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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE thejewishchronicle.net february 10, 2011 adar 1 6, 5771

Vol. 53, No. 41

Pittsburgh, PA

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Campus police limited access to Hillel-JUC event

Standoff continues

BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

convened inclusion committees that work year round and have their own programs and activities, February has been designated as the month to bring attention to the still-unfilled needs of those with disabilities, according to Linda Marino, special needs coordinator for the Jewish Family & Children’s Service. “We’re trying to get the word out this month,” Marino said. “We’re trying to get people to think about it.” More can be done. For instance, Langer noted a congregation in California that has both a special

The University of Pittsburgh Police restricted last week’s publicly advertised Hillel Jewish University Centersponsored lecture to students after 30plus anti-Israel protestors showed up to disrupt the event. The anti-Israel protestors responded by posting a video of the event on YouTube, which they recorded without permission, and in violation of the speaker’s security directive, according to Aaron Weil, executive director of Hillel JUC. Sgt. Benjamin Anthony, a veteran of the Israel Defense Forces, visited Pitt, Monday, Jan. 31, to speak about the cost of conflict and the values that soldiers share during wartime. The Pittsburgh Israel Public Affairs Committee (PIPAC), College Republicans and Panthers for Israel hosted the event along with Hillel. While the flyer advertising the lecture said the event was open to the public, the intention of the sponsoring groups was to limit attendance to students only because of space constraints, according to organizers of the event. “There was a miscommunication,” said Mia Jacobs, president of the Hillel JUC student board. “It should not have said ‘open to the public’ on the flyer.” A pro-Palestinian group arrived en masse for the lecture. “The Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) reached out to the wider Pittsburgh community,” Weil said. “Over 30 individuals who were strongly opposed to Sgt. Benjamin Anthony — about half of whom were not students — came prepared to disrupt the event.” “We had the event in a room that was set up for about 80 people,” said Samantha Vinokor, PIPAC president. “We didn’t expect such a large turnout

Please see Disability, page 23.

Please see Protestors, page 23.

Iman Mosaad photo

Protesters pray in front of a tank in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, Jan. 30. Far from Cairo, the unrest in Egypt is stirring tensions along the Israel-Egypt border. See story, page 10.

Jewish Disability Awareness Month means ‘inclusion’ BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

Nancy Langer understands the challenges of integrating a special needs child into the Jewish community. Her 8year-old son, Martin, has autism. “It’s a struggle,” said the Mt. Lebanon resident, and member of Beth El Congregation of the South Hills. “But one thing I have noticed: I think there has been a move lately to pay more attention to the issue of including people with special needs.” There’s even an entire month devoted to the issue.

February marks Jewish Disability Awareness Month, and activities are being planned in the city and suburbs to raise community sensitivity toward those with special needs. Those events, combined with the ongoing efforts of various organizations throughout the area, can help to open doors to Jewish life for those with physical and mental challenges. “Our ultimate goal,” said Terry Feinberg Steinberg, director of special education services for the Agency for Jewish Learning (AJL), “is that people won’t need us — that everyone is just included.” Although some congregations have

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Times To Remember

KINDLE SABBATH CANDLES: 5:31 p.m. EST. SABBATH ENDS: 6:32 p.m. EST.


2 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011

Metro Excuses, excuses

Egypt revolution should not slow peace efforts — Gorenberg ies Program at the University of Pittsburgh. That same day, he will appear at Temple Sinai at 7 p.m. in a program sponsored by J Street Pittsburgh. Gorenberg is the author of “The Accidental Empire: Israel and the Birth of the Settlements, 1967-1977,” which sheds new light on Israel’s post-1967 history and its relations with the United States. He’s a senior correspondent for The American Prospect and a former editor of the Jerusalem Report. Gorenberg said Israel’s status with its Palestinian neighbors is too serious to be slowed down by excuses. “It’s a very negative situation for Israel to be involved in,” he said, “ruling over the Palestinians, not having a clear border and having a large number of disenfranchised people under Israeli [control].”

BY LEE CHOTTINER Executive Editor

The two-week-old revolution in Egypt could affect Israel in several areas, but one of them shouldn’t be the peace process, according to Gershom Gorenberg. “Whichever outcome there is with Egypt, Israel has a deep interest in reaching agreement with the Palestinian Authority,” the noted author and journalist said. Nevertheless, Gorenberg, who will be speaking in Pittsburgh next week, warned that many Israeli leaders, including Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, may use Egypt as an excuse not to move forward with peace talks, as he says they have with other external threats to the Jewish state. He said the same of Netanyahu’s demand that the Palestinian Authority recognize Israel as a Jewish state, as well as the Iranian nuclear threat. “When the Israeli government puts that front and center, it’s the same as, ‘Oh, there’s this crisis in Egypt, we can’t negotiate, or if there’s this crisis in Iran, ‘we can’t negotiate now,’ or any other of a number of excuses … He (Netanyahu)

