a nd m a k u r prefe o u y o y r e t s v e te r . W h ate t w il l in re is sues side th a e in futu s e th ite m s in f o s e e mor e w a nt to

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135 First Ave. • Suite 200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 1-800-392-4670 www.pittsburghcatholic.org

Vol. 4, No. 4

Publisher | Bishop David A. Zubik General Manager | Robert P. Lockwood Editor | William Cone Operations Manager | Carmella Weismantle Senior Life Project Editor | William Hill Associate Editors Phil Taylor (Special Projects) Chuck Moody (News) Senior Staff Writer | Patricia Bartos Staff Writer | John W. Franko Graphic Designers David Pagesh | Karen Hanlin Director of Advertising | John Connolly Account Executives Michael A. Check | Paul Crowe Michael Wire Circulation Mgr./Parish News Coord. Peggy Zezza Administrative Assistant | Amanda Wahlen Office Assistant | Karen Hanlin

On the cover...

RGH

PITTSBU

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MAGAZ

Another view of summer fun as two generations enjoy time together, celebrating the gifts of family, of health and cool water. Water that also evokes reminders of our baptism — our rebirth to new life — water that quenches our spiritual thirst and refreshes the soul. Cover design by Debbie Skatell-Wehner

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Featuring Soaring

Life and Counting Senilesor rs | 200 Yea

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Pittsburgh Catholic Senior Life Magazine is a complimentary publication available at all 204 Catholic parishes in the Diocese of Pittsburgh from the Pittsburgh Catholic Publishing Associates, Inc. Paid first-class delivered subscriptions are available. Advertising: ads@pittsburghcatholic.org Editorial: editor@pittsburghcatholic.org


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Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine 5


For Mac Martin, the grass in Pittsburgh is always blue By Mac Martin, as told to William Hill

Mac Martin said his guitar has a new pick guard after he wore the first one out.

“I’ve been playing bluegrass music for so long that I’m recognized in the industry across the country, even though we stayed local and never went on the road,” said Mac Martin during a recent interview on his back porch in the Brookline neighborhood of Pittsburgh. He has been performing bluegrass in Pittsburgh and regionally for over 60 years, originally forming a band in 1947 called the Pike County Boys (after “Pike County Breakdown,” made famous by Bill Monroe and the Bluegrass Boys). A few years later, around 1954, Mac formed the Dixie Travelers, and that name has endured. “We didn’t want to use a name tied to a particular place, and there were already a lot of bluegrass bands with ‘boys’ in the name,” Mac said. “We thought Dixie would give the right flavor, and picked Travelers to go with it, even through we travel the least of about anybody.” Mac originally played under his given name, Bill Colleran, but there were two other Bills in the early band, so he took Mac, because it was easy, and “people called each other Mac in the Navy,” he said, recalling his WWII service with the Navy Seabees 194346. He added Martin as a short, easy name to go with Mac — “It was pretty common for people in entertainment to pick different names for the stage.” Colleran reflects Mac’s Irish Catholic roots, as the son of Irish immigrants from Galway who came to Pittsburgh around 1923, and Mac was born in 1925. They lived on DeSoto Street in the Oakland neighborhood, and Mac was an altar boy at St. Paul Cathedral, serving for Bishop Hugh Boyle, whose house was then located on what is today’s cathedral parking lot. “I would go over and wait in the kitchen with the big Irish cook until the bishop came downstairs.” In high school, Mac listened to country and hillbilly music on the radio, and bought himself a mandolin through a local newspaper

6 Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine

ad. “I never took a lesson, but I could feel the music in my hands. If you have it in your bones, you can play it.” He also acquired a $25 guitar and played it. He listened to the records owned by his friend Ed Brozi, a Fayette County native and country musician who had moved to Pittsburgh in the early 1940s. They formed a duo for a short while until Ed went into the service, soon followed by Mac. When the two returned to Pittsburgh after the war, they teamed up again and added Bill Higgins and Bill Wagner to form the Pike County Boys. The music that Mac originally used to guide him was not the bluegrass as it is known today, but more country songs, old ballads, string band music, and the uptempo instrumentals called “breakdowns.” But when Bill Monroe added banjo player Earl Scruggs, who had a distinctive threefinger picking style, and guitarist Lester Flatt to his Bluegrass Boys, the combination of banjo, fiddle, mandolin, guitar and bass gave rise to the bluegrass genre that continues as a distinctive and separate branch of what is broadly labeled country and western music today. Mac and the Pike County Boys began to see greater demand for their music,

and they began to play on WHJB radio in Greensburg in 1949. Mac also had found time to complete two years at Robert Morris Business College and continued with his day job as office manager at the Atlantic Commission Co., which was the produce buying office for the A&P stores. “I was in charge of 50 employees and we began to package food as well, and then later I had the traffic department for all the fruits and vegetables in the tri-state area, Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia.” While working for A&P, Mac met Jean Walker, and they were married in 1952 in Immaculate Conception Parish in Bloomfield. As part of their honeymoon trip, they went first to Virginia, then to Raleigh, N.C., to a trailer camp where they just “happened to find” Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs, as well as Everett Lilly and Benny Martin. “I know they were playing on the radio there at the time, so I thought it would be a good addition to our honeymoon to go see them.” Mac and Jean just celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary in May. “I worked for A&P from 1948 until they closed down the local operation and wanted me to relocate to the East Coast. I didn’t want to move, because by that time we had five children and we were settled in our

Senior Life 2012


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home here. We are the original owners music is distinctly their own. “I’m proband have never moved. I never missed ably best known as a song arranger,” a paycheck. I found a new job with Mac said. “I have written a few songs Volkwein’s Music on the North Side, over the years, but most of the time, I’ll and went with them when they moved take an old song and change the tempo, to RIDC Park West, and finally retired maybe speed up a slow song, or I will again at age 70. But the music never update some verses that have become stops. We’re playing at Hambones in obsolete, or I’ll find old obscure tunes October, have a wedding coming up, and give them a new sound. and we play in Kittanning every year “We have cut back from the early days and New Year’s Eve in Butler. And we of playing every week. Now we play play the benefit concert every year for about once a month, and I don’t think St. Joseph’s House of Hospitality at I want to do more than that right now, Synod Hall in Oakland. and I have other activities, too. We go “How many people are still working to Florida every year, to Fort Myers, and at age 87? But you have to stay active they always look for me to play at their and you have to play regularly if you annual festival. And we visit our children are going to keep a band together. and grandchildren. Martin picking his vintage Martin guitaron the back porch There’s a timing and flow that you “I go to daily Mass, and my daughter in Brookline. want to have for a concert. For gave me the Liturgy of the Hours and instance, we’ll do a nice opener, and I really enjoy that, staying close to the then feature the side man, usually the lead guitar, on a tune and daily readings and to the Office. Like music, faith is a gift, and you then you want to have some solo spots for the banjo and fiddle have to use it, stay active in it, and practice it to keep it alive.” player. Sometimes we’ll go back to the old style with two guitars, Mac Martin and the Dixie Travelers music lives on in their recordlike the Carter Family. Then we’ll do a gospel song, and then close ings as well, with 11 original LP albums and six CDs, covering the peout a set with a faster tune like the ‘Orange Blossom Special’ or riod from 1963 to 2004. Three albums in the ’70s earned five-star some other breakdown. We usually do about 12-14 songs to a ratings by “Bluegrass Unlimited,” and Mac and the band continue to set, and usually do two sets, but sometimes three. That’s a lot of provide what many reviewers call “pure, unadulterated bluegrass” music.” from a first-generation performer. More details about the band and While the music that Mac Martin plays is derived from the countavailability of their music are on the web, www.thedixietravelers. less songs that form the bluegrass genre, the Dixie Travelers com.

Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine 7


Sister Catherine Meinert leads the U.S. Province of Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill By William Hill After more than 50 years in religious life, Sister Catherine Meinert was elected to a four-year term as provincial superior/president of the United States Province of the Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill, headquartered in Greensburg. Joining her on the Provincial Council are Sister Mary Norbert Long – first councilor; Sister Brycelyn Eyler – second councilor; Sister Susan Jenny – third councilor; and Sister Barbara Einloth – fourth councilor. “I am grateful for the sisters’ confidence in me,” said Sister Catherine. She and the other members of the council are finally having the opportunity to work together as a

group after the election of two months ago. “With travel and other commitments, we estimated that we had spent only 10 days together out of the past 60, so it’s good to be moving forward with the administration of the province.” The chief responsibilities of the president and the council include oversight and administration of the province in all its different aspects. “The chief focus is always on the spiritual life and mission of the sisters,” Sister Catherine noted, “in addition to stewardship of provincial property, buildings and grounds.

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Joining Sister Catherine on the Provincial Council are Sister Mary Norbert Long – First Councilor; Sister Brycelyn Eyler – Second Councilor; Sister Susan Jenny – Third Councilor; and Sister Barbara Einloth – Fourth Councilor.

“There is also the reality of a declining number of sisters, and as an aging group, we have fewer wage earners; but we find ways to carry on our various ministries. Our older sisters carry on an active prayer ministry, and we engage in collaboration with other orders so that our combined resources can allow us to achieve more than we could on our own. “We were missioned to Fayette County to work with the poor, and I also had the joy of being principal there in the Conn-Area Catholic School in Connellsville from 19962007.” Another ministry near and dear to Sister Catherine is Alternatives. Yes, crisis pregnancy center in Connellsville, where she serves as president of the board of directors. She received an early Christmas present on the feast of the Immaculate Conception when the Diocese of Greensburg announced that a $10,000 grant was awarded to Alternatives.Yes. It is among the first groups to be helped by the Diocesan Poverty Relief Fund.

Senior Life 2012


Later, in April 2012, the program received recognition of its 25 years of service. Sister Catherine and Andrea Pritts, the organization’s executive director, accepted the Salt and Light Award presented by Bishop Lawrence Brandt at the Catholic Charities Communities of Salt and Light Award Dinner. Alternatives.Yes began providing crisis pregnancy services in Connellsville in 1986 and was named a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization in 1999. Support services include pregnancy tests, maternity clothing, counseling, and referrals for medical and legal assistance, as well as social services. Newborn layettes full of baby items are provided after delivery. Although many services are focused on protecting and enhancing the lives of expectant mothers and their babies, 30 percent of the 1,200 clients who visited Alternatives.Yes last year were young fathers who sought assistance through parenting classes or needed grants to take the GED exam. Sister Catherine noted that the poverty rate of Alternatives.Yes clients is 85 percent and that babies born to clients have a 35 to 40 percent chance of having a parent who did not complete high school. The grant proposal signed by Pritts and Sister Catherine specified that funds will be used to help break the cycle of poverty through the establishment of a Life Skills Center that will provide educational services to empower young parents to nurture their children and sustain their households. An 840-squarefoot addition to the current building will provide a suitable environment for a hands-on life skills curriculum. The Life Skills Center will help Alternatives.Yes clients enjoy greater self-respect through self-sufficiency, and pass those traits on to their children. The Sisters of Charity have cared for hundreds of years for vulnerable women and children. In 1891 they founded the Roselia Center in Pittsburgh as a safe place to leave abandoned infants. “We have always been dedicated to serving the poor. That hasn’t changed,” she added. “And we are faithfully aligned with the church. Mother Seton’s final words as she was dying were ‘Be daughters of the church.’ And that’s what we strive to be.” Sister Catherine and the council are responsible for more than 200 sisters, primarily in four Pennsylvania dioceses, but with others in the dioceses of Phoenix, Tucson, and the archdiocese of Chicago; and one each in the Archdioceses of Washington, D.C., Cincinnati and Newark as well as one each in the dioceses of Buffalo, Springfield, Wheeling-Charleston and Orlando. A Pittsburgh native, Sister Catherine

Sister Catherine and Andrea Pritts, Alternatives.Yes executive director, accept the Salt and Light Award presented by Bishop Lawrence Brandt at the Catholic Charities Communities of Salt and Light Award Dinner.

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Senior Life 2012

Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine 9


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Sister Catherine Meinert

leadership of the United States Province, which numbers 205 sisters in active or retired ministry. Another 207 sisters serve in the Korean Province. The Sisters of Charity of Seton Hill is an international, apostolic community of women religious who serve in five countries, 10 United States dioceses, and four United States archdioceses. Founded in 1870, the congregation traces its roots to the first American saint, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton. The Sisters of Charity minister primarily in the areas of education, health care, pastoral care and social services.

In 1990, Sister Catherine was elected to the executive committee of the National Catholic Educational Association. She was honored with the association’s “Recognition of Dedicated Service” in 1994. Sister Catherine finally noted, “I find it an honor to work so closely with our sisters and the entire staff that works on the Sister of Charity complex.” Sister Catherine is open to the challenges of her work and approaches her tasks with enthusiasm. The newly elected Provincial Council is responsible for the administration and

Andrea and Sister Catherine at Alternatives.Yes.

Continued from page 9 entered the Sisters of Charity on Sept. 8, 1961, from St. Joseph Parish, Bloomfield. “For a long time, I felt this tug, this calling to enter the religious life, and I couldn’t put it aside. Like any journey, you go in different directions before you finally settle on what to do. I had an active social life as a teenager, and had already found a good job.” Sister Catherine had entered the work force early on, and had become controller at Crucible Steel, but she still felt the calling to the religious life. “I was an only child with both parents gone. I had to wait until I was 21 so that I could legally dispose of family property. But I was convinced that this was what God wanted of me. And it has been a wonderful blessing to have answered that call more than 50 years ago.” Sister Catherine is an alumna of Seton Hill University, earning a bachelor’s degree in history, and a master’s degree in education from Duquesne. She later earned a master’s degree in theology from Wheeling Jesuit University. Sister Catherine spent the majority of her career in education, with teaching positions from 1963-73 in the dioceses of Pittsburgh, Greensburg and the Archdiocese of Washington, D.C. “We had 1,200 students in the school in Bethesda,” She had her first principal’s appointment in 1973 at St. Therese of Lisieux in Munhall, where she served until 1982, with an enrollment of 543 children. “I then had the honor of being an educational consultant for 14 years, working with Father Hugh Lang, who was superintendent, Archabbot Nowicki, who was secretary for education at the time, and then with Father Kris Stubna, who has been a dear friend for many years.”

