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Style Workin’ on the Railroad North Hills man builds miniature trains Page 10

THE JEWISH CHRONICLE thejewishchronicle.net february 3, 2011 shevat 29, 5771

Vol. 53, No. 40

Pittsburgh, PA

Wrapped up with the Steelers Jews celebrate Steelers in educational, creative ways

JTA

Associate Editor

Please see Steelers, page 23.

Pro-Israel groups face dilemma: How to approach Egypt BY RON KAMPEAS

BY JUSTIN JACOBS

If you’ve left your house or turned on the television in the last two weeks, you know: Pittsburgh’s going to the Super Bowl. But while huge portions of Pittsburghers — and, surely, much of the country — will be cheering for a Steeler victory, some members of the city’s Jewish community are celebrating in creative, and even educational ways. At Tree of Life/Or L’Simcha Congregation Sunday school, students will actually feel some unity with Green Bay, Wis. This Sunday morning, the school’s 90 students will connect with the 20 students of Congregation Cnesses Israel, a small Conservative synagogue in Green Bay, through Skype. Students at both schools spent the last few weeks learning football-related vocabulary in Hebrew, which they’ll swap with each other and answer sports trivia. “When Pittsburgh was entering the AFC championship, I challenged the kids: on Sunday you come in with any Hebrew words pertaining to football, and anybody who does gets a prize,” said Shelly Schapiro, director of education. “Sure enough, some students they had their lists. But now, for the Super Bowl, those papers are piling up on my desk.” Schapiro knew she could put that enthusiasm to work, and thought, “It’d be cool for the kids to connect with a congregation in Green Bay,” she said. “It was truly one of those moments when a light went off.” Schapiro connected with Congregation Cnesses Israel because, “It’s

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Photo by Steve Hecht

Rabbi Alex Greenbaum of Beth El Congregation of the South Hills sports his homemade Terrible Tallis to stir up some excitement for the Super Bowl on Sunday, when the Pittsburgh Steelers will take on the Green Bay Packers.

WASHINGTON — As Egypt convulses, pro-Israel groups and U.S. Congress members are seized by the ancient maternal dilemma: If you have nothing nice to say, should you say anything at all? The question of whether to stake a claim in the protests against 30 years of President Hosni Mubarak’s autocracy is a key one for the pro-Israel lobby and pro-Israel lawmakers because of the role they have played in making Egypt one of the greatest beneficiaries of U.S. aid. And in the same way that the outcome in Egypt continues to idle in the gear of “anyone’s guess,” there is little consensus in the byways of pro-Israel Washington over how to treat the nation and its nascent revolution. The competing claims were evident in the divergent, and at times contrasting, calls issuing from figures known for their closeness to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, or AIPAC, the trendsetter in the pro-Israel community. In general, reactions to the unrest in Egypt crossed political lines, with some liberal and conservative commentators pressing the Obama administration to help topple the regime, and others stressing the need for stability. Some AIPAC-related called for assistance to Egypt to be contingent on whether the emerging government remained committed to cooperation with Israel. Others were emphatic in omitting Israel as a consideration, saying it was not the place of Israel or its friends to intervene in what appears to be an organic shucking-off of a dictator. Josh Block, AIPAC’s former spokesman who is still close to the lobby, said the commitment of whatever government emerges to peace with Please see Egypt, page 14.

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Times To Remember

KINDLE SABBATH CANDLES: 5:23 p.m. EST. SABBATH ENDS: 6:25 p.m. EST.


2 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011

Metro Students become advocates

Over 70 students converge in Pittsburgh for Israel advocacy weekend BY JUSTIN JACOBS Associate Editor

At Hiram College in northeast Ohio, a student population of just over 1,000 means there aren’t too many Jews coming to the events held by the school’s recently re-launched Hillel. But student president Robert Weitzner believes that small numbers don’t necessitate small voices. “On campus, we have a number of students with a negative image of Israel,” said Weitzner. “This year, Hillel was refounded. Before that, we Jews didn’t have a voice showing the positive side of Israel.” So when Weitzner was invited to the first ever Israel advocacy training weekend at Pittsburgh’s Hillel JUC, he decided to come, and bring his board along. From Friday to Sunday this weekend, Hillel JUC will draw over 70 students from 10 local universities for its advocacy training workshop — a three-day program co-sponsored with Israel education organization The David Project to teach students how to respond to negative messages about Israel spreading on campuses. Deputy Consul General of Is-

Raslan Abu Rukun, the Deputy Consul General at the Consulate General of Israel, will speak at the Hillel JUC this weekend.

rael Raslan Abu Rukun, a Druze Israeli, will be the special guest speaker. Rukun is the first non-Jewish Israeli to be named Deputy Consul General. While

most Israel advocacy in this country comes from Jews, Rukun represents a non-Jewish voice educating others about his country.

“I will speak about the challenges Israel faces in the Middle East and international arenas,” said Rukun, calling from his office in Philadelphia. “Israel advocacy is very important today. In the last few years, we see an increasing process of the delegitimizing of Israel, and a lot of it is coming from inside college campuses. It is alright to criticize Israel — we have a lot of criticisms from inside the country — but it’s not right to boycott or sanction.” The idea for the weekend originated back in October, when Hillel JUC’s Assistant Director of Jewish Student Life, Carly Adelmann, and Israel fellow, Leehee Kaane, met with staff of The David Project. They wanted to create a weekend to immerse students in advocacy training when the winter Birthright season had just ended, courting students who had just traveled to Israel to attend the workshop. “When you get back [from Birthright], you want to do anything and everything for Israel,” said Adelmann. “If we don’t engage the students in that time, they lose that spark.” Please see Advocates, page 4.

Visit The Jewish Chronicle Website thejewishchronicle.net


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011 — 3

METRO Briefly

The Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh has named David and Cynthia Shapira and Edgar and Sandy Snyder to co-chair the committee planning the Federation’s 2012 centennial celebration. The Federation has also released an image for the centennial year festivities. The centennial will be marked by a wide range of programs, events and special projects, some of which will take place in 2011, to lead up to the anniversary year. Among those activities are: • A 10-day “Mega Mission” to Israel with special tracks tailored to the needs of families, seasoned Israel travelers and first-time visitors to the Jewish state (June). • A major donor centennial kickoff celebration, honoring Federation past presidents and founders of the Centennial Fund for a Jewish Future (fall). • Yom Ha’atzmaut celebration, highlighting partner agencies and congregations (spring). • Communitywide event featuring a dinner and a leading speaker or entertainer. • History exhibit, showcasing the past century of the evolution of our Jewish community. • Building the Centennial Fund for a Jewish Future, which is intended to ensure a perpetual stream of funding for programs that promote Jewish learning and engagement. “We hope to involve everyone who wants to take part in this momentous celebration,” Federation Chair Bill Rudolph said in a prepared statement. David and Cindy Shapira co-chair the Federation’s Jewish Community Foundation and its Centennial Fund for a Jewish Future Endowment Campaign. David is a past Federation chair and has held many other positions within the community. Cindy currently sits on the Federation board and executive committee as well as the boards of the Jewish Federations of North America, Jewish Agency for Israel, Jewish Community Center and Community Day School. She is also a former executive director of National Council of Jewish Women, Pittsburgh Section. Edgar Snyder currently is on the Federation executive committee, board of directors and funding committee, and he is an executive committee member of the American Jewish Joint Distribution committee and a member of the JFNA board of trustees and its Israel/overseas committee. Sandy has served on the Federation’s board of directors, missions committee and communications/ marketing committee.

Congregation Dor Hadash will hold an afternoon celebration Sunday, Feb. 20, to commemorate Cheryl Klein’s 25th year as its cantor. Her parents were among the 48-year-old congregation’s earliest members and, in 1967, Klein became a bat mitzva at Dor Hadash. Klein has been the member-led congregation’s Cheryl Klein cantor through several moves — from its earliest home at the Hebrew Institute, to its current space at the Tree of Life/Or L’Simcha synagogue on Wilkins and Shady avenues. Klein has worked with hundreds of students at Dor Hadash and other congregations over the years, training them to become b’nai mitzva. She also taught religious school, and held the position as head of the School of Advanced Jewish Studies. Contact the Dor Hadash administrator at admin@dorhadash.net for more information. Sara Stock Mayo, the musical vocalist and soloist at Temple Sinai, will present her fourth Sinai Cabaret Night. During the evening of Broadway, jazz and popular music, Mayo will sing songs of love, loss and life’s experiences. Mayo has been the soloist at Temple Sinai for seven years. Before then, she was a musical theater major at Syracuse University and has performed at cabarets in New York City. She is the daughter of the Pittsburgh composer David Stock. Women of Temple Sinai, which is sponsoring the cabaret, will feature wines served with selected cheeses to match, hors d’oeuvres and desserts. A silent auction will round out the evening. There a charge for the evening, which can be paid in advance or at the door. The Zionist Organization of America-Pittsburgh District is now accepting applications for its 2011 Israel Scholarship Program. The late Hy Kimel, executive director of the ZOA-Pittsburgh District for more than 30 years, established the program in 1962 as an investment in the children of the region. ZOA has found these trips important in reinforcing the commitment of students to Judaism and in giving them an appreciation of the centrality of Israel to Jewish life. The first scholarship will assist high school juniors, seniors and college freshman traveling to Israel on structured study trips. Five $250 scholarships will be presented from endowments established by Drs. Bernard and Esther Klionsky, Dr. Harold and Marla Scheinman and the late Thelma Esman. The Ivan J. and Natalie E. Novick Israel Scholarship Essay Contest was established in their memory by the Novick family, to recognize their many years of dedicated service to the Pittsburgh Jewish Community. Applicants 15 to 19 years of age will submit 500 word essays on the topic, “The Influence of Israel on me as a Jew.” A $500 scholarship will be Please see Briefly, page 5.


4 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011

METRO

Israeli Sgt. speaks to Pitt students, draws protestors BY NOAH LEVINSON Chronicle Correspondent

As tension in the Gaza Strip increases, headlines can give a grim representation of events. Yet, behind these stories are real Israeli people, fighting to defend their Jewish homeland. One of those soldiers from the Israeli Defense Force spoke to students about his time spent in the force and his relationships with his fellow soldiers Monday, Jan. 31, at the University of Pittsburgh, organized by the Pittsburgh Israel Public Affairs Committee, Panthers for Israel, Hillel Jewish University Center, Chabad and the College Republicans, Sgt. Benjamin Anthony, a heavy machine gunner in the IDF, spoke to a crowd of Pitt students at the William Pitt Union. The sergeant is a speaker for Our Soldiers Speak, a nonprofit organization not affiliated with the government of Israel. He entered the room nearly 45 minutes late due to an assortment of groups of protesting Palestinian supporters. The event, initially open to the public, was then restricted to Pitt students only. Anthony removed his blue hooded jacket and prepared to speak, but sever-

Advocates: Continued from page 2. The goal was to “provide an educational foundation for a larger amount of students,” said Adelmann. “We thought, instead of sending our students away to conferences, why not bring more students here?” Friday afternoon, students from Carnegie Mellon University, Ohio State, Penn State, Hiram College, Case Western, George Washington University, Community College of Allegheny County,

al protestors with blue tape over their mouths and signs written in Arabic on their chests confronted him. They sat down quietly, but left about 15 minutes into the speech. Anthony asked that maybe if the protestors would remove the tape on their mouths to ask reasonable questions they could have a civil discussion. The soldier, though, didn’t come to speak about Israeli politics. “I’m here to transport you to the human side of warfare,” said Anthony. He talked mainly about the men in his squad that he was personally responsible for, and the cruel and difficult decisions that are made by them every day. The sergeant posed a situation to the audience where a soldier has to decide what to do when being fired upon by an enemy using a child as a shield. He said that his 18-year-old fellow soldiers are “making that decision when you (the university students) are deciding what college to attend.” It is Israeli policy that all Israeli citizens over 18 years of age must serve in the IDF, men for three years and women for two. One senior student attending the

speech, Micah Toll, the business manager for Panthers in Israel, plans to move to Israel and join the IDF after his graduation. He intends to work with electric vehicles after his time in the force. “The IDF isn’t just the Israeli army, it’s the army of the Jewish people,” said Toll. Anthony commented about the men in his squad being, “really just boys, charged with an incredible responsibility.” Yet, he continued to reiterate that it only takes, “10 minutes for a boy to become a man.” After his speech, the sergeant asked for questions. One individual asked how he, as an Israeli citizen, felt about the recent mass uprising in Egypt. “Whoever ends up standing once the dust has settled ... I hope that they revere peace as well as Israel,” said Anthony. After answering several more questions about his experience with the IDF, Anthony ended his speech, chatted briefly with several audience members, and left hoping to beat the imminent snowstorm. The event’s organizer, and president of Panthers in Israel, Samantha Vinokor,

felt the event was an absolute success. “Benjamin is amazing. He gives an emotional and articulate glimpse of something that I as a Pitt student have not witnessed firsthand,” said Vinokor. Major Shawn Gralinski, 36, an Army ROTC officer at the university, was impressed with Anthony, also calling him, “a very articulate individual.” “It’s obviously nice to hear the experiences and thoughts and feelings of a soldier,” said Gralinski. Anthony stressed how important advocacy on the behalf of Israel is on a college campus. “We ask you to defend and protect our names. You are our ambassadors,” said Anthony to the students. Vinokor felt especially proud of the sergeant’s statement, considering how she plans to work in Israel activism and advocacy after her graduation. “Something I say to people all the time is that the reason why I’m not at the University of Tel Aviv is that I want to be here defending Israel to the people who need to hear it,” said Vinokor.

West Virginia University, the University of Cincinnati and the University of Pittsburgh will meet at Hillel to begin the training weekend. The students, many of whom are involved in their schools’ Hillels, will join the Hillel JUC’s Israelthemed Shabbat dinner. They’ll be trained by representatives from The David Project on how to speak out for Israel, including some cultural education from local Israeli students. To break Shabbat, the students will head to a popular Oakland bar for a Tel Aviv-themed party. “We want to give the students a personal stake in why they’re advocating for

Israel,” said Adelmann. “When you get back from Birthright, you have new friends and new experiences. But that doesn’t give you much when you talk with people boycotting Israel, saying it shouldn’t exist. We want to connect the passion with the facts.” One session will have students reading Pitt’s student paper, The Pitt News, to look at details of how Israel is portrayed in even student-centric media. “Instead of just saying how to combat misreports about Israel in the media, they’re going to look at very specific articles from their paper,” said Adelmann. Ryan Gianola, the Hillel president at

Penn State, put together a crew of 10 Jewish students to attend the training weekend. Gianola, a Fox Chapel native, leads a small Hillel, considering his school’s Jewish population is upward of 6,000. Those few voices, then, must be heard. “It’s really important to educate people on the real issues,” said Gianola. “With the whole Israel-Palestinian conflict, there are rumors. It’s hard to hear the right information.”

(Noah Levinson can be reached at ndl10@pitt.edu.)

(Justin Jacobs can be reached at justinj@thejewishchronicle.net.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011 — 5

METRO Briefly Continued from page 3. awarded for the winning essay. Avraham and Patricia Anouchi established the scholarship fund to assist students traveling to Israel for research. Available to undergraduate and graduate students who have completed at least one year of college, applicants may submit to the ZOA scholarship committee their proposal describing the topic, planned research, interviews to be conducted, etc. One proposal will be selected and the applicant will present ZOA a minimum 3,000-word report on their project. The scholarship award will be a

minimum $500. Applicants must be Jewish and permanent residents in Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Fayette, Washington or Westmoreland counties. Applications will be accepted from Feb. 1 through March 1. Scholarships will be paid directly to the Israel study program of the winning applicants. Contact ZOA-Pittsburgh Executive Director Stuart Pavilack at (412) 6654630 or pittsburgh@zoa.org for more information. The Tikva Group of Hadassah will meet Sunday, Feb. 13, 1 p.m. in the party room at 220 N. Dithridge St. Sue Linzer, senior manager of overseas operations for the Jewish Federation of

Greater Pittsburgh, who just returned from Israel, will give an account of the situation there and abroad. Linzer is a past president of the Hadassah Rishon Group, a past vice president of the Pittsburgh Chapter, a life member, and the madricha of the leadership academy. “The VoKols,” a co-ed singing group from the Hillel Jewish University Center, will perform American and Jewish pop music and a dessert buffet will be served. Call Yetta Speiser at (412) 682-2105 for reservations and information. Beth El Congregation of the South Hills will hold the 14th Annual All-You-Can-Eat Pancake Festival Sunday, Feb. 13, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.,

1900 Cochran Road, behind Taco Bell. Participants are asked to bring a nonperishable food item to be donated to a local food bank. Call (412) 561-1168 bethelcong.org for more information. “More Than Just Learning” hosts Shirley and Morris Shratter discuss education in Russia and the United States with Russian immigrant Jenny Milson and Pat Crawford, formerly in public relations for the Pittsburgh Board of Education during the Cold War years. The two systems will be compared. The program airs every Tuesday in February at 8 p.m., cable TV-Channel 21 in Pittsburgh only.