He claimed the current Palestinian government headed by President Mahmoud Abbas is more committed to a peace settlement than Netanyahu, noting that the prime minister had the opportunity to establish a governing coalition following the last election with Tzipi Livni, leader of Kadima, the party that garnered the most votes in that race. He didn’t, Gorenberg said, because Livni would have insisted on real power sharing as well as serious peace progress. “I know this is a very uncomfortable thing for people to deal with,” he said, “but the asymmetry is that the current Israeli government is less interested in reaching an agreement than the current Palestinian government.” (Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.)

Gershom Gorenberg

Correction manufactures excuses,” said Gorenberg. The author will speak Wednesday, Feb. 16, noon, at 837 William Pitt Union in a program sponsored by the Jewish Stud-

Due to an editing error, the time and date of the Temple Sinai cabaret show featuring soloist Sara Stock Mayo were omitted from an item in the

Feb. 3. issue. The show begins at 7:45 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 12, at Temple Sinai. There will be dessert served at the intermission. There is a charge for tickets, which can be purchased in advance or at the door.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011 — 3

METRO Briefly Temple Sinai will host members of local congregations, Friday, Feb. 11, 9 p.m., following Sabbath services, to pay tribute to the memory of composersinger Debbie Friedman. The tribute marks the end of shloshim, the first 30 days of mourning, at which time it is customary to gather in Debbie Friedman memory of the deceased and to recall their life. Rabbinic and cantorial staff members of Rodef Shalom Congregation, Temple Sinai, Beth Shalom and Ohav Shalom will join together to honor Friedman’s life and work. Friedman, who died Jan. 9, released more than 20 albums and performed in sold-out concerts at Carnegie Hall and in hundreds of cities around the world during her career. She is credited with creating a new genre of contemporary, accessible Jewish music. Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion recently announced it would rename its cantorial school for Friedman, who taught there in the last few years of her life. This event is open to the community and everyone is welcome to bring their voices and their musical instruments. Contact Linda Raden at (412) 4219715 for more information. Squirrel Hill Urban Coalition has released its revised 2010 update to its community Master Plan. According to the revised plan, 11 of the 15 major projects first identified in the 1990 version have been completed. But the plan also identifies new or continuing issues in 2010. Among those issues are: • Enhance the business district in the face of changing tastes and increasing competition from other areas; • Continue the work of the SHUC Education Committee; • Address several housing issues in the neighborhood including affordable housing, pockets of sub-standard housing, zoning code violations, an older housing stock and the need for housing choices for various stages of our residents’ lives; • Advancing a trail along the north shore of the Mononghahela River between the existing Duck Hollow Trail and the Carrie Furnace site being developed by Allegheny County. Pittsburgh Area Jewish Committee is sponsoring a program to bring together Christian, Hindu, Jewish and Muslim teenagers, Sunday, Feb. 20, at Oakland Catholic High School. The teenagers, who will come from all over the Pittsburgh region, will

explore and share information on their various faith traditions. The program will include a tour of the Oakland Catholic chapel, social action project, tasting of traditional foods and workshop on how the four represented religions address death and the afterlife. Registration is at 1:45 p.m. and the event lasts from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Interested teenagers or youth group leaders should contact PAJC at (412) 605-0816 or at pajc@pajc.net. Congregation Poale Zedeck is hosting an art auction Sunday, Feb. 13. A light dinner of soup, homemade rolls and salads, dessert and coffee will be served. The auction will feature art for all tastes and budgets. The preview will be from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. in the Congregation Poale Zedeck, Social Hall, 6318 Phillips Ave., and the auction begins at 6:30 p.m. There is a charge. Call Poale Zedeck at (412) 421-9786 or e-mail Yikara Levari at ylevari@hillelpgh.org for more information. Congregation Beth Shalom is hosting its annual winter film festival class with discussions by expert facilitators. The second in the series will be screened in the Samuel and Minnie Hyman Ballroom, 5915 Beacon St., Squirrel Hill, Sunday, Feb. 13, 7 p.m. “I Was There in Color” (2009), is a documentary about the newly discovered film reels of Fred Monosson showing footage from the Holocaust and the birth of the State of Israel in color. The movie tells the story that lay dormant in a basement in Brookline, Mass., for more than 40 years until it was accidentally found a few days before it was to be dumped. Contact Beth Shalom at (412) 4212288 for more information. Refreshments will be served and all are welcome to attend. There is no charge but donations are appreciated. South Hills JCC and Chabad of the South Hills will host a pre-Purim seniors concert and luncheon, Wednesday, March 16, 12:30 p.m. at the South Hills Jewish Community Center, 345 Kane Blvd, Scott Township. Contact Chabad at (412) 344-2424 or at Batya@chabadsh.com for more information. Rodef Shalom Sisterhood will screen the next film in its Movie Night Series, “Making Trouble,” Sunday, Feb. 13, 7:30 p.m. in Levy Hall. The documentary tells the story of six of the funniest women comics of the last century — Molly Picon, Fanny Brice, Sophie Tucker, Joan Rivers, Gilda Radner and playwright, Wendy Wasserstein. Made in 2007 by the Jewish Women’s Archives in collaboration with director Rachel Talbot, the film explores rich entertainment history through wellpreserved and rarely seen archival material, photos, films and television clips. It has been screened at film festivals Please see Briefly, page 5.