Senior Life 2012

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Contact John Connolly @ 412.471.1253 Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine 11


PHYSICAL FITNESS IS KEY TO HEALTHY AGING SilverSneakers Fitness Program member exercises over 280 times a year

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The SilverSneakers Fitness Program is offered by Healthways, providing specialized, comprehensive health and care support solutions to help people maintain or improve their health. SilverSneakers was founded in 1992 and

A better quality of life, increased energy levels, and a feeling of personal accomplishment — these are just a few of the added benefits John Feitl has experienced since starting a regular physical activity routine with the SilverSneakers Fitness Program in 2007. Just exactly how physically active is Feitl? He has exercised at Bodytech on Perry Highway over 1,400 times since enrolling in the SilverSneakers Fitness Program in 2007. Lillian Tamir, SilverSneakers account manager, believes Feitl’s dedication to health and well-being is outstanding, “The Centers for Disease Control recommends 150 minutes of physical activity each week for older adults. John far surpasses this recommendation, and is a testament to the health benefits of regular physical activity.” Feitl decided to begin his wellness journey after retirement from his career as a carpenter at the age of 62. He paid for a gym membership at another location for many years, but then joined Bodytech in 2007 when he learned that his insurance would pay for the membership. He says that exercise is “a good way to spend retirement.” While Feitl can use over 10,000 participating SilverSneakers locations nationwide, he chooses to enjoy his membership at Bodytech, located in Pines Plaza at 1130 Perry Highway. He says his favorite part of using this facility is the friendship of other men around his own age. He says that when he misses a day, he hears, “Where were you yesterday?” I, as co-owner at Bodytech, feel that Feitl has brought a new brightness to our facility. I look forward to seeing him every day when he comes in. The National Institutes of Health reports that being physically active can lead to long-term health benefits. Perhaps even more importantly, they also state that older adults who already have diseases and disabilities may see health improvements after becoming more physically active.

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Feitl believes that regular exercise has helped him stay healthy and enjoy his retirement. Bodytech is proud to offer strengthening equipment and cardiovascular equipment as well as group exercise classes to their members.

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12 Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine

Senior Life 2012


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‘The First Family of Fireworks’ By Sandy McStay Proudly known as the “First Family of Fireworks,” Zambelli Fireworks is one of the oldest and largest American Fireworks companies. Today the family name is equated with quality, creativity and safety. Zambelli has presented artistic excellence in fireworks displays for over 100 years. The Zambelli name is recognized and respected worldwide. We have set the industry standard in design and technology … then exceeded it. George Zambelli Sr. was the pioneer of Zambelli Fireworks for over 65 years. His father, Antonio Zambelli, brought the artistry to New Castle, Pa.,

14 Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine

Senior Life 2012


from Italy. George’s son, Dr. George Zambelli Jr., is now the chairman of the board of Zambelli Fireworks. Along with the year-round professional staff of technicians, designers, office staff and administrators are here to assist and guide their customers in the development and implementation of their specific fireworks event. We are on the forefront of new technology and artistic innovation. We work to “wow” the audiences of our clients with creative shows that appeal to all the senses and enable audiences to feel and experience the power of the display. Our artistic and technical staff design shows combining computers, high-tech firing strategies and unexpected surprises. Zambelli Fireworks has performed many internationally known programs including the Statue of Liberty birthday celebration, numerous Super Bowls, many presidential inaugurations, the visits of kings and queens, and the visit of Pope John Paul II, which was one of George Zambelli’s most cherished moments. Lou Zambelli, brother of George Sr., at age 86 still works almost every day at the plant outside New Castle. He is also still a member of St. Vitus Parish in New Castle, where he and his brothers and all of their families were raised. McStay is assistant to the president of Zambelli Fireworks.

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Contact: John Connolly 412-471-1253 Cell: 412-330-7867 jconnolly@pittsburghcatholic.org Pittsburgh Catholic 135 First Avenue • Suite 200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 1-800-392-4670 www.pittsburghcatholic.org Senior Life 2012

Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine 15


B

A

A. Capt. Schaefer in the cockpit. B. Retirement plaque, with the 767 that he flew in his later years with the airline. C. Schaefer’s first day with Allegheny Airlines. D. Schaefer telegram for job interview. E. Schaefer with plane he flies with Young Eagles. F. Having fun at the controls as co-pilot on first Young Eagles flight. G. Capt. Schaefer with one Young Eagle and one ready in a couple of years. H. Schaefer at 30 years with the company. I. Schaefer solos.

Still Soaring with the Eagles By Capt. Lawrence P. Schaefer I always wanted to fly. I built model airplanes as a kid, and flew paper airplanes in school. Sometimes it made the teachers angry, at Nativity on Pittsburgh’s North Side and North Catholic. A few months after graduation, I signed up with the Air Force. It seemed like the best place to me. I love flying, and they had plenty of airplanes. But at the time I joined in 1959, it was after Korea and before Vietnam, so there were no flight schools operating. But I took flight lessons through the Air Force Aero Clubs, on my own time and with my own money. Whenever I saved up enough and had free time, I was flying, and completed my commercial and instrument ratings. I had my first flying lesson in New C Hampshire in a Cessna 140. I spent two years in Alaska and made my first solo flight Aug. 31, 1960, in a Cessna 120. A 120 is an earlier model and has fabric-covered wings while the 140 has metal wings. After Alaska, I finished my last two years at Altus Air Force Base in southwestern Oklahoma and completed all my ratings. Upon my return to Pittsburgh, I worked for a short while with an air transport

16 Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine

company at the Allegheny County Airport, but they didn’t last long, so I had to find another job. For a short while that was Gimbel’s in the North Hills, but at the same time I went to the Beaver County Airport and completed my flight instructor rating, which led to my getting a job as a flight instructor out of Akron, Ohio, with Shawnee Airways, which kept me busy for a couple of years, but I was constantly looking for the possibility of flying with a commercial airline, and applied to Allegheny Airlines when they advertised an opening. Lo and behold, one wintry February day in 1966, I received a telegram inviting me for an interview within the next two weeks. There were seven people interviewed that day, and three of

D us were hired. The vice president of flying was conducting the interview, and when he asked me why I wanted to work for them, I said Pittsburgh is my hometown, you’re based in Pittsburgh and I love to fly. He said, “Good, see you in class.” That was Capt. Harvey Thompson, and he’s retired, and still living at age 95 in Naples, Fla. I walked out and had to pinch myself. Here I was, with about 1,500 hours in a little