Covenant lawsuit moves toward settlement BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

The class action lawsuit filed last year by residents of the former Covenant at South Hills against B’nai B’rith International and its affiliates appears to be moving toward resolution. Attorneys for the parties appeared before Judge David S. Cercone in Federal District Court last week to provide an update of the status of the suit.

While no details regarding any proposed agreement have been made public, a final settlement seems imminent. The lawsuit alleges, among other things, that the plaintiffs collectively paid millions of dollars of entrance fee deposits in order to move into the B’nai B’rith-sponsored senior living facility in Mt. Lebanon, and that they were entitled to recover up to 90 of those deposits upon leaving the facility. The suit further alleges that the

plaintiffs relied upon B’nai B’rith to protect their interests in the facility. The Covenant, which had been plagued by financial problems since its opening in 2002, filed for bankruptcy protection in January 2009, and the facility was sold by order of the court nine months later to Concordia Lutheran Ministries. Under the terms of Concordia’s purchase agreement, it was not required to refund the residents’ deposits. The residents do not yet know the

terms of the settlement agreement, according to Maury Deul, former president of the Residents’ Council, but many look at a recovery of any portion of their funds as found money. “For many of us, it’s almost like finding a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow, even though there’s only a couple of colors showing,” Deul said. (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)


6 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011

Opinion

The Jewish Chronicle

New Middle East has rough birth

Barbara Befferman, CEO EDITORIAL STAFF Lee Chottiner, Executive Editor Justin Jacobs, Associate Editor Angela Leibowicz, Community Editor Toby Tabachnick, Staff Writer SALES STAFF Susie Mangel, Senior Sales Associate Roberta Letwin, Sales Associate PRODUCTION STAFF Dawn Wanninger, Production Manager Nancy Bishop Production Artist BUSINESS STAFF Jennifer Barill, Comptroller Josh Reisner, Office Manager Donna Mink, Classified & Subscriptions Marcy Kronzek, Receptionist BOARD OF TRUSTEES Davida Fromm, President Richard Kitay, Vice President Cindy Goodman-Leib, Secretary Lou Weiss, Treasurer Lynn Cullen, Past President Carolyn Hess Abraham Brian Balk Daniel Berkowitz Stephen Fienberg Malke Steinfeld Frank Stanley Greenfield David Grubman Thomas Hollander Larry Honig Evan Indianer David Levine Judy Palkovitz Amy W. Platt Jane Rollman Benjamin Rosenthal Dodie Roskies Charles Saul Andrew Schaer Ilana Schwarcz Jonathan Wander Published every Thursday by the Pittsburgh Jewish Publication and Education Foundation 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Flr. , Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Phone: 412-687-1000 FAX: 412-521-0154 E-Mail: newsdesk@thejewishchronicle.net SUBSCRIPTION: $44 in Pennsylvania $46 East of the Mississippi $48 West of the Mississippi and FL NEWSSTAND PRICE $1.50 PER COPY POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE JEWISH CHRONICLE, 5915 BEACON ST., 3RD, FLR., PITTSBURGH, PA 15217 (PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS TO JEWISH TELEGRAPHIC AGENCY AND FEATURE SERVICE) USPS 582-740 Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to the Jewish Chronicle become the property of this publication, which is not responsible for the return or loss of such items. The Chronicle does not endorse the goods or services advertised in its pages and makes no representation to the kashrut of food products and services in said advertising. The publisher is not liable for damages if, for any reason whatsoever, he fails to publish an advertisement or for any error in an advertisement. Acceptance of advertisers and of ad copy is subject to the publisher’s approval. The Chronicle is not responsible if ads violate applicable laws and the advertiser will indemnify, hold harmless and defend the Chronicle from all claims made by governmental agencies and consumers for any reason based on ads appearing in the Chronicle.

o one knows for sure if Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak will stay in power until September (as he hopes) or until tomorrow (as hundreds of thousands of demonstrators on the streets demand). This much we do know: A new Middle East is taking shape, which is not necessarily something the Jewish world should fear. But violent forces can still hijack this revolution, which for days seemed surprisingly peaceful. Pro- and antiMubarak forces clashed Wednesday in Cairo, with apparently no attempt by the army to intervene. Whip-brandishing protesters rode horses and camels into the crowds while the two sides pelted each other with rocks. Now, Human Rights Watch is reporting that undercover Egyptian secret police are committing acts of looting and vandalism to foment fear and instability. Such uncertainty in a country so close to Israel, one that has kept a cold peace with the Jewish state, is definitely cause for concern. But if the Egyptian people can keep control of the situation, then

N

this tide of change sweeping their country — and Tunisia, and Jordan — may ultimately be good for Israel as well. Why? First, unlike the Iranian Revolution, this is not a fundamentalist uprising. It’s an economic one. The people in the streets are young men and women — many of whom are educated and skilled — who see no future in their homelands. Egypt, for example, had GDP growth of more than $188 billion in 2009 and a not-so-shocking unemployment rate of 9.4 percent. But nearly half of all Egyptians live at or below the United Nationsset poverty line — $2 a day. Clearly, too many Egyptians have not shared in the growth their country has experienced for more than 25 years. The economic outlook is also dismal in Tunisia and, to a lesser extent, Jordan. Second, for its entire existence, Israel has had to deal with despotic regimes (with the exception of Jordan, but the king is still a powerful ruler). How different could the politics of the region have been were they instead democratically elected governments?

Next, we haven’t seen any charismatic imams speaking through bullhorns to thousands of fanatical followers in the street scenes beamed to us from Tunis, Cairo, Suez and Amman. Are they there? For sure. Will they win? Well, they can’t offer what the people apparently want — prosperity. Lastly, do these demonstrators like Israel? OK, there’s a lot of pent-up hostility toward the Jewish state; that hasn’t changed. But these revolts aren’t about us. At the end of the day, when the cameras stop rolling, and the reporters go home, the people of Tunisia, Egypt and Jordan want the same quality of life most Israelis enjoy. Could it be they want a better life more than they hate us? It’s not impossible. So, the new Middle East is having a rough birth. The presence of plainclothes police among the demonstrators is reminiscent of Iran during its Green Revolution, and things could still go terribly wrong. But if they don’t, then these popular uprisings in these countries can have benefits far beyond their borders.

How Jews can put their liberalism to good use Abby Wisse Schachter

“It was a terrible mistake for Obama to make democratization seem like an ‘imposition,’ with its imperialist implications, and to conflate it with military invasion. The promotion of democracy is a policy of support for indigenous Egyptian, or Arab, or Muslim democrats who are just as authentic as indigenous Egyptian, or Arab, or Muslim autocrats and theocrats, and certainly more deserving of American respect.” — Leon Wieseltier, literary editor of The New Republic and like the majority of American Jews, a liberal. It would do a lot of good if President Obama, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and American Jews heeded Wieseltier’s words. President Obama ought to heed the message that democracy promotion must be part of American foreign policy because rejecting democracy promotion has now hurt its potential blossoming. There is little guarantee and even smaller probability that the current upheaval in Egypt will result in a free and democratic republic where individual freedoms and the rule of law are respected and upheld. But if post-Mubarak Egypt does not emerge from the protests as a secular, representative democracy it will certainly be true that the Obama administration did nothing to promote such an outcome. A skilled administration would have spent some part of the last year considering its options regarding Egypt’s future given Mubarak’s ill health and the

reality that he was going to be exiting the stage at some point in the near future. The movement for his ouster (which may have succeeded by the time this is published), has occurred quicker than the Obama administration could have predicted, but there has been a Working Group on Egypt meeting for more than a year now, and the experts who make up the group, both conservative and liberal, couldn’t get anyone at the State Department or the White House to take their calls. Equally troubling is the analysis by Washington Post reporter Glenn Kessler, who after closely examining the Obama administration’s statements regarding Egypt found a complete “failure” to emphasize — and in some instances even mention — the need for political reform there. Working toward an open and free Egypt — or an open and free Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Lebanon, Syria, Yemen and Tunisia, for that matter — has not been part of the Obama administration’s policy, period. Israel too needs to see the forest for the trees. Officially, Prime Minister Netanyahu worries about a post-Mubarak Egypt and how that country might not be the ally it once was. But such concerns cut both ways. It isn’t true that the only outcome from these protests will be an Islamist state on the Nile. And just because Egypt was a stable ally does not mean it could not have been or could not become a better one. If a free, democratic and liberal state were to border Israel along the Sinai, rather than a repressive dictatorship, there would be no reason to worry about Egypt cancelling its peace agreement with the Jewish state. There could be trade, development, tourism and cultural exchanges, and Israel would not have to spend money and resources securing their border. As Wieseltier points out, Egyptians, Muslims and Arabs are no less capable of democracy than Jews or Americans. Sadly it doesn’t seem as if the Israeli government has even considered this possibility.

Israel and the American Jews who support her have similarly ignored the question of democracy and freedom among the Palestinians and how such a change might be in Israel’s self-interest. How much stronger and lasting would the long hoped for peace be if the agreement was signed between two free democracies? Also, it is clear now that the protests in Egypt have exerted some pressure on the Palestinian leadership as it has called for new elections (finally). But let’s be clear, elections don’t take place in a vacuum, they happen within a particular context, and for a generation of Palestinians that context has been about denying Israel’s legitimacy. Weather maps on Palestinian television do not include Israel and neither do Palestinian schoolbooks. A recent study by the Institute for Monitoring Peace and Cultural Tolerance in School Education suggests that the content taught in school can have a real impact on the growth of democracy. According to the study, for example, Tunisia’s textbooks “preach the importance of negotiating, and of peace and respect for others” whereas in Egypt “school textbooks … urge tolerance towards Copts and call for religious moderation and peace,” but “they deny the existence of the State of Israel and contain anti-Jewish material ... The Egyptian curriculum emphasizes self-sacrifice for the sake of the homeland and war narratives, rather than peace.” Instead of trying to silence Glenn Beck, couldn’t Jews spend a little more time trying to promote free speech among Egyptians, Jordanians and Palestinians? Such a change in emphasis would put Jewish liberalism to work in a constructive and meaningful way. (Abby Wisse Schachter, a Pittsburghbased columnist, edits the New York Post’s Capitol Punishment blog, nypost.com/blogs/capitol, and can be reached at awschachter@aol.com.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011 — 7

OPINION

Letters to the editor We invite you to submit letters for publication. Letters must include name, address and daytime phone number; addresses and phone numbers will not be published. Letters may not exceed 400 words and may be edited for length and clarity; they cannot be returned. Mail, fax or e-mail letters to: Letters to the Editor via e-mail The Jewish Chronicle letters@thejewishchronicle.net 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Flr. via fax Pittsburgh, PA 15217 (412) 521-0154 Web site address www.thejewishchronicle.net

HIAS slams column I am the Director of the HIAS (Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society) Israel office and am intimately involved in the

evolution of the asylum system in Israel. The system is lacking and Israeli leadership has been less than receptive to the phenomenon of receiving non-Jewish refugees. However, there are too many errors in Jay Bushinsky’s Jan. 20 column, “Israel’s treatment of African immigrants gives cold shoulder,” to bother commenting on each of them. The figure of 40,000 Africans having entered Israel through Egypt is off by at least 25 percent; the reception center in the south is being built for 6,000 to 8,000 people, not 25,000; and the Israeli secret police scooping up 170 people and Please see Letters, next page.


8 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011

OPINION

Either embrace change in Egypt or stay quiet Guest Columnist LARA FRIEDMAN WASHINGTON (JTA) — There is the old joke that “denial is not just a river in Egypt.” And indeed it is true. The Nile is the longest river in the world, along whose shores the Egyptian people continue their unprecedented protests, demanding an end to the Mubarak era. But denial also is the increasingly discordant notes sounded by some elements in the American Jewish community and in Israel seeking to attack and discredit the protests and lobby

for a return to the pre-Jan. 25 status quo in Egypt. On Sunday, for example, Malcolm Honlein, the executive vice president of the Conference of Presidents of Major Jewish Organizations, blasted Mohammed ElBaradei — one of the few faces to emerge as a “leader” in Egypt’s ongoing protests — as a “stooge for Iran.” The same day, Haaretz carried an article headlined “Israel urges world to curb criticism of Egypt’s Mubarak.” Panic at change in Egypt and what its impact will be on Israel simply cannot justify this kind of response. Yes, everyone who cares about Israel is concerned about what change will mean for security and stability in the region, especially for Israel. But only a fool could look at the ongoing developments and draw the conclusion that the best thing for Israel and friends of Israel to

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do is bash the protesters or stump for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who has been in power for three decades. Make no mistake, change is coming in Egypt — indeed, it has come already. Few serious observers believe there is even the remote possibility that Mubarak can hold on to power much longer. The longer he tries to hang on, the greater the likelihood that he will have to resort to more repressive (violent) measures to do so. Many fear a Tiananmen Square-style showdown in Cairo’s Tahrir Square. Egypt, however, is not China, and such a horrific event would not save Mubarak. Rather it would only cement his regime’s total loss of legitimacy domestically and make it impossible for even old friends like the U.S. government to continue speaking of the current situation — and what must come next — in diplomatic, measured tones. Denying the reality of change in Egypt does not help Israel; it only guarantees that Israel’s future relationship with Egypt will be more difficult. It sends a message that Israel wants to hold on to the title of “the only real democracy in the Middle East” in perpetuity, even if this means directly engaging to frustrate the will of Arab peoples for democracy. From a purely strategic, cynical, selfinterested perspective, this is not a message that Israel or friends of Israel want to be sending to the people of a nation that when the dust settles will still be Israel’s most important neighbor and almost certainly will have a government that will be more populist in its approach. Since Israel’s birth as a state, regimes throughout the region have been nondemocratic. This is not Israel’s fault. Nor can anyone fault Israel for developing security and foreign strategies that capitalized on the over-

whelming authority of these regimes — whether with respect to Israel’s peace treaties with Egypt or Jordan, or its de facto detente with the Arab world at large. But the Middle East is changing, and the attitudes and approaches of Israel and friends of Israel must change, too — even if in their hearts many still believe that for Israel’s sake, an autocratic but reliable Arab neighbor is preferable to a democratic but potentially unreliable one. According to reports from the ground, the protests in Egypt in the past week have been mostly bereft of anti-Israel sentiment. The protests are genuinely about domestic politics — against poor governance, corruption, lack of democracy, etc. They are not about Egypt’s foreign policy or Egypt’s peace treaty with Israel. This should be taken as a promising sign for the future, but it should not be taken for granted. If Israel and friends of Israel unwisely insist on making what is happening in Egypt about Israel, this could change. They may get their wish and see Egyptians begin protesting against Israel, too. Fears that a post-Mubarak regime will be less friendly to Israel are understandable, but some of the people speaking out now from Israel and the U.S. Jewish community need to be aware of self-fulfilling prophecies. Their fears are only more likely to materialize if Israel and friends of Israel act foolishly during this transition period. For Israel and friends of Israel, there are two smart choices: Either embrace the change that is happening with the same good will that is being shown by the rest of the world, or keep quiet. (Lara Friedman is the director of policy and government relations for Americans for Peace Now.)

