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Style Groovy! Jewish cast member of “Hair” says play still resonates Page 12

THE JEWISH CHRONICLE thejewishchronicle.net february 17, 2011 Adar 1 13, 5771

Vol. 53, No. 42

Pittsburgh, PA

$1.50

Food Pantry receives $1.5 million endowment

Future front lines?

BY JUSTIN JACOBS Associate Editor

Dina Kraft photo

An Egyptian flag flies from an army outpost on the Egyptian side of the border with Israel near the moshav of Kadesh Barnea. Following the revolution in Egypt, Israel’s military leaders wonder if they may have to fight a multi-front war in the future. See story, page 10.

Ten Pittsburgh teens named AHA Honor Society inductees BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

Ten young Pittsburgh teenagers will be inducted into the American Hebrew Academy Honor Society, a distinction reserved nationwide for only 100 students who exhibit both strength in academics, and a committed interest in Judaism. Local Jewish educators nominated the eighth- and ninth-graders for their leadership potential, demonstrated maturity and Jewish involvement, said Beth Goldstein, director of teen

education at the Agency for Jewish Learning. “We’re really excited that out of the 100 students chosen, 10 are from Pittsburgh,” Goldstein said. “These teens will be the up and coming leaders in the Jewish community. They are really the future of our Jewish leaders.” Sarah Pincus, a student at Community Day School, was selected for the honor society, as well as nine students who attend J-Site programs: Kayla Goldstein, Adi Kadosh, Abigail Natelson, Rachel Reibach, Gabe Sklan (who also attends

Community Day), Marissa Snyder, Benny Stern, Jeremy Witchel and Zeva Young. The American Hebrew Academy, located in Greensboro, N.C., is the nation’s only Jewish pluralistic college prep boarding school. This is the second year it has inducted students from across the country into its honor society. “Pittsburgh had the most [kids chosen to be inducted] of any city,” said Mark Spielman, director of both recruitment and the honor society of The American Please see Honor Society, page 23.

Just about four months after the Squirrel Hill Community Food Pantry’s move into a larger facility, the $1.5 million endowment from Jewish community members Eric C. Cooper and Naomi Weisberg Siegel couldn’t have come at a better time. “When we moved to the new building, we assumed higher operating costs,” said Food Pantry Director Becky Abrams. “We are seeing more people, giving out more food, purchasing more food and fresh produce to make sure we give clients adequate food each month.” For Siegel, the gift comes from her devotion to the pantry after years of volunteer work. “I was pretty much unaware; I thought Squirrel Hill was fairly well to do. But when I saw that hunger was not only there, but that [the pantry’s services] were desperately needed, I was taken aback,” said Siegel, who started volunteering after her daughters began exploring organizations to donate their time to for school. Cooper, founder of FORE Systems, Inc. and a professor at Carnegie Mellon University, and Siegel, who founded the bakery Sweet! last year, have long been supporters of charitable causes. Profits from Sweet! are donated to the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. In 2008, the couple’s Cooper-Siegel Family Foundation pledged millions to build the CooperSiegel Community Library, which is expected to open in Fox Chapel in May. “It seems to me that if you don’t have food, almost nothing else matters. If you’ve got a hungry child, you can’t benefit from good libraries; your child won’t do well in school,” said Siegel. Abrams said her relationship with Please see Donation, page 23.

B U S I N E S S 1 7 /C L A S S I F I E D 2 0 /C O M M U N I T Y 1 6 /O B I T UA R I E S 2 2 O P I N I O N 6 /R E A L E S TA T E 1 9 /S I M C H A S 1 5 /S T Y L E 1 2 /T O R A H 2 0

Times To Remember

KINDLE SABBATH CANDLES: 5:40 p.m. EST. SABBATH ENDS: 6:40 p.m. EST.


2 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011

Metro Community building

Jews in Cranberry Township start to organize themselves BY HILARY DANINHIRSCH Chronicle Correspondent

First, there was the JCC. Now, there’s the CCJ. That’s the abbreviation for the newly formed and unofficially named Cranberry Community Jews. Co-founders Jack Cohen and Michael Berman were childhood friends, having met through B’nai B’rith Youth Organization. Both raised their families in Cranberry Township, Butler County, but they thought they were the only Jewish residents in the neighborhood. Nevertheless, they decided to see if there were any more Jewish people in the area. Through local media, they advertised a meeting of Jewish Cranberry residents. Inspired by the initial interest, they

Want to go? The next meeting of the Cranberry Community Jews is March 22. Contact Jack Cohen at Jcohen@zoominternet.net for more information.

held a second meeting Feb. 10 at the Cranberry Township Community Center. Members of northern suburban congregations — Temple Ohav Shalom, B’nai Abraham (Butler) and Beth Samuel Jewish Center (Ambridge), as well as those who were unaffiliated, attended. Cohen, who is the executive director of Butler County Tourism, said that the goal is simply to bring Jews in Cranberry together.

“It’s about building a community and a neighborhood presence,” he said. One Cranberry resident said she has lived in the township for more than 20 years and never met another Jewish person there. Another Cranberry woman said, “I just want to make some Jewish friends close to home.” Various committees were formed at the first meeting. At the second, attendees followed up with committee reports, which included a conversation about forming a book club and a singles group. There was also talk about some social events, including a pre-Purim brunch and a Passover seder. They also discussed the idea of ensuring the presence of a menora in the community center next holiday season to be placed alongside the Christmas tree display. Edward Frim director of the Agency

Clarification A story in the Feb. 10 Chronicle, “Egypt revolution should not slow peace efforts — Gorenberg.” omitted the cosponsors The Tikkun Olam Center for Jewish Social Justice of Temple Sinai, Pittsburgh Area Jewish Committee, Congregation Dor Hadash and the

for Jewish Learning, who attended the last meeting, said the AJL can provide educational programs to CCJ on whatever topics they’d like, such as interfaith families or Hebrew. While some Cranberry Jews questioned whether their needs can be met by existing congregations, the majority appeared to believe that there is room for the CCJ. “We are all here to pull from each other,” said Berman, owner of Berman Financial Services and a Cranberry Public Library trustee. “We don’t need a shul to build a spirited community. We want to build a Jewish spirit here in Cranberry and put a call out to like-minded individuals.” (Hilary Daninhirsch can be reached at hilarysd@comcast.net.)

Social Justice Committee of Temple Ohav Shalom. ••• The Feb. 10 Chronicle Cooks recipe for healthy veggie burgers includes beans in the instructions, but they were missing in the list of ingredients. The recipe calls for one 15-ounce can of red kidney beans.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011 — 3

METRO Briefly Rabbi Mark N. Staitman has been named Congregation Beth Shalom’s rabbinic scholar. Stefi Kirschner, president of Beth Shalom, announced Monday that Staitman had been named to the one-year position that previously did not exist, although, Beth Shalom has used the term rabbinic scholar for specific weekends Rabbi Mark N. Staitman for specific speakers invited to the congregation, she said. The executive committee and board of trustees extended the offer to Staitman, a member of Beth Shalom who already has participated in several education programs there, in response to demand from its members for a more formalized scholar program, Kirschner added. Staitman was a rabbi at Rodef Shalom Congregation for 28 years, serving as the senior rabbi from 1995 to 2003. He previously taught at Duquesne University, Chatham University and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and lectured frequently to refusnik communities in Moscow, Leningrad, Kiev and Kishinev before the collapse of the Soviet Union. At Beth Shalom, he has participated in the Library Minyan, Beth Shalom

University and has delivered several sermons there. It is not unusual for members of the congregation to lead educational programs, said Rabbi Michael Werbow of Beth Shalom. “We always enlist congregants for educational opportunities and he (Staitman) has graciously done that in the past,” Werbow said. In addition to his rabbinate, Staitman is a therapist at Gateway Rehabilitation Center in Squirrel Hill where he is the principal therapist for the Adult Partial Hospitalization Program, which serves adults with substance use disorders. As rabbinic scholar Staitman will present lectures, Torah messages, teach adults and provide educational opportunities for many of the Beth Shalom youth. “Beth Shalom has a very large number of members who are able to work with traditional Jewish texts, biblical commentaries, midrashic texts, and Talmud,” Staitman said. “One of the things I would like to do is establish some regular, on going text study.” Staitman, a Freehof scholar, becomes the second Reform rabbi associated with Beth Shalom, a Conservative congregation. Rabbi Donni Aaron already works part-time at the congregation as director of youth services. “I believe the congregation is open to the realization that we’re not monolithic,” Kirschner said. “We embrace singing and praying together with individuals of different backgrounds within our Conservative framework.” Staitman’s spring schedule of learning opportunities will be announced in the near future. Please see Briefly, page 5.


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METRO Jewish Pittsburgher, descended from Muhammad, speaks at Chabad BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

S. Yousef Hashimi grew up in 1970s Phoenix, Ariz., in a traditional, Conservative home. His mother lit candles on Friday nights, while his father forbade telephone calls during Shabbat dinner, as well as interfaith dating. He attended Hebrew school, was a member of USY, and spent summers at Camp Ramah. But one thing set Hashimi apart from his Jewish peers: according to Muslim genealogy, he is a direct descendant of Muhammad, the founder of Islam. Hashimi, who now lives in Pittsburgh, and is a member of the Lubavitch community, will address Carnegie Mellon University students Friday, Feb. 18, at Chabad of CMU’s Middle East Shabbat. “He has spoken on campus in the past, and the students really enjoyed it,” said Chani Silverman, co-director of Chabad of CMU. “We brought a few options of speakers to our student board, and they all agreed that Mr. Hashimi’s story sounded fascinating, and that he would most likely attract a large crowd to hear him speak.” Born in Afghanistan, the son of a Western-educated Muslim father and an American-born Jewish mother, Hashimi was named “Sayed,” as are all Muslim males who are descended from Muhammad. He asked that his parents not be identi-

fied by name here to protect their security. civil engineering in Afghanistan. He “I know I am a descendant of Muham- came to the United States on a USAID mad the same way someone knows he’s a scholarship, and pursued his master’s Kohen,” Hashimi told the Chronicle. degree in engineering at the University “It’s passed down from father to son, and of Arizona in Tucson, where he met his can be traced back to Fatima, the daugh- wife, who was an undergraduate student. The couple married in 1966 in a Muster of Muhammad.” Hashimi was raised as a Muslim the lim ceremony in Kabul and remained in first two years of his life, according to an Afghanistan until the country began its agreement his parents made when they drift towards communism. Disliked by the Afghan married: If foreign ministhey lived in ter, Hashimi’s Afghanistan, “My story is one of self-awareness and father decidthe couple mutual respect for other people. I ed it was time would raise for the family their children detest bigotry.” to leave the in the Muslim country. faith; if they S. Yousef Hashimi They left in ever moved 1970, taking back to the the small United States, the children would be brought up as amount of money and possessions they were allowed to remove, and traveled Jews. Hashimi suspects his parents made back to Phoenix. “They showed up on my bubbie and that agreement so that their children would have the same faith as their near- zayde’s doorstep,” Hashimi said. “My father left his entire fortune behind.” est extended family. Once back in the states, Hashimi’s faHashimi’s mother was born in Detroit in 1944 and grew up in a Conservative home. ther kept his promise to raise his children as Jews. Her family moved to Phoenix in 1957. Hashimi, his two sisters who were Hashimi’s father was born in 1937 in Afghanistan to a wealthy and prominent born in the United States, and an adoptfamily that was revered because of its ed brother, who was a cousin of his mothlineage as well as its relations to the roy- er’s, were all steeped in the Conservative al family of Jordan. He was educated in a Jewish tradition, with their father’s British boarding school in Alexandria, whole-hearted support. “For every High Holiday, every PeEgypt, and obtained a college degree in sach, every Sukkos, Shavuot, and sometimes on Shabbos, my father would go to shul with us,” Hashimi recalled. “He would put on a yarmulke and a tallis, take a siddur, open it up, and sit there. On Yom Kippur, he would sit there for the whole entire day so that his children would not be embarrassed.” Still, Hashimi found curious the dichotomy of being a Jewish boy with a Muslim father. After his bar mitzva, he asked his father how he, as a Muslim, could raise his children as Jews. “My father said, ‘I am a man of God. I believe in God,’” Hashimi said. “ ‘And when parents aren’t united about something, children can get confused. So, I want my children to grow up and be peo-

ple of God. I don’t want my children to be confused and reject God. That would be a travesty for me.’” He described his father as a “secular Muslim,” but attributed his “strong Jewish identity” to both his parents. His move toward Orthodoxy began, he said, one day when he was 13 and eating a Big Mac at McDonalds. “We kept kosher at home,” Hashimi said, “but we ate non-kosher meat out. I was sitting there and I had this thought: ‘What is kosher about me other than my mother’s plates?’ “I put the Big Mac down. That was the last time I ate treif meat and had milk and meat together.” Hashimi’s next “aha” moment came a year into college at Arizona State, when he realized he had no friends, and began to examine why. “I was always going out of my way to impress upon people that I was smarter than they were, and people didn’t like to be around me,” he recalled. “I was an arrogant snob. At that moment, I made a commitment to try to be a humble person.” A few weeks later, Hashimi found himself at a Friday night dinner at the campus Chabad house, where, during a speech, the rabbi impressed upon him the importance of humility. That inspired him to study Lubavitch writings, and eventually become Orthodox, he said. An associate partner for IBM Global Business Services, Hashimi moved to Pittsburgh six years ago. Growing up the child of a rather unusual interfaith marriage taught Hashimi tolerance and deference for all religions, he said. “My story is one of self-awareness and mutual respect for other people,” he said. “I detest bigotry.” While his father has been supportive of his son’s religious choices, Hashimi said there has been some “interesting tension” between the two men. “My father didn’t speak to me for about a year after my first son was born,” he said, “because I didn’t name him Sayed.” (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

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METRO Briefly Continued from page 3.

Mustaches for Kids supports childrenfocused charities.