Cherokee, up against former Air Force pilots who had been flying B-52s and other big aircraft. After several years with the airline, I asked about making captain, knowing I had to pass my air transport rating for that. I asked if I could go ahead and complete that on my own, but this time, I was able to use the GI Bill to pay the costs. I earned my rating in April 1976, and found out after the check ride that if I hadn’t passed they would not have kept me on, even as a first officer, because flunking would have meant I would never make captain. I was named captain in 1981, flying Douglas DC-9s in the early years, and later, when I started international flights, I finished my career flying a Boeing 767. I retired Aug. 30, 2000, 40 years after my first solo, and three days before my 60th birthday, which is when pilots have to retire. If you’re flying on your 60th, you have to parachute out before the plane lands! Of course, that didn’t mean I had to stop flying, but it was exclusively back to the single engines for me. I had continued to fly small planes over the years and had been a partner in owning a small plane on two different occasions, but didn’t really fly often enough to justify that. I continued to fly by joining the Experimental Aircraft Association chapter at the Zelienople airport where I had flown during my periods of ownership. Then in 2003, the chapter president said they needed more pilots to fly Young Eagles, and I’ve been doing it ever since. Next year will mark 10 years for me, and I’ll probably pass the 400 mark, since I’m up past 370 kids flown now

Senior Life 2012


EAA Young Eagles Zelienople

F

E

in over 100 flights. We take up two at a time most of the time, and sometimes three. I really get a kick out of the kids. They have to be between the ages of 8 and 17 to get a Young Eagles certificate for taking a flight, and I have dozens of cards and photos from many of them. Some of my original Young Eagles have gone on for flight training, and some have already soloed. Others are headed off to college and are signed up to complete their flight training while in school. I guess you could say I’ve come full circle in my flying, starting off in single engine and returning to it now. There is quite a difference between flying a 2,500-pound Cessna and a 350,000-pound 767. There’s a common flying H

G

I

story about coming full circle in your career. The guy in the little singleengine plane takes off from a grass strip at a small airport and looks up and sees a twin-engine going by and says, “That’s where I want to be.” The twin-engine pilot looks up and sees the con-trail of a jet and says, “That’s where I want to be.” The jet pilot is up flying and sees the space shuttle going up and says, “That’s where I want to be.” Finally, the space shuttle captain looks down, and sees a little single-engine plane flying below and says, “That’s where I want to be.”

So that’s where I am, flying for over 50 years, and still soaring with the Young Eagles. I’m always looking forward to the next flight.

Schaefer and his wife, Sharron, are members at St. James in Sewickley, where she also is associate music minister.

Senior Life 2012

The EAA Young Eagles program was launched in 1992 to give interested young people ages 8-17 an opportunity to go flying in a general aviation airplane. These flights are offered free of charge and are made possible through the continuing generosity of EAA member volunteers. There is no cost or obligation, before or after the flight. Since 1992, more than 1.6 million Young Eagles have enjoyed a flight through the program. Young Eagles have been registered in more than 90 different countries and have been flown by more than 42,000 volunteer pilots.  Participating in the program at Zelienople airport simply requires checking the website for upcoming events at the airport to find the next Young Eagle flight event, then showing up to arrange for a flight. TA form has to be completed and signed by a parent or guardian before the flight. This form also enrolls participants in the Young Eagles National Log Book, and provides them with a commemorative certificate after the flight. So what will the flight be like? The biggest question might be about the actual flight. First, there is a brief “ground school” discussion of what makes an airplane fly.  Young flyers are then escorted to a gateway where an EAA member will take them safely to an aircraft. After boarding, the pilot explains what will happen during the flight. This might include talking about the airplane, reviewing an aeronautical chart (or map) and identifying ground reference points during the flight. Then the pilot will help buckle seat belts beforehand and describe the interior workings of the airplane, including some of the instruments. Once in the air, passengers see the earth and sky in a new, exciting way.  Most Young Eagle flights last between 15 and 20 minutes.  Once back on the ground, there will be additional time for asking the EAA members questions about the flight.  Ask away!  And don’t forget, everyone receives an official Young Eagles certificate, which is signed by the personal pilot and our two EAA Young Eagle co-chairmen: Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenburger and the co-pilot from the amazing “Hudson River” landing, Jeff Skiles.

The Zelienople chapter is part of the worldwide network of Experimental Aircraft Association chapters. EAA embodies the spirit of aviation through the world’s most engaged community of aviation enthusiasts. EAA’s 170,000-plus members enjoy the fun and camaraderie of sharing their passion for flying, building and restoring recreational aircraft. To find out more about EAA programs and services, visit the home page at EAA.org.

Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine 17


By William Hill Certainly no other dessert is more welcome during the hot summer months. Many recipes are easy to make in an oldfashioned hand-cranked churn or an electric ice cream. My favorite is the French vanilla. It’s better to make the custard mix a day

ers that use ice and salt. For a 4-quart model, you need about 20 pounds of crushed or cubed ice, and about six cups of rock salt. If your freezer comes with specific directions, you may follow those, but these should work for you. When you first purchased your freezer, you should have noticed a small cork that’s essential when you’re ready to ripen

or crank on top and fasten it in place. Then add layers of ice and salt in proportions of about 3 cups of rock salt to 15 pounds of ice. Pour about a cup of water over the mixture to

HOMEMADE ICE CREAM!

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make it easier for the can to spin. The mixture should freeze in about 30 minutes. If you try to speed up the freezing by adding more salt, the ice cream will be grainy and not as smooth. If it takes longer than 30 minutes, the longer churning may turn some of the fat into butter, and the ice cream will have a slightly greasy feel in the mouth — it will still taste fine. But if it freezes at about the right speed, when the motor stops running, or by hand, when you can’t run the crank any more, carefully pour off brine through the overflow hole, remove the crank, open the can, and remove the dasher, scraping ice cream back down into the can.Stir with a long-handled spoon to evenly distribute the harder ice cream from around the outside, replace the lid, and put the cork into the hole in the lid. Add another 5 pounds of ice and about 3 more cups of rock salt, in layers, cover with newspaper and weight it down and let it sit for about an hour and it will be nice and hard for serving. Or, to make it easy, simply take the can, remove the dasher as instructed earlier, replace the lid and set it in your refrigerator’s freezer compartment if the shelves are tall enough. Again, it will be ready to serve in an hour or less. Of course, if you like soft-serve consistency, you can start dipping right away — but it’s better when it ripens for awhile. You may add toppings of your choice— sauces, fresh fruit, nuts, or just eat it plain. Regardless of how you serve it, any day is improved with home made ice cream.

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French Vanilla Ice Cream

ahead and chill in the refrigerator in the ice cream can overnight. There are several different kinds of electric ice cream freezers, with some of the newer ones having the removable cores that have to be frozen, and you don’t have to use ice and salt as with the other models that are electric, but otherwise operate just like oldfashioned hand-cranked freezers. The following instructions are for the freez-

the ice cream after it’s made. After you have mixed up your ingredients and have put them in the clean can, making certain to fill it only to the fill line (on any can, leave at least 3 inches of head space to allow for expansion of the frozen mixture), chill in the refrigerator for several hours or overnight for the best taste and texture. The next day, put the dasher in the can, put the lid on, set the can in the freezer pail and set the motor

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18 Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine

1 qt. milk 6 egg yolks, beaten 1 cup sugar ¼ tsp. salt 3 cups whipping cream 2 tbsp. vanilla Combine milk, egg yolks, sugar and salt in a 3-qt. heavy saucepan; blend thoroughly. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture coats a spoon (about 15 minutes). Do not boil. Cool. Add cream and vanilla. Chill 1 to 2 hours. Churn-freeze. Makes about 3 quarts. This recipe originally appeared in the June 22, 1985, issue of Wallace’s Farmer magazine, the leading farm publication covering the industry in Iowa. Used with permission, copyright Farm Progress Cos.