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Continued from previous page. sending them off through Kenya seems to be a distortion of the assisted voluntary return flight of 143 Sudanese in Dec. 2010 and helping them return home. I suggest you publish an apology and retraction and do better research in the future. Yosef Joel Moss Tel Aviv

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Rooting for our team: Super Bowl Sunday and the Jews As I was changing planes in Charlotte last week, heading back to Pittsburgh, I noticed the woman in front of me in the boarding line. She was decked out in a Steelers sweatshirt and cap. When I mumbled to myself, “Here we go,” she launched full throat into “Here we go Steelers, here we go.” The US Airways stewardess checking our boarding passes smiled broadly and said, “There are a lot of Steelers fans working here in Charlotte now.” That brought to mind an article I had read pointing out that Steelers fans all over the country, proud of who they are

and where they are from, are looking for Iron City beer. I thought to myself, “If you are born in Pittsburgh, you are a Steelers fan no matter where you relocate to.” Recent news photos shows babies born in a local hospital swaddled in terrible towels. A father is quoted as saying of his newborn, “… she can’t choose what team she likes.” We Jews can learn something from this. The Jewish people are our team. We are born into the Jews. No matter where we go, they are still our team. Sometimes parents say, “I am not going to raise my child in a religion, he can make that decision when he gets older.” We can learn from the parents and babies in that hospital: you are on this team, the Jewish “team” from birth. Be proud of it! Just as we see all the buses in town proudly displaying on the front “Go Steelers!” we should be openly proud of our team and root for them. A friend once told me, “We all have to wear our Steelers shirts so the team can win.” When we Jews are proud to “wear our team colors,” when we are not afraid to say what side we are on, when we stand together and support each other, the rest of the world will respect us and we will respect ourselves. Every Jew’s connection with the Jewish people strengthens “our team.” Go black and gold! Go blue and white! Simone (Sheindel) Shapiro Squirrel Hill


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011 — 9

OPINION

Is Pollard Caspar Weinberger’s revenge on the Jews? Guest Columnist PHYLLIS CHESLER NEW YORK — Why is this man still in jail? Why was this man forced to spend seven years in solitary? Why is he still confined, languishing, festering in jail for 25 years? Solitary confinement is the most barbaric of punishments. Few people can withstand this form of torture without becoming very ill, both physically and mentally. Am I talking about the Soviet Gulag? Or about some hellhole in Afghanistan or Iran? Last year, The New Yorker ran a piece about solitary confinement. The article concludes that this punishment amounts to torture, that it can even induce “acute psychosis with hallucinations.” The article describes the cases of two political prisoners or prisonersof-war: AP’s Middle East correspondent, Terry Anderson, who was put into solitary by Hezbollah in Lebanon for six years. Anderson “felt himself disintegrating”; his mind went blank; he had hallucinations; he started to become “neurotically possessive about his little space;” he felt his brain was “grinding down.” He also describes Sen. John McCain who said, “Solitary

confinement crushes your spirit and weakens your resistance more than any other form of mistreatment. And he said that even though he had his arms broken and was subjected to other forms of torture.” Clearly, the New Yorker’s man, Atul Gawande, opposes this practice. He does mention the cases of two unnamed inmates: one was convicted of felony-murder and spent five years in isolation. After a few months he began talking to himself, pacing back and forth, having panic attacks and hallucinating. After a year he was hearing voices on the television speak to him. In another case, Gawande describes another American man in solitary whose initial crime was armed robbery and aggravated battery but who then “misbehaved” at a medium security prison for which he was was put in solitary or in isolation for almost 14 years. This man stopped showering and began throwing his feces around his cell. He became psychotic. Even he was released after he served his sentence of 15 years. Gawande does not mention the man I have in mind, a man whose living head is on a pike in the public square for all to see — a message, a warning to us all — is a man who killed no one. I am talking about Jonathan Pollard. What crime did he commit? Did he spy against American for the Soviets or for the Chinese communists? Did he do so for money, sex, or for ideological reasons? American Navy Seaman, Michael Walker, operated a Soviet spy

ring; he was arrested in 1980, pled guilty, was sentenced to 25 years and released after 15 years. What is “different” about Pollard? He is a Jew. What else is different? Pollard is the only one who shared secrets with an American ally with whom America was not and is not now at war. Pollard shared information with Israel. What else is “different” about Pollard? There is one more thing. Like the Rosenbergs, Pollard was the proving grounds, the scapegoat, for another man, also a Jew, but a Jew who did not like being mistreated as a Jew, as a Jew who wanted to prove how tough the was or how hard he was ready to be on another Jew and on the Jewish state. The Rosenbergs, (who were guilty), had their Jewish judge who chose to have them electrocuted. Pollard had Secretary of Defense Caspar W. Weinberger, whose paternal grandparents were Jews and whose father was a Jewish lawyer. Weinberger submitted a 40-page affidavit in which he insisted that Pollard should be harshly sentenced. (In later years, he said, “the Pollard matter was comparatively minor.” One wonders: What did he have over CIA head George Tenet (who threatened to resign when President Clinton suggested pardoning Pollard)? Where are all the anti-torture activists on Pollard? How can it be that our most prominent American political prisoner has never made it onto their

honor roll of causes with which to browbeat America? Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu formally asked President Obama to pardon Jonathan Pollard, at long last. I and all true believers in democracy stand with him in this matter. Update: Based on a recent article by Leo Rennert which critique’s coverage of the Pollard case in The New York Times, “ it is now clear that Pollard, in failing health, has been the victim of a CIA cover-up of a massive intelligence failure, with the agency blaming Pollard for the damage caused by a real “mole” inside the CIA who passed to Moscow the names of more than a dozen U.S. informants in the Soviet Union — namely Aldrich Ames, the head of CIA’s Soviet-Eastern Europe division, who fingered Pollard to keep the CIA from discovering his own treachery.. The CIA did not discover Ames’ role until well after Pollard was behind bars and it still isn’t willing to acknowledge its mistake in blaming Pollard for Ames’s crimes.”

(Phyllis Chesler, an emeritus professor of psychology and women’s studies at City University of New York, is the co-founder of the Association for Women in Psychology and the National Women’s Health Network. Chesler is often on international media and is a frequent contributor to INN as well as FOX News and Middle East Quarterly.)


10 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011

Style Ridin’ the [model] rails Ohav Shalom member builds model train railroad

BY HILARY DANINHIRSCH Chronicle Correspondent

Neal Schorr has been working on the railroad all the livelong day, and even some nights and weekends, for many years. He is the builder, conductor and engineer of a model railroad based on the Middle Division of the Pennsylvania Railroad; this layout is displayed in the basement of his North Hills home. Schorr, a Wexford-based family physician and member of Temple Ohav Shalom, has been fascinated with trains ever since receiving a Lionel train starter set for Chanuka when he was 5. (Incidentally, the inventor of the Lionel train, Joshua Lionel Cowen, was the son of Jewish immigrants whose original surname was Cohen.) The Lionel brand of model train reached the zenith of its popularity between the 1930s and 1960s. “It died out in the ’60s and then in the ’70s, slowly became more popular,” said the 54-yearold Schorr. “Those kids who played with these trains are now in their 50s, 60s and 70s, and the hobby is booming because these people have disposable income.” The display cases of Lionel trains peppered throughout his custom-built home are the culmination of a lifetime of collecting. “At age 16, I started building train layouts, and as the years went by, they got more sophisticated and more realistic,” Schorr recalled, basing the genesis of the Middle Pennsylvania model railroad on his love of the central Pennsylvania scenery. Schorr explained that the Middle Division of the Pennsylvania Railroad was chartered in 1846 to connect Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. The section he models was the first one actually built by the Pennsylvania Railroad, which is the segment between Harrisburg and Altoona. (The railroad is still in operation but is now owned by Norfolk Southern.) “I couldn’t model everything, so I picked the most scenically interesting towns to me.” These include Port Royal and Mifflintown, the latter of which happens to be the home of the Empire Kosher Poultry processing plant. He calls himself a frustrated civil engineer: “I love highways and bridges and transportation; this is an outlet for my engineering interest.” In fact, Schorr, who co-authored a book with his best friend and fellow collector, Mitchell Dakelman, entitled “The Pennsylvania Turnpike,” employed some ideas in his design for easing the bottleneck at the Fort Pitt Tunnels, but don’t expect PennDOT to implement them any time soon. It was his knowledge of highway construction that led Schorr, a Mt. Lebanon native, to open his medical practice in the North Hills, predicting a boom in the

Photo by Kimberly Schorr

Steven and Caroline Schorr watch their dad, Neal, set his model train set in motion.

area with the building of I-279 in the 1980s. July will mark his 25th year of practice in the area, making him, to his knowledge, the longest-practicing physician in Wexford. In 1990, Schorr purchased land on secluded acreage in the North Hills and built a house there in 1996. He designed the train layout along with the house. “I designed the house with an attached garage so I would not have to use any of the basement for the garage,” he said. “I excavated out the area under part of the garage to provide a workshop, again so it did not have to take up any square footage intended for my train layout room. The house has two staircases, one in the middle and one at the end of the house. Only the one at the far end of the house extends into the basement.” The room designated for the layout takes up 1,400 of his 2,000 square foot basement. In addition to a lot of extra electrical circuits, a special HVAC system was designed to ensure that the room heats up quickly, making it a comfortable space even during the cold winters.

The backdrop was painted by Schorr himself and was largely based on actual scenes in central Pennsylvania. He built all the model bridges from scratch, as well as the hills and mountains. “Every bridge I built on there so far is a scale model of the real thing,” he said. Many of the buildings were from kits, though he painted them to look as realistic as the buildings they represent. The track itself runs approximately 300 feet and goes from east to west; the model gradually gets more modern the further west it goes around the circuit. “People tend to think of a model railroad as multiple circles of track built on a table, but mine is one circuit built on a shelf around the walls of the train room,” he said. “One train follows another and the signals govern the operation of the trains — it looks and operates like a real railroad.” Schorr and his wife, Kim, have two children. Steven, 11, and Caroline, 7, assist him in the adjoining basement workshop, painting and helping with other projects. “Fortunately, the kids go down there with me a lot and we hang out to-

gether. They love it, and that thrills me,” said Schorr. He said his son is really into it. “Steven goes with me to model train conventions and even works on the layout when I’m not home. Caroline likes to run the trains.” Schorr sees working on his model railroad as a 20-year project and already has put 13 years into it. “I try not to let it become a job. It’s more of a creative outlet. Every project has new challenges. I have to research things, to make things accurate. I have to be a historian, artist, electrician, engineer and carpenter. It takes a broad range of skills and a lot of energy,” he commented. “It’s also social for me,” he added, “because I am active with the National Model Railroad Association and I’ve gone to national conventions almost every year for 20 years. I have friends all over the world; it’s very nice.”

(Hilary Daninhirsch can be reached at hilarysd@comcast.net.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011 — 11

STYLE Sports writer turns to ritual to make Steelers XLV prediction JONATHAN MAYO

The Chosen 1s

Am I the only one seeing this? I can’t believe that numerologists haven’t made the connection before. As if I needed to paint any clearer lines between the Jewish people and American sport. Four quarters of football, four cups of wine. And we don’t even have to wait until Passover to contemplate that. We just celebrated Tu B’Shevat, with its own four-quarters, I mean four-cup, seder. The first cup is white, for winter, our current season, and the season every Steelers fan looks forward to. This first cup corresponds to the world of “assiya,” or action (and the earth). And we all hope there’s plenty of it for the Black & Gold in the first quarter, with the

earth being represented by success with the running game. The first fruits that go along with this first cup are supposed to have inedible peels or tough shells, kind of like the Steelers defense. Cup No. 2 is white with a drop of red in it. This is for “yetzira,” or spiritual formation and for the spring (and water). That means the second quarter of Sunday’s game between the Steelers and Packers should see offensive coordinator Bruce Aryans coming up with some absolutely divine formations for the offense. From that should bloom a larger lead. The fruits are supposed to have inedible centers, though I’m not sure what that means for rookie All-Pro Maurkice Pouncey (yes, he’s their center). The third cup is split evenly between red and white. It’s good to have a third cup ready to erase the memories of what will certainly be another insipid halftime act (this time courtesy of the Black-Eyed Peas). You can pour half of an Iron City and half of a Yuengling into one cup to match the symbolism. This is for “beriya,” or creation, for the season of summer and the element of air. This

must mean Ben Rothliesberger will use the passing game to great effect in this quarter. Fruits to be eaten are ones that can be eaten whole. Does a black-eyed pea qualify? (Please note: Nothing against the group in general, it’s just that no one, and I mean no one, does a good Super Bowl halftime show.) The fourth and final cup is red with a drop of white. This represents “atzilut,” or nobility. It’s hard not to consider the Steelers nobility after they win their unprecedented seventh Super Bowl. The season that corresponds is the fall, when

we will all begin watching the Steelers go for Super Bowl number eight. The element associated with this final cup is fire, which is what we’ll want to do to the NFL and the Players Association if there’s a lockout keeping us from watching all of that occur. OK, so maybe all of that is a stretch. But combine it with the importance of the number seven in numerology — it took seven days for the world to be created, the seventh day is Shabbat, etc. The Hebrew letter for seven is zayin, which can be translated to mean “weapon.” It also comes from a root that means “sustenance” or “nourishment.” Just think how sustained we all will be if the Steelers can use all their weapons to win championship No. 7. Seven, some have said, is the divine number of completion. And that pretty much says it all, doesn’t it? (Jonathan Mayo, the Chronicle’s sports columnist and a staff writer for MLB.com, can be reached at mlbmayo@aol.com.)


12 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011

DINING

GUIDE

3/2/11


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011 — 13

STYLE Retro Reviews: ‘The Rise of David Levinsky’ Book R eview

BY HILARY DANINHIRSCH Chronicle Correspondant

(Editor’s note: In “Retro Reviews,” Chronicle Correspondent Hilary Daninhirsch begins a yearlong series in which she will review Jewish-themed books that have been out of print for decades, or perhaps remain in print but are difficult to find [except in your public library]. Some titles may be recognizable; others may be obscure. But if they appear here, then you can bet they still have something to offer the Jewish reader.) Sometimes, when I think of my past in a superficial, casual way, the metamorphosis I have gone through strikes me as nothing short of a miracle. I was born and reared in the lowest depths of poverty and I arrived in America — in 1885 — with four cents in my pocket. I am now worth more than two million dollars… And yet when I take a look at my inner identity it impresses me as being precisely the same as it was thirty or forty years ago. My present station, power and the amount of worldly happiness at my command, and the rest of it, seem to be devoid of significance. Thus begins the compelling first paragraphs of “The Rise of David Levinsky” by Abraham Cahan. This novel, written in 1917, is one of the earliest and one of the most notable pieces of Jewish immigrant fiction. David Levinsky narrates his own tale, starting with his childhood in Antomir, Russia, as a Talmudic scholar who is physically abused by his teachers. When his beloved mother dies as a result of a violent attack, he commits to sailing to America. In David’s words, Cahan eloquently describes the immigrant’s feelings upon reaching American land: When the discoverers of America saw land at last they fell on their knees and a hymn of thanksgiving burst from their souls. The scene, which is one of the most thrilling in history, repeats itself in the heart of every immigrant as he comes in sight of the American shores. David pounds the pavement looking for work, living from day to day, often going hungry and living in substandard housing. He hates being referred to as a “greenhorn,” and makes every effort to learn to write and speak English. Despite the initial hardships, everything about America fascinates him, expressed in one of my favorite lines in the book: It takes a country like America to produce butchers who look and speak like noblemen.