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4 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011

METRO Pittsburgh psychiatrist opposed to Tutu speech at national meeting BY LEE CHOTTINER Executive Editor

A Pittsburgh area psychiatrist is protesting an appearance by South African Anglican Bishop Desmond Tutu at a national psychiatric gathering in May. Tutu is scheduled to deliver the principal address at the Convocation of Fellows during the American Psychiatric Association’s annual meeting in Hawaii. He also will be made an honorary fellow at that time. All of which irks many Jewish members of the APA, including Dr. Daniel Shrager of Jefferson Hills, a member of Beth Israel Center. Shrager and several other APA members are planning some way to register their displeasure with Tutu’s appearance during the meeting. He wasn’t prepared to disclose the details of that protest, but 27 members, who have decided not to attend the gathering, have listed their names on an ad, which will run in the next issue of Psychiatric Times — the APA publication — explaining why. One of the signees, Dr. Thomas G. Gutheil, a distinguished life fellow of the APA, has gone further, resigning from the organization. “Although my feeling that the APA does not have its members’ interests at heart

Bishop Desmond Tutu

has been growing for many years,” Gutheil wrote in a letter to the members, “the precipitant for this action is, first, the selection of Archbishop Desmond Tutu as recipient of one of APA’s highest honors, the role of convocation speaker and second (and more important), the complete indifference and non-responsiveness of

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the leadership when his despicable record of anti-Semitism and anti-Israel communications was explicitly pointed out by actual cites and quotations. The leadership’s refusal not only to dis-invite him but even to respond to members’ concerns was, for me, the final straw.” Tutu’s anti-Israel remarks are well known in Jewish circles. Not only has he referred to Israel as an apartheid state, last year he urged the Cape Town Opera to cancel a tour of Israel, which it refused to do, and called for an academic, artistic, social and political boycott of Israel including the severing of research cooperation on water purification between the University of Johannesburg and Ben Gurion University in Israel. APA is on record with a position statement opposing all academic boycotts. Among his many other controversial remarks, Tutu has said the Palestinians are paying “penance” for the Holocaust. Shrager believes the APA didn’t properly vet Tutu before inviting him to speak, and that its president, Dr. Carol Bernstein, wasn’t aware of his anti-Israel stances. But in a reply to an e-mailed query by Shrager, he said Bernstein did not back away from her position on the cleric’s appearance at the annual meeting. “She said she really liked him and he

had good things to say,” said Shrager, paraphrasing Bernstein’s response to him. “She said something about people taking things out of context, but nothing that ever responded to the concerns, no actual response to the anti-Israel sentiment — not just anti-Israel, some of his remarks are clearly anti-Semitic.” Bernstein said she was unavailable to talk when reached by the Chronicle by phone on Monday. She also did not respond to an e-mailed request for comment or a message left at her office. As Shrager gets involved in the protest, he said he’s discovering that many people are unaware of Tutu’s criticism of Israel. “Not many people know about his antiIsrael rhetoric,” he said. “They remember him as a part of the anti-apartheid event and that’s about it.” Shrager is no stranger to public battles such as these. In 2003, he won a court battle against Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield and its subcontractors for terminating his participation in the program because he refused to share confidential patient files with the HMO. At the time, the case was believed to be the first of its kind in the nation. (Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.)