Mustaches for KidsPittsburgh will kick off its “2011 Growing Season.” The hairy four-week endeavor will use the power of the mustache to positively impact youth in the Pittsburgh area. The month long growing season runs from March 1 to April 2, concluding with the “‘Stache Bash” celebration. Mustaches for Kids Chapters have been raising money for children’s organizations nationally since 1999. Beginning March, volunteers across the Pittsburgh area will grow mustaches following carefully articulated grooming guidelines while soliciting donations from friends, family and people in the community. Pittsburgh Public Schools and Congregation Beth Shalom are sponsoring the growing season. The Pittsburgh Chapter is looking for “growers” and supporters to participate in the challenge. Mustaches for Kids is a volunteer-run organization established to improve our local communities and have fun by growing mustaches for children's charities. Since its beginnings, Mustaches for Kids chapters have spread across the continent. Through the years, Mustaches for Kids has enlisted the efforts of thousands of growers and supporters who, collectively, raised over $1 million for children-focused charities. Contact Mustaches for Kids Pittsburgh at m4kpittsburgh.org or m4kpittsburgh@gmail.com for more information. Rodef Shalom Congregation is one of 20 North American Reform congregations to receive an incubator grant from the Union for Reform Judaism. The Rodef Shalom grant will be used to establish “The Edible Garden at Rodef Shalom” — a container garden consisting of edible vegetables, plants, fruits and nuts — that will be planted, tended to, and harvested on the Deaktor Terrace. In addition, a Jewish education program for preschoolers, religious school children and congregants along with a composting program will complement the garden. The garden is intended to exemplify the Jewish value of healthy, sustainable food choices, and strengthen the traditional Jewish connection between food and social responsibility. The education and activities will engage all generations and utilize master gardeners within their membership. Susan Melnick, archivist for the Rauh Jewish Archives of the Heinz History Center, will be the next speaker

at NA’AMAT Lunch and Learn, Wednesday, Feb. 23, noon at the Labor Zionist Building, 6328 Forbes Ave. Melnick’s work involves the preservation of library and archival materials in various capacities. She also is the project coordinator for the Fred Rogers Project of the University of Pittsburgh Library System, in which 400 of Rogers’ tapes are indexed and cataloged. The meeting is open to the public. Call NA’AMAT at (412) 521-5253 for more information. Philip Rosenthal, a veteran of the high-tech industry with a career in law enforcement and investigating high-tech crimes, will speak at the Jewish Community Center Sunday, Feb. 20, at 7 p.m. The program for parents will focus on how children and adults can handle new technological issues — cyber bullying, cell phones, texting. Rosenthal is the director of the nonprofit charity TechAware, which teaches appropriate uses of such technologies. The program is presented by the Agency for Jewish Learning in collaboration with Community Day School, Hillel Academy and Yeshiva Schools. There is a charge. Call Carolyn Linder at (412) 5211101 Ext. 3104 for more information. Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish, a physician and peace activist whose three daughters were killed during the fighting in Gaza, will be speaking about his new book, “I Shall not Hate: A Gaza Doctor’s Journey on the Road to Peace and Human Dignity,” Wednesday, March 2, 7 to 9 p.m. at the Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. J Street Pittsburgh is organizing the event. Pittsburgh Area Jewish Committee is sponsoring the Christian–Jewish Dialogue Thursday, March 3, noon, at the Church of the Redeemer (next to St. Edmunds Academy), 5700 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. Use the Darlington Road entrance. The topic will be “Self-Defense and Just War.” The dialogue is free and open to the public. The monthly conveners are Rabbi Jamie Gibson, Father Dan Valentine, Rabbi Michael Werbow and Pastor Larry Kemp. Contact the PAJC of at (412) 605-0816 or at pajc@pajc.net for more information. The Jewish Law Student Associations at the University of Pittsburgh and Duquesne University, the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh’s Cardozo Society and J’Burgh will present a Q&A panel and networking event called “How Do I Incorporate Judaism in my Legal Practice,” Tuesday, Feb. 22, 5:30 p.m., at Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC, One Oxford Center, 20th Floor, Downtown. Dinner will be provided. Contact Sara Heal at sarah@hilleljuc.org or (412) 621-8875 Ext. 108 for more information. Chabad of Carnegie Mellon University hosts a monthly “Theme Shabbat” dinner with a menu and décor to fit each theme. This Shabbat the theme is Middle Eastern. “We are going all out with this theme,” Sam Benkel, theme Shabbat chair of the Chabad of CMU student board, said in a prepared statement. “Chabad of CMU will be decorated to feel like a Bedouin tent and the food will include falafel, pita, lots of hummus and even some baklava for dessert.” Due to limited space, this program is open to CMU students only. Visit Chabad of CMU’s website, chabadofcmu.com or e-mail rabbi@chabadofcmu.com for more information.


6 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011

Opinion

The Jewish Chronicle

Trains, windmills = security

Barbara Befferman, CEO EDITORIAL STAFF Lee Chottiner, Executive Editor Justin Jacobs, Associate Editor Angela Leibowicz, Community Editor Toby Tabachnick, Staff Writer SALES STAFF Susie Mangel, Senior Sales Associate Roberta Letwin, Sales Associate PRODUCTION STAFF Dawn Wanninger, Production Manager Nancy Bishop Production Artist BUSINESS STAFF Jennifer Barill, Comptroller Josh Reisner, Office Manager Donna Mink, Classified & Subscriptions Marcy Kronzek, Receptionist BOARD OF TRUSTEES Davida Fromm, President Richard Kitay, Vice President Cindy Goodman-Leib, Secretary Lou Weiss, Treasurer Lynn Cullen, Past President Carolyn Hess Abraham Brian Balk Daniel Berkowitz Stephen Fienberg Malke Steinfeld Frank Stanley Greenfield David Grubman Thomas Hollander Larry Honig Evan Indianer David Levine Judy Palkovitz Amy W. Platt Jane Rollman Benjamin Rosenthal Dodie Roskies Charles Saul Andrew Schaer Ilana Schwarcz Jonathan Wander Published every Thursday by the Pittsburgh Jewish Publication and Education Foundation 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Flr. , Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Phone: 412-687-1000 FAX: 412-521-0154 E-Mail: newsdesk@thejewishchronicle.net SUBSCRIPTION: $44 in Pennsylvania $46 East of the Mississippi $48 West of the Mississippi and FL NEWSSTAND PRICE $1.50 PER COPY POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE JEWISH CHRONICLE, 5915 BEACON ST., 3RD, FLR., PITTSBURGH, PA 15217 (PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS TO JEWISH TELEGRAPHIC AGENCY AND FEATURE SERVICE) USPS 582-740 Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to the Jewish Chronicle become the property of this publication, which is not responsible for the return or loss of such items. The Chronicle does not endorse the goods or services advertised in its pages and makes no representation to the kashrut of food products and services in said advertising. The publisher is not liable for damages if, for any reason whatsoever, he fails to publish an advertisement or for any error in an advertisement. Acceptance of advertisers and of ad copy is subject to the publisher’s approval. The Chronicle is not responsible if ads violate applicable laws and the advertiser will indemnify, hold harmless and defend the Chronicle from all claims made by governmental agencies and consumers for any reason based on ads appearing in the Chronicle.

t’s hard to find a U.S. senator with less vision for the future than Mitch McConnell. In his mania to slash federal spending, which we admit is an ominous problem, the Kentucky Republican and Senate Minority Leader seems willing to risk not only our economic recovery, but also our national security. When the president sent his $3.7 trillion budget for 2011 to Capitol Hill this week, McConnell greeted it with this statement: “The president’s budget is the clearest sign yet he simply does not take our fiscal problems seriously. It is a patronizing plan that says to the American people that their concerns are not his concerns. It’s a plan that says fulfilling the president’s vision of a future of trains and windmills is more important than a balanced checkbook.” Darn right those trains and windmills are more important. So are the one million electric cars the president wants on the road by 2015. Not only do they represent new industries, and new jobs to replace the ones corporate America has outsourced overseas, but they represent something more

I

important in an increasingly hostile world: national security. Sixty percent of the oil used by the United States is imported, and that figure will only continue to rise. To put that in perspective, 30 years ago, this country imported 28 percent. As former President George W. Bush said — rightly — America is “addicted” to oil. The problem with that addiction is the sources that supply our habit. While the United States imports oil from around the world (Canada is our biggest exporter), too many of the top 15 chief exporting nations are politically unstable, anti-American or anti-Israel. We’re talking about Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, Kuwait and Algeria, to name a few. Meanwhile, most of the proven oil reserves in the world today are located in the Middle East — an estimated 727 billion barrels — which far outstrips anywhere else in the world. The known reserves in Central and South America are an estimated 99 billion barrels; Africa an estimated 87 billion barrels; the former Soviet Union, an estimated 78 billion barrels; western Europe and China, an estimated 18 billion barrels each; Mexi-

co, an estimated 16 billion barrels and India an estimated 5 billion barrels. Like it or not, we’re putting all our chips on the Middle East to supply our oil fix going forward. What might these regimes — or future regimes — demand in return? Reducing U.S. support for Israel? Who can read the tealeaves? Some propose that America begin an aggressive offshore drilling program to reduce its oil dependency; we won’t use last year’s BP spill in the Gulf of Mexico as a scare tactic; let’s assume that was a one-time thing. But we will note that oil companies are finding it necessary to go further off the U.S. coast to find oil, as far as 250 miles, and to drill more than one mile into the ocean floor. That will add considerably to the cost of extraction. Believe it or not, we’re not anti-oil. It will have a place in any future U.S. energy policy. But its consequences for security are great. Israel already recognizes this, which explains its huge investment in high-speed rail and electric vehicle infrastructure. America must not mortgage its future to balance its budget. For the sake of our kids, we cannot fall behind.

Greece, Israel draw closer following Turkey spat Jay bushinsky

JERUSALEM — Moving quickly to fill the diplomatic and economic vacuum created by the deterioration of relations between Turkey and Israel, a new regional partnership is being formed by Israel and Greece. With Cyprus as a catalyst for rapprochement and wide-ranging cooperation, the ultimate goal is a new multinational bloc that could include Bulgaria and Albania. The University of Piraeus’ Professor Aristotle Tziampiris described the new links between Athens and Jerusalem as an informal alliance that “has the potential to bring Israel closer to Europe and act as a source of regional stability.” Eventually, he told a recent academic gathering at Bar-Ilan University near Tel Aviv, Greece could help reduce tension that was spawned by Israel’s airborne operation last May against ships that set sail from Turkey to run the Israeli blockade of the Gaza Strip. Nine Turkish passengers aboard the Comoros-flageed Mavi Marmara were killed in clashes with Israeli commandos. While it may seem surprising that Athens could play a constructive role in mollifying the Turks, Tziampiris said, it should be borne in mind that “Athens maintains good relations with Ankara. ... The elimination of all strained regional

relations is ultimately in its (Greece) best interest.” The newly upgraded contacts between Greece and Israel already have produced tangible results. Trade between the two countries totaled $500 million this past year and is increasing. The Israelis export computer software as well as electronic and medical equipment; the Greeks, raw materials and agricultural products. In addition, Israeli tourism to Greece has increased by 50 percent in the same time frame. This upsurge came in the wake of Prime Minister George Papandreou’s official visit to Jerusalem and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s reciprocal visit to Athens. Netanyahu’s trip, which took place last August, marked the first time an Israeli prime minister was hosted officially in the Greek capital. There also has been a little publicized, but significant meeting in Athens between leaders of the American-Jewish community and Greek government officials. Israel’s foreign ministry spokesman, Yigal Palmor, quoted members of Greece’s resident Jewish community as saying their status in Greek society has been enhanced by the current diplomatic initiatives. He said Israel’s foreign ministry’s staff has been seeking ways to further expand and improve relations. Long-range Greek interest in Israel’s natural gas is a major, if not dominant, catalyst in the ongoing rapprochement. With the main impetus evidently coming from Cyprus, which would be one of the projected recipients, experts from all three countries have been preparing blueprints for these underwater conduits. They could link Israel’s Leviathian natural gas field to Crete as well as

Cyprus. From the strategic standpoint, this could be a “game changer,” Tziampiris said. “It certainly would alter Israel’s position vis-a-vis Europe and lessen the continent’s energy dependence on Russia (especially significant now, since the Nabucco gas pipeline project appears problematic). Tziampiris cited several concrete steps taken by Greece in the spirit of the new relationship with Israel. Referring to the forest fire that devastated the Carmel Mountain Range near Haifa two months ago, he recalled that Greece mounted a 70-member rescue operation of pilots, firefighters and several planes. Routinely, the Greek and Israeli air forces and navies have conducted joint exercises in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. The United States evidently is favorably disposed to the positive turn in Greco-Israeli relations and has been nurturing it. This is a reflection of its having won strong congressional support. One of the potential impediments to a genuine rapprochement is the degree that anti-Semitism persists within Greece’s body politic. However, Tziampiris contends that it is limited to “the far left and far right” while the overwhelming majority of Greece’s population is immune to it. He noted that a Greek Orthodox archbishop was recently chastised publicly for derogatory comments regarding Jews. There is a significant historical precedent for the positive trend in Greco-Israeli relations. Greece’s initial entry to the Holy Land under the command of Alexander the Great had a major cultural impact on the Kingdom of Judea, which he conquered 2,300 years ago. It Please see Bushinsky, page 23.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011 — 7

OPINION

Middle East ripe for democracy? Probably not Guest Columnist STUART PAVILACK I have been following the political unrest in Tunisia and Egypt for several weeks — with eyes wide open, hopeful and cautious. There are a lot of influ-

ences in play; some unsolicited, some missing in action; some good, some bad. No one disputes the repressive regimes and the intolerable conditions Arabs have been forced to live under for decades, if not centuries. The civilized world certainly wants a better way of life for them, but what makes this point in time such a ripe opportunity? One major influence may be U.S. foreign policy or the lack thereof. Is it because our administration is Please see Pavilack, page 9.


8 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011

OPINION

American Jews must regain their focus on Middle East Guest Columnist JENNIFER LASZLO MIZRAHI WASHINGTON — The rapid changes in the Middle East are leading many in the American Jewish community to suffer from analysis paralysis. We have become so mesmerized by events in Cairo that we have stopped doing vitally important work to advance American interests and stability in the Middle East, as well as Israel’s security. It is critical that we refocus our energies on what American leaders and citizens can do now: • Continue to work with our allies to expand and enforce sanctions against Iran, the largest state sponsor of terror. Tehran is broadening its influence in Latin America and increasing its massive investment in public relations in the United States. Its PR machine includes Iran’s 24/7 cable channel, PRESSTV, which broadcasts in English and Spanish to win the hearts and minds for the Islamic Republic, undermine U.S. interests in the Middle East and challenge Israel’s legitimacy. • Ensure that any new Egyptian government honors its peace treaty with Israel and continues its efforts to stop the smuggling of weapons into Gaza. Last year, terrorists in Gaza fired 238 rockets and missiles at Israeli towns,

despite the fact that there are no Is- support for a unilateral declaration of raeli settlers or settlements in Gaza. a Palestinian state and have parts of The failure to halt weapons smuggling Jerusalem (including the Western will lead to more unacceptable attacks Wall) declared an illegal settlement. on Israeli civilians. Nobody wants to They would like to isolate Israel at the see a repeat of Operation Cast Lead, U.N. General Assembly meeting in but no country can tolerate unpro- September. The Israeli government voked attacks on its civilians indefi- froze settlement building in the West Bank for 10 months and is promoting nitely. • Let America’s Palestinian and Palestinian economic development. The PalesArab allies tinian Auknow that t h o r i t y they should should recstop teaching ...we in the American Jewish community ognize Istheir citizens, rael as a deand especially committed to peace and security in the mocratic their children, Middle East cannot merely be spectahomeland to hate Jews tors to events in that region. for the Jewand Israel. ish people U.S. tax monand engage ey should not in serious go to leaders peace talks and entities that name streets, squares and public with Israel now. • Devise a solution to Jerusalem that buildings after terrorists, or who deliberately leave Israel off textbook will bring lasting peace and does not maps. Arabs need jobs, not jihad; slice the city in half as if it were a pizza. Israeli and Palestinian relations are very hope, not hate. • Veto Palestinian efforts in the complicated, with shared power, water United Nations to bypass Israel to cre- and security issues affecting both sides. ate a Palestinian state. The Israeli gov- Palestinians living in eastern Jerusalem ernment supports a two-state solution enjoy freedom of religion, speech and and is ready to continue peace negoti- the right to vote in municipal elections. ations to achieve it. However, even Israel is ready to work toward a twomoderate Palestinian leaders are re- state solution in which the people of all fusing to negotiate and are denying the religions — Christians, Muslims and concessions that the recently leaked Jews — continue to have the same access documents from WikiLeaks showed to all the holy sites in Jerusalem that they might be willing to make. Pales- they have now. • Reduce dependency on foreign oil. tinian leaders are seeking to garner

The turmoil in the Arab world again underscores America’s dependency on Middle East oil, which threatens vital U.S. national interests. Robbie Diamond of SAFE and Gal Luft of the Institute for the Analysis of Global Security are among those whose practical ideas about flex fuels and electric cars deserve serious consideration. Israel is at the forefront of the push for alternative energy, and joint U.S.-Israeli energy projects should be expanded. • Maintain aid to Israel, America’s most reliable ally in the Middle East. This issue is being considered now in Congress. Poll numbers consistently indicate that most Americans view a strong U.S.-Israel relationship as vital to American interests and want the United States to continue to stand with Israel. The changes unfolding in Egypt before our eyes are historic and dramatic. Yet we in the American Jewish community committed to peace and security in the Middle East cannot merely be spectators to events in that region. We also must address these important issues decisively and proactively. Of course, America can’t do this alone. We need strong allies and partners with us in this effort. If not now, when? (Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi is the founder and president of The Israel Project, a nonprofit organization that provides facts about Israel and the Middle East to press, policymakers and the public.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011 — 9

OPINION Pavilack: Continued from page 7. inexperienced or naïve? Or are there other agendas? This much is true. In trying to put a new face on America and its standing in the world with our enemies and others unhappy with the United States, President Barack Obama has said he would engage our enemies but not tell them what to do. He certainly has no problem telling U.S. allies what to do. In a very short time, his policies have alienated our allies and emboldened our enemies. He welshed on a previous commitment to put in a nuclear shield in Eastern Europe, gave Russia previously unknown and secret information on the size of Great Britain’s nuclear arsenal, our oldest and most powerful ally, and constantly pressures Israel in negotiations with the Palestinian Authority What has the PA done for our security or economy lately?. In 2009 as the Iranian public demonstrated against an oppressive anti-American regime, Obama largely said nothing, claiming the United States should not meddle in their affairs. But when the Egyptians demonstrated against the Mubarak regime, a long-standing American ally, he intervened quickly and pow-

erfully by publicly and regularly calling for Mubarak to step down. Obama never called for the enemy regime of Ahmadinejad to step down even though he called for the destruction of the United States and Israel. Citizens of the United States and Western countries have long since equated elections with democracy, but that is not often the case. We have seen that time and time again in Russia, Afghanistan, Iraq, Lebanon and Gaza. It takes a people who are committed to democracy. Secretary of State Hilary Clinton has said, “the Egyptian people are looking for an orderly transition that can lead to free and fair elections ... we learned that the Muslim Brotherhood has decided to participate, which suggests that they, at least, are now involved in the dialogue that we have encouraged.” But Palestinian Media Watch has translated the book “Jihad is the Way” by Mustafa Mashhur, who was the official leader of the Muslim Brotherhood from 1996 to 2002. Mashhur explains the fundamental concepts of the Muslim Brotherhood ideology. His teachings encompass subjects such as the Muslim Brotherhood’s goal of establishing an Islamic state, world domination under Islam, the public and personal religious duty of mili-

tary Jihad, and the warning not to rush to Jihad until it is prepared and timed for maximum benefit. Daniel Pipes, director of Middle East Forum has said, “Islamists wish to repeat their success in Iran by exporting popular unrest to take power.” So let’s take a look at the Egyptian people. According to a 2010 research poll: • 60 percent of those surveyed have fundamentalist views; • 85 percent view Islam’s influences on politics as positive; • 50 percent view the United States as an enemy; • 92 percent view Israel as an enemy nation; • 84 percent believe those who forsake Islam should face the death penalty; • 77 percent say thieves should have their hands cut off; • 54 percent believe men and women should be segregated in the workplace; • 70 percent support Iran getting a nuclear bomb; • 80 percent favor abrogating the Camp David accords with Israel; • 20 percent support suicide bombing; This is a people that a couple of months ago were slaughtering Christians. Sound to you like a people wanting democracy?