David ultimately finds work in a sweatshop. He faces a turning point when he is about to enroll in college and learn a profession, but due to an accident of fate, ends up following the road he never thought he would take: establishing his own garment business. While it doesn’t happen overnight, the ingenuity David exhibits in trying to establish his business makes for absorbing reading. He resorts to whatever means he can to succeed, including lying, cheating and stealing. Despite his flaws, he is a likeable character and the reader roots for him to come through. David’s success has a cost, though. Not only does he turn away from Judaism, but the money is never enough. There is always that elusive next level of success:

I was now worth more than one hundred thousand dollars, and the sum did not seem to be anything to rejoice over. My fortune was not climbing rapidly enough. I was almost tempted to stamp my foot and snarlingly urge it on. In addition, he is lonely. Love eludes him throughout his life, other than passing fancies and affairs with women he cannot have. The author writes with such familiarity with the immigrant experience and the garment industry that I had to stop and remind myself that this was a novel and not a memoir. While Cahan was indeed a Russian immigrant, he made his living not in the garment industry but as a founder and first editor of the Forward, the first Yiddish daily newspaper for Americans (Forverts in Yiddish), which became the voice of Jewish immigrants and the precursor to today’s Jewish American newspapers. This novel, with its eloquent and expressive phrasing, was written by one whose English was a second language, making this book even more of an achievement. This is the quintessential rags-to-riches story that will resonate in your mind long after you’ve read the last word. (Hilary Daninhirsch can be reached at hilarysd@comcast.net.)


14 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011

GLOBE Jewish leaders debate what Egypt uprising means for Israel Continued from page 1. Israel should be a critical element in considering whether to continue the $1.5 billion Egypt receives in aid, much of it in defense assistance. “Given what’s taking place, it’s appropriate for the U.S. government to be reviewing U.S. aid to Egypt,” said Block, now a senior fellow at the centrist Progressive Policy Institute and principal at the consulting firm Davis-Block. “No matter what happens, clearly one of the top criteria Congress is likely to use is Egypt’s approach to its peace treaty obligations with Israel.” That seemed to be the tack adopted by U.S. Rep. Nita Lowey (D-N.Y.), the ranking Democrat on the foreign operations subcommittee of the U.S. House of Representatives Appropriations Committee. She framed her statement in the context of the 1979 Camp David peace accords with Israel, which is the basis for Egypt’s status as one of the top recipients of U.S. aid. “Ever since the historic Camp David peace accords more than 30 years ago, Egypt and the United States have been partners in seeking a just resolution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict,” she said. “It is in the interest of the United States and regional stability that this period of turmoil and uncertainty be resolved peacefully and that Egypt remain a strong ally.” U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (RFla.), the chairwoman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, took that posture further, saying in a statement that U.S. assistance should be contingent on an election that allows only parties that recognize Egypt’s “peace agreement with the Jewish State of Israel.” Such cautions are fueled by fears of the role the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood might play in a new Egypt. Other pro-Israel lawmakers notably omitted reference to the peace with Israel in their statements. U.S. Rep. Gary Ackerman (D-N.Y.), the ranking Democrat on the House Middle East subcommittee, called for a suspension of assistance to Egypt until Mubarak left — and then its renewal once a transitional government was in place, whatever its makeup. “I believe the United States must suspend its assistance to Egypt until this transition is under way,” said the statement from Ackerman, who is Jewish and a pro-Israel stalwart. In an interview, Ackerman said the omission of an Israel reference was deliberate. “I understand the angst and anxiety that exists in Israel, but we’re not going to pick the next leader of Egypt,” he said. Instead, Ackerman said, the United States should use what he said was a closing window of opportunity, and side pronouncedly with the people and against Mubarak. “If we sign the people of Egypt up as lobbyists, they will do the right thing,” he said. U.S. Rep. Howard Berman (D-Calif.), who is also Jewish and the ranking member on the Foreign Affairs committee and the author of last year’s sweeping Iran sanctions law, also kept Israel out of his statement. Unlike Ackerman, however, he said assistance should continue as a means of stabilizing the Egyptian military. “So long as the Egyptian military plays a constructive role in bringing about a democratic transition, the United States should also remain committed to our ongoing assistance programs for Egypt,

JTA photo by Muhammed Ghafar

Protestors gather in Cairo on Jan. 25, calling for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to step down. Mubarak announced Feb. 1 that he will not seek re-election.

both military and civilian,” he said. Betting on the military was perhaps the only certainty in the current chaos, said David Schenker, an Egypt expert at the pro-Israel Washington Institute for Near East Policy think tank. The Egyptian army is popular among Egyptians and, unlike the hated police, has taken steps during the uprising not to alienate the street. “The arbitrator of this may be the military,” Schenker said. “It doesn’t want to cede power to a civilian power that’s Islamist. The army has entrenched interests with this regime and likes very much its relations with the U.S. military.” Egypt’s potential collapse triggered an intense “who’s to blame” debate in Washington over which party or group had done more to prop up Mubarak’s regime. One emerging theme was that more should have been done to use aid as leverage to nudge Mubarak toward democratization. Pro-Israel congressional insiders said there had always been talk throughout the years of shifting funds from defense aid to democratization assistance, at times from unlikely bedfellows: RosLehtinen and the Zionist Organization of America had backed such a shift, but so had the former Appropriations chairman, Rep. David Obey (D-Wis.), a frequent Israel critic. Such initiatives were abandoned, the insiders said, both in Congress and in the Bush White House after Hamas won elections in the Gaza Strip. In a hearing on Egypt assistance in May 2006, just after the Hamas victory, Rep. Shelley Berkley (D-Nev.), the lawmaker who is perhaps closest to Israel, made this aside: “I am wondering if I need a change in the way I think about the Middle East and about democratizing nations that are no more ready for democracy than the man on the moon.” The remark made headlines in Egypt. Now some pro-Israel voices are saying that not pushing for democracy has disastrous consequences — including crit-

ics of the regime. For example, the ZOA, which has frequently accused the Egyptian government of undermining peace and pressed for a reduction in U.S. military aid, now is calling for the Obama administration to do everything it can to keep the regime in place, with Mubarak or one of his associates in charge. Obama “should be showing some loyalty to a regime with which we have had good relations for 30 years,” ZOA President Mort Klein said. “If we have elections in the near future, you’re going to have a result like in Gaza. Of course I want democracy, but I don’t want democracy when the results support Islamic takeover.” Malcolm Hoenlein, the executive vicepresident of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations, told the Yeshiva World News that the United States should have been working more proactively to ensure an orderly transition to democracy. “This is something that we knew was coming — we should have been working at it all along,” Hoenlein said, adding that the Bush administration had paid lip service to the notion of building democratic institutions and the Obama administration not even that. Hoenlein warned against the emergence in Egypt of possible transition leader Mohammed ElBaradei, saying he covered up Iran’s true nuclear weaponization capacities while he directed the International Atomic Energy Agency, the U.N. nuclear watchdog. “He is a stooge of Iran, and I don’t use the term lightly,” Hoenlein said. “He fronted for them, he distorted the reports.” ElBaradei, who directed the IAEA from 1997 to 2009, returned to Egypt following his third term. Soon he was touted as a possible challenger to Mubarak’s autocractic reign and has emerged during the protests as a consensus figure. During his term as IAEA chief, ElBaradei said Iran was further away from a nuclear weapon than many in the West

claimed and castigated Western powers, including Israel, for suggesting that a military option against Iran was increasingly possible. He made it clear in those statements that his posture stemmed from the U.S. failure to heed warnings from him and other weapons experts that Iraq did not have a nuclear weapons capacity. ElBaradei also has been cool to Israel, however, and has infuriated Israel’s military establishment by saying that Israel’s alleged nuclear arsenal undercuts efforts to keep Iran and other countries from going nuclear. In an interview with The Washington Post just before he retired, he said Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad did not want to get rid of Israel, but to replace it with a non-Jewish state — two concepts Israelis and pro-Israel groups see as synonymous. Hoenlein was not alone. Reporters were bombarded this week by e-mail from pro-Israel groups with ElBaradei quotes that appeared hostile to the United States. In some cases, however, the quotes were taken out of context and questionably sourced. Keith Weissman, a former AIPAC lobbyist and analyst who witnessed the Iranian Revolution unfold and who has lived in Egypt, said the warnings about ElBaradei were overheated. “From what I see in Cairo there is no evidence he is on an Iranian agenda,” he said Weissman said the inclusion of the Muslim Brotherhood in the opposition alliance ElBaradei is leading should not be a cause for concern. “In a post-Mubarak Egypt, you’d want the Brotherhood close,” he said. In any case, meddling is counterproductive, said Lara Friedman, the legislative director for Americans for Peace Now, writing in an op-ed for JTA. “Denying the reality of change in Egypt does not help Israel; it only guarantees that Israel’s future relationship with Egypt will be more difficult,” she said.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011— 15

Simchas of Wisconsin, Madison and is pursuing a doctorate in clinical psychology at Northwestern University in Chicago. Keith graduated from the University of Indiana, Bloomington and the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine. He completed his residency at Akron City Hospital in Akron, Ohio. He is in private practice in Chicago.

Weddings

Births

Rischall/Schulhof: Drs. Flora Soumekh and David Rischall of Mendota Heights, Minn., and Dr. Jay and Roni Schulhof of Mt. Lebanon announce the marriage of their children, Michal Sara Rischall and Dr. Keith Douglas Schulhof, June 20, 2010, at Beth Jacob Congregation, Mendota Heights. A reception followed at the Marriott City Centre, Minneapolis. Michal’s grandparents are Ruth Rischall of Minneapolis and the late Maurice Rischall, and Malka Soumekh of San Diego and the late Eliahu Soumekh. Keith’s grandparents are the late Lillian and Leonard Schulhof and the late Beatrice and Harry Cantor. Michal’s attendants included the groom’s sister, Melissa Rosenberg; Julie Schulhof, the groom’s sister-in-law; and friends Brooke Haro, Rachael Pius, Bracha Szleifer and Sara Dudgeon. Sherri DeVito was maid of honor. Keith’s groomsmen were Jonathan Rischall and Ari Rischall, brothers of the bride; brother-in-law Adam Rosenberg; and friends Dr. Adam Friedman, Jason Haag and Adam Harrison. Best man was the groom’s brother, Scott Schulhof. Michal graduated from the University

Rabbi Mordecai Rosenberg Certified Mohel (412) 521-4637

Bloch: Yacov and Edye Berman Glausiusz and Menachem and Chana Bloch of Israel, announce the birth of their granddaughter, Roni Alta, daughter of Shoshana and Shalom Bloch of Rivava, Israel. Great-grandparents are: Joanne and the late Jack Berman of Squirrel Hill, Irene and Gershon Glausiusz of England, Yonna and the late Esther Bloch, the late Shalom Ulrich and Yitzchok and Zippora Nir. Roni Alta is named in loving memory of her great-great-maternal grandmother, Alice Belinky. Itskowitz: Rina and Marc Itskowitz announce the birth of their son, Zachary Steven (Zecharya Yitzchak), Jan. 14. Grandparents are Leslie and Alan Itskowitz of Pittsburgh and Chaya Farkas of Brooklyn, N.Y. Zach is the brother of Yael, Shira, Aviva and Talia.

Zachary Steven is named in loving memory of Sam Farkas and Steven Itskowitz. Neiss: Jessica and Jason Neiss announce the birth of their son, Joshua Ian (Yitzhak Reuven), Dec. 20, 2010. Grandparents are Dee and Jeff Weinberg of Squirrel Hill and Gerry and Mel Neiss of Chads Ford, Pa. Great-grandparents are Sarah and Leon Steckel of Pompano Beach, Fla. Big sisters are Ellia Simone and Moriah Rachel. Joshua Ian is named in loving memory of his great-grandfathers, Isador Sheir and Robert Mittman. Schulhof: Julie and Scott Schulhof of Chicago announce the birth of their son, Justin Daniel (Shimon Herschel) Schulhof. Grandparents are Sharon and Robert Schwartz of Arlington Heights, Ill., and Dr. Jay and Roni Schulhof of Mt. Lebanon. Great-grandparents are Bell Schwartz of Chicago and the late

Harold Schwartz, the late Shirley and Harry Hartman, the late Lillian and Leonard Schulhof and Beatrice and Harry Cantor. Justin Daniel is named in loving memory of his maternal great-grandmother, Shirley Hartman; and his paternal great-grandfather, Harry Cantor.

B’nai Mitzva Sammy Bernstein, daughter of Amy and Michael Bernstein, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Feb. 5, at 10:30 a.m. at Temple Sinai. Grandparents are Sandy and Larry Rosen and Karen and Tommy Bernstein, and great-grandfather is Dan Danovitz, all of Pittsburgh.


16 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011

Community A C L O S E R

Opening night should bring lots of laughs hat happens when you find out you aren’t who you think you are? “The Infidel,” in its Pittsburgh premiere, will answer that question at the 18th Annual Opening Night of the JFilm Festival, Thursday, March 24, 7 p.m. at SouthSide Works Cinema. In the film, Mahmud Nasir, a nice Muslim family guy, discovers he’s adopted after his mother dies. Adopted, OK, but the son of a Jewish mother and father? Mahmud tries to explore his Jewish roots in this satire that pokes fun at the serious subject of Muslim-Jewish relations. A tough Jewish taxi driver (Richard Schiff from the “West Wing”) serves as his guide into the world of matzo ball soup, dancing the hora and the proper pronunciation of chutzpa. But will his Muslim family accept his new identity? A reception will follow the film with light hors d’oeuvres and dessert. Tickets go on sale March 3 and can be purchased by contacting (412) 992-5203 Monday through Friday from 1 to 3 p.m. or visiting JFilmPgh.org. JFilm, a program of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, will run its Festival from March 24 through April 10.

W

A still from the film “The Infidel,” which will be shown at the 18th Annual Opening Night of the JFilm Festival.

Steeler fans Jewish Association on Aging photo

The Jewish Association on Aging showed their colors at their Steeler festivities. Pictured are Carol Danhires, Carol Akrie, Rita Klein, Daryl Marks, Marcellina Hoskowicz, Ron DeVaughn, Sue Bryan, Joseph Rudick, Aron Reznick, Eleanor Limperos, Mollie Morris, Mary Smith, Jen McCay, Delia Rivera and Sharon Hostein.

Ready for the big game

L O O K

Community Day School photo

Community Day School students are getting ready for the big game.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011 — 17

BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL CONCRETE

AUTO/TRUCK

$

BUYING AUTO$ & TRUCK$ CAR$ • TRUCK$ • VAN$ • $UV$

$

QUIT DRIVING - DEATH - WRECKS ANTIQUE$ • CLA$$IC$ • JUNKERS DENNY OFFSTEIN AUTO SALES 724-287-7771

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AWNINGS

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Custom canvas awnings.

MON-FRI: 9-5 • SAT 9-1

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CLEANING

PAINTING

CONCRETE Eric Gerber

All types of concrete work and retaining walls 30 years experience

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-

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NORTH CITY

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Since 1990 • Fully Insured

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Canvas Shopping Bags $3.95

KRAMERS CLEANING

Free estimates.

WE GET IT CLEAN FOR LESS GREEN

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Residential • Light Commercial Cleaning Services

MARTHA 412-452-1677

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wall washing, windows. Other services available.

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DUMP TRUCK SERVICE

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• $215 You Load • $255 Driver Helper • $295 We Load

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ROOFING • SIDING • GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS CONCRETE • KITCHENS & BATHROOMS WINDOWS & DOORS • DECKS • FLOORING

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Home Improvement

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RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

KRAMER

CONSTRUCTION

Licensed, Bonded, Insured

COMPUTER

Plumbing • Electrical Windows • Decks • Kitchens Baths & Painting • Sr. Discount

ENTERTAINMENT

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CHUCK CAPUTO

“The King of Trickery” Blends professional

Magic/Ventriloquism • Birthdays/Gatherings

ELECTRICAL

Reasonable

NEED AN ELECTRICIAN? We arrive on time, prepared to start work. Insured, bonded, and uniformed and trained on the value of customer service, producing high quality work, and leaving your home neat and clean.