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011 — 5

METRO Briefly Continued from page 3. around the world, including the Jerusalem Film Festival and the Pittsburgh Jewish Israeli Film Festival in 2008. The film is open to the community and there is no charge. Congregation Beth Shalom Men’s Club will hold its annual sports luncheon, Sunday, Feb. 13, 12:15 p.m., in the congregation’s Samuel and Minnie Hyman Ballroom, 5915 Beacon St. in Squirrel Hill. The event, emceed for the 14th year by WTAE-TV sportscaster Andrew Stockey, will benefit more than 400 special needs people across the area, while guests will meet local sports celebrities, including members of the AFC Champion Steelers and several collegiate athletes. The event will include celebrity introductions and hot dog/hamburger lunch from 12:15 to 1 p.m. followed by celebrity arm wrestling matches and autograph sessions. This annual program is provided as a free service to the special needs community, and is funded by the Beth Shalom Men’s Club and a generous group of donors called their “Angels.” Contact Congregation Beth Shalom at (412) 421-2288 for reservations. Rodef Shalom Congregation is establishing a new incentive grant program, underwritten by the Fine Family Foundation. Rodef Shalom Incentive Grants

(RSIG) are intended to encourage awareness of and connection to Jewish life. Specifically, Spring 2011 RSIG-funded projects must draw visibility to or support the celebration of the festival of Passover. As such, projects will coincide with the holiday, which runs from April 18 to 25. Examples of grant-worthy projects include an innovative public seder, an awareness campaign of holiday themes, an interactive Passover website component, an “app,” or another tool that supports the celebration of this Jewish festival. Applications are due on Feb. 15. For application guidelines, visit rodefshalom.org/news/publication. Contact Executive Director Jeffrey Herzog at (412) 621-6566 x119 or herzog@rodefshalom.org for more information. New Light Congregation will host a Shabbat Kiddush luncheon, Saturday, Feb. 12, following Shabbat services. The luncheon is in gratitude to the Steelers for a great season. The luncheon is open to all worshippers. There is no charge. The Agency for Jewish Learning, the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh and the Jewish Community Center will sponsor a showing of the documentary, “Including Samuel,” Sunday Feb. 13, from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Squirrel Hill JCC, Kaufmann Building, Room 204. The community film screening will also include a conversation for Jewish Disability Awareness Month. Individuals requiring accommodation should e-mail tsteinberg@ajlpittsburgh.org.


6 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011

Opinion

The Jewish Chronicle

Bang for the buck

Barbara Befferman, CEO EDITORIAL STAFF Lee Chottiner, Executive Editor Justin Jacobs, Associate Editor Angela Leibowicz, Community Editor Toby Tabachnick, Staff Writer SALES STAFF Susie Mangel, Senior Sales Associate Roberta Letwin, Sales Associate PRODUCTION STAFF Dawn Wanninger, Production Manager Nancy Bishop Production Artist BUSINESS STAFF Jennifer Barill, Comptroller Josh Reisner, Office Manager Donna Mink, Classified & Subscriptions Marcy Kronzek, Receptionist BOARD OF TRUSTEES Davida Fromm, President Richard Kitay, Vice President Cindy Goodman-Leib, Secretary Lou Weiss, Treasurer Lynn Cullen, Past President Carolyn Hess Abraham Brian Balk Daniel Berkowitz Stephen Fienberg Malke Steinfeld Frank Stanley Greenfield David Grubman Thomas Hollander Larry Honig Evan Indianer David Levine Judy Palkovitz Amy W. Platt Jane Rollman Benjamin Rosenthal Dodie Roskies Charles Saul Andrew Schaer Ilana Schwarcz Jonathan Wander Published every Thursday by the Pittsburgh Jewish Publication and Education Foundation 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Flr. , Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Phone: 412-687-1000 FAX: 412-521-0154 E-Mail: newsdesk@thejewishchronicle.net SUBSCRIPTION: $44 in Pennsylvania $46 East of the Mississippi $48 West of the Mississippi and FL NEWSSTAND PRICE $1.50 PER COPY POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE JEWISH CHRONICLE, 5915 BEACON ST., 3RD, FLR., PITTSBURGH, PA 15217 (PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS TO JEWISH TELEGRAPHIC AGENCY AND FEATURE SERVICE) USPS 582-740 Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to the Jewish Chronicle become the property of this publication, which is not responsible for the return or loss of such items. The Chronicle does not endorse the goods or services advertised in its pages and makes no representation to the kashrut of food products and services in said advertising. The publisher is not liable for damages if, for any reason whatsoever, he fails to publish an advertisement or for any error in an advertisement. Acceptance of advertisers and of ad copy is subject to the publisher’s approval. The Chronicle is not responsible if ads violate applicable laws and the advertiser will indemnify, hold harmless and defend the Chronicle from all claims made by governmental agencies and consumers for any reason based on ads appearing in the Chronicle.

he United States supports Egypt every year, this year to the tune of $1.3 billion, in defense aid. So, what are we buying? An Egyptian army that is intrinsically tied to the Pentagon, an Egyptian government that is an ally in America’s war on terrorism and an Arab country that keeps the peace with Israel, albeit a cold one. That’s a lot of bang for the buck. So what do we do with that money should the regime of President Hosni Mubarak fall, to be replaced by a more extreme, perhaps even jihadist regime? Hopefully nothing. First, it’s not a foregone conclusion that the extremists will take over the government once Mubarak leaves — which must happen sooner or later. True, the strongest, best-organized opposition political party in Egypt is the