Senior Life 2012


Founders are ancestors of Dr. Robert Paserba, newly named secretary for Catholic education and evangelization.

Left: Evelyn Paserba is seated, and standing behind Evelyn are her parents, Deanne and Kristofor Paserba. Center: Henrietta and Robert Paserba are seated in the center. Right, seated are: Sarah Paserba and son Adam, with husband David Paserba standing in back.

200 Years and Counting Members of founding families visit St. Patrick Church in Sugar Creek, Armstrong County

By Robert Paserba Many of the early pioneers came to the “Donegal Settlement” in western Pennsylvania in the early 1790s from the Lough Erne area of County Donegal, Ireland. In a poem authored by Jerry Monaghan, the voyage on the ship Eliza of these pioneers reads, in part: he

sides of the interior walls. A small balcony was added for additional seating. Although a visiting priest was rare in the early years of the church, families walked to the services from as far as 10 miles away!

Over the years from the start of this log cabin church, another St. Patrick Church was built nearby and it served area families up to its recent closing Stations “On the fourth of June, in the as a worship site by the Diocese of of the afternoon, We sailed from LonGreensburg. The history of this St. Cross were donderry … September ninth Patrick Church shows it first being we took our leave of Captain, formed into built in 1842 and destroyed by fire in mate, and sailors … We gave the sides of 1872; the second church built in 1877 three cheers for old Ireland … and and destroyed by fire in 1929; and the interior parted from each other.” the third church, which was restored walls. in 1930. Ground was broken for this Among the 90 families on board new church on Oct. 3, 1929, and the the Eliza were those who eventually settled cornerstone was laid by Father Stephen in western Armstrong and northern Butler Benson on Nov. 24, 1929. Father Benson, a counties. Names such as O’Donnell, Boyle, priest from the Diocese of Pittsburgh, was Black, Dougherty, McLaughlin, Gallagher, my great-uncle. Dougan, Coyle and Benson were among those who settled in this area, founding the On July 30, 2006, descendants of these earliest English-speaking Catholic church earliest pioneers and members of the church west of the Alleghenies, St. Patrick Church. throughout its modern history gathered The work on the log cabin church was comto celebrate the 200th anniversary of the pleted in 1806. The church was restored in church that stands as a testament to the 1926 and still stands where it was once built sacrifices and long-standing Catholic faith in 1806. Tourists are welcome during the of the people who lived and continue to live summer months to visit the historic church in this area. Among the celebrants at the and its adjoining cemetery where the tombanniversary celebration were myself, my wife stones of the earliest settlers still mark their and children and other member families. My gravesites. maternal ancestry includes my mother, Mary Ruth Benson Paserba, and her great-greatThe church itself was built by the pioneers great-grandparents, who were all founders with their own tools and oxen. They hauled and members of this early church, including and hewed the logs for the four sides of the Benson, McLaughlin, Gallagher, Dougan, church. The scarcity of nails prolonged the Dougherty and Coyle. building of the church and the making of the shingles was likewise a difficult task. The Pictured in June 2012 on a visit to the Stations of the Cross were formed into the old log cabin church are myself, my wife

T

Senior Life 2012

Henrietta, son Kristofor Paserba and his wife Deanne and their daughter Evelyn; son David Paserba and his wife Sarah and their son Adam. A snapshot of the professions of the pictured descendants of those buried in the old cemetery at St. Patrick would reveal stark differences between the “then and now,” with myself, a public and Catholic school superintendent, and Henrietta, a school nurse and Lamaze teacher; Kristofor, Continued on page 23

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Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine 19


The history of The Chaplet of The Divine Mercy

‘There is nothing the world needs more than Divine Mercy.’

(Pope John Paul II, Shrine of The Divine Mercy, Lagiewniki, Poland, June 7, 1997) By Robin Parow Even though we celebrate Divine Mercy Sunday the week after Easter Sunday, praying the Divine Mercy Chaplet is an ongoing devotion throughout the year for many of the faithful. If anyone wants to combine a vacation trip with an educational opportunity, consider “Divine Mercy 101,” a presentation by Brother Chris Alar on Saturday, Aug. 4, 9 a.m.-noon at the National Shrine of The Divine Mercy, Eden Hill 2 Prospect Road in Stockbridge, Mass. The free program provides an overview of Divine Mercy and its key aspects. They include Divine Mercy Sunday, a feast day on which great graces are promised to the faithful, as revealed by Jesus to St. Faustina. Other topics in the program include the connection between the Divine Mercy image and the Shroud of Turin; the Chaplet of Divine Mercy as a powerful intercessory prayer, especially for the dying; and the life and mission of St. Faustina, described as a mystic and visionary. Brother Chris said, “This is a great opportunity for anyone who has always wanted to know about Divine Mercy, or who wants to enrich their knowledge of Catholicism, to learn some of the deeper aspects of our faith.” Brother Chris entered the Marians of the

20 Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine

Immaculate Conception as a postulant in July 2006. He earlier earned a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering and an MBA from the University of Michigan. After working for a Fortune 500 company and then his own consulting company, he studied philosophy at Franciscan University in Steubenville, and is finishing a master’s in theology at Holy Apostles in Cromwell, Conn. He resides and works at the national shrine. The national shrine site at Eden Hill was purchased by the Marians in 1943 to serve as a residence for those entering the novitiate or a home for those entering the religious life. As the community was established, the chapel included a side altar for Divine Mercy Sunday, but the number of pilgrims grew, and they decided to build a shrine that was started in 1950, dedicated in 1960. In 1996, the shrine, built in honor of Divine Mercy and Mary Immaculate, was honored with the title of National Shrine of The Divine Mercy. In 2000, St. Maria Faustina Kowalska, the secretary of Divine Mercy, was canonized on Divine Mercy Sunday and the feast of Divine Mercy officially proclaimed by Pope John Paul II at St. Peter’s in Rome. The shrine is the site for the largest celebration in the Northeast of the feast of Divine Mercy, which is held each year on the Sunday after Easter. Parow is chief communications and publicity officer, Association of Marian Helpers, Stockbridge, Mass.

In 1935, St. Faustina received a vision of an angel sent by God to chastise a certain city. She began to pray for mercy, but her prayers were powerless. Suddenly she saw the holy Trinity and felt the power of Jesus’ grace within her. At the same time she found herself pleading with God for mercy with words she heard interiorly: Eternal Father, I offer you the body and blood, soul and divinity of your dearly beloved Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, in atonement for our sins and those of the whole world; for the sake of his sorrowful Passion, have mercy on us. (Diary, 475) As she continued saying this inspired prayer, the angel became helpless and could not carry out the deserved punishment (see 474). The next day, as she was entering the chapel, she again heard this interior voice, instructing her how to recite the prayer that our Lord later called “the chaplet.” This time, after “have mercy on us” were added the words “and on the whole world” (476). From then on, she recited this form of prayer almost constantly, offering it especially for the dying.