Call Mr. Electric 724-830-9979 www.mrelectric.com Electrical Services Residential Service Whole House plugs to panel box. Sr. discount 27 years experience 412-304-7725

412-825-0822 HANDYMAN

HANDYMAN NO JOB TOO SMALL or A “Honey, TO DO” List Call Dave at Maids & more

412-824-3540 HANDYMAN

Patch Work French Drains Tie Wall Trash Removal Reliable & Honest Work

Delivering honest and experienced computer services to your door. Max Hersch: 412-519-4176 Email: Info@PittsburghTCS.com Web: www.pittsburghtcs.com

The Jewish Chronicle on the web -- www.thejewishchronicle.net

MASONRY

HOME REPAIRS

T&H PAVING

INTERIOR - EXTERIOR CARPENTERY WORK PAINTING • DRY WALL WALL REPAIR REPAIR KITCHEN KITCHEN • BATH BATH • FLOORING FLOORING REPAIR REPAIR • TIE WALLS WALLS CONCRETE WORK VERSLOC VERSLOC WALLS WALLS CLEAN UP DEBRIS REMOVAL REMOVAL

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ELECTRICAL

Marc Mendelson and Mendelson Electric, LLC are ready to help you with your residential and light commercial electrical contracting needs. From service calls to new electrical services - rewiring to recessed lights - renovations to changing fixtures - we would like to help you with your winter projects. Please contact us at mendelsonelectric@gmail.com or 412 521-7652 for an estimate or an appointment. PA ID 040523

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originalkraftpainting.net

412-461-8114


18 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011

BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL JUNK REMOVAL

PAINTING

MIKE RODGERS PAINTING & WALLCOVERING TOP QUALITY INTERIOR & EXTERIOR • Skilled Professional Painters • Thorough Preparation • Victorian Restoration PGH 412-362-2555 C A L L East 412-856-5474

• Top Quality Materials • Neat Work • Fully Insured North 412-967-9198 South 412-343-4567

• • • •

Professional Painting Wallcovering Plaster Repair Wallpaper removal

FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED

412-664-4869

PAINTING

PLUMBING

PAINTING & POWERWASHING Stain and Polyurethane FOR FREE ESTIMATES

JIMMY COHEN PLUMBING & HEATING 24 HR. Emergency Service

AND REFERRALS

A Full Service Company • Water Heaters Installed

CALL

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POINTING

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General Contracting

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412-421-1575 or 412-884-7272

• • • • • •

Whole house/Partial pointing Chimney rebuilds/Pointing Brick replacement/Mortar matching Steel 1-beam/Lentil replacement High pressure cleaning stone/brick Local references/Insured

412.831.7074 w w w. r e b e r r e s t o r a t i o n . c o m

PAINTING

Steve Tierno

Painting & Wallpapering Residential & Commercial Interior/Exterior Fully Insured 412-351-3443

LIEBEL PAINTING Professional

Interior/Exterior Painting Wallpaper Removal Plaster Repair

Quality Workmanship, Fully Insured References. PA 013425

G&E PAINTING Interior/Exterior

Free Estimates Gary Ruben

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412-672-5237 412-951-0013

Vince Marino

PLUMBING Basement Waterproofing French Drains Reg. Master Plumber Sewer Cleaning Water & Flood Restoration Call for free quote

MAGAZINE

Jewish Pittsburgh Living

ISSUE 2 IS ALMOST HERE!

SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING $80.00 FURNACE CHECK $35.00

CARPET CLEANING

•••

EMERGENCY SERVICE

Arriving at homes the week of March 6th

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DON’T MISS IT!

REMODELING

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f t tle o Bot sh Spo

r Fre OxiRemovleeaning c y

Plumbing & Electrical

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an 160 withover $

ROOFING

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2 Rooms Cleaned

$

68

Whole House Carpet Cleaning

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168

Includes 6 Rooms

Upholstery Cleaning Special

35 All 3 Pieces $ Sofa 75 $ $ Loveseat 60 Chair

$

159

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An $8 service charge will apply.

An $8 service charge will apply.

An $8 service charge will apply.

TO PLACE YOUR AD

Expires 03-31-11

Expires 03-31-11

Expires 03-31-11

CODE JC010111

CODE JC010111

CODE JC010111

The Jewish Chronicle ON THE WEB www.thejewishchronicle.net

R EAL E STATE • C LASSIFIED B USINESS & P ROFESSIONAL

Jewish news around the world and around the block ...as it happens!


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011 — 19

GLOBE Briefly JTA

Friends of Magen David Adom is reeling from the resignation of its five-member executive committee in a dispute over oversight issues. The resignation, first reported in The New York Jewish Week, resulted from a dispute between the Israeli emergency medical group and its American supporters, which was demanding greater financial oversight. “We tried to negotiate a new cooperation agreement with them, but we had a difficult time because of their senior leadership,” Lewis Krinsky, former national chairman of the American Friends of Magen David Adom, said of the Israeli group. “They were making demands that in the opinion of the executive committee would compromise our ability to act as an independent organization.” The dispute between Magen David Adom, essentially the Israeli version

The Jewish Chronicle

of the American Red Cross, and its American supporters has been going on for some time. In March, the Israelis threatened to cancel the American Friends of Magen David Adom’s contract as Magen David Adom’s exclusive representative in the United States. An investigative series in the Israeli daily Yisrael Hayom alleged misuse of Magen David Adom funds. American Friends of Magen David Adom raises $20 million to $30 million annually for the Israeli charity.

U.S. House of Representatives leaders urged President Obama to veto a proposed U.N. Security Council resolution that slams Israel on settlements and urges a return to direct Israeli-Palestinian talks. “We are deeply concerned about the Palestinian leadership’s decision to reject the difficult but vital responsibility of making peace with Israel through direct negotiations, and instead to advocate for anti-Israel measures by the United Nations Security Council and other international forums,” says the letter sent Jan. 26.

2 & 3 Bedrooms Corner of Fifth and Wilkins Spacious 1500-2250 square feet

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Rabbi David Nesenoff, whose impromptu interview with journalist Helen Thomas led to her resignation from the Hearst Corp., has been named the publisher and editor of The Jewish Star. The weekly newspaper, based on Long Island in suburban New York, made the announcement late last week on behalf of its owners, Clifford and Stuart Richner. Nesenoff is an independent filmmaker and runs a blog called RabbiLive.com. The Reform movement’s cantorial school has been named for the

late Debbie Friedman. Rabbi David Ellenson, president of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, made the announcement Jan. 27 in New York at a memorial tribute to Friedman, who died Jan. 9 at 59. Friends of the late singer-songwriter have made possible an endowment to the school, which will be known as The Debbie Friedman School of Sacred Music, Ellenson said. Friedman transformed Jewish worship in North American liberal synagogues with her sing-along style of folk-inspired music. Since her start as a song leader in Reform summer camps in the early 1970s, she released 20 albums and was a much sought-after performer on the Jewish circuit. Her most well-known composition, “Mi Shebeirach,” a Hebrew-English version of the Jewish prayer for healing, is now part of the Reform liturgy. She was named to the School of Sacred Music faculty in 2007. HUC’s cantorial school in New York was established in 1948 and has invested 462 cantors.

Real estate directory FOR RENT

5125 Fifth Ave.

The letter was initiated by Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.), the chairwoman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, and signed by Reps. Eric Cantor (R-Va.), the majority leader; Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), the minority leader; and Howard Berman (D-Calif.), the ranking Democrat on Ros-Lehtinen’s committee, as well as the lead congressman on its Middle East subcommittee.

EXQUISITE...

Incredibly Beautiful 1, 2 & 3 BR Apartments!!! Spacious floor plans, tremendous closet space, eat-in-kit, formal DR, laundry rooms, rooftop sundeck, social room, fitness center & garage parking. Convenient Oakland/Shadyside Area.

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This space could be yours.

Call Donna 412 687-1000

FOR RENT

SQUIRREL HILL 5720 Solway Street

Nice 3 BR, 1st floor duplex for rent. $1,250 + all utilities. For more information lease call Nancy

412-401-9848 or 412-261-6500

FOR SALE

MT. LEBANON SALE BY OWNER LEASE-BUY OPTION

Buying or Selling T HE JEWISH C HRONICLE’S

Real Estate Directory

5 Unique homes All remodeled and updated Move-in condition $140,000-$275,000 3 years interest only financing available GLICKMAN REAL ESTATE 412-521-9555

IS THE BEST SOURCE.

Call 412-687-1000 to place your ad.

Rates starting at $10.25.

FOR SALE

“ M o r t g a g e R a t e s A r e L o w ” Think of the advantage of Buying or Selling OAKLAND CONDOS WINCHESTER — 2 Bed & 2 Bath Contemporary, pool, exercise & guest suite, great location Priced $229,500 220N DITHRIDGE — Terrific 2 bed 2 bath, balcony, pool & party rm, 2 guest rms, exercise & party rm. Priced $219,500 220 N. DITHRIDGE NEWLY OFFERED! 3 BR, 2 1/2 bath. Beautiful condition. W/D in unit. Asking $389,000. PARK PLAZA — Large 3 Bedrooms, 21/2 Baths, eat-in kitchen, Tons of closets - Extra large private storage room. Priced $329,500 OAKLAND CO-OP BRISTOL - Most desirable, Parquet floors, 3 Bed, 2 Baths. Beautiful View, Maintenance includes all taxes & utilities Priced $165,000

SQ. HILL CONDO BEACON PLACE - 1 Bed & Bath Move in - perfect condition Priced $102,000. Reduced $97,500 SQ. HILL TOWNHOME SCHENLEY RD. - Stunning end unit. Very warm with contemporary touches, 4 bed 3 1/2 baths, 2 car int. garage. Price upon request.

POINT BREEZE Walk to schools & parks. Custom built, 1 of a kind! Wonderful Contemporary. Most Unusual & Desirable. Looks as though it was built today, 4 bed 21/2 Baths, eat-in kitchen, family rm, study off master bed, 3 car garage, 2 wood burning fireplaces. Reduced $695,000

SQ. HILL BEECHWOOD BLVD. — A home for all to enjoy. Truly a beautiful gem of a grand old house completely restored but kept its original charm. Asking $1,250,000 SHADYSIDE “Restored Victorian” in the Heart of Shadyside. 5 bed 21/2 Baths, Leaded glass windows, enclosed urban garden. Reduced $375,000 Will lease or do owner financing.

For information call Tamara Skirboll 412-521-2222 x220 Cell 412-401-1110


20 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011

CLASSIFIED

Advertisements • Deadline Monday at Noon • All Classified Ads Are Payable in Advance

7 $ 1025 $

00

For 10 Words or Less 25¢ For Each Additional Word

For Boxed Ads 1 Inch x 1 Column Inch THE JEWISH CHRONICLE Call Today 5915 BEACON ST., 3RD FLR., PITTSBURGH, PA 15217

412-687-1000

HELP WANTED

POSITION WANTED

GUARDIANSHIP CASEWORKER, Degree in Social Work or related field. Excellent analytic, organizational and interpersonal skills. Driver’s license/dependable car required. Ability to work as a team player and advocate on behalf of individuals who are unable to do so on their own. Experience and knowledge of County MH/MR programs, providers, ISC units, and treatment facilities. Act 33/34 and FBI clearance required. Experience as an ISC a plus. Please email cover letter and resume to niole@jfcspgh.org. EOE ••• CONGREGATION SEEKS Aron Kodesh for our three Torahs. Old or new, willing to refurbish. Contact Daniel 412-422-9078. ••• NANNY A HEALTHY 5 month old needs a nanny 12 hours/week, afternoons in my home. Must be fluent in English with experience, references & physically fit. Call 412-404-8781.

HOME HEALTH CARE specialist in hospice, dialysis & direct care. Will work any shift. Call Patricia Spencer 412-229-8760. ••• EXCELLENT NANNY available. Professional, honest, reliable caring person is looking for a full-time position. Experienced with kids with special needs. Fluent in English & Spanish. References available upon request. Ask for Alexandra 786-521-4365. ••• EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Will also do light housekeeping & cooking for your loved one. Available daylight, reasonable. Call 412969-2386. ••• DETAILED CLEANING just the way you like it to be done. Great references. Janet 724-359-7800 or Lyn 412-403-7287. ••• BABYSITTING BY Responsible college student (education major) seeks babysitting Sq. Hill/ East End area. 412-926-6321. ••• CAREGIVER WITH all criminal clearance certifications in CPR, first aid & exercise. Good references, call Carol 412-606-7372. ••• LPN/CNA/SITTER seeks private duty employment, in home, nursing home or hospital. Licensed to give medication, can transport. 412-678-1223. ••• HOUSE CLEANING COUPLE available with 20 years’ experience, great references & reasonable rates. 724-994-7830.

POSITION WANTED THE CARE REGISTRY INC. is a state licensed company providing screened & experienced nurse aids & companions. Reasonable rates, top quality & caring management also available. For more information Call Andrea Seewald, LSW 412421-5202 or visit www.TheCareRegistry.com. ••• BRANNON HOME & HEALTH Care, INC. is a licensed by the PA Dept. of Health and meets all its requirements for screening and placement of nurse aides and companions. Affordable rates for hourly or live-in service. Out of town support. Call 412341-2666 or 412-682-2279. www.brannonhomehealthcare.com. ••• CAREGIVER CONNECTION A PA. Licensed home-care registry, Jewish Family & Children’s Service refers screened, JF&CS trained caregivers providing short/long-term personal care services to seniors at affordable rates. Available 24/7, call 412-422-0400 or 877-243-1530 (toll free). ••• LAUNDRY/IRONING/CLEANING. Will clean your home or business, basement, garage or yard. Reliable with good references & reasonable rates. 412-708-4647. ••• HOUSE CLEANING Residential or commercial. Experienced with reasonable rates. 412-403-3149.

BUYING AUTO/TRUCKS C A R S -T R U C K S -VA N S SUVS- Quite driving, death, wrecks, antiques, classics, Junkers. Denny Offstein 724-287-7771 dennyoffsteinusedcar@zoominternet.net.

BUYING CLUB FORMING KOSHER PASTURED Meat buying club forming. Glatt Kosher sustainable grass fed meat, OU & Star-K. Buying club helps reduce shipping costs. Contact Jim Lando at jlando@gmail.com or 412256-8060 to find out more.

COMPUTER NICE JEWISH Boy, offering the full range of computer services, from advising and teaching to repair and support. I will come to your house or apartment, fix any problem you’re having & teach you what you need to know to use it. I have 14 years’ experience working with people of all ages. . No job is too large or small, and nobody is too computer illiterate. (Really) CALL JASON 412-401-1204 , or visit my web www.computerwizard.us., references available.

TORAH If you build it, God will come; if you don’t, God won’t Portion of the Week RABBI MARK JOEL MAHLER TEMPLE EMANUEL OF SOUTH HILLS Terumah, Exodus 25:1-27:19

DRIVER NEED A RIDE? Call Norm, he will drive you. Doctors, shopping, anything that needs to be done. Experienced, insured, great references and reasonable rates. Available le for airport pickup or departure. Norm 412521-6999.

ELECTRICIAN ARMSTRONG PLUG & Switch, LLC. Registered-Insured, electric breaker box upgrade, lighting, additional outlets, code corrections, dedicated circuits, rewires & repairs. PA075442pgh.elo4802. Call 412-2983423 or 412-751-2693.

HANDYMAN NO JOB TOO SMALL or a honey to do list! Call Dave at Maids & More 412-8243540.

HOME REPAIRS GENERAL HOME Repairs, interior/exterior, retaining walls, dry wall, flooring, ceramic, laminate, painting, plastering, pressure washing, kitchen & bath remodeling. PA licensed & insured. 412-731-1496.