T

Muslim Brotherhood, whose members are certainly not friends of Israel. But the Muslim Brotherhood is not the strongest political force in Egypt. That distinction goes to the Egyptian army, which could have much to lose by an extremist takeover of the country — about $1.3 billion worth. (By the way, leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood called a press conference Wednesday to announce they do not want to take over the government, merely to be a part of it, according to the Jerusalem Post. You can believe them or not, but this much is so, they know Egypt is not Iran, it is a traditionally secular state in which they are still a minority.) So one could argue that $1.3 billion in aid is a good investment for the United States. It might just keep Egypt in the U.S. camp and its peace treaty with

Israel in force. In fact, it’s so good an investment that Congress and the president might want to increase it. If the level of the U.S. aid to Egypt remains the same in the future, while the costs of arms and other equipment go up, as they likely will, then effectively the U.S. support for the Egyptian military will shrink. Meanwhile, U.S. military aid to Israel — scheduled to reach $3 billion this year — rises commensurate with cost increases, according to JTA. We think U.S. financial support for Egypt makes sense — bang for the buck, if you will — and despite some suggestions in Congress that the aid should be used as leverage to keep Egypt firmly in the U.S. camp, the carrot approach will work better than the stick.

American Jews must stand up for the New Middle East joel rubin

WASHINGTON — Sometimes the Middle East just plain explodes. And when it does, the residue of the fallout tends to last for a very long time. Major events in the Middle East inevitably become woven into the social fabric of the region’s peoples in ways that make the past feel like the present. With each new explosion, issues accumulate rather than dissipate, and the region’s people are never quite the same. Now is one of those times. And unlike the explosions of the past half-century, this one isn’t creating war, but is actually creating democracy. We are witnessing history in the making, where the people of the Middle East are rising up to change their world. We as American Jews need to be on the right side of this history. Let’s start with a refresher about the violent history of the Middle East. In the 1930s and ’40s, the Middle East exploded from a civil war between Jews and Arabs over control of Palestine. In the 1950s, the region exploded from an Egyptian revolution and the rise of PanArab nationalism. In the 1960s and 1970s, it exploded from major wars between Israel and her neighbors over Israel’s survival. In the 1980s, it exploded from sectarian battles (Lebanon) and border wars (Iran-Iraq), as well as popular uprisings (Palestinian Intifada). And in the 1990s and 2000s it exploded from external invasion and occupation. Each of these violent experiences is still simmering, living in the reptile memory banks of the people of the region. Israelis are still fighting for legitimacy as if it’s 1948; Lebanese are still fighting each other for supremacy; nationalism and sectarianism still plague Iran and Iraq; and the Palestinians are caught amongst each of these currents. As the violent conflicts persist in the minds of the people of the region,

they are prevented from moving forward with their lives. Yet now, instead of violent conflict, the region has instead exploded in a people’s revolt, caused by frustration against the region’s governments. Can this be the moment that the Middle East shifts course and actually turns in a direction that helps resolve some of the region’s core problems, including poverty, failing educational systems, women’s inequality, and political repression? With this question on the table, it’s now crucial that we in the American Jewish community assess our next moves. How we react is important, as our views about the Middle East matter in Washington.

So now is not the time for the American Jewish community to, as Margaret Thatcher once said to George Bush, “go wobbly.” The new Middle East is arriving and it’s time to make sure that we in the Jewish community are on the right side of this change. In the past, when the Middle East exploded in violent conflict, American Jews would react by racing to support Israel. These reactions included sending financial and moral support to Israel, as well as working the corridors of power in Washington to ensure that Israeli security needs were met. Yet when relations between Israel and the Arab world were broached, the baseline assumption was that the Arab world was run by either autocrats or mullahs, and that one should cast a skeptical eye on these governments. Democratic change was viewed with suspicion, largely out of fear of what lay underneath. Well, I have news: Middle Easterners control their countries and they are now rising up, challenging the status quo and calling for real change in their governments. “Stability” is giving way to something new. We should not sentimentalize