Israel’s “peace partner” would probably love to see the Brotherhood in control of Egypt. On Jan. 24, Palestinian President Abbas is quoted, “I have said more than once that if the Arabs want war [with Israel], we are with them. I cannot fight alone. We tried military action during the Second Intifada and during the attack on Gaza at the end of 2008 ... and it brought destruction upon us.” As Americans, as Jews, and as people of faith, we all would like to see oppression reduced, liberties instilled and economic conditions for people of the Arab world improved. Is today some miraculous window of opportunity? I think not. Will it happen in five, 10 or 20 years? Who knows? As much as things change, they remain the same. A thousand plus years of hatred won’t disappear overnight. One thing is sure: the Jewish people won’t be on the sideline. If and when there might be a two state solution, we just want to make sure one of those states is Israel.

(Stuart V. Pavilack is executive director of the Zionist Organization of America-Pittsburgh District.)


10 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011

Globe ‘A new future’ With Egypt in turmoil, Israel rethinks readiness for multi-front war BY LESLIE SUSSER JTA

JERUSALEM — Although it’s still far from clear how the uprising in Egypt is going to play out, the volatility there is already raising questions in Israel about the Jewish state’s readiness for a war on several fronts. The optimistic view in Israel is that a wave of democracy will sweep the Middle East from Cairo to Tehran, making war in any form less likely. The pessimists — there are many here — see an ascendant Islamic radicalism taking hold in Egypt and elsewhere, thus compounding the military threats facing Israel. In the Israel Defense Forces, generals are planning for worst-case scenarios. In a series of farewell addresses this month, outgoing IDF Chief of Staff Gabi Ashkenazi offered a rare insight into how the Israeli military sees the emerging threats and what it is doing to meet them. Ashkenazi spoke of “tectonic changes” in the region, leading to gains for the Iranian-led radical axis at the expense of the region’s moderates. He pointed to the growing dominance of Hezbollah in Lebanon, the Islamist shift in Turkey and now the danger that Egypt, once the

Egypt’s military junta has more unknowns than knowns BY RON KAMPEAS JTA

country free to lurch toward the radicals. In Ashkenazi’s view, all this means that the IDF needs to prepare for a significant broadening of the spectrum of threats against Israel. Not only does the IDF have to be ready to fight a simultaneous war on several fronts, it must be able to wage very different kinds of warfare — from “low intensity” irregular conflict with terrorists, to classical conventional warfare against regular armies, to missile warfare against states or powerful non-state actors such as Hezbollah. Even though the threat of terrorist or missile attack might seem more imminent, IDF doctrine under Ashkenazi has put the emphasis on war between regular armies. “We must train for classic conventional warfare. It poses the biggest challenge, and from it we can make adaptations to other forms of warfare, but not vice versa,” Ashkenazi argued earlier this month at the 11th annual Herzliya Conference on national, regional and global strategic issues. “It would be a mistake to train for low-intensity conflict and to think that the army will be ready overnight to make the switch to fullscale warfare.” During Ashkenazi’s watch, which began in 2007 in the wake of the army’s much-criticized performance in the 2006 Second Lebanon War, the IDF focused on enhancing its already impressive accurate long-range firepower, rebuilding its neglected capacity for sweeping armored maneuvers, and honing coordination for joint ground, sea and air strikes. Training on all relevant parameters was increased by an estimated 200 percent. According to Ashkenazi, Israel’s “smart” guided missile firepower is at the cutting edge, and in some aspects the IDF may even be a world leader — for example, in its ability to pinpoint targets in the heat of battle and bring lethal fire to bear within seconds. Despite the focus on conventional

WASHINGTON — One guy we know, and we’re pretty sure he’s not in charge. The other guy we don’t know so well, and it looks like he might be in charge. The other three guys — who knows? The five figures comprising Egypt’s Supreme Military Council are commanding the rapt attention of a world already transfixed by the unrest that last week unseated President Hosni Mubarak, Egypt’s autocratic leader for 30 years. They appeared on state television in a pose typical of the region’s leaders: sitting along a table, ramrod straight and inscrutable. They are now running the Egyptian show, although they have promised speedy elections to replace Mubarak and the parliament they dissolved. The Sphinx-like TV pose accrued a Sphinx-like riddle in the wake of the sudden transfer of power: Who exactly are they? Extraordinarily, the Egyptian sources routinely tapped by Westerners for inside information were responding to queries this week with a shrug emblematic of the degree of how much has changed in Egypt. They don’t seem to know much either. Ehud Ya’ari, an Arab affairs expert with Israel’s Channel 2, said it was because Mubarak for years had played his cards close to his vest. He and a small circle of advisers were the only interlocutors with Israel and the West. “We have a big problem here: We don’t know the Egyptian army,” Ya’ari told a conference call convened by the Jewish Federations of North America. “The Egyptian army was kept by Mubarak outside all dealing with Israel except for liaison officers in the Sinai. Israelis do not know the Egyptian generals who now form what I would describe as a military junta.” For the record they are Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, the defense minister; Lt. Gen. Sami Hafez Enan, the military chief of staff; Vice Adm. Mohab Mamish, commander of the Navy; Air Marshal Rada Mahmoud Hafez Mohamed, commander of the Air Force; and Lt. Gen. Abd El Aziz Seif-Eideen, commander of the Air Defense. The two figures emerging as the ones to watch are Tantawi and Enan. They both are known to have served in wars against Israel, in 1967 and 1973. What they did, however, is hardly known, much less the stuff of legend. Mubarak, by contrast, made his name between those two wars when he resisted Soviet pressure, as Air Force commander, to run raids over the Sinai. That made his reputation as a man wise enough to pick his battles — one that served him well until his fruitless effort to resist calls to resign. Tantawi, who is in his mid-70s, already has been dubbed “Mubarak’s

Please see Turmoil, next page.

Please see Junta, next page.

Yotam From photo

Lt.-Gen. Gabi Ashkenazi, the outgoing chief of staff of the Israel Defense Forces, speaking at the Herzliya Conference about what the Israeli military is doing to meet emerging threats, Feb. 7.

linchpin of the moderate camp, will fall into the orbit of radical Islam. Things could get even worse, he said, when the Americans finally pull out of Iraq, leaving that Shiite-dominated


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011 — 11

GLOBE Turmoil: Continued from previous page. warfare, the IDF also developed specific capabilities for terrorist and missile warfare. This includes a four-layered anti-missile defense system starting with the Arrow missile, which is capable of intercepting long-range missiles at altitudes of above 50 miles, to the Iron Dome system for shooting down low-flying, short-range rockets. In any future missile war against Hezbollah in Lebanon, Ashkenazi says the IDF will apply conventional warfare skills, committing ground forces to attack the enemy in its embedded positions and considerably shortening the duration of the conflict. Perhaps the most dramatic stride forward made by the IDF over the past few years is in field intelligence. If in 2006, its “bank” of targets in Lebanon numbered approximately 200, today the figure is in the thousands. Ashkenazi insists that firepower is meaningless unless there are targets of high military value. All this adds up to a military doctrine that is likely to give the IDF the capacity to wage different kinds of warfare simultaneously on several fronts: the socalled Revolution in Military Affairs, or RMA. Israel sees an edge here over potential foes: While Israel has inculcated this sophisticated, real-time interoperation of accurate long-range firepower, high-grade intelligence, command and control, and joint forces operations, its potential adversaries have not. For comparison, the largely American-equipped and-trained Egyptian army — with some 700,000 troops

(450,000 in the standing army and about 250,000 reserves), 12 ground force divisions, and approximately 3,400 tanks and 500 fighter planes — is considered by far the strongest in the Arab world. Some of the equipment is state of the art: Egypt has about 1,000 Abrams M1 tanks and just over 200 F-16 fighters. But the Egyptians have not even begun to incorporate RMA. “RMA requires a great deal of training of a very special kind,” Yiftah Shapir, director of the Military Balance Project at the Tel Aviv-based Institute for National Security Studies, told JTA. “In my view there are just two armies who have these capabilities at the highest level: the U.S. Army and the IDF. And simply buying the platforms does not give this kind of capability.” Indeed, largely because of the RMA disparity, Shapir says that in the event of war between Israel and Egypt, he would expect a result similar to that achieved by the American army in Iraq in 2003. “The American army in Iraq was not any bigger than Israel’s standing army. They had only three divisions, one of which came late,” Shapir said. “True, their air force was much bigger, but it was mainly because of the advantages of RMA that they defeated an army of 21 divisions in two weeks. I would expect the IDF to achieve a similar result, perhaps not quite so easily or with so few casualties.” To launch a ground war against Israel, Egypt would have to order the American-led multinational peacekeeping force out of Sinai, the huge buffer zone between the two countries. That’s something a new regime would be unlikely to undertake lightly.

Junta: Continued from previous page. poodle,” although this might derive simply from his having served in the outgoing government. He is, in any case, a known quantity. “We know a lot more about Tantawi than Enan in terms of roles they played in the former regime and this regime,” said J. Scott Carpenter, the deputy assistant secretary of state in the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs from 2004 to 2007 and now a senior fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. What is known about Tantawi suggests that he is not in control, although he is nominally the most senior officer on the council. “The officers, from a number of generals and colonels on down, don’t hold him in high regard,” Carpenter said. Tantawi, trained by the Soviets, is seen as the old guard by a younger generation of officers trained by the United States to be forward thinking, according to Joel Rubin, an analyst with the National Security Network who during the last Bush administration headed the State Department’s Egypt desk. “He’s perceived as a yes man to Mubarak — not charismatic, not someone perceived as leading a rebellion,” said Rubin, who also writes a political column for the Chronicle. Tantawi was visible but did not make himself known, Carpenter said. “I’ve only met him a couple of times,” he said, “and both times I have

been struck how he’s not dynamic, hard to converse with, not forthcoming — he doesn’t seem to get it.” Worse, he apparently had a tin ear when it came to cultivating loyalty. “He’s mishandled some of the relations he’s had with senior military officers, being late with salary payments, holiday bonuses,” Carpenter said. Rubin said Enan, believed to be between 64 and 68, had better relations with U.S. officials. He was the point man for military relations with the United States, meaning he handled the requests for equipment through the $1.3 billion in U.S. defense assistance Egypt gets annually — that is believed to comprise as much as 80 percent of the country’s materiel. Enan was in Washington on just such a consultation with his Pentagon counterparts when the protests erupted on Jan. 25. “He understands our culture, he’s someone who’s seen as responsible and responsive,” Rubin said. Carpenter said that was the impression he got from the Americans he spoke to, but he noted that outside of the interactions on defense assistance, not much else was known about Enan. “Our military perceives him as thoughtful and very active,” Carpenter said. “He was one of the people they were talking to during the runup” to Mubarak’s ouster, “when they thought there would be real violence.” One narrative, as related by Rubin, has it that Enan clashed with Egyptian Vice President Omar Suleiman over who controlled the transition. Under the Suleiman plan, Mubarak would have remained as a purely titular president.


12 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011

Style

Let the sunshine in Let the sunshine in Let the sunshine in Let sunshine in Letthe the sunshine in ‘Hair’ launches a be-in

‘Iconic musical

at Heinz Hall

The Company of “Hair” National Tour

BY JUSTIN JACOBS Associate Editor

When “Hair” debuted off-Broadway in 1967, it was a musical that attempted to capture the social unrest of youth culture struggling to find its place in American society. Almost 45 years later, it serves much the same purpose. While the youth culture of 2011 might not be decked out in tie-dye and beads, the sexual, religious, and political issues that existed around the Summer of Love still make headlines today. The mix of those issues and iconic music is what drew in Josh Lamon, a former synagogue theater kid from San Diego. Playing Father in the PNC Broadway Across America tour of “Hair,” Lamon is performing in Pittsburgh this week at Heinz Hall. He answered some questions from the road last week about the importance of “Hair,” his first show and social revolution. Jewish Chronicle: How did you first get involved with theater? Josh Lamon: My mother took me to see plays at a very young age, and I just fell in love with theater and wanted to perform. I started doing some youth theater at a local community theater and

Photo by Joan Marcus

then got my first professional acting job in fifth grade performing in the musical “Gypsy.” JC: What do you remember about your first time onstage? JL: I don’t really remember my very first time onstage, but what I do know is every time I am onstage, I feel at home. JC: Do you feel your involvement in Jewish culture helped cultivate your love for music and theater in any way? How so? JL: I remember music, especially Jewish music, always being played in my childhood home. I also started performing with a Jewish junior theater company called “Show BIS,” or Beth Israel Students. We performed in original Jewish rock operas. It was a blast. JC: What is your dream part? JL: I don’t really have a dream role, per se. My dream is to work, doing what I love and performing in pieces that excite me intellectually. I love being a part of “Hair,” as I really care about the material and the message. It isn’t every day that you get to do a show that is so meaningful to you.

JC: “Hair” was a popular show decades ago. Why is it still relevant now? JL: It is very relevant now. I think people get surprised when they come see the show. We are still living in a world that is torn apart by conflict. Whether it’s religious, political or otherwise. This is a piece that shows that you can stand up for what you believe in, in a peaceful manner. You can be patriotic and protest what you disagree with. You can still disagree with your country and its politics, but that doesn’t mean you don’t love your country with all your heart. The show is about passion. It is about celebrating life. It is about love. JC: As a young person growing up in the 2000s, do you feel like your generation has the same restless spirit that’s captured in “Hair”? JL: Yes and no. I feel that many people of my generation and younger don’t fight enough for what they feel is right. On the other hand, look at Egypt. A younger generation started and won a revolution. JC: Has your experience in “Hair” changed how you feel about the power of

youth culture at all? JL: No, but it has reminded me how the people will always have the power, if we demand it. JC: Tell me about the vibe between the cast members. I imagine it’s a pretty fun show backstage. JL: It is a giant love fest! JC: What kind of audience digs “Hair”? Will more traditional people like it? JL: I think “Hair” is for everyone, no matter how you stand politically or socially. I hope everyone can come into the theater and be taken back to this very special time period. Let our hair down. And of course, come celebrate and dance with us onstage at the end of the show. Everyone is invited. (Justin Jacobs can be reached at justinj@thejewishchronicle.net.)