“Do you ever have doubts about God?” One of my confirmation students asked me this question recently. I took her question seriously. I wanted to give her not merely a quick answer, but a good one. I then replied, “More than I’m concerned with my doubts about God, I’m concerned with God’s doubts about me.” But I’ve given her question further consideration, and now I realize that my best answer is, “Much more than I’m concerned with my doubts about God, and even more than I’m concerned with God’s doubts about me, I’m concerned with God’s doubts about us, with God’s doubts about humankind altogether.” Look at the world. How much faith should God have in us? As in the days leading up to the flood story in the Torah, our world blazes with Hamas, “Violence,” running the gamut from verbal violence to bloodshed. The only way that the world could be saved from violence in the Torah was for Noah to build an ark. So it is in our world. To alleviate human suffering and evil, to traverse the torrents of violence churning our world, we too have something to build. Asu li mikdash, v’shachanti b’tocham, are the central words of our Torah portion Teruma: “Make me a sanctuary and I will dwell in their midst.” As Noah had to build an ark for salvation, and as the people of Israel had to build the mishkan for God’s presence to journey with them from Mt. Sinai, we have to make sanctuaries for God to dwell in our midst, not merely physical sanctuaries,

but sanctuaries of morality, menschlichkeit and certainly for the Jewish people, Yiddishkeit. From every vantage, seemingly small as well as the enormously obvious stated above, how much faith should God have in us? The Shabbat after my confirmation student asked me this question, I attended the morning service at a congregation in another city. I relish my rare opportunities to attend other synagogues, and on this particular Shabbat, I enjoyed the comments and quips by the rabbi and the sweet singing of the cantor. Yet otherwise, my view from the pews was disconcerting. Few people prayed. Some people did not even open the prayer book. There was great praise of the bar mitzva boy. There was little praise to God, or for the gifts of keeping Shabbat and studying Torah. Hundreds of people were seated in that sanctuary, yet few people were making it a sanctuary for God to dwell in. For generations now, the story has been told of the student who asked his rabbi, “Where can I find God?” The rabbi replied, “Wherever you let God in.” This parable reiterates the central lesson of Teruma, when God commands Moses at Mt. Sinai, “Make for me a sanctuary that I may dwell in their midst.” For God to dwell in our midst, we must build sanctuaries of study and observance, morality and ritual, menschlichkeit, Yiddishkeit and community. With every mitzva we keep, we can cement another block in the foundation, hammer another plank, secure another beam, or nail another shingle in building God’s sanctuary in our midst. If we build it, God will come. And if we don’t, how can God come, let alone why should God come? If we don’t, God won’t.

(This column is a service of the Greater Pittsburgh Rabbinic Association.)

MEDIS

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RealisEstate Directory the best source. Call 412-687-1000

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PESACH APARTMENT SEEKING PESACH apartment in Sq. Hill during Pesach, April 17 to 27, 2011. We have our own Pesachdik pots, pans, dishes & silverware. We will come in & kasher your kitchen & use it for Sedarim and other meals. Rent open for discussion. Call Rabbi & Mrs. Perlman 412-904-3601.

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LEGAL NOTICE ESTATE NOTICES Letters have been granted on the estate of each of the following decedents to the personal representative named, who requests all persons having claims against the estate of the decedent to make known the same in writing to him or his attorney, and all persons indebted to the decedent to make payment to him without delay:

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011 — 21

ENVIRONMENT Dignity and respect needed Photo courtesy CIMMYT/Flickr

The Obama administration’s reinstatement of funding to the United Nations Population Fund helps the agency’s efforts around the world to reduce poverty and to ensure that every pregnancy is wanted, every birth is safe, every young person is free of HIV/AIDS, and every girl and woman is treated with dignity and respect.

Reducing global population pressures

Earth Talk By the Editors of E/The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: Global population numbers continue to rise, as does the poverty, suffering and environmental degradation that goes with it. Has the U.S., under President Obama, increased or at least restored its family planning aid to developing countries that was cut when the Bush Administration first took office? T. Healy, via e-mail The short answer is yes. President Obama is much more interested in family planning around the world than his predecessor ever was. One of Obama’s first acts upon assuming office in 2009 was the restoration of funding for the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). George W. Bush had withheld some $244 million in aid to the UNFPA over the previous seven years. UNFPA works with developing countries around the world to “reduce poverty and to ensure that every pregnancy is wanted, every birth is safe, every young person is free of HIV/AIDS, and every girl and woman is treated with dignity and respect.” Reinstated U.S. funding will help the agency pursue its goals of universal access to reproductive health services, universal primary education and closing of the gender gap in education, reducing maternal and infant mortality, increasing life expectancy and decreasing HIV infection rates. Along with restoring UNFPA funding, Obama also overturned the so-called “Global Gag Rule” that prohibited groups funded by the U.S. Agency in International Development from using any government or nongovernment funds for “providing advice, counseling or information regarding abortion, or

lobbying a foreign government to legalize or make abortion available.” Foreign nonprofits were already not allowed to use U.S. funds to pay for abortions, but the Global Gag Rule—first instituted as the “Mexico City Policy” in 1984 by the Reagan White House, then overturned by Clinton and later reinstated by George W. Bush — went further by restricting the free speech rights of government grantees and stifling public debate on the contentious topic. Foreign NGOs that accept U.S. funding still cannot perform abortions, but can discuss the options openly with the families they serve. “For too long, international family planning assistance has been used as a political wedge issue, the subject of a back and forth debate that has served only to divide us,” said Obama upon overturning the policy as one of his first acts in office. “It is time that we end the politicization of this issue.” Of course, advocates for increased family planning are pressuring the Obama administration to step up its efforts aboard even more. The Institute of Medicine, one of four government-affiliated nonprofit “academies” of experts, recommended last spring that the U.S. increase its spending on global health by some 50 percent over the $63 billion pledged by the Obama White House over the next six years. Groups providing family planning services domestically would also like to see the Obama administration step up funding for their programs, not only to improve the quality of life for American families but to save money and reduce abortions as well: A 2009 report by the nonprofit Guttmacher Institute concluded that publicly funded family planning services at both hospitals and non-profit clinics saves taxpayers $4 for every $1 spent by preventing nearly two million pregnancies and 810,000 abortions per year. (Send your environmental questions to: EarthTalk®, c/o E – The Environmental Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport, CT 06881; earthtalk@emagazine.com. E is a nonprofit publication. Subscribe: emagazine.com/subscribe.)

MORNING SERVICES - 9:30 A.M. SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6: HARRY ADLER, ESTHER ALPERN, RIKA F. BARKUS, LOUIS BLOCH, LOUIS BORCHARDT, SAM BRENNER, ETHEL BURKE, HENRIETTA CAPLAN, IDA DANENBERG, MARY ELENBAUM, JACK A. FEINGOLD, MORRIS FINKELSTEIN, CHARLES FRIEDBERG, ABE I. FRIEDMAN, ROSE GOLDENBERG, MARY GOULD, HERMAN GREEN, MILTON GREENFIELD, CARL GUSSIN, JACHIEL HAUS, JOSEPH HOREWITZ, HEIMIN S. JACOBSON, ISADOR JAEGER, SADYE JUDD, JACOB KRAMER, ALLAN KRAUSS, JACK LEFF, LENA LEFKOWITZ, DAVID LEVEN, LIBBIE LEVY, ABRAHAM A. LINDER, DORA MALLIN, AARON MALLINGER, BELLA W. MARKS, SAM MILLER, SAMUEL G. MILLER, REGINA NEUGASS, SOLOMON NEUSTEIN, BETTY F. PAULL, EMANUEL PERLOW, MAX RAND, MINNIE ROTH, IDA SCHWARTZ, NATHAN SCHWARTZ, ALICE SHAPIRO, LILLIAN SIEGMAN, MIRIAM SILBERMAN, DORIS L. SILVERMAN, JULIUS SILVERMAN, RUTH SLOTEKEVICH, IRVING LEWIS STUTZ, MD, JANINA WINKLER. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7: LOUIS AZORSKY, ESTHER BENKOVITZ, WILLIAM BERGER, ELAINE BERKOVITZ, MAX BERKOVITZ, SARAH LOUISE BERNSTEIN, JACK E. BRODY, RENA BURKE, REBECCA DRESNER, JACOB FEIGENBAUM, BELLE F. FINN, ANNA R. FOSTER, DOROTHY FRANKEL, ELIZABETH GREEN, ROSA HERSKOVITZ, ALEX HERTZ, EPHRAIM HURWITZ, LOUIS HYTOWITZ, HERBERT D. JONES, RALPH KALSON, GIZELLA KOVACS, ALVIN LAIBMAN, MARY LEVIN, ROSE S. LEVINE, SAMUEL H. LEVINE, ORIN J. LEVY, TILLIE LIPSON, MAX A. LOEVNER, REBECCA LOVE, JANE MARGOWSKY, LUCILLE R. MERMELSTEIN, LENA NESVISKY, DORA OBERLIN, MENDEL PERIL, MEYER RABINOVITZ, PEARL R. ROSENBERG, ROSE L. ROSENTHAL, IDA R. ROTH, JOSEPH ROTH, SIDNEY S. SAPPER, MAX H. SCHINDLER, EDWARD SCHLESSINGER, SADIE SCHWARTZ, FANNIE SHULLMAN, ALBERT SIGAL, NAOMI CONN SILVERMAN, NATHAN SILVERMAN, MAX SOLOMON, ROSE SPANDAU, BESSIE SWARTZ, NACHMAN TABACHNICK, BENJAMIN TEPLITZ, SAMUEL WALKOW, HENRY WEINBERGER, MOLLIE WEISMAN, LENA ELIZABETH WIZENBERG, ABRAHAM YORKIN, PHILLIP ZAKOWITZ. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8: SAMUEL H. BEGLER, HELEN BUCK, DAVID CANTER, LEONARD CHOTINER, MINNIE COHEN, YETTA COHEN, LENA COOPER, BARBARA FINK, GOLDIE FRANK, GOLDIE FRANK, NETTA FRUHLINGER, SAMUEL GESCHEIDT, DANIEL GLICK, ROSI GOLDBLATT, ESTHER D. GOLDMAN, CHARLES GOLDSTEIN, HAYA K. HARRIS, SAUL I. HELLER, HARRY HIRSCH, HYMAN J. JACOBSON, LENA KITMAN, LILLIAN KLEIN, GUS KLINE, SIMON KRAUS, JEANNETTE G. KURTZ, JACOB LADERMAN, HARRY LANDAW, ABRAHAM LEEBOVE, LOUIS L. LENCHNER, MORRIS LEVINE, MAURICE LEVINSON, ROSE LEVY, WILLIAM LIFF, LYNETTE A. LONDON, FRED H. LUDIN, SAMUEL MANDEL, SAMUEL MANDELL, ETHEL MARETZKY, ROSE MENDLOW, SOLOMON J. METLIN, EDYTHE MOSS, YITZCHAK AARON NADLER, MILTON D. PATZ, FANNIE PERIS, BENJAMIN PERLMAN, ROSEMOND PLANT, DAVID C. POLLOCK, SADIE RESNICK, LENA ROBIN, ABRAHAM ROSEN, PINCUS P. ROSENTHAL, MURRAY RUBENSTEIN, SARAH RUBINSTEIN, MINNIE O. SAUL, IRWIN SCHATZ, EDWARD SCHUGAR, JACK I. SEGAL, JOSEPH SEGAL, MOLLIE SEIGER, MOLLIE SIEGER, IKE SKIRBLE, JACK STEINFELD, FANNIE SUGGARS, ANNA TARSHIS, ABRAHAM VENZERUL, SAMUEL WASSERMAN, BELLE G. WEINER, DONNA MAE ZIMRING, NATHAN ZUCKER. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9: SOPHIE ANISMAN, FANNIE BALFER, LOUISE BEHR, ABE P. BENNETT, SANFORD R. BERMAN, SAM BOCHNER, THEODORE CHERTOFF, ELSIE B. COHEN, JOSEPH COHEN, ABE I. DANIELS, SAMUEL ENDICH, LIBBY ETTA GOLDSTON, WOLF GORDON, JULIA WISE GORMAN, FANNIE HERMAN, HAHUM HERSCHELN, DR. LEON HIRSCH, DR. HARRY KALET, FRANK A. KAMINS, JACK M. KANE, JACOB KLEINMAN, MARY LANDO, LOUIS R. LEVITH, ELLA LEVY, DR. YALE S. LEWINE, BERTHA LOMASK, LOUIS LUTERMAN, ALYCE H. MANDELBLATT, BENJAMIN D. MILLER, SADIE MILLER, ALEX MOSCOV, ESTHER NAUHAUS, BENJAMIN POLLACK, MARWIN D. RUBENSTEIN, ESTHER RUDKIN, HARRY W. SAMOLSKY, IKE SCHLESINGER, MORRIS SCHMIDT, JACOB SCHOEN, DAVID SCHWARTZ, FRANCES B. SIGAL, ISAAC W. SOLOMON, HELEN O. TUNNARELLO, SAMUEL VEINEGAR, MORRIS S. WERTHEIMER, ANNA S. WILKOFF, HARRY ZALEVSKY, MOLLIE ZEIDMAN. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10: MARY ALPERT, DORA G. BERNSTEIN, MICHEAL CANTOROVICH, DORA DAVIS CAPLAN, ALEC W. CHINN, GERTRUDE CHIZECK, GOLDIE CHUSSETT, NOAH COHEN, SARA F. COHEN, SAMUEL ENDICH, FLORENCE FARKAS, BAER FRIEDLANDER, MIRIAM J. GLICK, ANNA GOLDBERG, RUTH GOULD, ISIDOR HOLLANDER, MARVIN KLEIN, SOPHIA KRASIK, SOPHIE LEBOWITZ, BUDDY LEVENSON, LEON LEWIS, REGINA LITTLE, NATHAN MANN, ADA MORRIS, LOUIS RAYMOND, FANNIE ROSEN, LOUIS B. ROSENBERG, JEROME ROSENBLOOM, ISAAC L. ROSENFELD, JOSEPH SANDERS, CHARLES SCHWARTZ, SARAH L. SHAPIRO, SYLVIA D. SHRIVER, JACOB SNOW, JACOB OWEN SPECTER, MD, SIDNEY STARK, DAVID STERN, HENRIETTA STRENG, RAYE SUPOWITZ, HELEN WEINBERGER. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11: BESSIE BARINGOLTZ, SAM BENKOVITZ, BERNARD BERKMAN, HENRIETTA BUCK, ISAAC CAPLAN, ROSE CHERKOSKY, JULIUS CLOSKY, JACOB DAVIS, ALBERT FARBER, SAMUEL FARBSTEIN, FRANCES A. FEINBERG, DR. ABRAHAM FINEGOLD, FANNY FINKELSTEIN, ISRAEL FIREMAN, DOROTHY FISHER, ETTIE K. FRANK, HARRIS FRIEDMAN, ABRAHAM GREEN, ROSE GRUMMER, LOUIS M. HARRIS, JACOB HERMAN, IRA KLEIN, CHARLES KOROBKIN, ABRAHAM Z. LAVINE, MORRIS S. LEVINE, TILLIE LIPPOCK, ELI LIVINSTON, ANNA LYTTON, IDA MEYERS, JOSEPH MILLER, HARRY B. ORRINGER, M.D., ABRAHAM PEREIRA, HAROLD B. POLLACK, REVA M. RATNER, LILLIAN S. ROMANOFF, FANNIE R. ROSENFIELD, IRWIN I. SARON, BETTY B. SHER, ETTA SILVERBLATT, DAVID SOLOF, DORA STADTFELD, ANNA STERN, JOSEPH SUNSHINE, RACHEL TALENFELD, MAX L. WECHSLER, ALBERT WEINBERGER, PHILLIP WEINBERGER, BENJAMIN WOLK. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12: ELLA ALPERN, GERTRUDE ATLAS, RASHEL BROWARSKY, SAMUEL J. BURKE, RUTH CHELL, JULIUS COHEN, BERNARD COTTLER, GERTRUDE CRIEP, JACOB FIBUS, FRANK FINKELSTEIN, ANNA FISHER, ISADORE FLEEGLER, EMIL GLICK, DORA GOLDFARB, EVA GOLDSTEIN, EDWARD GREEN, CELIA GRINBERG, MEYER HART, RUTH G. HERMAN, ROSELLA B. HORVITZ, HAROLD LEVINE, BESSIE R. LEVINSON, DINAH MARTIN, JAY CALVIN MILLER, ALBERT MORGAN, BELLA OPPENHEIM, GOLDA POLESETSKY, JOSEPH PORTER, ABE RADER, SAMUEL REZNICK, STANLEY E. ROSENBLOOM, MD, ABRAHAM RUTSTEIN, CLARA SCHLEIFER, BELLE SELKOVITS, YETTA SHAPIRO, ETHEL SIEGAL, CHAIA SPECTOR, BESSIE STEIN, ROSE STEINBERGER, JOSEPH STEINER, ALICE STRAHL, SAMUEL TYSON, REBECCA WELTMAN, ESTHER WERTHEIMER, JENNIE WHITMAN, MAX WIKES, ROSE ZIFF.