this stability, as it is grounded in an authoritarianism that has bred the extremism we detest. So while what happens in these countries is not up to us to determine, how American Jews react to these changes will drive how we are perceived by the people of the region. American Jews cannot miss this unique opportunity to be on the right side of history. Let’s remember that the revolts in Tunisia and Egypt are about the people of these countries. In each instance, political repression was (and is) the norm, with elite cliques running both the governments and economies. The Arab Middle East is the world’s least democratic region, and despite its great oil wealth, the population sits near the bottom of the global economy. There is a reason why the people are rebelling. Change is long overdue. So while the Arab world undergoes its own internal reckoning, American strategic alliances with the authoritarian governments of the region are coming under deep strain. These governments have oftentimes been our friends, but are buckling, searching for ways to keep the calm. As these governments change, the United States must respond in the affirmative, not clinging to the past, but instead building bridges to the new powers — powers that may likely be driven by the democratic voices of these countries. As American Jews, we must call on our government to press the governments of the region to release the pressure and meet the aspirations of their people. So now is not the time for the American Jewish community to, as Margaret Thatcher once said to George Bush, “go wobbly.” The new Middle East is arriving and it’s time to make sure that we in the Jewish community are on the right side of this change, supporting it vociferously so that the people of the Middle East can finally create a positive chapter in their lives. (Joel Rubin, deputy director and chief operating officer of the National Security Network in Washington, D.C., and a Pittsburgh native, can be reached at joelr@thejewishchronicle.net. His views are his own and not necessarily those of the National Security Network.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011 — 7

OPINION

Open the doors for hungry Gen-Yers to serve Guest Columnist KENNETH BRANDER NEW YORK — It comes as no surprise that in a world where many neglect the importance of community, iPhones, iPods and iPads are the trendiest gadgets. These devices represent a culture that desires to deconstruct the power and purpose of community, placing all importance on the needs of the individual. Despite this societal disposition, I believe that many young people of this generation possess an ever-increasing eagerness to live lives of meaning. With all the serious setbacks brought on by our new economic realities, the Gen-Y generation still had the opportunity to amass so much material stuff and travel with unprecedented frequency. But these fleeting objects and experiences do nothing to quench their thirst for a purposeful existence. Just look at the new phenomenon in Israel in which sheirut leumi — alternative voluntary national service for those who cannot or do not serve in the military — once was the sole purview of the

religious Zionist community. Recent years have seen a rise of new organizations such as Ma’ase, Shlomit and Sheirut Leumi Mamlachti empowering young adults of Israel’s secular community to volunteer for a year of service before their obligatory time in the army or enabling those exempt from army service who still wish to impact the destiny of the State of Israel. These organizations are collectively serving thousands. One illustration of the same development appears at Yeshiva University’s Center for the Jewish Future, which sends nearly a thousand young adults on community initiatives, service learning trips and experiential learning missions across the globe. And the center cannot keep up with ever-greater student demand. Organizations throughout North America that work with young adults have seen a similar phenomenon and are working in partnership to create structures permitting all of us to better respond to this yearning. Recently a new organization, Repair the World, was established to help coordinate and fund successful models of this kind of engagement. It has even created a website allowing adults to find various short- and long-term volunteer opportunities around the world. Please see Brander, page 9.

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8 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 3, 2011

OPINION

Celebrating 25 years of freedom for Natan Sharansky Guest Columnist AVI WEISS NEW YORK — Feb. 11 marks 25 years since Natan Sharansky crossed the Glienicke Bridge from East to West Germany and became a free man. Countless stories have been told about Sharansky’s defiance of the Soviets and his courageous actions during his more than nine years of imprisonment. Sharansky is one of many heroic prisoners of Zion. But it is through his wife, Avital, that the world came to know him during his years of incarceration in ways that we did not know the others. Avital and Natan were married in July 1974. The next morning Avital was ordered out of the Soviet Union with a promise that Natan would soon follow. It was not to be. Four years later, the Soviets accused Natan of spying for the United States and sentenced him to 13 years in prison. It was during this period that Avital undertook the worldwide campaign that led to her husband’s release. Avital’s style as an activist was modest yet intensely focused and unwavering. She spoke out in the spirit of the biblical message to the prophet Elijah that the most profound form of protest is delivered in a still, small voice.

Even at rallies her voice hardly rose above a whisper. At the General Assembly of the Jewish Federations in Washington, Avital addressed the plenary, concluding her remarks by softly imploring the audience to walk with her to the Soviet Embassy to raise a voice on behalf of her husband. Her call was gentle yet powerful, and hundreds followed her. She also had the uncanny ability to walk a fine line, working within the establishment as well as from the outside. Avital knew that she needed the help of the mainstream, but was careful never to march to their orders. She walked the tightrope, instinctively understanding that results would come only from a symphony of voices, from within as well as from without. On International Human Rights Day in 1984, influential figures gathered at the White House to listen to a talk by President Ronald Reagan. Members of the audience were given strict instructions to remain in place. Suddenly, Avital stepped out of the line, approached the president and asked for an appointment to speak with him about the plight of her husband. The president, a very gracious man, assented. The picture of Avital leaning down as she spoke to President Reagan found its way to front pages around the world. Despite the unbelievable odds, Avital was always full of faith — not only faith that ultimately she would succeed in her quest to gain the release of