Want to go? “Hair” Feb. 17-20, times vary Heinz Hall (412) 456-6666 for more information


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011 — 13

STYLE

How to throw a Jewish Oscar party BY EDMON J. RODMAN JTA

LOS ANG E L E S (JTA) — With so many famous Jewish names among the A c a d e m y Awards nominees this year — Coen, Cohen, Eisenberg, Aronofsky, Sorkin and Newman, to name a few — it seems like a good time for a Jewish Oscar party. But how to make an Oscar party Jewish? I n c a s e someone like Joan Rivers asks what I’ll be wearing, I have my total Jewish designer outfit pressed and ready: Calvin Klein pants, Ralph Lauren shirt and Dov Charney (American Apparel) T-

shirt. But that’s not going to be nearly enough. Should there be a set order and ritual, like the seder? Or, like Purim, an evening filled with costumes, beauty pageants, shouting at bad guys and lots to drink? Do I need a red carpet or a blackand-white tallit? Clearly I needed help. Who ya gonna call? No, not Ghostbusters. Rabbi Sara Goodman, a Los Angeles chaplain, has been holding Oscar parties for almost 25 years, even through rabbinic school. “I can’t say that I am at my holiest during the party,” Goodman told JTA. “But I do see the show as a holy event,” she added with a note of melodrama. Her parties feature a nice buffet, and a friend brings Oscars ballots. And then there are the tableaus: Goodman makes sure her table is graced each year with a few thought-provoking, Oscar-related creations that keep her guests guessing. “One year I had a Koran on the table,” she recalls. “It was for the movie ‘Babel.’ ” Another year Goodman put out a Princess Diana mug, a royal collector’s spoon and a soap box with Buckingham Palace pictured on it. That was in 2007, when director Stephen Frears’ “The Queen” was nominated in three categories. Helen Mirren won the Best

Actress award. With Jewish actress Natalie Portman up for an award Feb. 27, I asked my special-effects friend Stuart Ziff for an idea for my table. Ziff worked in the first three “Star Wars” movies, and in 1982 he won a Technical Achievement Academy Award. He picked up the little-known industry honor, which is handed out at a special ceremony and dinner prior to the Oscars, for the “motion picture figure mover” — a device that was used to animate a puppet of ET in the famous scene when the extraterrestrial and Elliott ride a bicycle into the air in front of the moon. I was in the hands of a maker of movie magic. To honor Portman, who was nominated for Best Actress for her role in “Black Swan,” Ziff suggested a goose made of chopped liver. “Maybe we can figure out a way to make it move,” he said, again showing his award-winning chops. “Maybe it doesn’t need to move,” I responded, thinking the chopped liver sculpture could double as an hors d’oeuvres. Now that I had table art and food, what about the awards? The pre-show Oscar balloting, the heart of any real Oscar party, gives the guests a shot at voicing their opinions and picking the winners. Could I call them the Mazels? What would be my categories: Best Jewish actor who had

a bar mitzvah? Best actress who identifies as being Jewish? Best name variation of Cohen? Best screenplay with characters who are not stereotypically Jewish? Things were getting complicated, so I needed to consult with someone who could put things in perspective. I called my uncle, a Director’s Guild member who votes for the Academy Awards and has won an Emmy for Best Director. “I agonize over the process,” Alexander Singer said. In the Best Picture category, Singer said he was torn between “Inception,” which he loved for its inventiveness; “The Social Network,” for its great characters; and “The Kings Speech,” for great storytelling. How to decide? Change the ballot. On my rejiggered Jewish ballot, if I recast the category a bit, the answer became easy: Best movie featuring the portrayal of a character who had a bar mitzvah but now considers himself an atheist (so what’s new?), and though he invented a new form of social media seems coolly distant just like your crazy cousin who sits in front of the computer all day. The envelope please? (Edmon J. Rodman is a JTA columnist who writes on Jewish life from Los Angeles. He sees the Hollywood sign every morning as he walks out the door to get the paper.)


14 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2010

STYLE

‘Anya’s War’ a coming-of-age book for teens Book R eview

to America and study medicine, but she is afraid to tell her mother. Midway through the book, Anya finds an abandoned baby girl in the streets — an unfortunate common occurrence in Chinese society at that time. Fearing for its life, she makes a rash decision to bring the baby home, which will have unforeseen consequences later in the book. The Rosen family’s housemaid, Li Mei, only a few years older than Anya, plays a pivotal role in Anya’s daily life and helps her deal with Kisa (the name Anya gives to the foundling baby).

BY HILARY DANINHIRSCH Chronicle Correspondent

“Anya’s War,” by Andrea Alban, a captivating middle grade novel, centers upon a little known chapter in history — the arrival of Jewish refugees in China in the years preceding and during World War II. Fourteen-year-old Anya Rosen, her brother Georgi, her parents, and her grandparents, the feisty Babushka and the quiet Dedushka, are living in the French Quarter of Shanghai in 1937. Shanghai was considered to be a safe haven for Jews, though the city was occupied by the Japanese. The family had left their life of privilege in Odessa, Russia, due to threats by Stalin’s secret police. While the family still held fast to its Jewish traditions, having regular Shabbat dinners, for example, they were aware that they must blend their Russian-Jewish culture with Chinese

Book Review “Anya’s War,” by Andrea Alban, Feiwel and Friends (an imprint of MacMillan) 2011, 190 pages.

Even though the family feels that they are safe in China, a terrifying scene in the latter part of the book changes everyone’s perspective. For middle-graders and above, this is a coming-of-age book worth reading. Not only is the storyline original and insightful, but the author accurately and perceptively delves into the heart of a young Jewish girl. (Hilary Daninhirsch can be reached at hilarysd@comcast.net.)

JCC routs NUP; moves on to GPIBL semis culture in order to be comfortable in their temporary country. Anya struggles with typical teenage issues — she has crushes on boys, she worries about party invitations, she fights with her brother, she holds back secrets from her parents. She’s also obsessed with Amelia Earhart’s disappearance. But Anya is living in atypical times in a country not her own, forcing her to endure unusual situations and make difficult choices. Anya’s mother, who was a famous opera singer in Odessa, is priming Anya to follow in her footsteps. Anya, however, has bigger dreams: She wants to go

BY ZACHARY WEISS Chronicle Correspondent

JCC defeated Northside Urban Pathways (NUP) 62-18 Tuesday in the first round of the Greater Pittsburgh Independent Basketball League Playoffs. “We did the same thing tonight that we’ve been teaching all season. It took us all season to get to this point,” JCC Head Coach Andy Pakler said. “The biggest preparation that we had was the season leading up to this, and mentally we were in the right mindset.” Ben Katz led the JCC in scoring with 18 points. Teammate Jesse Goleman nailed 15. NUP’s leading scorer had four. “We’ve been looking for this all season from Ben, and finally, he’s healthy and he’s back,” Pakler said. “There’s no way that we can move forward doing anything without Ben. We need Ben.” JCC staked itself to a nine-point lead by the end of the first quarter and never looked back.

It added on in the second quarter as Jake Berntsen scored six of his seven points, using a combination of lay-ups and free throws. The JCC led 28-7 at the half. The JCC quickly silenced any chance at a comeback in the third quarter, scoring the first six points of the period and taking a 34-7 lead. Goleman scored eight in the quarter as JCC went up 55-16. JCC played its reserves in the final quarter, and outscored NUP in the quarter 6-2. With the win, the JCC improved its record to 14-4. Its next matchup will be Monday, Feb. 21, 7 p.m. at the JCC gym against Pittsburgh Project, a team that has defeated the JCC in both of their previous meetings. The winner will move on to the GPIBL finals. (Zachary Weiss can be reached at yngzc@yahoo.com.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011— 15

Simchas Engagements

Hanniford/Sloan: Martin and Linda Sloan of Mt. Lebanon announce the engagement of their son, Eric Sloan, to Laurie Hanniford, daughter of Neil and Sarah Hanniford of Carlisle, Pa. Laurie’s grandparents are James and the late Mary Greenbaum of Kittanning and June Hanniford of Carlisle and the late George Hanniford. Eric’s grandparents are Robert and Susan Wolf of Pittsburgh and Maryce Sloan of Chicago and the late Howard Sloan. Laurie and Eric graduated from Allegheny College. Laurie earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology and is a mental health therapist for UPMC. Eric earned a bachelor’s degree in economics and Spanish and is with BNYMellon in Pittsburgh. A May wedding in Carlisle is planned.

Births

B’nai Mitzva

Goldstein: Eric and Shannon Goldstein of Bridgeville announce the birth of their son, Zakary Bennett, Jan. 12. Grandparents are Mark and Sheila Grenadier of Mt. Lebanon and Allan and Karen Goldstein of Sewickley Heights and Highland Beach, Fla. Great-grandparents are Anne Grenadier of Parkland, Fla., Aaron Rovinsky of Scottsdale, Ariz., and the late Bernard Grenadier, Bess Rovinsky, Sidney and Gertrude Goldstein and Leonard and Edna Kane. Zakary Bennett is named in loving memory of his great-grandfathers, Zelig (Sidney) Goldstein; and Bernard Grenadier.

Gabriel Brodsky, son of Jeff Brodsky and Nancy Knowles, will become a bar mitzva Saturday, Feb. 19, at Rodef Shalom Congregation. Grandparents are Merwyn and Renee Brodsky, Alice Macy and the late Jim Knowles.

Leffel: Ryan and Jessica Falango Leffel of Nutley, N.J., announce the birth of their son, Liam Jake, Aug. 5, 2010. Grandparents are Marsha and Dick Leffel of Monroeville and Anne Marie and Jim Falango of Medford, N.Y. Great-grandparents are the late Bette and Bernie Goodman, the late Virginia and Irving Leffel, Jennie Rabinovich of Port St. Lucie, Fla., the late James Falango, and the late Mabel and Carmine Bongiorno. Liam is the brother of Mia Blake. Liam is named in loving memory of his paternal great-grandfather, Irving Leffel; and his maternal great-grandfather, James Falango. Timmerman: Deborah Levine and Christopher Timmerman of Providence, R.I., announce the birth of their son, Ezra Harry Timmerman (Ezra Chaim), Jan. 29. Grandparents are Sandra Beck Levine, Max Levine and Hilary Spatz, all of Pittsburgh and Barbara and Douglas Timmerman of Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Great-grandmothers are Mildred Levine and Phyllis Spatz. Ezra is named in loving memory of his great-grandfathers, ER Lund; and Harry Levine.

Hartman/Sheinberg: James Snyder Sheinberg and Kelley Lorene Hartman announce their engagement. Jim’s parents are Sorley Sheinberg of Pittsburgh and Marco Island, Fla., and the late Herbert Sheinberg. Kelley’s parents are Carole Hartman of Greensburg and Ft. Myers, Fla., and the late J. Wiley Hartman. A fall wedding is planned.

Walfish: Naftoli and Yael Walfish of Passaic, N.J., announce the birth of their daughter, Zehava Lily, Nov. 4, 2010. Grandparents are Abraham and Shirley Walfish of Monsey, N.Y., and Rabbi David and Naama Lazar of Pittsburgh. Great-grandmother is Tmima Bar-Ilan of Rehovot, Israel. Big brothers and sister are Ari, Nechemya, Moshe Eliyahu and Tehilla Channa. Zehava is named in loving memory of her maternal great-grandmother.

Rabbi Mordecai Rosenberg Certified Mohel (412) 521-4637

VISIT OUR WEB SITE thejewishchronicle.net

Jacob Andrew Hirshman, son of Julie and Jesse Hirshman, will become a bar mitzva Saturday, Feb. 19, at 10:30 a.m. at Temple Sinai. Grandparents are Rita and Jules Hirshman, the late Florence and Felix Oppenheimer and the late Irwin Kramer.


16 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011

Community A

Restoration at Riverview Towers n June 25, 2010, a water line break soaked the first floor of Squirrel Hill’s Riverview Towers, buckling walls and floors and destroying the senior community’s beauty salon. During a ribbon-cutting ceremony Feb. 7, a new fitness room was revealed. Thanks to the Nord family of Pittsburgh, topof-the-line fitness equipment, and a fitness center designed with seniors in mind, sits where soggy carpets once were. A new beauty salon was also built on the first floor and new carpets have been installed.

O

C L O S E R

Rabbi installed

Creative together

Rabbi Jonathan Perlman was installed as rabbi of New Light Congregation in Squirrel Hill, Sunday, Jan. 23. As part of the program, he put on his tallit, assisted by Dassi Sklan, a member of the congregation.

The Friendship Circle recently concluded a three-week Creative Arts Club in collaboration with the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Pittsburgh Glass Center and Pittsburgh Filmmakers. Friendship Circle participants enjoyed making glass mosaics, prints and animation. Pictured are Rebecca Spear, Jeremy Elias and Sophie Abo.

The Friendship Circle photo

New Light Congregation photo

The Chronicle Cooks This will put a vegetable on your table with very little effort. There are days when I am just too lazy to make a salad and dressing, so I always keep a few bags of broccoli in the freezer. My version is to throw this together at home without measuring, but below is Jamie Geller’s more elegant version from “Quick & Kosher Meals in Minutes.” I think I’ll actually try the whisking — sounds like a good idea.

L O O K

Riverview Towers photo

Pictured from left are Julie Nord Friedman, Stuart Nord and Kevin and Karen Nord.

BROCCOLI WITH LEMON DRESSING 1 pound frozen broccoli florets 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon sea salt 1/2 teaspoon cracked black pepper 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil Cook broccoli according to package instructions. While the broccoli is cooking, whisk together the lemon juice, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Slowly whisk in the oil. Place broccoli on a serving platter and drizzle dressing over top. COMPILED BY ANGELA LEIBOWICZ angelal@thejewishchronicle.net


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011 — 17

BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL CONCRETE

AUTO/TRUCK

$

BUYING AUTO$ & TRUCK$ CAR$ • TRUCK$ • VAN$ • $UV$

$

QUIT DRIVING - DEATH - WRECKS ANTIQUE$ • CLA$$IC$ • JUNKERS DENNY OFFSTEIN AUTO SALES 724-287-7771

dennyoffsteinusedcar@zoominter net.net AUTO/TRUCK

AWNINGS

LOOKING FOR USED & NEW AUTO & TRUCK PARTS?

ROTHMAN

AWSince N1921 I NG

(We Find Everything...Almost)

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Custom canvas awnings.

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Storage and service. Cash & Carry, Awnings

CLEANING

PAINTING

CONCRETE Eric Gerber

All types of concrete work and retaining walls 30 years experience

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-

Interior • Exterior • Residential • Commercial We specialize in Large Homes Quality Work • Free Estimates • Fully Insured

NORTH CITY

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CONTRACTING

MARK MALLEY CONTRACTING S P E C I A L I Z I N G IN DECORATIVE PLASTERING , PAINTING ALL CONSTRUCTION NEEDS

Since 1990 • Fully Insured

412-243-3820

Canvas Shopping Bags $3.95

KRAMERS CLEANING

Free estimates.

WE GET IT CLEAN FOR LESS GREEN

412-421-1133

Residential • Light Commercial Cleaning Services

MARTHA 412-452-1677

• House Cleaning • Carpet Cleaning • Wall Washing • Party Service • Windows • Move In/Move Out • Interior Painting • Spring Cleaning • Holiday Cleaning

General Cleaning / Wall Washing / Janitorial

MARIANNE Quality Cleaning Services Residential/Commercial SINCE 1975 Insured/Bonded

412-823-4797 724-861-9595 Call Now For A Free Estimate

Who Has Time? General house cleaning,

10% OFF 1st cleaning

wall washing, windows. Other services available.