The Chaplet of The Divine Mercy How to recite the chaplet

The Chaplet of Mercy is recited using ordinary rosary beads of five decades. The chaplet is preceded by two opening prayers from the diary of St. Faustina and followed by a closing prayer. 1. Make the sign of the cross In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen. 2. Optional opening prayers You expired, Jesus, but the source of life gushed forth for souls, and the ocean of mercy opened up for the whole world. O Fount of Life, unfathomable Divine Mercy, envelop the whole world and empty yourself out upon us. O Blood and Water, which gushed forth from the heart of Jesus as a fountain of mercy for us, I trust in you! 3. Our Father Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name; thy kingdom come; thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen. Continued on page 23

Senior Life 2012


Parish Festival Fun through October AUGUST St. Mary, Herman Sunday, Aug. 5, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., school grounds, 821 Herman Road, Bingo, chucka-luck, Chinese auction, basket raffle, cash raffle, children’s games, country market and more. Featuring ham or char-grilled chicken dinner, served from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Assumption, Bellevue Tuesday-Saturday, Aug. 7-11, starting at 7 p.m., parking lots and school grounds, 45 N. Sprague Ave. Bingo, money games, children’s games, inflatable rides (obstacle course and giant slide), children’s train and more. Dinners served nightly from 4-7 p.m. St. Germaine, Bethel Park Wednesday-Saturday, Aug. 8-11, church parking lot at Baptist and Horning roads. Highlights include new and improved selection of rides, new games, as well as bingo, huge flea market, raffles, auction baskets and more. Dinners served nightly from 5-7 p.m. St. Irenaeus, Oakmont Thursday-Saturday Aug. 9-11, 6-10 p.m., church parking lots and building, 387 Maryland Ave. Includes 12-room indoor flea market, bake sale, kids rides, Chinese auction, bingo, games of chance and more. Dinners, 4-7 p.m., with different menu each night. Holy Sepulcher, Glade Mills Sunday, Aug. 12, noon-9 p.m. (flea market begins at 8 a.m.), behind school building, 1304 E. Cruikshank Road. Bingo, huge flea market, games, Chinese auction, and more. Barbecue chicken and ham dinners, served from noon-6 p.m., with takeout available. Holy Family, Creighton Sunday, Aug. 12, beginning with outdoor Mass at noon, Syria Mosque Pavilion, 1877 Shriners Way, Cheswick. Bingo, tremendous baked goods, auctions, raffles and more. Food will be served, beginning at 1 p.m., with a full menu of homemade foods at reasonable prices. For information, call 724-2241626. Our Lady of Grace, Scott Township Monday-Saturday, Aug. 13-18, starting at 7 p.m. (dinners from 4-7 p.m.), parking lots, Bower Hill Road at Kane Boulevard. Highlights include rides (including Ferris wheel), games, bingo, money wheel, raffle, bake sale, white elephant and more. Dinners served nightly from 4-6:30 p.m., with a complete grill open at 7 p.m. Holy Wisdom, North Side Northside Summer Celebration, WednesdaySaturday, Aug. 15-18, St. Boniface Church campus, 2208 East St. Special events nightly: Wednesday, cheerleaders; Thursday (oldies night) classic car cruise with entertainment by Chuck Blasko and the Vogues; Friday, chicken dinner from 4-7 p.m., 6 p.m. Skydiver

Senior Life 2012

Lottery and entertainment by Corbin/Hanner; Saturday, 4 p.m. festival Mass, spaghetti dinner from 4-7 p.m. and entertainment by Dancing Queen. Also, no-smoking bingo, games, amusement rides, photo booth and more. ATM is on site. Variety of food, beer, wine and bakery featured. Disc jockey will play music nightly. For more information, call 412-231-1116, or visit www.holywisdomparish. org St. Francis of Assisi, Finleyville Parish picnic, Sunday, Aug. 19, 1 p.m. until dark, parish grounds, 3609 Washington Ave. Featuring games for all ages, country store, theme basket and craft raffles, all-day bingo and more. Food stands include roast lamb, roast beef, barbecue chicken, haluski, kielbasa, hot dogs, funnel cakes and more. St. Wendelin, Carbon Center Sunday, Aug. 19, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., parking lot, 218 St. Wendelin Road. Bingo, car cruise, country store, paddle wheel, games, raffles and more. Dinner, served from 11 a.m.-6 p.m., features chicken or baked ham, with mashed potatoes, gravy, stuffing, green beans, coleslaw, fresh vegetables, beverage and homemade desserts. St. Sylvester, Brentwood Monday-Saturday, Aug. 20-25, church parking lot, 3754 Brownsville Road. Rides by Reinhart Amusements, bingo, games and more. Variety of foods for sale, including homemade doughnuts. Disc jockey will provide music nightly. An afternoon for children to be held Friday, 12:30-2:30 p.m. St. Teresa of Avila, Perrysville Monday-Saturday, Aug. 20-25, parish grounds, 1000 Avila Court. Dinners, starting at 4:30 p.m., $8 adults, $4 children. Highlights include rides by C&L Shows, with all-night ride tickets available. Also, flea market, bingo, games, petting zoo, kids games, Chinese auction and more. Dinner menu: Monday, steak; Tuesday, Eastern European; Wednesday, chicken/meatloaf; Thursday, German; Friday, fish; Saturday, Italian. Good Samaritan, Ambridge Thursday, Aug. 30, 6-10 p.m., Friday, Aug. 31, 6-11 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 1, noon-11 p.m. (with booths opening at 2 p.m.), Sunday, Sept. 2, 1-10 p.m., church grounds, Eighth and Melrose avenues. Bingo, face painting, hourly 50/50 raffle, bake sale, huge silent auction, Vegas-style action, wheelbarrow of food & certificate raffle, and more. Big money raffle drawn on Sunday. Homemade dinner menu: Thursday, 4-7 p.m., stuffed chicken breast; Friday, 4-7 p.m., famous fish dinner; Saturday, 1-7 p.m., stuffed cabbage; Sunday, noon-7 p.m., famous spaghetti and meatball dinner. Mass with polka music, Saturday, 5:30 p.m., with Bishop David Zubik presiding. For information, call 724-266-6565.