her husband, but also religious faith. At our home in Riverdale, N.Y., where she often spent Shabbat, Avital would use oil instead of candles to light the Sabbath candles. I once asked her why. She replied that she was convinced that her husband’s freedom would come about miraculously, much like the Chanuka miracle, when a small cruse of oil lasted eight days. Even in the heat of the struggle Avital never lost her sense of humor. After Leonid Brezhnev died, she stood in front of the Soviet Mission to the United Nations and announced to the media that the Soviet premier had passed away because he had not released her husband. I pulled her aside and said that message would not resonate with the larger public. A year later, after Andrei Kosygin died and was replaced by Yuri Andropov, she stood in the same place and declared that her husband was not yet free, and she warned Andropov that he would suffer the same fate if he did not let Natan go. A year later, after Andropov died, there she was again, warning his successor, Mikhail Gorbachev: Here’s your chance; if you don’t release Natan, you’ll face your end. To this day, if you were to ask Avital why Gorbachev is still alive, she would say he was smart enough to let Natan go. Avital detested being in the public eye. Her style was to step back to make room for others, inspiring them to speak out not only for her husband but for all those persecuted in the for-

mer Soviet Union. As Natan celebrates the 25th anniversary of his release, no doubt tens of thousands of people will proudly and deservedly take some personal credit for Sharansky’s liberation. That was Avital’s strength. She made each person feel as if she or he were making the difference. Though it is true that many dedicated souls did contribute, it was Avital who led the battle, and the victory in many ways was her triumph. Once in a Toronto airport, I overheard a young woman carrying her infant daughter telling Avital that she had decided to name her newborn Avital in admiration of her struggle, her courage and all that Avital had come to mean to the larger world. Avital thanked the woman and humbly walked away. I have no doubt that in the world today there are many young women named Avital in homage to this remarkable woman. Natan’s freedom is not only a celebration of his great courage; it is also a celebration of Avital’s formidable moral and spiritual strength. (Rabbi Avi Weiss is the senior rabbi of the Hebrew Institute of Riverdale, and the founder and president of the Yeshivat Chovevei Torah Rabbinical School, both in New York City. He was national chairman of the Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011 — 9

OPINION Brander: Continued from page 7. In contrast to this vitality, we increasingly hear of grayer board rooms, the passing of philanthropists who supported our organizations, the thinning of the ranks of dedicated volunteers and a dearth of professionals to service our many worthwhile organizations. So how do we in the Jewish communal and educational world leverage the hunger of the Gen-Yers to insure the future health of our institutions? More importantly, how do we insure that this new generation brings its creativity, charisma and capacity to the leadership table with a commitment to Jewish ideals, guaranteeing the perpetuation of the soul of our sacred community? We need look no further than these forms of experiential experiences as a start, for they transform young adults. I have often shared with students that their experiences on service missions should empower them to understand why the Hebrew word for giving, NaTaN, is a palindrome. For when one gives to another with the sole purpose of effectuating change, what one receives in return is as great or even greater than the efforts expended. No more can we hear the old joke told among North American service providers that begins with a participant asking how does one say tikkun olam in Hebrew? Or why doesn’t Judaism have a concept similar to tikkun olam? Leadership experiences, whether in Israel, the former Soviet Union, Thailand or around the corner must be contextualized with

the ideals of Jewish leadership. We must share the paradigms of leadership found in the Bible: that of the kohen (priest) and the navi (prophet). Rooted in externals, the priest realized his holiness through the wearing of his special garb and his lineage. As the custodian of ritual for the Jewish community, he guaranteed that the form and the function of the Temple and the Jewish community passed on from generation to generation. We must share with our young adults that participation in the identical rituals in which our great-grandparents engaged (and perhaps even using their candlesticks or kiddush cup for the Shabbat/holiday experience) creates a sense of continuity and immortality to the Jewish story. Like the kohen, our leadership experiences must serve as an incubator to engage our young adults in exploring and knowing the Jewish story. Yet that is just half the job, for they must also embrace the role of the prophet. Dress and lineage possessed no consequence for the prophet. His/her concern rested in the substance of the religious experience in the effort to insure that the ritual not become robotic or devoid of meaning and purpose. Like the prophet, our young adults must experience a tradition imbued with passion and principle. We must insure the placing of service learning initiatives and leadership opportunities within a rich Jewish context. This allows our experiential experiences to give voice to the immortal and contemporary traditions of our people. The Gen-Yers wish to live lives that matter. They are hungry for community, and where they do not find ones that wel-

come them, they will create their own. They do not wish to escape but to engage; they do not want to judge or to be judged but to join. They do not desire indictment; they seek inspiration. They also are not willing to accept the community silos of the past but are interested in models that perform. They are not interested in being silent partners in an organizational bureaucracy but want to matter and will accept process only if it leads to purpose. They are looking to change the spelling of their gaming console, the Wii, from two i’s to an “e.’’