Call (412) 687-1000 to place your ad in 10,000 Eyes will see your ad in the Classifieds

The Jewish Chronicle


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011 — 21

ENVIRONMENT Dignity and respect needed Photo courtesy CIMMYT/Flickr

The Obama administration’s reinstatement of funding to the United Nations Population Fund helps the agency’s efforts around the world to reduce poverty and to ensure that every pregnancy is wanted, every birth is safe, every young person is free of HIV/AIDS, and every girl and woman is treated with dignity and respect.

Reducing global population pressures

Earth Talk By the Editors of E/The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: Global population numbers continue to rise, as does the poverty, suffering and environmental degradation that goes with it. Has the U.S., under President Obama, increased or at least restored its family planning aid to developing countries that was cut when the Bush Administration first took office? T. Healy, via e-mail The short answer is yes. President Obama is much more interested in family planning around the world than his predecessor ever was. One of Obama’s first acts upon assuming office in 2009 was the restoration of funding for the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). George W. Bush had withheld some $244 million in aid to the UNFPA over the previous seven years. UNFPA works with developing countries around the world to “reduce poverty and to ensure that every pregnancy is wanted, every birth is safe, every young person is free of HIV/AIDS, and every girl and woman is treated with dignity and respect.” Reinstated U.S. funding will help the agency pursue its goals of universal access to reproductive health services, universal primary education and closing of the gender gap in education, reducing maternal and infant mortality, increasing life expectancy and decreasing HIV infection rates. Along with restoring UNFPA funding, Obama also overturned the so-called “Global Gag Rule” that prohibited groups funded by the U.S. Agency in International Development from using any government or nongovernment funds for “providing advice, counseling or information regarding abortion, or

lobbying a foreign government to legalize or make abortion available.” Foreign nonprofits were already not allowed to use U.S. funds to pay for abortions, but the Global Gag Rule—first instituted as the “Mexico City Policy” in 1984 by the Reagan White House, then overturned by Clinton and later reinstated by George W. Bush — went further by restricting the free speech rights of government grantees and stifling public debate on the contentious topic. Foreign NGOs that accept U.S. funding still cannot perform abortions, but can discuss the options openly with the families they serve. “For too long, international family planning assistance has been used as a political wedge issue, the subject of a back and forth debate that has served only to divide us,” said Obama upon overturning the policy as one of his first acts in office. “It is time that we end the politicization of this issue.” Of course, advocates for increased family planning are pressuring the Obama administration to step up its efforts aboard even more. The Institute of Medicine, one of four government-affiliated nonprofit “academies” of experts, recommended last spring that the U.S. increase its spending on global health by some 50 percent over the $63 billion pledged by the Obama White House over the next six years. Groups providing family planning services domestically would also like to see the Obama administration step up funding for their programs, not only to improve the quality of life for American families but to save money and reduce abortions as well: A 2009 report by the nonprofit Guttmacher Institute concluded that publicly funded family planning services at both hospitals and non-profit clinics saves taxpayers $4 for every $1 spent by preventing nearly two million pregnancies and 810,000 abortions per year. (Send your environmental questions to: EarthTalk®, c/o E – The Environmental Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport, CT 06881; earthtalk@emagazine.com. E is a nonprofit publication. Subscribe: emagazine.com/subscribe.)

MORNING SERVICES - 9:30 A.M. SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6: HARRY ADLER, ESTHER ALPERN, RIKA F. BARKUS, LOUIS BLOCH, LOUIS BORCHARDT, SAM BRENNER, ETHEL BURKE, HENRIETTA CAPLAN, IDA DANENBERG, MARY ELENBAUM, JACK A. FEINGOLD, MORRIS FINKELSTEIN, CHARLES FRIEDBERG, ABE I. FRIEDMAN, ROSE GOLDENBERG, MARY GOULD, HERMAN GREEN, MILTON GREENFIELD, CARL GUSSIN, JACHIEL HAUS, JOSEPH HOREWITZ, HEIMIN S. JACOBSON, ISADOR JAEGER, SADYE JUDD, JACOB KRAMER, ALLAN KRAUSS, JACK LEFF, LENA LEFKOWITZ, DAVID LEVEN, LIBBIE LEVY, ABRAHAM A. LINDER, DORA MALLIN, AARON MALLINGER, BELLA W. MARKS, SAM MILLER, SAMUEL G. MILLER, REGINA NEUGASS, SOLOMON NEUSTEIN, BETTY F. PAULL, EMANUEL PERLOW, MAX RAND, MINNIE ROTH, IDA SCHWARTZ, NATHAN SCHWARTZ, ALICE SHAPIRO, LILLIAN SIEGMAN, MIRIAM SILBERMAN, DORIS L. SILVERMAN, JULIUS SILVERMAN, RUTH SLOTEKEVICH, IRVING LEWIS STUTZ, MD, JANINA WINKLER. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7: LOUIS AZORSKY, ESTHER BENKOVITZ, WILLIAM BERGER, ELAINE BERKOVITZ, MAX BERKOVITZ, SARAH LOUISE BERNSTEIN, JACK E. BRODY, RENA BURKE, REBECCA DRESNER, JACOB FEIGENBAUM, BELLE F. FINN, ANNA R. FOSTER, DOROTHY FRANKEL, ELIZABETH GREEN, ROSA HERSKOVITZ, ALEX HERTZ, EPHRAIM HURWITZ, LOUIS HYTOWITZ, HERBERT D. JONES, RALPH KALSON, GIZELLA KOVACS, ALVIN LAIBMAN, MARY LEVIN, ROSE S. LEVINE, SAMUEL H. LEVINE, ORIN J. LEVY, TILLIE LIPSON, MAX A. LOEVNER, REBECCA LOVE, JANE MARGOWSKY, LUCILLE R. MERMELSTEIN, LENA NESVISKY, DORA OBERLIN, MENDEL PERIL, MEYER RABINOVITZ, PEARL R. ROSENBERG, ROSE L. ROSENTHAL, IDA R. ROTH, JOSEPH ROTH, SIDNEY S. SAPPER, MAX H. SCHINDLER, EDWARD SCHLESSINGER, SADIE SCHWARTZ, FANNIE SHULLMAN, ALBERT SIGAL, NAOMI CONN SILVERMAN, NATHAN SILVERMAN, MAX SOLOMON, ROSE SPANDAU, BESSIE SWARTZ, NACHMAN TABACHNICK, BENJAMIN TEPLITZ, SAMUEL WALKOW, HENRY WEINBERGER, MOLLIE WEISMAN, LENA ELIZABETH WIZENBERG, ABRAHAM YORKIN, PHILLIP ZAKOWITZ. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8: SAMUEL H. BEGLER, HELEN BUCK, DAVID CANTER, LEONARD CHOTINER, MINNIE COHEN, YETTA COHEN, LENA COOPER, BARBARA FINK, GOLDIE FRANK, GOLDIE FRANK, NETTA FRUHLINGER, SAMUEL GESCHEIDT, DANIEL GLICK, ROSI GOLDBLATT, ESTHER D. GOLDMAN, CHARLES GOLDSTEIN, HAYA K. HARRIS, SAUL I. HELLER, HARRY HIRSCH, HYMAN J. JACOBSON, LENA KITMAN, LILLIAN KLEIN, GUS KLINE, SIMON KRAUS, JEANNETTE G. KURTZ, JACOB LADERMAN, HARRY LANDAW, ABRAHAM LEEBOVE, LOUIS L. LENCHNER, MORRIS LEVINE, MAURICE LEVINSON, ROSE LEVY, WILLIAM LIFF, LYNETTE A. LONDON, FRED H. LUDIN, SAMUEL MANDEL, SAMUEL MANDELL, ETHEL MARETZKY, ROSE MENDLOW, SOLOMON J. METLIN, EDYTHE MOSS, YITZCHAK AARON NADLER, MILTON D. PATZ, FANNIE PERIS, BENJAMIN PERLMAN, ROSEMOND PLANT, DAVID C. POLLOCK, SADIE RESNICK, LENA ROBIN, ABRAHAM ROSEN, PINCUS P. ROSENTHAL, MURRAY RUBENSTEIN, SARAH RUBINSTEIN, MINNIE O. SAUL, IRWIN SCHATZ, EDWARD SCHUGAR, JACK I. SEGAL, JOSEPH SEGAL, MOLLIE SEIGER, MOLLIE SIEGER, IKE SKIRBLE, JACK STEINFELD, FANNIE SUGGARS, ANNA TARSHIS, ABRAHAM VENZERUL, SAMUEL WASSERMAN, BELLE G. WEINER, DONNA MAE ZIMRING, NATHAN ZUCKER. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9: SOPHIE ANISMAN, FANNIE BALFER, LOUISE BEHR, ABE P. BENNETT, SANFORD R. BERMAN, SAM BOCHNER, THEODORE CHERTOFF, ELSIE B. COHEN, JOSEPH COHEN, ABE I. DANIELS, SAMUEL ENDICH, LIBBY ETTA GOLDSTON, WOLF GORDON, JULIA WISE GORMAN, FANNIE HERMAN, HAHUM HERSCHELN, DR. LEON HIRSCH, DR. HARRY KALET, FRANK A. KAMINS, JACK M. KANE, JACOB KLEINMAN, MARY LANDO, LOUIS R. LEVITH, ELLA LEVY, DR. YALE S. LEWINE, BERTHA LOMASK, LOUIS LUTERMAN, ALYCE H. MANDELBLATT, BENJAMIN D. MILLER, SADIE MILLER, ALEX MOSCOV, ESTHER NAUHAUS, BENJAMIN POLLACK, MARWIN D. RUBENSTEIN, ESTHER RUDKIN, HARRY W. SAMOLSKY, IKE SCHLESINGER, MORRIS SCHMIDT, JACOB SCHOEN, DAVID SCHWARTZ, FRANCES B. SIGAL, ISAAC W. SOLOMON, HELEN O. TUNNARELLO, SAMUEL VEINEGAR, MORRIS S. WERTHEIMER, ANNA S. WILKOFF, HARRY ZALEVSKY, MOLLIE ZEIDMAN. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10: MARY ALPERT, DORA G. BERNSTEIN, MICHEAL CANTOROVICH, DORA DAVIS CAPLAN, ALEC W. CHINN, GERTRUDE CHIZECK, GOLDIE CHUSSETT, NOAH COHEN, SARA F. COHEN, SAMUEL ENDICH, FLORENCE FARKAS, BAER FRIEDLANDER, MIRIAM J. GLICK, ANNA GOLDBERG, RUTH GOULD, ISIDOR HOLLANDER, MARVIN KLEIN, SOPHIA KRASIK, SOPHIE LEBOWITZ, BUDDY LEVENSON, LEON LEWIS, REGINA LITTLE, NATHAN MANN, ADA MORRIS, LOUIS RAYMOND, FANNIE ROSEN, LOUIS B. ROSENBERG, JEROME ROSENBLOOM, ISAAC L. ROSENFELD, JOSEPH SANDERS, CHARLES SCHWARTZ, SARAH L. SHAPIRO, SYLVIA D. SHRIVER, JACOB SNOW, JACOB OWEN SPECTER, MD, SIDNEY STARK, DAVID STERN, HENRIETTA STRENG, RAYE SUPOWITZ, HELEN WEINBERGER. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11: BESSIE BARINGOLTZ, SAM BENKOVITZ, BERNARD BERKMAN, HENRIETTA BUCK, ISAAC CAPLAN, ROSE CHERKOSKY, JULIUS CLOSKY, JACOB DAVIS, ALBERT FARBER, SAMUEL FARBSTEIN, FRANCES A. FEINBERG, DR. ABRAHAM FINEGOLD, FANNY FINKELSTEIN, ISRAEL FIREMAN, DOROTHY FISHER, ETTIE K. FRANK, HARRIS FRIEDMAN, ABRAHAM GREEN, ROSE GRUMMER, LOUIS M. HARRIS, JACOB HERMAN, IRA KLEIN, CHARLES KOROBKIN, ABRAHAM Z. LAVINE, MORRIS S. LEVINE, TILLIE LIPPOCK, ELI LIVINSTON, ANNA LYTTON, IDA MEYERS, JOSEPH MILLER, HARRY B. ORRINGER, M.D., ABRAHAM PEREIRA, HAROLD B. POLLACK, REVA M. RATNER, LILLIAN S. ROMANOFF, FANNIE R. ROSENFIELD, IRWIN I. SARON, BETTY B. SHER, ETTA SILVERBLATT, DAVID SOLOF, DORA STADTFELD, ANNA STERN, JOSEPH SUNSHINE, RACHEL TALENFELD, MAX L. WECHSLER, ALBERT WEINBERGER, PHILLIP WEINBERGER, BENJAMIN WOLK. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12: ELLA ALPERN, GERTRUDE ATLAS, RASHEL BROWARSKY, SAMUEL J. BURKE, RUTH CHELL, JULIUS COHEN, BERNARD COTTLER, GERTRUDE CRIEP, JACOB FIBUS, FRANK FINKELSTEIN, ANNA FISHER, ISADORE FLEEGLER, EMIL GLICK, DORA GOLDFARB, EVA GOLDSTEIN, EDWARD GREEN, CELIA GRINBERG, MEYER HART, RUTH G. HERMAN, ROSELLA B. HORVITZ, HAROLD LEVINE, BESSIE R. LEVINSON, DINAH MARTIN, JAY CALVIN MILLER, ALBERT MORGAN, BELLA OPPENHEIM, GOLDA POLESETSKY, JOSEPH PORTER, ABE RADER, SAMUEL REZNICK, STANLEY E. ROSENBLOOM, MD, ABRAHAM RUTSTEIN, CLARA SCHLEIFER, BELLE SELKOVITS, YETTA SHAPIRO, ETHEL SIEGAL, CHAIA SPECTOR, BESSIE STEIN, ROSE STEINBERGER, JOSEPH STEINER, ALICE STRAHL, SAMUEL TYSON, REBECCA WELTMAN, ESTHER WERTHEIMER, JENNIE WHITMAN, MAX WIKES, ROSE ZIFF.