SEPTEMBER St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, Carnegie Thursday-Saturday, Sept. 6-8, 5-11 p.m. (510 p.m. on Thursday), parking lots on Third Avenue and Bayley Building. Bingo, Chinese auction, money wheels, games, face painting, balloon animals, magician, raffles and more. Homemade dinners, 4-7 p.m., $9 for adults, $6 for children. Also, a variety of food booths open at 6 p.m. St. Blaise, Midland Friday-Saturday, Sept. 7-8, 4-10 p.m., parish grounds, Eighth Street and Penn Avenue. Featuring games, free door prizes and entertainment. Menu will feature a variety of ethnic foods. St. Alphonsus, Wexford Harvest Home Festival and Dinner, Sunday, Sept. 9, 12:30-6:30 p.m., parish grounds, 201 Church St. Country store, bonanza raffle, Chinese auction, games and more. Homestyle chicken and ham dinners (with chicken grilled on property), 12:30-6:30 p.m. Cost is $10 for adults ($12 for takeout), $6 for child ($7 for child). St. Michael, Butler Saturday-Sunday, Sept. 29-30, social hall, 130 Glenn Ave. Italian Village shops include bakery, ice cream parlor, rosary makers, youth activities, face painting and more. A la carte dinner on Saturday, featuring wedding and chicken pastini soups, pasta e fagoli, salad, rice balls, lasagna, stuffed shells, Italian beans and greens, meatballs, hot sausage, panini sandwiches, pizza, Italian love cake and more. Sunday dinner features spaghetti and meatballs, $8.50 for adults, $4 for children. OCTOBER St. Malachy, Kennedy Township Food festival, Thursday, Oct. 4, 4-10 p.m., Friday, Oct. 5, 4-11 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 6, 2-6 p.m., parish grounds and building, 343 Forest Grove Road. A large variety of nationality booths, including German, Italian, French, Mexican, Slovak and American, in addition to gyro booth, pierogie kitchen and cookie patch. St. Peter, Slippery Rock Oktoberfest, Friday evening, Oct. 5, and all day Saturday, Oct. 6, parish center, 342 Normal Ave. Featuring German food and biergarten, children’s games, raffles, bingo, and more. Dinners and a la carte menu available. For more information, visit www. rockcatholic.org. St. Bartholomew, Penn Hills Thursday-Sunday, Oct. 11-14, 5-10 p.m. (noon5 p.m. Sunday), parish campus, 111 Erhardt Drive. Includes rides, games, variety of food and more. For more information, call 412-2423374.

Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine 21


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Senior Life 2012


How to recite the chaplet Continued from PAGE 20

4. Hail Mary Hail Mary, full of grace. The Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 5. The Apostle’s Creed I believe in God, the Father Almighty, Creator of heaven and earth; and in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified; died, and was buried. He descended into hell; the third day he arose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from thence he shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy Catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and life everlasting. Amen. 6. The Eternal Father Eternal Father, I offer you the body and blood, soul and divinity of your dearly beloved Son, our Lord, Jesus Christ, in atonement for our sins and those of the whole world. 7. On the 10 small beads of each decade For the sake of his sorrowful Passion, have mercy on us and on the whole world. 8. Repeat for the remaining decades Saying the “Eternal Father� (6) on the “Our Father� bead and then 10 “For the sake of his sorrowful Passion� (7) on the following “Hail Mary� beads. 9. Conclude with Holy God (repeat three times) Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy Immortal One, have mercy on us and on the whole world. 10. Optional closing prayer Eternal God, in whom mercy is endless and the treasury of compassion — inexhaustible, look kindly upon us and increase your mercy in us, that in difficult moments we might not despair nor become despondent, but with great confidence submit ourselves to your holy will, which is love and mercy itself. Diary of St. Maria Faustina Kowalska: Divine Mercy in My Soul and The Chaplet of The Divine MercyCopyright Š 1987 Marian Fathers of the Immaculate Conception of the B.V.M. Not for reproduction. Used with permission.

Senior Life 2012

ST. PATRICK CHURCH Sugar Creek, Armstrong County, PA 1806

Continued FROM page 19 He erected a cabin in the Donegal Settlement of Sugar Creek, reared a large family and farmed on 400 acres of land. Still another fourth great-grandfather was Hugh Gallagher, arriving about 1800 from County Donegal and settling on 300 acres of land in the same area. And, the Dougan family too settled in this area, yet another fourth great-grandparent named Dennis Dougan. Arriving on the ship Eliza, Dennis and his family settled on 200 acres of land in this area and engaged in farming. These families and their descendants founded and attended the Catholic churches in this general area, including St. Patrick and St. John, Coylesville. There are still stained-glass windows donated at the time to St. John Church and bearing the Dougan family name.

a project manager at Westinghouse and Deanne, a pharmacist with Rite Aid; David, a school psychologist at the Allegheny Intermediate Unit and Sarah, a teacher of special education. Headstones in the graveyard would reveal a different set of work and life skills, including my fourth great-grandfather, who was John Coyle. He was a linen weaver in County Donegal, arriving in America in 1791 and manufactured linen goods for local demand in the Sugar Creek area. The town of Coylesville is named for him. Another gravesite identifies a fifth great-grandfather, Marcus McLaughlin, born in 1744, and a fourth great-grandfather Patrick McLaughlin, born in 1765 in County Donegal.

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Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine 23


Have Fun and Keep Active By BOB ZAJAC “The fun of softball and the enjoyment of others is what this activity is all about. Don’t let your senior years just slip away.” That is the theme of the North Allegheny County Senior Softball League, where I play ball. It is a slow-pitch league comprised of 16 teams —ages 53 and up in two age divisions — who play at the Senior Softball Complex in North Park. I first began playing softball about 10

years ago for a team sponsored by Billy’s Bistro in Troy Hill and currently play for the Golden Eagles. There was a gap of some 40 years from the last time I played organized ball to when

24 Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine

I joined this league. While initially playing for Billy’s I was primarily an outfielder and I played a little infield, but what I really wanted to do was pitch. Pitching was not foreign to me. When my daughters were growing up, they were the pitchers on their respective teams in the Ingomar Franklin Park Athletic Association. I worked with them for many hours in our back yard, and all the hard work eventually paid off as both won Pennsylvania state championships at the age of 10. So pitching softball is in our blood. The pitcher on the Billy’s team was Norb Hrach, and he was very good, so I knew I would have to bide my time if I wanted to move from the outfield to the mound. Norb soon thereafter moved to another division in the league, and that created the opportunity for me to pitch. But I quickly found out that pitching is not simply about the mechanics of throwing strikes. There is a lot of strategy involved. One of my teammates — Ron Eggert — helped me in this regard. He taught me about release angles, pitching pace, pushing and varying the ceiling height, when to pitch inside or outside, short or deep, and just plain know-

ing my opponent and the game situation. With slow pitch, it is very unlikely that you are going to strike out the batter. Instead, you want to throw pitches to which the batter cannot make solid contact, or hits towards the best gloves on your team. If I can get the batter to hit the ball where I want rather than where he wants, I feel I have done my job. So all of you out there who think you are either too old, too injured, too out-of-shape or don’t have enough time to practice a lot, why not come out and join us? We’re out there with some of our best friends, playing the game because we love it. Though we may be a bit slower than we were in our younger years, that does not mean we play with any less competitive fire than we did before. It’s an extension of life for us. It keeps us young. Check out our website at www.nacssl.com. Hopefully we’ll see you next spring. Zajac, retired from Alcoa Inc., and his wife, Ginny, are members at St. John Neumann Parish, Franklin Park.

Senior Life 2012


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Baseball Hall of Famer

Pud Galvin

from Pittsburgh’s North Side

Second only to Cy Young in Innings Pitched By Jude (Galvin) Ostrowski When we were kids, in my paternal grandparents’ house was a light-up closet. When you opened the closet door, the light came on and there was this lifesize charcoal portrait of James “Pud” Galvin in a baseball uniform, holding a baseball. He was my great-grandfather. We grew up on stories of Pud. Baseball was part of my family’s history. My grandmother was selling her house in the 1960s and the person who was interested in buying it happened to be affiliated with the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. He saw the portrait in the closet and wanted to get more information from my grandfather. After research on Pud’s career was done, Pud was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1965, posthumously, of course.