724-797-1891 • 412-422-1100 Major credit cards accepted

CLEAN-UP/HAULING

DUMP TRUCK SERVICE

Commercial & Residential clean ups and debris removal

• $215 You Load • $255 Driver Helper • $295 We Load

412-734-5432 or 412-780-3898

ROOFING • SIDING • GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS CONCRETE • KITCHENS & BATHROOMS WINDOWS & DOORS • DECKS • FLOORING

Wallpaper Removal • Stucco Repair & Painting • Complete Wood Stripping & Refinishing Complete Waterproofing Services • Power Washing & Deck Cleaning • Masonry Cleaning Check us out at www.thepittsburghpaintingco.com

Home Improvement

CLEANING

412.824.3540

412-247-9467 • 412-243-3788 kramerconstruct@aol.com

for free estimates

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

KRAMER

CONSTRUCTION

Licensed, Bonded, Insured

COMPUTER

Plumbing • Electrical Windows • Decks • Kitchens Baths & Painting • Sr. Discount

ENTERTAINMENT

412-304-7725

CHUCK CAPUTO

“The King of Trickery” Blends professional

Magic/Ventriloquism • Birthdays/Gatherings

ELECTRICAL

Reasonable

NEED AN ELECTRICIAN? We arrive on time, prepared to start work. Insured, bonded, and uniformed and trained on the value of customer service, producing high quality work, and leaving your home neat and clean.

Call Mr. Electric 724-830-9979 www.mrelectric.com Electrical Services Residential Service Whole House plugs to panel box. Sr. discount 27 years experience 412-304-7725

412-825-0822 HANDYMAN

HANDYMAN NO JOB TOO SMALL or A “Honey, TO DO” List Call Dave at Maids & more

412-824-3540 HANDYMAN

Patch Work French Drains Tie Wall Trash Removal Reliable & Honest Work

Delivering honest and experienced computer services to your door. Max Hersch: 412-519-4176 Email: Info@PittsburghTCS.com Web: www.pittsburghtcs.com

The Jewish Chronicle on the web -- www.thejewishchronicle.net

MASONRY

HOME REPAIRS

T&H PAVING

INTERIOR - EXTERIOR CARPENTERY WORK PAINTING • DRY WALL WALL REPAIR REPAIR KITCHEN KITCHEN • BATH BATH • FLOORING FLOORING REPAIR REPAIR • TIE WALLS WALLS CONCRETE WORK VERSLOC VERSLOC WALLS WALLS CLEAN UP DEBRIS REMOVAL REMOVAL

LOW WINTER RATES

412-951-3437 Cement Concrete Asphalt Repair -driveways-foundations-steps-wallsInsured Free estimates No Deposits

412-734-5432 or 412-780-3898

Blacktop • Paving Concrete Work Landscaping Restoration Patching & Sealing Residential/Commercial Free Estimates

412-281-9860 1-800-641-9055 MASSAGE

MASSAGE SPECIAL Full Body Clean Back with Lufa Hot Rocks • Deep Tissue $

45 HOUR NEW CLIENTS 2 LOCATIONS SQ. HILL • S. HILLS, INDIAN SUMMER

412-422-5486 412-480-7607 412-207-8746

412-793-6260

ELECTRICAL

Marc Mendelson and Mendelson Electric, LLC are ready to help you with your residential and light commercial electrical contracting needs. From service calls to new electrical services - rewiring to recessed lights - renovations to changing fixtures - we would like to help you with your winter projects. Please contact us at mendelsonelectric@gmail.com or 412 521-7652 for an estimate or an appointment. PA ID 040523

SLOW/DEAD COMPUTER? Technological Consulting Services®

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME HEALTHCARE

CALL DONNA 412-687-1000 TO PLACE YOUR AD REAL ESTATE • CLASSIFIED • BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL

PAINTING

47 YEARS OF PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE! Interior/Exterior•Residential/Commercial

THE ORIGINAL

• FREE ESTIMATES • FULLY INSURED • REFERENCES

KRAFT PAINTING

BBB B+ Rating

Loving Kindness Healthcare Systems Allow us to provide care for you or your loved ones. 24 hour care/365 days a year “LOVING KINDNESS IS AT THE HEART OF WHAT WE DO!”

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LARGE HOUSES OUR SPECIALTY

155 N. Craig St. Suite 160 Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Wood and Stucco Repair • Large Home Restorations • Drywall, Wallcoverings, Plastering, Wood Refinishing Deck Cleaning and Waterproofing Services

412-578-9890 www.lkhscorp.com

originalkraftpainting.net

412-461-8114


18 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011

BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL JUNK REMOVAL

PAINTING

MIKE RODGERS PAINTING & WALLCOVERING TOP QUALITY INTERIOR & EXTERIOR • Skilled Professional Painters • Thorough Preparation • Victorian Restoration PGH 412-362-2555 C A L L East 412-856-5474

• Top Quality Materials • Neat Work • Fully Insured North 412-967-9198 South 412-343-4567

• • • •

Professional Painting Wallcovering Plaster Repair Wallpaper removal

FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED

412-664-4869

PAINTING

PLUMBING

PAINTING & POWERWASHING Stain and Polyurethane FOR FREE ESTIMATES

JIMMY COHEN PLUMBING & HEATING 24 HR. Emergency Service

AND REFERRALS

A Full Service Company • Water Heaters Installed

CALL

VINCENT

412-537-4405

412-421-2208

PLUMBING

POINTING

SAM BALES, INC.

R & R MASONRY

Plumbing, Heating &

General Contracting

Registered Licensed Insured

412-421-1575 or 412-884-7272

• • • • • •

Whole house/Partial pointing Chimney rebuilds/Pointing Brick replacement/Mortar matching Steel 1-beam/Lentil replacement High pressure cleaning stone/brick Local references/Insured

412.831.7074 w w w. r e b e r r e s t o r a t i o n . c o m

PAINTING

Steve Tierno

Painting & Wallpapering Residential & Commercial Interior/Exterior Fully Insured 412-351-3443

LIEBEL PAINTING Professional

Interior/Exterior Painting Wallpaper Removal Plaster Repair

Quality Workmanship, Fully Insured References. PA 013425

G&E PAINTING Interior/Exterior

Free Estimates Gary Ruben

412-421-4053 412-963-1198

412-672-5237 412-951-0013

Vince Marino

PLUMBING Basement Waterproofing French Drains Reg. Master Plumber Sewer Cleaning Water & Flood Restoration Call for free quote

SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING $80.00 FURNACE CHECK $35.00

CARPET CLEANING

•••

EMERGENCY SERVICE

412-225-0017 412-682-6733 REMODELING

MENASHE SHIMON INTERIOR REMODELING Kitchen • Bath Walls • Floors

r Fre OxiRemovleeaning c y

Plumbing & Electrical

412-537-6002

an 160 withover $

ROOFING

412-567-8333 FREE ESTIMATE OVER THE PHONE

$

68

Whole House Carpet Cleaning

$

168

Includes 6 Rooms

Upholstery Cleaning Special

35 All 3 Pieces $ Sofa 75 $ $ Loveseat 60 Chair

$

159

HAUSLER ROOFING

Arriving at homes the week of March 6th

DON’T MISS IT! Reserve your copy by sending your name, mailing address and e-mail address to

Since 1952

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No Hidden Fees

No Hidden Fees

No Hidden Fees

An $8 service charge will apply.

An $8 service charge will apply.

An $8 service charge will apply.

TO PLACE YOUR AD

Expires 03-31-11

Expires 03-31-11

Expires 03-31-11

CODE JC010111

CODE JC010111

The Jewish Chronicle ON THE WEB www.thejewishchronicle.net

Residential - Commercial

CALL DONNA 412-687-1000

CODE JC010111

ISSUE 2 IS ALMOST HERE!

High Quality AMISH Custom Cabinets at a Reasonable Rate.

f t tle o Bot sh Spo

2 Rooms Cleaned

MAGAZINE

Jewish Pittsburgh Living

R EAL E STATE • C LASSIFIED B USINESS & P ROFESSIONAL

Jewish news around the world and around the block ...as it happens!


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011 — 19

GLOBE Briefly JTA

Continued from previous page. Rahm Emanuel, the front-runner in the Chicago mayoral election, was the target of an anti-Semitic leaflet campaign. Flyers with anti-Semitic messages directed at Emanuel were recently distributed on a train line that runs through the city. The flier, distributed at a Chicago Transit Authority Red Line station, Rahm Emanuel shows a silhouette of Emanuel and reads: “I will run Chicago as I ran Freddie Mac, PROFITABLE (for me, me, me) thirty millions$$$$$$. I was entitled to it, being a Holocaust survivor (I mean my family).” Emanuel is “unfazed” by the fliers, according to the NBC television affiliate in Chicago, which quoted him as saying “I have confidence in the people.” The nonpartisan election is scheduled

The Jewish Chronicle

for Feb. 22; a runoff, if necessary, would be six weeks later. On Sunday, fellow candidate Carol Moseley Braun compared Emanuel to a character in the Mel Brooks film “The Producers” who describes Hitler as “kind” and “gentle.” “I was not comparing him to Adolf Hitler; print that,” Moseley Braun told reporters later. “I was trying to say ... the kind, gentle concern for the public that is being portrayed in these ads does not square with the record.” Emanuel in a debate Monday said he thought Braun's words were taken out of context. Emanuel served for two years as President Obama's White House chief of staff and also was a congressman. The Palestinian Authority reportedly has settled a lawsuit over the murder of two American citizens living in Israel. Court papers indicating that a settlement agreement was reached were filed Monday in a Rhode Island District Court, but no details were provided, the Associated Press reported. A $116 million default judgment awarded by the Rhode Island court in 2004 was vacated by the agreement, according to the papers, the AP reported. The agreement also lifts a freeze on PA

2 & 3 Bedrooms Corner of Fifth and Wilkins Spacious 1500-2250 square feet

Americans, by a substantial majority, continue to rate Israel favorably according to the latest Gallup Poll. Sixty-eight percent of Americans rated Israel favorably in the poll conducted Feb. 2-5, statistically the same as the 67 percent Israel scored in 2010. Israel ranked seventh among 21 countries in this year's poll behind, in order, Canada, Britain, Germany, Japan, India and France. Iran scored last, with 11 percent approval, and the Palestinian Authority scored fifth from last, with 19 percent approval.

In its commentary when the poll was released Feb. 11, Gallup noted that Egypt had plunged in approval since the 2010 polling. The most recent poll was conducted before military authorities acceded to protesters' demands and removed Hosni Mubarak from the presidency. France, meantime, had climbed steadily from a low of 34 percent in 2003, when it opposed the U.S. invasion of Iraq, to 71 percent this year. “Americans' ratings of foreign countries suggest Americans are aware of what is occurring internationally,” Gallup said. “Countries that are friendly to the United States and supportive of its foreign policy are generally rated positively, while countries that are unfriendly to the United States and oppose its policies are rated negatively.” Gallup reached 1,015 respondents by telephone. The poll has a margin of error of 4 percent. Separately, a poll released Monday by The Israel Project showed that a majority of Americans believed that the United States should support Israel in “the ongoing conflict between Israel and the Palestinians in the Middle East.” Support for Israel was 55 percent to 6 percent for the Palestinians. Sixteen percent responded “neither.” The Feb. 7-9 poll surveyed 1,000 likely voters by phone.

Real estate directory FOR RENT

5125 Fifth Ave.

assets in the United States. The 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston last year had sent the case back to the district court for more arguments on whether the unpaid default judgment should be set aside after new P.A. attorneys said they would fight the judgment. The Rhode Island court had awarded the judgment to the family of terror victims Yaron and Efrat Ungar, American citizens killed in 1996 when they were attacked in their car by Palestinian terrorists as they drove home from a wedding near Beit Shemesh, west of Jerusalem. Their infant son survived the attack. Lawyers for the Ungar family and the Palestinian Authority would not comment to AP.

UNIVERSITY SQ. End unit 6th floor, 2BR, 1Bath, newly updated kitchen $95,900. Marcia 412-680-3011.

”Finest in Shadyside”

412-661-4456

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

MT. LEBANON SALE BY OWNER LEASE-BUY OPTION

FABULOUS BUYS IN NORTH OAKLAND

5 Unique homes All remodeled and updated Move-in condition $140,000-$275,000 3 years interest only financing available GLICKMAN REAL ESTATE 412-521-9555

www.kaminrealty.kamin.com

This space could be yours.

Call Donna 412 687-1000

FOR RENT

SQUIRREL HILL 5720 Solway Street

Nice 3 BR, 1st floor duplex for rent. $1,250 + all utilities. For more information lease call Nancy

412-401-9848 or 412-261-6500

154 N. BELLEFIELD — 2 BR, 2 Bath — $99,900 4625 FIFTH AVE. — 2 BR, 2 Bath — $79,000 4601 FIFTH AVE. — 2 BR, 1 Bath, — $55,000 Stefanie Behrend, Realtor HOWARD HANNAH REAL ESTATE 412-302-3408 or 412-687-6000

FOR SALE

“ M o r t g a g e R a t e s A r e L o w ” Think of the advantage of Buying or Selling OAKLAND CONDOS WINCHESTER — 2 Bed & 2 Bath Contemporary, pool, exercise & guest suite, great location Priced $229,500 220N DITHRIDGE — Terrific 2 bed 2 bath, balcony, pool & party rm, 2 guest rms, exercise & party rm. Priced $219,500 220 N. DITHRIDGE NEWLY OFFERED! 3 BR, 2 1/2 bath. Beautiful condition. W/D in unit. Asking $389,000. PARK PLAZA — Large 3 Bedrooms, 21/2 Baths, eat-in kitchen, Tons of closets - Extra large private storage room. Priced $329,500 OAKLAND CO-OP BRISTOL - Most desirable, Parquet floors, 3 Bed, 2 Baths. Beautiful View, Maintenance includes all taxes & utilities Priced $165,000

SQ. HILL CONDO BEACON PLACE - 1 Bed & Bath Move in - perfect condition Priced $102,000. Reduced $97,500 SQ. HILL TOWNHOME SCHENLEY RD. - Stunning end unit. Very warm with contemporary touches, 4 bed 3 1/2 baths, 2 car int. garage. Price upon request.

POINT BREEZE Walk to schools & parks. Custom built, 1 of a kind! Wonderful Contemporary. Most Unusual & Desirable. Looks as though it was built today, 4 bed 21/2 Baths, eat-in kitchen, family rm, study off master bed, 3 car garage, 2 wood burning fireplaces. Reduced $695,000

SQ. HILL BEECHWOOD BLVD. — A home for all to enjoy. Truly a beautiful gem of a grand old house completely restored but kept its original charm. Asking $1,250,000 SHADYSIDE “Restored Victorian” in the Heart of Shadyside. 5 bed 21/2 Baths, Leaded glass windows, enclosed urban garden. Reduced $375,000 Will lease or do owner financing.

For information call Tamara Skirboll 412-521-2222 x220 Cell 412-401-1110


20 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011

CL ASSIFIED

Advertisements • Deadline Monday at Noon • All Classified Ads Are Payable in Advance

7 $ 1025 $

00

For 10 Words or Less 25¢ For Each Additional Word

For Boxed Ads 1 Inch x 1 Column Inch THE JEWISH CHRONICLE 5917 BEACON ST., 3RD FLR. PITTSBURGH, PA 15206

Call Today 412-687-1000

HELP WANTED

POSITION WANTED

B’NAI ABRAHAM Synagogue in Butler, PA. Is searching for a rabbi or spiritual leader/cantor. We are 45 min. north of Pittsburgh. Please call 814-786-7270 for further information. ••• CHILD CARE 35+ hrs. /wk. Sq. Hill. Inquisitive, lively & fun 6 year old girl seeks engaging energetic & devoted nanny before & after school. Must drive & be non-smoker. 412-341-1995 or jrhnanny4u@mac.com. ••• CONGREGATION SEEKS Aron Kodesh for our three Torahs. Old or new, willing to refurbish. Contact Daniel 412-422-9078. ••• NANNY a HEALTHY 5 month old needs a nanny 12 hours/week, afternoons in my home. Must be fluent in English with experience, references & physically fit. Call 412-404-8781.

EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Will also do light housekeeping & cooking for your loved one. Available daylight, reasonable. Call 412969-2386. ••• DETAILED CLEANING just the way you like it to be done. Great references. Janet 724-359-7800 or Lyn 412-403-7287. ••• LPN/CNA/SITTER seeks private duty employment, in home, nursing home or hospital. Licensed to give medication, can transport. 412-678-1223. ••• I HAVE 19 years’ experience in helping those with short/long term or perment personal care needs. Available evenings & weekends. 412-608-4616. ••• HOW WOULD YOU like to come home to a sweet smelling, clean home? I can make it happen! Melissa 412-628-9336. ••• PRIVATE DUTY Home health care. Experienced with references, available Mon.-Sat. any hours. 412537-5871. ••• CAREGIVER WITH all criminal clearance certifications in CPR, first aide & exercise. Good references, call Carol.412-606-7372. ••• HOUSE CLEANING done the way you like! Experienced with great references. 412-867-0413.