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22 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011

OBITUARIES ACKERMAN: On Monday, January 24, 2011, Bertha Ackerman; beloved wife of the late Morris J. Ackerman; beloved mother of Toby (late Stanley) Perilman and Martin (Sue) Ackerman; sister of Irene Louik; grandmother of Steven (Amy) Perilman, Scott Perilman, Bradley (Amanda) Ackerman and the late Traci Perilman; Great-grandmother of Spencer, Allison and Maxwell Perilman and Samantha Ackerman. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Shadyside. Interment Ohav Shalom Cemetery, Donora, PA. Contributions may be made to Caring Committee Fund, Congregation Beth Israel, 6100 Pleasant Run Road., Colleyville, TX 76034. FREEDEL: On Friday, January 28, 2011, Rochelle Freedel; beloved wife of Paul Freedel; beloved mother of Michelle (David) Barkdoll and Gerri (Victor) Primak; sister of Marvin Rubin, Natalie Brodsky and Lois Holbrook; grandmother of David, Adam, Kayla, Ethan and Ava. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Shadyside. Interment Pliskover Cemetery. Contributions may be made to New Light Congregation, 1700 Beechwood Boulevard, Pittsburgh, PA 15217. GOLDSTEIN: On Tuesday, January 25, 2011, Harold W. Goldstein of Monroeville, formerly of Titusville, PA; beloved husband of Marilyn Verk Goldstein; stepfather of Rita and Stuart Zolot of Mt. Lebanon and Robert and Lynn Verk of Edgewood, MD. Brother of the late Sylvia and Ruth Goldstein of Titusville and the late Janet Beerman of Johnstown. Also survived by four grandchildren. Services were held at Temple David in Monroeville. Private interment Temple Sinai Memorial Park. Contributions may be made to Squirrel Hill Community Food Pantry, c/o JF&CS, 5743 Bartlett Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15217 or Temple David, 4415 Northern Pike, Monroeville, PA 15146. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc. GROSS: On Tuesday, January 25, 2011, Robert E. Gross; beloved husband of the late Bernice Grotstein Gross; beloved father of Barry (Myra) Gross, Karen Christensen and Glenn Gross;

brother of Daniel Gross, Dorothy Josephson, the late Michael Gross, Eleanor Cohen and William Gross; grandfather of Bernard (Julie) Christensen, Kim (Kevin) Mills and David and Sabrina Gross; great-grandfather of Emily and Amy Christensen and Meghan and Rachel Mills. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Shadyside. Interment Temple Sinai Memorial Park. Contributions may be made to Jewish Family & Children’s Service, 5743 Bartlett Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15217. HELLER: On Monday, January 24, 2011, Dorothy (Feldman) Heller; beloved wife of the late Bernard Heller; devoted mother of Stephen Heller (Nancy Marx) and Elly Heller Toig (Mitchell Toig); daughter of the late Max and Sadye Feldman of McKeesport; grandmother of Andrew (Andrea) Heller, Julie (Mark) Corbin, Jonathan Heller, and Molly Heller Toig; great-grandmother of Leilana Blawat; sister of the late Alan Feldman; sister-in-law of Lila Feldman, Daniel Heller, Saul Rubin and the late Charlotte and Leo Shapiro, the late Alex and Lillian Heller, the late Zola and Bernice Heller, the late Marian Heller, the late Saul Heller, and the late Ethel Rubin; also survived by beloved nieces, nephews, great-nieces and greatnephews. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Shadyside. Interment B’nai Israel Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Alzheimer’s Alliance of Westen PA, 5180 Campbell’s Run Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15205.

Max, and Ayla. Interment at Beth David Cemetary on Long Island. Donations can be made to Magen David Adom Israel, amfda.org; Yad Sarah, friendsofyadsarah.org; or Young Israel of Pittsburgh, 5831 Bartlett St., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. SCHWARTZ: On Sunday, January 30, 2011, Verna M. Schwartz; beloved wife of the late Stanley G. Schwartz; beloved mother of Dr. David L. (Elaine) Schwartz of Oklahoma City, OK and the late Ellen Sue Schwartz; sister of Claryne Miggantz of Fox Chapel; grandmother of Shelby and Piper Schwartz; also survived by nieces and nephews. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Shadyside. Interment West View Cemetery of Rodef Shalom Congregation. Contribu-

Please refer to www.thejewishchronicle.net for regularly updated obituary information.

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WESTERMAN: On Thursday, January 27, 2011, Marcia K. Westerman; beloved wife of Dr. Maxwell Westerman; daughter of the late Jack and Gertrude Kahn; sister of Freda Lindblom and Marian Temkin; sister-in-law of Ruth Westerman and Wilma Kubrin; aunt of Jay Pochapin, Sandra Kachajian, Lee Pochapin, Jeff Westerman, Mark Westerman, Diane Reichblum, Jana Dichter, Kristy Kubrin, Jed Kubrin, Jacqueline Temkin, Louis Temkin and Neil Temkin. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Shadyside. Interment West View Cemetery of Rodef Shalom Congregation.

Demonstrations spread

LITTLE: On Saturday, January 15, Sylvan Little of Boca Raton, FL; beloved father of Marjorie Little of Richmond, CA, and Arnold Little of Sparta, NJ; grandfather of Jessica Chasse and Steven Little. Donations can be made to Hospice by the Sea, 1531 W. Palmetto Park Road, Boca Raton, FL 33486. ROTENSTEIN: On Friday, January 21, Rose Rotenstein, 91, born in Chenstochowa, Poland; Holocaust survivor; beloved wife of Chaim Rotenstein for 68 years; beloved mother of Susan (David) Goldhirsch and Dr. Deborah Rotenstein (Dr. Noah Bass); grandmother of Lorin, Kimberly, Sue, Aaron, Renee, Avi and Nechama; great-grandmother of Emily,

tions may be made to The Ellen Sue Schwartz Memorial Fund, c/o Children’s Institute, 1405 Shady Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15217.

(Gideon Markowicz/JTA)

Arabs and Jews demonstrating in front of the Egyptian embassy in Tel Aviv against the regime of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, Jan. 28, 2011.

Israeli journalists arrested in Cairo JTA

JERUSALEM — Four Israeli journalists were arrested in Cairo as anti-government protests in Egypt turned violent. Violence in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo escalated Wedensday afternoon with Molotov cocktails burning surrounding buildings and protesters attacking each other with metal rods. Egyptian police entered the square with water cannons to disperse the crowds and put out the fires. Some 500 protesters are reported injured in the street violence. The journalists were arrested Wednesday for violating the curfew in the capital city and for entering the city on tourist visas, according to reports. Israel’s Foreign Ministry said in a statement that it is working on the release of the reporters — three from Israel’s Channel 2 and one from Nazareth. “We call on all Israeli reporters arriving in Cairo to remain alert, act responsibly and honor the place’s rules,” the ministry said in its statement. Earlier Wednesday, anti- and proEgyptian government demonstrators the square clashed, throwing rocks at each other and tearing down protest banners. The army used tear gas to control the crowds, according to reports. It was the first time that President Hosni Mubarak’s supporters have taken to the streets in large numbers since the demonstrations began nine days ago.

In an address to the Egyptian people Tuesday night, Mubarak said he would not run in the next elections, scheduled for September, and said he would lead an orderly transition of power. The army on Wednesday took to state television to urge protesters to leave the streets and return to everyday life. “Your message has arrived, your demands became known,” military spokesman Ismail Etman said in an address. “You are capable of bringing normal life to Egypt.” Also Wednesday, Yemen’s President Ali Abdullah Saleh said he would step down at the end of his presidential term, ending three decades in office. Saleh’s term expires in 2013. Saleh also promised not to pass on his leadership position to his son. “I present these concessions in the interests of the country. The interests of the country come before our personal interests,” Saleh said Wednesday in an address to his parliament. “No extension, no inheritance, no resetting the clock.” Saleh made the announcement the day before a planned “Day of Rage” planned by the opposition and inspired by anti-government rallies in Tunisia and Egypt. Last week, thousands of demonstrators gathered in Sanaa at the city’s university and downtown following several days of smaller protests by students and opposition groups calling for Saleh to step down.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011 — 23

METRO Steelers: Continued from page 1. exciting for our students to connect with other Jewish kids,” she said. “They know New York and Miami, but to think there are the kids the same age in somewhere like Green Bay learning about Judaism is special.” Both congregations will donate the weekend’s tzedaka to the local charity of the winning team’s school — a Steelers victory means Green Bay money will go to the Squirrel Hill Community Food Pantry. “It’s a way of showing we’re not just having fun,” said Schapiro. “We’re also helping out.” At Community Day School, an end-ofday pep rally will have students cheering to win a pajama day. “We have a friendly wager with the Milwaukee Jewish Day School,” said CDS Principal Avi Baran Munro. “The head of school there and I have agreed to wear the winning team’s T-shirt and be ready to shame ourselves.” While local students lived through just a few Steelers Super Bowls, it’s likely many residents of the Jewish Association on Aging remember quite a few more. This Friday, patients and residents of JAA will celebrate the Super Bowl with a pep rally, waving their homemade, stenciled Terrible Towels. The entire Squirrel Hill building is decorated with Steelers posters and pictures of Art Rooney and Myron Cope, said JAA Director of Marketing Kathy Fuller. “We’ve got an 8-foot tall blow-up Steeler,” said Fuller. “We’re all about it here.” The excitement of a Steelers victory carries an important weight at JAA. “When you work in a nursing home, you need things, especially during flu

season, to encourage everyone to feel like there’s a reason to go on with the winter,” said Fuller. “The Steelers are doing that for us.” At Beth El Congregation of the South Hills, congregants are finding a craftier way to support the Steelers — by making the, ahem, Terrible Tallis. Transforming the Steelers symbol into a symbol of Judaism is many years in the making. “Back at Camp Ramah when I was 13, we’d make anything into a tallis,” said Rabbi Alex Greenbaum. “What makes it holy is not the material, but the fringes.” When Greenbaum saw a beach towel version of the classic hand towel about 3 years ago, “It seemed like a good idea, though it’s not for everyone,” he said. He created his Terrible Tallis and this year “used it as a teaching moment for my congregation,” he said. “I explained the laws of tallit and tzitzit.” On Feb. 3, Greenbaum said he’ll hold a workshop for congregants to make their own Terrible Tallit. The excitement has even brought out congregants who rarely come to services, said Greenbaum. “I find it fascinating — some people will show up to services just because they can wear their jersey,” he said. But praying in a Terrible Towel and actually praying for a Steeler victory are different things. “My congregation asked if we could do a prayer. I said we really don’t want to go down that path — the Jets probably have more rabbis than the Steelers, and I don’t want a holy war,” said Greenbaum. “I don’t think God loves the Steelers more, but time has shown that the Steelers know what they’re doing. Luck, coincidence or God — someone is on the Steelers’ side.”

Supr Bowl “Mem, hay”

JTA photo; Edmond J. Rodman

For Super Bowl XLV (that’s mem, hay in Hebrew) an array of Jewish institutions is offering parties, as well as opportuhnities to do mitzvot.

(Justin Jacobs can be reached at justinj@thejewishchronicle.net.)

The ring’s the thing: Ex-Steeler Randy ‘The Rabbi’ Grossman recalls glory days BY RON KAPLAN New Jersey Jewish News

WHIPPANY, N.J. — For ex-Pittsburgh Steelers tight end Randy Grossman, being nicknamed “The Rabbi” was inevitable. “The fellow who pretty much nicknamed everyone was Dwight White, who recently passed away,” Grossman said of the outstanding lineman from the Steel Curtain defense of the 1970s. “He and I were locker neighbors and, yeah, what are you gonna call a white kid from Philadelphia who’s Jewish? Sparky?” “The Rabbi” would ascend the championship bima four times in his eight years playing for the Steelers’ dynasty. His four Super Bowl rings are the most among any Jewish player. As his old club prepared to take on the Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl XLV in Dallas on Sunday, Grossman reminisced about his time with the Steelers and talked about his Jewishness and the absence of anti-Semitism he encountered in his career. Among his on-field memories is catching a short touchdown pass from Hall of Fame quarterback Terry Bradshaw in the 21-17 victory over the Cowboys in Super Bowl X 36 years ago. “It’s exciting, but one of the things I try to make people realize is that whatever level you’re at when you’re playing in a championship game — whether it’s in high school or college or professionally — it is the most exciting thing that could happen,” Grossman, 59, said in a

telephone interview from his home in Pittsburgh. “Doing something great in high school wasn’t any less exciting than doing something as a professional.” Grossman had come to the Steelers as an undrafted free agent following a stellar career at his hometown Temple University, where he made thirdteam All-America from The Associated Press. Grossman caught 119 passes in 118 regular season games for 1,514 yards — a 12.7 yard-per-reception average — and five touchdowns. He won four Super Bowl rings — in 1974, ’75, ’78 and ’79. Grossman, who was inducted into the Philadelphia Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 1999, described himself as a “Manischewitz Jew.” “The rabbi at my bar mitzva commented about me that I wasn’t always inside [the synagogue],” he said, “but they always knew where to find me — outside playing football.” Unlike today’s multimillionaire stars, Grossman played in an era when having an off-season job was a given. “Once you were finished playing football, as [ex-Steelers head coach] Chuck Knoll used to say, you got on with your life’s work,” Grossman said. “For a lot of us, our reputations as adults were started here, so a lot of people stayed here and found jobs, went into business, did what they did next.” Asked to pick the winner of Sunday’s game, Grossman could hardly answer through his laughter. “The Steelers!” he said.

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RACHEL LETTY AMERICUS . . . .LEO M. & BESSIE TABACK AMERICUS ELTON BAILISS . . . . . . . . . . .LUCILLE BAILISSPOLLOCK GARRETT H. BARNES . . . .EMANUEL PERLOW SHIRLEY AND MILTON BILDER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .HERMAN MEYERS ALLAN H. COHEN . . . . . . . . .FRANK R COHEN MORTON COHEN . . . . . . . . . . .FRANK COHEN LOIS LEVINE FISHMAN . . . . .MINNIE SOKOLE HARRIET FRANKLIN . . . . . . . .EDWARD LEWIS MR. AND MRS. RONALD FRIEDKEN . . . . . . . . . . . .DOROTHY FRIEDKEN NORRIS GLANTZ . . . . . . . . . . . .JACK GLANTZ NORRIS GLANTZ . . . . . . . . . .IVAN WOLINSKY SHIRLEY G. GOLDMAN . . . . . . .HARRY GREEN SHIRLEY G. GOLDMAN . . . . . . .LEONA GREEN MARTHA S. GREEN . . . . . . . . . .DAVID STERN SARA AND HOWARD HARRIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JOSEPH HARRIS HELEN KANAREK . . . .LEONARD L. SCHUGAR HELEN P. KLINE . . . . . . . .EDGAR MARKOWITZ HELEN P. KLINE . . . . . . . . . . .ABE MARKOWITZ HELEN P. KLINE . . . . . . . . MOLLIE GREENFIELD LESLIE LEWINTERSUSKIND . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JOSEPH LEWINTER IDA JEAN AND ROBERT MCCORMLEY . . . . . . . . . .MIRIAM SILBERMAN JOYCE OFFERMAN . . . . . . . . .MOLLIE & LOUIS FRIEDMAN CHARLES PORTER AND HILARY TYSON . . . . . . .GERALDINE A. TYSON

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IN MEMORY OF

SHIRLEY E. PRENY . . . . . . . .MAX MALLINGER SHIRLEY E. PRENY . . . . . .JACK I. MALLINGER SHIRLEY E. PRENY . . . . .ESTHER MALLINGER EVELYN K. REBB . . . . . . .ANNA KUPERSTOCK LINDA AND JEFF REISNER & FAMILY . . . . . . . . .JOANNE BRODELL ALPERN MARION AND MORRIS RIEMER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ESTHER COVEL MARION AND MORRIS RIEMER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MOLLIE GANELIN SAMUEL B. ROGERS . . . .ETHEL BODEK ROGERS ANNE D. ROSENBERG . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MINNIE ROSENBERG MYRON ROSENBERG . . . . .SAM ROSENBERG RUTH ROSENBLOOM . . . . . . . . . . . . .STANLEY ROSENBLOOM RUTH ROSENBLOOM . . . . . . . . . . . . .JEROME ROSENBLOOM RUTH ROSENBLOOM . . . . . .JOSEPH PORTER MORTON AND ZELDA SCHREIBER . . . . . . . . . . . . .SIMON SCHREIBER MORTON AND ZELDA SCHREIBER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IRWIN SCHATZ JACK SINGER . . . . . . . . . . . . .MORRIS SINGER CHERYL SOBER . . . . . . . . .RAY SHUKLANSKY RABBI AND MRS. SAMUEL M. STAHL MARKUS SHERMAN SELMA STEIN . . . . . . . .DOROTHY FRIEDMAN LYNDA LEE STERN . . . . . .EDWARD H. STERN LYNDA LEE STERN . . . . . . . . .SYLVIA F. STERN EUGENE WEINBERGER . . . .HELEN WEINBERGER MELVA D. WEISBERGER . . . . .WILLIAM DAVIS SUSAN S WOLFF . . . .FRANCES L. SHAEFFER


24 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011

The Jewish Chronicle Feb. 3, 2011  

The Jewish Chronicle Feb. 3, 2011

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