The following text on Judith Ostrowski’s great-grandfather, James Francis Galvin, comes from a book published by the Cooperstown Hall of Fame.

My grandfather and his sister were the only two of 11 children left, and they were presented with complimentary plaques of Pud at the induction ceremony. Whenever you entered the front door of my grandparents’ house, the plaque

Pud Galvin

His was not a household name, yet only five major league pitchers won more games in their careers than James (Pud) Galvin. He was the Walter Johnson of his time, blazing fastballs past bewildered batters. Galvin hurled more innings (5,959) than any other pitcher except Cy Young. He pitched two no-hitters for Buffalo, against Worcester and Detroit, and his gem against Detroit followed a one-hitter against the same club. Galvin accounted for the first two victories scored by the Pittsburgh club in the National League, beating John Clarkson of Chicago, 6-2, and Lady Baldwin of Detroit, 8-3, in 1887. of Pud was right there. It was, and is, very special to everyone in our family. The plaque from my grandfather has since passed on to me. Ostrowski works for the diocesan Department for Media and Technology.

26 Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine

After the powerful Providence team won 20 straight games in 1884, he shut out the Grays, beating Old Hoss Radbourn, 2-0. Still, with his convincing credentials, it required the passage of 63 years after his death for Galvin to be elected to the Hall of Fame.

Senior Life 2012


posted a 13-19 record before being sold to Allegheny. Although his lifetime batting average was barely above .200, Galvin played the outfield and once performed at shortstop. An eye injury, suffered when struck by a pitched ball, made Gentle James gun-shy in later years, and a fractured leg, suffered in a collision with Cap Anson of Chicago, created idle time that boosted Pud’s weight over 200 pounds by the time he retired in 1894. Galvin umpired for one season in the National League before returning to Pittsburgh, where he opened one of the largest cafes in the city. The father of 11, he once wisecracked that he should organize a family team and call it the “Galvinized Nine.” Galvin went broke. And, on Thanksgiving Day 1901, he was taken sick with a stomach ailment. Less than four months later, at age 45, Galvin died. Galvin, a friend of President Grover Cleveland, lived his final months in a rooming house on Pittsburgh’s lower North Side.

Sometimes he was called “Gentle James,” in tribute to his personality. Other times he was known as “Pud,” as in pudding, which, it was said, he made of opposing batters. Galvin placed little stock in the curve as a pitching weapon, relying on his fastball and control to register 46 victories in both 1883 and 1884. In ‘83, he worked a staggering 656 innings. Buck Ewing, incomparable New York catcher, insisted that “If I had Galvin to catch, no one would ever steal a base on me. That fellow keeps ‘em glued to the base, and he also has the best control of any pitcher in the league.” Galvin’s control was short of Ewing’s high praise during one game in 1886 as he walked three consecutive batters. But to the base-runners’ chagrin, they learned about Pud’s knack of keeping runners “glued.” Each was picked off base. Gentle James was all but invincible for Buffalo during a six-day period in 1884. On Aug. 2, he pitched a one-hitter. Two days later, he hurled a three-hit shutout, and the next day he worked 11 scoreless innings before bowing, 1-0. Late in the 1885 season, Pud was sold to the Allegheny (Pittsburgh) club of the American Association for $2,500, a princely sum of that day. He was given $700 from that amount, and handed a $1,000 raise by his new bosses, placing him in the $3,000 bracket. The Buffalo owners’ cash-gift generosity was in sharp contrast to their earlier treatment of Galvin. Infuriated that he was given no raise after a 46-22 campaign in ‘84, Galvin went to San Francisco and joined an independent club. Tales of his magnificent feats filtered back to Buffalo, where the Bisons were slumping dismally. On May 11, the Buffalo Express carried the welcome news: “There is great rejoicing on the baseball front. Negotiations have been opened with Gentle James.” Galvin rejoined the Buffalo club and

Senior Life 2012

Pud Galvin’s blazing fastball made him the Walter Johnson of the 19th century.

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By Dr. Bruce K. Maskarinec As summer temperatures continue to soar in the Pittsburgh area, all of us, especially the elderly and those with chronic medical problems, need to be reminded of the dangers associated with extremely hot weather. The most common heat-related illnesses are: (1) heat cramps, (2) heat exhaustion and (3) heat stroke. Heat cramps are painful muscle spasms, usually in the calves, thighs and abdomen. You can help to prevent these cramps if you stretch your muscles before you exercise and drink plenty of fluids, especially those rich in electrolytes. Avoid caffeine and alcohol. Heat exhaustion is a heat-related illness that may occur after your body has been exposed to high temperatures

for several days and you become dehydrated. Common signs and symptoms include heavy sweating, weakness, nausea, headache, lightheadedness, mild confusion, rapid heart rate and dark-colored urine. If you think you have heat exhaustion, get out of the heat quickly. Rest in a building that has air-conditioning or find a cool, shady area. Remove all tight and

unnecessary clothing, drink plenty of water and take a cool shower or bath or apply cold water to your skin. If you do not feel better within 30 minutes, contact your doctor because untreated heat exhaustion

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can lead to heat  stroke. Heat stroke is the most serious heatrelated illness and is a medical emergency. It occurs when the body is overwhelmed by heat and unable to control its temperature. The hallmark sign of heat stroke is a body temperature of greater than 104 degrees F. Other commonly associated signs and symptoms include a lack of sweating, rapid breathing and rapid heart rate, severe headache, nausea with vomiting, confusion, seizures and loss of consciousness. If not treated immediately, heat stroke can lead to brain damage, organ failure and even death. If you think someone might have heat stroke, call 911! While awaiting medical help, assist the victim by moving them to a cool area, removing all tight and unnecessary clothing and apply cold water to the skin. What can you do to prevent heat-related illness? When the heat index is high, stay indoors in air-conditioned areas. (The heat index is a measurement of how hot it feels when relative humidity is combined with the effects of the air temperature. A heat index of greater than 90 degrees is considered dangerous.) If you must go outside, take the following precautions: wear lightweight clothing, including a hat; use sunscreen with a sun protection factor of 15 or more; and drink plenty of water. Do medications increase your risk for heat stroke? Yes, some medicines for allergies (antihistamines), heart conditions (beta-blockers and vasoconstrictors), mental illness (antidepressants and antipsychotics) and seizures (anticonvulsants) may make you more likely to get a heatrelated illness. Diuretics, laxatives, diet pills, sedatives, caffeine and alcohol may also increase your risk. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if your medicines put you at risk for heat-related illness. Enjoy the rest of your summer and beat the heat. Don’t let the heat beat you! Maskarinec is a board-certified family practice physician and president of the Catholic Medical Association, Pittsburgh Guild.

Senior Life 2012


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Senior Life 2012

Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine 29


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30 Pittsburgh Catholic Magazine

Senior Life 2012


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Senior Life 2012

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Senior Life 2012


2012 Pittsburgh Catholic Senior Life