POSITION WANTED THE CARE REGISTRY INC. is a state licensed company providing screened & experienced nurse aids & companions. Reasonable rates, top quality & caring management also available. For more information Call Andrea Seewald, LSW 412421-5202 or visit www.TheCareRegistry.com. ••• BRANNON HOME & HEALTH Care, INC. is a licensed by the PA Dept. of Health and meets all its requirements for screening and placement of nurse aides and companions. Affordable rates for hourly or live-in service. Out of town support. Call 412341-2666 or 412-682-2279. www.brannonhomehealthcare.com. ••• CAREGIVER CONNECTION A PA. Licensed home-care registry, Jewish Family & Children’s Service refers screened, JF&CS trained caregivers providing short/long-term personal care services to seniors at affordable rates. Available 24/7, call 412-422-0400 or 877-243-1530 (toll free). ••• LAUNDRY/IRONING/CLEANING. Will clean your home or business, basement, garage or yard. Reliable with good references & reasonable rates. 412-708-4647. ••• HOME HEALTH CARE specialist in hospice, dialysis & direct care. Will work any shift. Call Patricia Spencer 412-229-8760.

ART SHOW “FINE ART SHOW: Yurry Mudrenko” artist from Moscow, Russia. Sq. Hill, Carnegie Library, regular hours through Feb. 28th.

BUYING AUTO/TRUCKS C A R S -T R U C K S -VA N S SUVS- Quite driving, death, wrecks, antiques, classics, Junkers. Denny Offstein 724287-7771 dennyoffsteinusedcar@zoominternet.net.

BUYING OLD JEWISH Books printed prior to 1900. 516-619-6381. We buy libraries.

CERAMIC TILE O’LEARY CERAMIC Tile SVC. New & repair work since 1977. Re-groutingcaulking, fully insured. PA HIC Lic. #004228. Call 412731-0440.

COMPUTER NICE JEWISH Boy, offering the full range of computer services, from advising and teaching to repair and support. I will come to your house or apartment, fix any problem you’re having & teach you what you need to know to use it. I have 14 years’ experience working with people of all ages. . No job is too large or small, and nobody is too computer illiterate. (Really) CALL JASON 412-401-1204, or visit my web www.computerwizard.us. References available.

TORAH Jewish heroes made the right moves on Purim Portion of the Week RABBI JOSEPH S. WEISS B’NAI EMUNOH CONGREGATION Ki Tissa, Exodus 30:1134:35

CONCIERGE SERVICE FAERY CONCIERGE & Errand Service. One call; from shoveling to shopping, pet sitting, light housekeeping. What can we do for you? 412-421-2024.

DRIVER NEED A RIDE? Call Norm, he will drive you. Doctors, shopping, anything that needs to be done. Experienced, insured, great references and reasonable rates. Available le for airport pickup or departure. Norm 412521-6999.

ELECTRICIAN ARMSTRONG PLUG & Switch, LLC. Registered-Insured, electric breaker box upgrade, lighting, additional outlets, code corrections, dedicated circuits, rewires & repairs. PA075442pgh.elo4802. Call 412-2983423 or 412-751-2693.

GOLFER GOLFER WANTED, Pittsburgh Spring, Summer & Fall 2011. Need partner for upcoming season. Jimmy Cohen @ 412-491-6781.

HANDYMAN NO JOB TOO SMALL or a honey to do list! Call Dave at Maids & More 412-824-3540.

HOME REPAIRS GENERAL HOME Repairs, interior/exterior, retaining walls, dry wall, flooring, ceramic, laminate, painting, plastering, pressure washing, kitchen & bath remodeling. PA licensed & insured. 412-731-1496.

This week would be Purim, if it were not a leap year in the Hebrew calendar, and we would have read the Megilla. In the Megilla of Esther, Mordechai overhears Bigthan And Terresh plotting secretly against the king. Mordechai reports the plot to Queen Esther who then brings the threat to Ahashuerus’ attention. Ultimately this helps put Esther and Mordechai into a positive power relationship with Ahashuerus. But the big puzzle is why did Mordechai help save Ahashuerus from this plot. After all, the rabbis teach that Ahashuerus was a bigger hater of Jews than his prime minister, Haman. When Haman broaches his desire to wipe out the Jews and completely fund the whole project from his private treasury — read his stores of graft and bribery — Ahashuerus generously refuses to accept Haman’s money. Instead he graciously agrees to finance the whole project from the royal treasury. Ahashuerus and Haman have the legal documents drawn and sent out to the Empire to get the project moving immediately and then the two good buddies sit down to drink and party. So why would Mordechai help such a tyrant? Aside from the fact that the king is holding Esther and many other women of the Persian Empire against their wills in his harem, it would seem that if you get rid of Ahashuerus Esther might have a chance of getting free. Mordechai, however, wisely sees

MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT THE HOT MATZOHS, Pittsburgh’s #1 Klezmer Band, is available for your Wedding, Bar/Bat Mitzvah, Corporate or other special event! The dynamic band, featuring violinist Barbara Lowenstein (founder), offers many styles of music in addition to Klezmer, e,g, classical, jazz, swing and folk. Call 412-3443338 or 412-303-0746. Or email:barbsviolin@gmail.com.

(This column is a service of the Greater Pittsburgh Rabbinic Association.)

PERSONAL

YOGA

LEGAL NOTICE

WILL TRAVEL TO meet a special Jewish lady. Jewish male (50’s) located in Central PA enjoys sports, comedy, Starbucks & much more. Please contact me at billtownmagic@hotmail.com.

AVAILABLE FOR Private & class style yoga instruction. Instruction can vary from beginner to intermediate/advanced. If interested please email ferris.glick@gmail.com or call 412-855-6027.

LEVINE, Barbara., deceased, of Wilkinsburg, PA. No. 0211-00664 or to: Kimberly S. Steinberg,Executrix, c/o Philip H. Rubenstein, Esq., 312 Second Avenue, Carnegie, PA 15106.

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INSURANCE SPECIALIZING IN Whole Life, Term, Indexed Annuities, Fixed Annuities, Disability & Final Expense insurance. I help people stretch their retirement resources. Call Joel Kruman 412-257-3598 PA Licensed Producer.

the big picture. If there were a successful assassination that would mean that for a period of time there would be chaos. Such chaos could very easily spin out of control, producing the kind of disorder where countless people are hurt. Even as the rabbis teach in the Pirkei Avot (3:2): “Pray for the peace and harmony of the government; for if not for the fear of the government people would swallow each other alive.” Historically, in these situations, Jews always receive the brunt of such unfettered violence. Besides, what guarantee is there that a successor would be friendlier to the Jews? Ahashuerus is a known entity and there is some possibility of an alliance with him; of course, the rest of the Megilla demonstrates that with God’s help and guidance Mordechai and Esther are able to persuade Aahshuerus about the loyalty of the Jews in his empire. Equally as significant, the loyalty of the Jewish people is a function of their dedication and commitment to their Jewish heritage. As I write these words, the world watches the events in Egypt and the rest of the Middle East. What will happen in weeks to come when you read these words, and what ramifications of these events will unfold as the years progress? God only knows. But certainly we all hope and pray that the pursuit of peace and security of all people in the region not be threatened by the potential destabilization of any government. As the rabbis in the Talmud advocate, I extend a prayer that the leadership of this great country, in which we live freely as Jews, be guided by God’s providence to make the decisions that will promote the best results for the people of Egypt, the Middle East and the nations of the world.

PIANO LESSONS BEGINNERS, CHILDREN or Adults, with or without talent, customized, classical instruction. Experienced, patient, reasonable rates, at my studio or your residence. Call Paul 412-4216583.

TRANSLATOR HEBREW, ENGLISH & Spanish translator looking for more clients. 412-918-1836 or 412-853-5109.

VOICE/PIANO VOICE/PIANO LESSIONS with CMU graduate. Info. 412-327-1753 or EastEndMusicPa@gmail.com.

3Th 338, 331, 324

ESTATE NOTICES Letters have been granted on the estate of each of the following decedents to the personal representative named, who requests all persons having claims against the estate of the decedent to make known the same in writing to him or his attorney, and all persons indebted to the decedent to make payment to him without delay:

STRICKER, Rose C., deceased, of Scott Township, PA, Allegheny County; No. 02-1100524 or to: Joyce A. Slaughter and Susan M. Chabala, CoExecutrices, c/o Philip H. Rubenstein, Esq., 312 Second Avenue, Carnegie, PA 15106. 3Th 338, 331, 324

ISACK, Edward, J, a.k.a. Edward Jay Isack, deceased, of Pittsburgh, PA 15217, Allegheny County; No. 02-1100604 of 2011. Steven D. Isack, Executor 3102 Labyrinth Road Pikesville, MD 21208 or to: Barry J. Palkovitz, Esq., Palkovitz Law Office, 1966 Lincoln Way, Suite 200, White Oak, PA 15131.

WACHTEL, Sandra, deceased, of Pittsburgh, PA, Allegheny County; No. 0210-07644 or to: Joel Pfefffer, Esq., Meyer, Unkovic & Scott LLP, 535 Smithfield St., Suite 1300, Pittsburgh, PA 15222.

3Th 317, 310, 303

3Th 338, 331, 324


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011 — 21

ENVIRONMENT A yurt by any other name

MORNING SERVICES - 9:30 A.M.

The yurt brings a touch of luxury to Israeli eco-tourism.

Israeli eco tourism welcomes Central Asian portable dwelling

BY KAREN CHERNICK

If you don’t know what a yurt is, have no fear. Most people don’t (including yours truly). But yurts, with their portability, suitability for nature trips, and simple low-tech structures are highly suitable for eco-tourism – so they definitely deserve our attention. And it certainly is exciting that yurts are entering the Israeli tourism scene. So what is a yurt? A yurt is a portable fabric covered dwelling with an underlying wooden structure that was first used by nomads in central Asia. What do yurts have to do with Israeli eco tourism? Thanks to the Indian village at Moshav Avnei Eitan in the Galilee, plenty. Located at the end of the Nahal El Al trail (which is a flowery, rocky, watery feast for the eyes of an eco tourist), the yurt campsite — though environmentally friendly in that is does not leave a permanent effect on the site and offers low impact housing — is a pampering

version of your normal camping experience. Meaning, for all those ladies out there who are a little squeamish about spending a romantic weekend in a tent, this is the perfect compromise. Some of the yurts (like the one pictured above) even go so far as to include jacuzzis, and all of the couple yurts include small kitchenettes, air conditioning, and other little extras. Pair that up with the beautiful scenery, the fresh outdoor breakfast that is included with a stay in the yurt, and the optional personal masseurs, and you’ve got an eco tourism option that is close to nature, but a pampering treat as well. The site includes three small, couple sized yurts and a few larger teepees that can house large groups. So whether you’re going away on a weekend vacation with your partner or having more of an experience with the family — the Indian Village is ready for you.

(Stories from The Green Prophet appear here by agreement with its editor, Karin Kloosterman. For more Green news from the Middle East, visit The Green Prophet at greenprophet.com. Contact the Green Prophet at karin.kloosterman@gmail.com.)

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20: DR. SIMEON ALLEN, GERALD G. BALCH, LOUIS BEAR, REBECCA BEGLER, BELLA BONDER, IDA SISSER BORTZ, DAVID BRINN, MARY W. CHABAN, CLARA COHEN, JOSEPH COHEN, SAMUEL COHEN, ISIDOR DAVIS, MILDRED COHEN FELDMAN, WILLIAM FISCHER, JACOB GILBERT, REBECCA GILLMAN, JENNIE GINGOLD, CPL. MILTON GOLDSTEIN, MILTON CPL GOLDSTEIN, NAT D. GORMAN, DOROTHY GREENBERG, SALLIE GREENSTEIN, ALEXANDER HANDMACHER, LEONARD C. HECHTMAN, ISRAEL E. HELFMAN, NATHAN M. KATZ, BESSIE KEMPLER, ELLA KLEIN, DAVID LEVINE, ELLA MILLER LEWINE, MAMIE LITTLE, ADOLPH LOBL, ROSE MARSHALL, ISRAEL J. MARTIN, HELEN MILLER, LEAH MULLIN, BENJAMIN PEARLMAN, LUCILLE POLLOCK, AARON PRETTER, MORRIS ROBBINS, CHAYA ROSSEN, JOSEPH H. ROSSEN, MORRIS SAMPLINER, ALBERT SAMUELS, CLAIRE R. SCHWEIZER, HARRY R. SEIGER, JEAN Y. SHAPERA, LOUIS E. SHIFMAN, MOLLIE SILVERMAN, SOPHIA SLOAN, BIRDIE SMITH, MORRIS SNYDER, MINNIE L. SOKOLE, ROSE SOLWITZ, SADIE M. SPEER, TILLIE STRENG, HERMOINE WACHS, ESTHER WEISENBERG, NELLIE ZABARENKO. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21: ANN GOLDSTEIN ARONS, MARY BARR, FLORA BARUCH, RUBIN BENKOVITZ, ESTHER F. BEREN, IRENE F. BERKOSKY, HARRIS BAER BERMAN, KATE BERNSTEIN, ABE R. COHEN, DOROTHY K. COHEN, FANNY EISENSTAT, DANIEL FRANK, DOROTHY FRIEDKEN, ARNOLD J. FRIEDMAN, JACOB GINSBERG, RACHEL E. GOLDBERG, DR. NORMAN GOLOMB, ANNA P. HART, LILLIAN HELLMAN, PEARL HERMAN, PHILLIP HILK, GERHART M. HOREWITZ, JENNIE HORNE, RAY W. JACOBSON, HENRY L. KALWARY, ANNA KINSBURSKY, MAX KRAM, BENJAMIN KRAVITZ, IDA LEVY, ENOCH LICHTENSTEIN, CELIA MARCUS, ISAAC MARCUS, ROSA MASSOFF, ISIDORE M. PALATNICK, BESSIE PERLOW, RACHEL RICE, JULIA B. ROSENBLATT, MINNIE ROSENBLOOM, JACOB ROSENTHAL, EDITH SACK, JULIUS SAMUELS, SYLVIA L. SAMUELS, CHARLES SAUL, DAVID SAUL, SIMON SCHREIBER, MORRIS SCHWARTZ, HYMAN DAVID SEGAL, MARION J. SEINER, MANUEL SELKER, EDNA M. SIEGAL, GOLDIE R. SIEGEL, IDA SILVERMAN, SAUL SMALLEY, GENEVIEVE STERN, NATHANIEL STUTZ, JACOB TOMBOFSKY, MILTON H. WEISMAN, JACOB WILNER, ISIDOR WINKLER, IDA ZWIRNBAUM. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22: JOSEPH ABRAVANEL, FANNIE BAVER, HARRY BEESON, DAVID BLOCK, JENNIE COHEN, LOUIS COHEN, NATHAN COHEN, CLARA EHRENPREIS, FANNIE R. FALKINSON, I. MELVIN FIEDLER, ESTHER S. FINKELHOR, MOLLIE FRIEDMAN, NISAN GILBOA, MICHAEL GLATZER, WILLIAM GOLDBERG, MORRIS GOLDMAN, ESTHER GOLDSTEIN, ROBERT C. GORDON, HARRY H. GREEN, JOHANNA HALLE, ROSE HARTSTEIN, MARTIN A. HEPPS, DANIEL HORNE, ROSE KALSTONE, RUTH KAPLAN, SAMUEL KATZ, ROSIA KAUFFMAN, ROSE KERTMAN, FRANK KLATMAN, TEMA LANDO, LOUIS LEVISON, MOLLY LEVITH, EDWARD LEWIS, SHIRLEY F. LITTLE, ANNA MADANICK, JACOB MALACHOFSKY, LENA MANN, AMELIA L. MARCUS, MENDEL MENDELSON, JUDITH MORITZ, YETTA G. NOVICK, JACOB OSWOLD, SEYMOUR M. PERLUT, LOUIS C. PETTLER, BENJAMIN RAMBACH, SAM ROSENBERG, SAMUEL ROSENTHAL, SOLOMON SCHWARTZ, ESTHER SIEGEL, ANNA PRICE SILVERBERG, PESHA SMITH, SELIG LOUIS STORMWIND, MAYME SUKOLSKY, DAVID A. VINOCUR, ESTHER WEISS, FANNIE A. ZIMET. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23: FRIEDA ALPER, IDA AMDURSKY, JOSEPH BALES, HYMAN L. BERKMAN, YETTA BROWARSKY, JACOB CAPLAN, REBECCA CAPLAN, MOLLIE CHAIMOVITZ, ROSE ENGELBERG, JESSIE SNYDER FELMAN, REBECCA GOLDFEIN, SIMON GOLDMAN, SYLVIA GOLDMAN, ABRAHAM S. GOLDSTEIN, MAX GOLDSTEIN, HERMAN GOLDSTROM, HERMAN GOLOMB, TILLIE E. GREENBAUM, NATHAN H. GROSS, HELEN B. HARRIS, FRED HELLMAN, ESTHER JAFFE, ISAAC KAHANOWITZ, DR. EDWIN J. KAMONS, DR. CECIL KAPLAN, SADIE KART, ROSE KATZ, WILLIAM KEIZLER, CELIA KOPELMAN, REBECCA KRAUS, BERTHA KRAUSE, ROSE LILLIAN LIEBERMAN, RALPH E. MANNHEIMER, ETHEL MILLER, MOSES BENJAMIN MILLER, BESSIE MOOGERMAN, ISRAEL R. NEWMARK, EDWARD PERLIS, HANNAH POSER, HATTIE H. RAPOPORT, JACOB M. ROSE, BERNIE ROSENBAUM, THOMAS ROSENBLATT, HARRY ROSSEN, ROSE ROTH, BESSIE SAKOLSKY, JACOB SAKULSKY, ROSE KATZ SCHOOLNIC, HARRY SCOTT, JENNIE SHERMER, ADA KLINE SIMON, MORRIS SMIZIK, RUTH STERN, JACOB WEINBERGER, ISAAC WILKOFF, JOSEPH ZINNER. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24: LT. MELIVIN S. BARRETT, MAX BERMAN, MORRIS J. BIALER, SARAH HELEN BRAUN, WILLIAM BRAUN, ESTELLE H. BRAVER, MARY BROIDA, NATHAN CAPLAN, FRANK R. COHEN, GOLDIE DAVIS, ANNE S. DEBROFF, MORRIS JACOB DEBROFF, NANA DEROY, IKE DIAMOND, PEARL M. FEINBERG, HERMAN G. FELDSTEIN, WILLIAM FRIED, REBECCA FRIEDBERG, ADOLPH GERSON, NATHAN GLOSSER, HARRY GOLDBERG, MICHAEL J. GOLDBERG, RACHEL GOLDSTEIN, LOTTIE GREENBLATT, SADIE C. HELLER, SOPHIE HERSH, SAMUEL E. HORNE, LEONARD B. JACOBSON, LENA KAUFMAN, MARY KROMEMER, SAMUEL LINETSKY, PAYCE LIPKIND, KATE MARKOWITZ, ELLI LAIB MOSCOVITZ, MORRIS H. MOSCOWITZ, LEON NUMER, JOSEFINE ODENHEIMER, CELIA OPPENHEIM, JOSEPH M. ORRINGER, OSCAR PERER, SARAH F. PITTLER, ANITA RABINOWITZ, SOLOMON ROMANOFF, SARAH ROTH, PEPI ROTHENBERG, SELMA ROTHMAN, HYMAN DAVID SAVILLE, FLORENCE SCHORIN, LEONARD L. SCHUGAR, LEONARD SCHWARTZ, HYMAN SHALANSKY, JOSEPH SHAPIRO, NORMAN SKOLSKY, JEANETTE SNIDER, ELLIS STEINFIRST, ELVIN TEITELBAUM, DAVID TOBIN, LOUIS WEINER, ISAAC WEIS, EMMA WINTERS. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25: SAMUEL L. ALPERN, ANNA CAPLAN, SANFORD EAFFY, NATHAN EDESES, JENNIE FARKAS, JOSEPH FREEDMAN, MORRIS D. GINSBERG, LEO GITELMAN, JOSEPH F. GOLDBERG, DORA GOLDMAN, LIBBIE GOLDMAN, NATHEN GOLDSTEIN, MARTIN GREENBARG, HARRY GREENWALD, JACOB L. GROPPER, NORMA E. HAMLETT, SOPHIA KEILLY, MORRIS KLEIN, MORRIS LABOWITZ, EARL LEBOVITZ, GOLDIE LEVIN, THERESE H. LEVINO, SAM LEWINTER, CARL LIEBERMAN, WILMA MARCUS, HARRY MARGOLIS, FANNIE MELNICK, ABE MILLER, SALLY MILLER, HARRY OSOFSKY, ABE PECK, BENNIE PORTNOY, ETHEL BODEK ROGERS, EMIL HEICKEL ROSENBERG, BESSIE RUBENSTEIN, IDA SADOWSKY, CLARA SALTMAN, MAX SAMUELS, ALEXANDER SIMON, ABRAHAM SMITH, CHARLES H. SOLTZ, OSCAR SUSSER, WOLF TOLOCHKO, MANUEL WIKES, MYRON J. WILKOFF, GEORGE WINTNER, RABBI SIMON YAFFEE, THEODORE ZEUGSCHMIDT. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26: JACOB ADLER, ANNA ALBERT, LOUIS ALTMAN, SAMUEL H. AMDUR, CHARLES BALBER, RALPH BALBER, BENJAMIN BECK, IDA BECKER, HERVIS M. BERMAN, SIDNEY BILDER, JACOB BLATT, CHARLES C. BURSTEIN, ISIDOR COHEN, BAILIE ANNA COHN, ARTHUR COOK, ALBERT DELL, HARRY DIZENFELD, SEDALIA EKKER, BURFORD B. EPSTEIN, BLANCHE FINKELSTEIN, SIMON FRIEDMAN, CLARA GOLDHAMMER, BENJAMIN GOLDSTEIN, FRANCES H. GORDON, BERTHA GREENBERG, RACHEL GREENBERG, JOSEPH GREENWALD, ABE I. GRINBERG, ROSE GROSS, HYMAN L. HAUSMAN, ABE KIRSHENBAUM, MINNIE KURTZ, BLANCHE MENDELSON, TYBA HUTTNER MERVIS, MARIE J. MILLER, MAX MILLER, SARAH MORETSKY, SAM NEEDLEMAN, HARRY NEWMAN, CELIA PERILMAN, FREDA ROSENTHALL, MORRIS G. SANES, JACK SARBIN, HANNAH RAE SHAPIRA, MINNIE SHEFFLER, ROSE STARR, BELLA STEINBERG, NATHAN WAGNER, HENRY WEINBERGER, NATHAN P. WEISSMAN, ROSALIE WETSTEIN, SAMUEL N. WHITEMAN, JOSEPH WILKOFSKY, MANUEL ZAPLER.


22 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011

OBITUARIES COHEN: On Monday, February 7, 2011, Anne L. Cohen; beloved wife of Howard L. Cohen; loving mother of Jeffrey H. Cohen, M.D. of Fair Oaks Ranch, TX and Lee C. Tepper of Pittsburgh; sister of Fern Diamond; grandmother of Joshua R. Tepper and Lauren A. Cohen. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Shadyside. Interment Beth Shalom Cemetery. KAUFMAN: On Saturday, February 12, 2011, Ronald Marc Kaufman; loving husband of Cheryl (Aronson) Kaufman; devoted father of Jared (Marcy) Kaufman and Adam (Liana) Kaufman; “Papa Ron” of Jesse, Brett and Ryan Kaufman; son of the late Ben and Ruth Kaufman; loving brother of Bernice and Dr. Myron Friedlander; son-in-law of Lillian and Ace Aronson; brother-inlaw of Franklyn and Helene Aronson and Sandra Lubin; also survived by aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews, cousins and friends. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Shadyside. Interment Pliskover Cemetery. Contributions may be made for brain cancer research, c/o UPCI, Development Dept., UPMC, Cancer Pavilion, Suite 1 B, 5150 Centre Ave., Pgh., PA 15232. KLINE: On Sunday, Feb. 13, 2011, Bernard H. Kline, 87, of White Oak; beloved husband of Betty Ruth Greenfield Kline; father of Ellie (Bruce) Lederman of Pacific Palisades, CA, George (Mary Jo) Kline of White Oak, Meryl (Fred) Trachtman of Olney, MD; grandfather of Eric, Jeffrey, and Joshua Lederman, Reita, Lena, and Max Kline and Rachel and Molly Trachtman; also many nieces and nephews; preceded in death by sister Sally Litman; son

of the late George N. and Reita Jackson Kline. Services were held at at Striffler’s of White Oak, 1100 Lincoln Way, White Oak. Interment Agudath Achim Cemetery, Forest Hills.

Egypt uprising carries echoes of Poland’s solidarity movement 30 years ago BY RUTH ELLEN GRUBER

PEARLMAN: On Saturday, February 12, 2011, Stanton H. Pearlman; beloved husband of Carol Bastacky Pearlman; beloved father of Jordan Pearlman of Squirrel Hill; special brother of Gerry (late Louis) Segneff of Stanton Heights, Robert Pearlman of Squirrel Hill, the late Harold (late Libby) Pearlman and the late Helen (late Ira) Selvin; also survived by beloved nieces and nephews and greatnieces, nephew and cousins. Graveside Services were held at Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Pittsburgh B’nai B’rith Men, 1831 Murray Avenue, #204, Pittsburgh, PA 15217 or Veterans, Fisher House Foundation, Inc., 111 Rockville Pike, Suite 420, Rockville, MD 20850. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc. WOLHENDLER: On Monday, February 14, 2011, Jacob Wolhendler; son of the late Ephriam and Sarah Wolhendler; beloved brother of the late Chana, Jocheved, Lipman and Hinda Wolhendler; cousin of Dr. Louis E. Goldszer and Anne Krieger and their children, Dr. Robert Goldszer, Richard Goldszer, Dr. James F. Goldszer, Patti Krieger, Claudia Miller and the late Karol Krieger Hays. Graveside services and interment were held at Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Holocaust Center of Greater Pittsburgh, 5738 Darlington Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc.

Please refer to www.thejewishchronicle.net for regularly updated obituary information.

JTA

NEW HAVEN, Conn. — The day after Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak was ousted by a widespread public uprising, I found myself presenting a lecture about Solidarity, the mass trade union movement that convulsed Poland 30 years ago and paved the way for the collapse of the Iron Curtain a decade later. It also helped land me in jail in 1983, eventually resulting in my expulsion from Poland. I had covered Solidarity — Solidarnosc in Polish — as a correspondent for United Press International, and my lecture came at the opening of an exhibition at Yale University about the dramatic strikes and public protests that gave birth to the movement in August 1980. It got me thinking about people power — its nature and the long, complex reach of its legacy. The so-called Polish August was the first mass protest movement to achieve some success in challenging Communist rule in Eastern Europe. When the strikes broke out, the Communists had been in power in Poland since the late 1940s — similar to the length of Hosni Mubarak’s tenure. And as in Egypt, the protests forced radical changes in less than three weeks. But freedom and democracy were by no means the automatic outcome of what seemed at the moment a victory; indeed, what’s happening in Egypt, and elsewhere in the Middle East, is still very much in flux. Thousands of workers went on strike at the Gdansk Shipyard on Aug. 14, 1980. The walkout was sparked by the firing of crane operator Anna Walentynowicz, a longtime dissident worker activist. Her dismissal was really just the straw that broke the camel’s back. Hikes in food prices and other economic hardships, as well as heavy-handed political and social repression, were behind the discontent, and over the years there had been sporadic failed attempts to challenge the regime. This time, circumstances were different. For one thing, the election of Polish Cardinal Karol Wojtyla as Pope John Paul II in 1978 had galvanized the nation and instilled a sense of national pride. When John Paul triumphantly returned home to visit in 1979, millions of Poles turned out to greet him as a national hero. Strikes and protests spread across Poland within days of the Gdansk Shipyard walkout. Prayers and outdoor masses in the overwhelmingly Catholic country were a key part of the protests. Significantly, too, workers and strike leaders formed an unprecedented strategic alliance with dissident intellectuals. Their list of 21 demands included labor reforms but also freedom of expression, freedom of religion and other civil rights. These formed the basis of the Gdansk Agreement, a landmark social accord eventually signed on Aug. 31, 1980, by the charismatic strike leader Lech Walesa and a senior government representative. Walesa used a jumbo souvenir pen that bore a likeness of John Paul II. Five days leader, the Polish Communist Party axed its longtime leader, Edward Gierek. Various commentators have compared the events in Egypt with the fall of communism across Eastern Europe in 198990. The comparison is valid — and perhaps increasingly so, given the spreading

protests across the Middle East. But in some ways the Polish August and the birth of Solidarity may be a more telling comparison, at least for now. As with Egypt, the Polish August was a huge global news story that sparked ecstatic heights of optimism, exhilaration and punditry. And as with the Egyptian uprising, it took us into utterly uncharted waters: No one really knew where it was all going to lead. Confidence and expectations were high, but martial law crushed Solidarity less than a year-and-a-half after the Gdansk Agreement was signed. The movement was banned, hundreds of Solidarity leaders and activists were jailed, censorship was re-imposed and harsh controls were put in place. In January 1983, I myself was arrested, accused of espionage, jailed, interrogated and expelled from Poland because of my journalistic activity — apparently as a warning to both the international media and local Polish contacts. Martial law, however, did not stop the process begun with the Polish August. Dissent and efforts to foster civil society went underground, where they continued to build momentum as deteriorating economic conditions fueled mounting popular anger. In Warsaw, for example, young Jews who tentatively had begun rediscovering their roots and religious heritage met in a semi-clandestine Jewish study group they called the Jewish Flying University because each meeting took place in a different apartment. It took nearly eight years, but in 1989 roundtable negotiations between the underground opposition and the government enabled a peaceful transition to democratic rule. The images on the panels of the Solidarnosc exhibit at Yale this winter portray events that happened more than 30 years ago, but the pictures look uncannily similar to the images of the protests in Egypt. They show huge crowds, banners, slogans and confrontations between protesters and authorities. Much has been made of the role of the social media in Egypt. Back in 1980, however, there were no social media. There was no Twitter, no Facebook, no mobile phones, no Internet, no e-mail, no 24/7-hour news cycle (except for us wire service folks). CNN was the only cable news network, and it had only just been founded. The government, moreover, cut communications between Gdansk and Warsaw during the August strikes, so that in order to file their stories, some reporters actually commuted back and forth between the two cities on domestic flights. Information was carried by word of mouth or clandestine Samizdat newsletters, or shortwave broadcasts on the BBC or Radio Free Europe. Still, word got out. Protests engulfed a nation and all but brought down a hated regime. If enough people want to create change, they will, Twitter or not. One image in the Yale exhibition shows the enormous sea of people gathered in downtown Warsaw to celebrate outdoor Mass with Pope John Paul II in 1979. “I was in that crowd,” Polish-born Yale professor Krystyna Illakowicz told me. “I remember feeling that we were not afraid any longer.” (Ruth Ellen Gruber is currently a scholar in residence at the Hadassah Brandeis Institute.)


22 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011

OBITUARIES COHEN: On Monday, February 7, 2011, Anne L. Cohen; beloved wife of Howard L. Cohen; loving mother of Jeffrey H. Cohen, M.D. of Fair Oaks Ranch, TX and Lee C. Tepper of Pittsburgh; sister of Fern Diamond; grandmother of Joshua R. Tepper and Lauren A. Cohen. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Shadyside. Interment Beth Shalom Cemetery. KAUFMAN: On Saturday, February 12, 2011, Ronald Marc Kaufman; loving husband of Cheryl (Aronson) Kaufman; devoted father of Jared (Marcy) Kaufman and Adam (Liana) Kaufman; “Papa Ron” of Jesse, Brett and Ryan Kaufman; son of the late Ben and Ruth Kaufman; loving brother of Bernice and Dr. Myron Friedlander; son-in-law of Lillian and Ace Aronson; brother-inlaw of Franklyn and Helene Aronson and Sandra Lubin; also survived by aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews, cousins and friends. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Shadyside. Interment Pliskover Cemetery. Contributions may be made for brain cancer research, c/o UPCI, Development Dept., UPMC, Cancer Pavilion, Suite 1 B, 5150 Centre Ave., Pgh., PA 15232. KLINE: On Sunday, Feb. 13, 2011, Bernard H. Kline, 87, of White Oak; beloved husband of Betty Ruth Greenfield Kline; father of Ellie (Bruce) Lederman of Pacific Palisades, CA, George (Mary Jo) Kline of White Oak, Meryl (Fred) Trachtman of Olney, MD; grandfather of Eric, Jeffrey, and Joshua Lederman, Reita, Lena, and Max Kline and Rachel and Molly Trachtman; also many nieces and nephews; preced-

ed in death by sister Sally Litman; son of the late George N. and Reita Jackson Kline. Services were held at at Striffler’s of White Oak, 1100 Lincoln Way, White Oak. Interment Agudath Achim Cemetery, Forest Hills.

Egypt uprising carries echoes of Poland’s Solidarity movement 30 years ago BY RUTH ELLEN GRUBER JTA

PEARLMAN: On Saturday, February 12, 2011, Stanton H. Pearlman; beloved husband of Carol Bastacky Pearlman; beloved father of Jordan Pearlman of Squirrel Hill; special brother of Gerry (late Louis) Segneff of Stanton Heights, Robert Pearlman of Squirrel Hill, the late Harold (late Libby) Pearlman and the late Helen (late Ira) Selvin; also survived by beloved nieces and nephews and greatnieces, nephew and cousins. Graveside Services were held at Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Pittsburgh B’nai B’rith Men, 1831 Murray Avenue, #204, Pittsburgh, PA 15217 or Veterans, Fisher House Foundation, Inc., 111 Rockville Pike, Suite 420, Rockville, MD 20850. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc. WOLHENDLER: On Monday, February 14, 2011, Jacob Wolhendler; son of the late Ephriam and Sarah Wolhendler; beloved brother of the late Chana, Jocheved, Lipman and Hinda Wolhendler; cousin of Dr. Louis E. Goldszer and Anne Krieger and their children, Dr. Robert Goldszer, Richard Goldszer, Dr. James F. Goldszer, Patti Krieger, Claudia Miller and the late Karol Krieger Hays. Graveside services and interment were held at Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Holocaust Center of Greater Pittsburgh, 5738 Darlington Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc.

Please refer to www.thejewishchronicle.net for regularly updated obituary information.

NEW HAVEN, Conn. — The day after Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak was ousted by a widespread public uprising, I found myself presenting a lecture about Solidarity, the mass trade union movement that convulsed Poland 30 years ago and paved the way for the collapse of the Iron Curtain a decade later. It also helped land me in jail in 1983, eventually resulting in my expulsion from Poland. I had covered Solidarity — Solidarnosc in Polish — as a correspondent for United Press International, and my lecture came at the opening of an exhibition at Yale University about the dramatic strikes and public protests that gave birth to the movement in August 1980. It got me thinking about people power — its nature and the long, complex reach of its legacy. The so-called Polish August was the first mass protest movement to achieve some success in challenging Communist rule in Eastern Europe. When the strikes broke out, the Communists had been in power in Poland since the late 1940s — similar to the length of Hosni Mubarak’s tenure. And as in Egypt, the protests forced radical changes in less than three weeks. But freedom and democracy were by no means the automatic outcome of what seemed at the moment a victory; indeed, what’s happening in Egypt, and elsewhere in the Middle East, is still very much in flux. Thousands of workers went on strike at the Gdansk Shipyard on Aug. 14, 1980. The walkout was sparked by the firing of crane operator Anna Walentynowicz, a longtime dissident worker activist. Her dismissal was really just the straw that broke the camel’s back. Hikes in food prices and other economic hardships, as well as heavy-handed political and social repression, were behind the discontent, and over the years there had been sporadic failed attempts to challenge the regime. This time, circumstances were different. For one thing, the election of Polish Cardinal Karol Wojtyla as Pope John Paul II in 1978 had galvanized the nation and instilled a sense of national pride. When John Paul triumphantly returned home to visit in 1979, millions of Poles turned out to greet him as a national hero. Strikes and protests spread across Poland within days of the Gdansk Shipyard walkout. Prayers and outdoor masses in the overwhelmingly Catholic country were a key part of the protests. Significantly, too, workers and strike leaders formed an unprecedented strategic alliance with dissident intellectuals. Their list of 21 demands included labor reforms but also freedom of expression, freedom of religion and other civil rights. These formed the basis of the Gdansk Agreement, a landmark social accord eventually signed on Aug. 31, 1980, by the charismatic strike leader Lech Walesa and a senior government representative. Walesa used a jumbo souvenir pen that bore a likeness of John Paul II. Five days leader, the Polish Communist Party axed its longtime leader, Edward Gierek. Various commentators have compared the events in Egypt with the fall of communism across Eastern Europe in 198990. The comparison is valid — and perhaps increasingly so, given the spreading

protests across the Middle East. But in some ways the Polish August and the birth of Solidarity may be a more telling comparison, at least for now. As with Egypt, the Polish August was a huge global news story that sparked ecstatic heights of optimism, exhilaration and punditry. And as with the Egyptian uprising, it took us into utterly uncharted waters: No one really knew where it was all going to lead. Confidence and expectations were high, but martial law crushed Solidarity less than a year-and-a-half after the Gdansk Agreement was signed. The movement was banned, hundreds of Solidarity leaders and activists were jailed, censorship was re-imposed and harsh controls were put in place. In January 1983, I myself was arrested, accused of espionage, jailed, interrogated and expelled from Poland because of my journalistic activity — apparently as a warning to both the international media and local Polish contacts. Martial law, however, did not stop the process begun with the Polish August. Dissent and efforts to foster civil society went underground, where they continued to build momentum as deteriorating economic conditions fueled mounting popular anger. In Warsaw, for example, young Jews who tentatively had begun rediscovering their roots and religious heritage met in a semi-clandestine Jewish study group they called the Jewish Flying University because each meeting took place in a different apartment. It took nearly eight years, but in 1989 roundtable negotiations between the underground opposition and the government enabled a peaceful transition to democratic rule. The images on the panels of the Solidarnosc exhibit at Yale this winter portray events that happened more than 30 years ago, but the pictures look uncannily similar to the images of the protests in Egypt. They show huge crowds, banners, slogans and confrontations between protesters and authorities. Much has been made of the role of the social media in Egypt. Back in 1980, however, there were no social media. There was no Twitter, no Facebook, no mobile phones, no Internet, no e-mail, no 24/7-hour news cycle (except for us wire service folks). CNN was the only cable news network, and it had only just been founded. The government, moreover, cut communications between Gdansk and Warsaw during the August strikes, so that in order to file their stories, some reporters actually commuted back and forth between the two cities on domestic flights. Information was carried by word of mouth or clandestine Samizdat newsletters, or shortwave broadcasts on the BBC or Radio Free Europe. Still, word got out. Protests engulfed a nation and all but brought down a hated regime. If enough people want to create change, they will, Twitter or not. One image in the Yale exhibition shows the enormous sea of people gathered in downtown Warsaw to celebrate outdoor Mass with Pope John Paul II in 1979. “I was in that crowd,” Polish-born Yale professor Krystyna Illakowicz told me. “I remember feeling that we were not afraid any longer.” (Ruth Ellen Gruber is currently a scholar in residence at the Hadassah Brandeis Institute.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011 — 23

METRO Bandage that helped save lives in Giffords shooting has Israeli backstory BY R ON KAMPEAS JTA

WASHINGTON — Israel changed Gabrielle Giffords’ life when the budding politician first visited the country in 2001 and it drew her close to Judaism. After the Arizona congresswoman was shot in the head a month ago, an Israeli innovation invented by an American immigrant to Israel may have helped save her life. First responders credited the emergency bandage colloquially known as “the Israeli bandage” with saving lives in the aftermath of the shooting in Tucson, Ariz., that left six dead and 13 wounded. Pima County officials displayed the kit at a Jan. 21 news conference in

Donation: Continued from page 1. Siegel began about five years ago. “I learned how interested she was in hunger as we worked together,” said Abrams. “It seemed like a natural fit that she and Eric would be our lead donors because of their strong belief in the fight against hunger.” Siegel and her husband’s giving comes from her sense of “responsibility to help improve the world,” she said. “It’s a privilege.” The Squirrel Hill Community Food Pantry’s expansion is larger than square footage. Since the move, the Pantry has served 234 new individuals from 93

Honor Society: Continued from page 1. Hebrew Academy. “It’s something to be proud of.” That such a large percentage of inductees hail from Pittsburgh this year is due to the high caliber of students, as well as the large number of applicants, Spielman said. “There were a lot of applicants from Pittsburgh, but more importantly, all of them were worthy of being recognized for this honor,” he said. “They were all good students, doing good stuff in the community. It made sense, and they deserved the kavod.” All students inducted into the honor society will travel to the school for an all

Tucscon, along with other militarygrade gear used in ministering to the wounded in the Jan. 8 shooting. The county had switched last June to the upgraded gear, and the shooting was its major first field test. “Without this care it would have definitely been a different situation,” Dr. Katherine Hiller, who had attended the wounded at University Medical Center, told The Los Angeles Times. It is not clear if the Israeli bandage was applied to Giffords — the details of the day were lost in the chaos — but the bandage is known for, among other things, its utility in stanching head wounds, one of the greatest challenges with conventional bandages. One model covers both entry and exit wounds, which Giffords is known to have sustained.

households. “We’re serving 750 people each month,” said Abrams. “Just a few years ago, we were at that number per year.” Clients are also now able to pick which foods they need from stocked shelves, instead of receiving pre-prepared food packages. “We’ve had so much positive feedback,” said Abrams. “Our clients take what they need and don’t need to worry about returning the food they don’t use. In the first month [operating this way], we got more praise and hugs from clients than I did in my first 4.5 years. It’s a change for the good.” (Justin Jacobs can be reached at justinj@thejewishchronicle.net.)

The bandage, like others, applies a sterile pad to the wound to stop the blood. What distinguishes it is that a built-in applicator applies the equivalent of up to 30 pounds of pressure over the pad by wrapping it in the opposite direction of the initial wrap. Head wounds require multiple standard bandages to keep a pad in place. One Israeli bandage, with its elasticized cloth, is enough for a head wound, and the very act of wrapping it around the head applies pressure to the wound. That saves precious time, and the applied pressure applicator, because it is built-in, is more stable than the external pressures used with conventional bandages. Since its 1993 invention, the Israeli bandage has become standard issue in militaries throughout the world. The U.S. military made it standard issue in 2003, in time for the Iraq War. The inventor of the pad, Bernard Bar-Natan, is a self-described Brooklyn boy, a son of Holocaust survivors who immigrated to Israel in 1979 and was drafted into the military in 1983, serving an abbreviated service as an adult. When he was going into the military, friends advised him to get a “job” or a specialty to alleviate the boredom of grunt-level service. Immigrants drafted as adults serve only a few months rather than three or more years, so they rarely serve in the military’s upper reaches. One of the few specialties available at that level is medic. As the years wore on through monthlong stints in the Israeli reserves, BarNatan became annoyed by an anomaly: The bandages available might have manufacture dates as early as 1942 or

expense-paid weekend on March 25 to 27, for “learning and socializing and being with other future leaders of the Jewish community,” Goldstein said. Additionally, the inductees will be given the opportunity to compete for five renewable $20,000 annual merit-based scholarships to attend the American Hebrew Academy. “It’s great to have so many incoming leaders in the Jewish community in JSite,” Goldstein said. “We looked at it as an honor to let these students shine, and to let them know they’re appreciated for their involvement in the Jewish community, and recognized nationally for their local achievements.” (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

DONOR

Bushinsky: Continued from page 1. fostered a revision of religious concepts especially in the more affluent segment of Judean society and caused a sharp division between Hellenists and Chasidim. It also led to the incorporation of many Greek words into Hebrew, an effect still evident in modern Hebrew as spoken and written in contemporary Israel. (Jay Bushinsky, an Israel-based political columnist can be reached at Jay@actcom.co.il.) (Editor’s note: In response to a Feb. 3

as late as the previous month, yet they remained essentially unchanged. Medics in the field were required to improvise pressure applicators — magazines, rocks, canteens, whatever was handy. “The guns we used had improved, the planes flying above us had improved, but the bandages were the same,” Bar-Natan told JTA. In the early 1990s, the Israeli government was encouraging start-ups through “incubators,” providing them low-interest loans. That encouraged Bar-Natan to jump in the waters with his idea for a newfangled bandage. In 2000, he took the bandage to Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas, where the U.S. military trains medics. Soon his company, First Care, was selling the bandage for use by elite units, including the 75th Rangers and the 101st Airborne. Three years later the bandage was certified for standard use. The Giffords shooting shined unexpected — and unwanted — publicity on his invention. “The real story is about her,” BarNatan said. He had heard about how Giffords on an American Jewish Committee trip to Israel in 2001 — shortly after she was first elected to the Arizona state Legislature — had connected with her father’s faith and decided to become a practicing Jew. Bar-Natan’s success is not going unnoticed. Michael Oren, Israel’s ambassador to Washington, told the conservative Daily Caller website recently that learning of the bandage’s role in saving lives in Tucson has been a highlight of his stint as ambassador.

letter to the editor regarding his Jan. 20 column on illegal immigration to Israel, Mr. Bushinsky has issued this statement: “There was an unfortunate misunderstanding on my part with regard to the circumstances in which 143 illegal African immigrants left Israel for their native lands late last year. Local newspaper reports on which my comments were based said their departure was due to coercion by Israeli law enforcement authorities. However, the Foreign Ministry’s spokesman, Yigal Palmor, who is a very honest and reliable source of information, said the Africans had asked to leave and were neither coerced nor subject to any kind of pressure to that end. I trust Palmor and regret having relied exclusively on the Hebrew press’ version.)

IN MEMORY OF

AL K. DEROY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ED ISAK JERRY L. GORDON . . . . . . .SAMUEL GORDON EDWARD H. HIRSCH . . . . .EDWARD J. LEVINE ILENE ISKOE . . . . .MARTHA TRACHTENBERG RHODA A. JUDD . . . . . . . . . . .JACOB MARKS STANLEY B. JUDD . . . . .HERBERT ROTHMAN MARTIN B. KAPLAN . . . . . . . . . .DAVID STERN SAUL KUPERSTOCK . . . .ANNA KUPERSTOCK MOLLYANN G. MARCH . . . .AUDREY B GREEN BEVERLY MARKS . . . . . .SAMUEL SCHWARTZ MYLES H. MARKS . . . . .JOSEPH ROSENTHAL ABBY S. MILSTEIN . . . .MARVIN SNIDERMAN DONALD I. MORITZ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MARIAN LINDEN BAUM MARLENE T. O'CONNOR . . .WILLIAM TAYLOR

DONOR

IN MEMORY OF

JOHN PHILLIPS . . . . . . . . . .ESTHER PHILLIPS MARIANNE R. RABINOWITZ . . . . . . . .HARVEY RABINOWITZ MARIANNE R. RABINOWITZ . . . . . . .JACOB H. RABINOWITZ STEPHEN G. ROBINSON . . . . . . . . . .E. MILLER JAY N. ROSENBERG . . . . . .SAM ROSENBERG JAY N. ROSENBERG . . . .PEARL ROSENBERG CORINNE ROZENSKY . . . . .BERNARD "HERKY" ROZENSKY RALPH R. SILVERMAN . . . . .JEAN G. SEMINS SELMA F. STEIN . . . . . . .DOROTHY FRIEDKEN DAVID A. WOLFSON . . . . . . . . . .ALEXANDER HANOMACHER

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24 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 17, 2011

The Jewish Chronicle February 17, 2011  

The Jewish Chronicle February 17, 2011

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