If we create portals of entry, share with them our story undiluted or whitewashed, and find the courage to let them make it their own, they will do something that we cannot: guarantee our future.

(Rabbi Kenneth Brander is the David Mitzner dean of Yeshiva University’s Center for the Jewish Future. Its missions focus on helping impoverished individuals, Jews and non-Jews, around the world.)


10 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 27, 2010

Globe Fragile peace?

Revolution raises concern along the Israel-Egypt border BY DINA KRAFT JTA

KADESH BARNEA, Israel — Driving along the Israel-Egypt border near this southern Israeli town, rusted metal posts strung with barbed wire give way to sand dunes and an exposed, open border as wide open as the question of what will become of the countries’ relations now that Egypt is in turmoil. During a break between border patrols, which have been stepped up since the recent protests in Egypt began, a few Israeli soldiers climbing into a Hummer say they have been told to be on alert for possible trouble. But for now, the same quiet borne of 32 years of a cold but functional peace prevails. “It’s a very quiet border and we never expected it to continue being anything else but quiet,” said Sigalit Efrat, 36, who moved to Be’er Milka, overlooking the Egyptian border, eight years ago. Efrat and her husband came here from the Golan Heights, Israeli territory disputed by Syria, seeking life in an agricultural community in a seemingly more stable part of Israel. “You can never know what will be, but it’s in everyone’s interest to keep things calm,” said Sigalit’s husband, Adi Efrat, who grows pomegranates and lilies here, mostly for export to Europe. He was referring not only to the Israeli and Egyptian governments, but Bedouin smugglers who make brisk business smuggling migrant workers and refugees across the border. They also run a lucrative sideline trafficking in drugs and women. For the residents of the five Israeli villages near the Egyptian border, the mood is watchful waiting. Last week, a group of Chinese migrants were found hiding in the greenhouses of the Kadesh Barnea, the Israeli

Israel Egypt border: Residents on both sides hope for the best in light of unrest in Egypt.

town nearest the border. Residents shrug it off as nothing new. What is new, they note, is the behavior of the Egyptian soldiers manning the border. They are no longer facing Israel but toward the vast expanse of the Sinai Peninsula on their own side. Menachm Zafrir, a farmer at Kadesh Barnea who for 25 years served as its civilian security chief, offered his own commentary Feb. 4 just hours after

Egyptian Bedouin used rocket-propelled grenades to attack an Egyptian state security office in the northern Sinai. “They have changed direction to make sure the Bedouin don’t slaughter them,” Zafrir said of the Egyptian soldiers. Reports in Israeli media say that Egyptian soldiers are building reinforced gun positions on the rooftops of their border outposts to cope with possible attacks.

The Bedouin may want a modicum of quiet along the border to keep their smuggling business afloat, but they also harbor aggression against the Egyptian authorities, who they say have discriminated against them and mistreated them for years. Israeli authorities fear the Bedouin will help smuggle weapons and militants Please see Egypt, next page.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011 — 11

GLOBE Egypt: Continued from previous page. into Gaza and Israel. The 166-mile Israel-Egypt border has been Israel’s quietest front since the historic peace accord between the countries was signed in 1979 after Israel agreed to withdraw from the Sinai. The absence of the threat of a mobilizing Egyptian army meant Israel did not have to concern itself with defending its longest border — even when it went to war against Lebanon in 1982 or, more recently, against Hamas in Gaza at the end of 2008. The peace meant Israel could leave most of the border without a fence. Last year, however, a growing number of African migrants sneaking across the border prompted the Israeli government to begin construction of a fence. Zafrir, 53, who settled Kadesh Barnea along with several others who, like him, had been evacuated from an Israeli settlement of the same name in Sinai, drives along the narrow paved border road in his white pickup truck. His mother is Egyptian and grew up in Cairo. He grew up speaking Arabic at home and says he has been to Cairo dozens of times for business. “I feel very much at home there,” Zafrir said. “What will happen there now depends entirely on which way the politics of it all goes. The people themselves are good people.” As he drives on the road he speaks of the unpleasant uncertainty of what’s next. “We are the soft underbelly of the border,” he said, noting the vulnerability of

his town and the cluster of other Israeli villages. Because of their isolated location, if there are security problems of any kind it is the army, not the far-away police, on call. Some local residents, all trained soldiers, are part of a first-response civilian team with access to army-issued weapons in a time of emergency. Israeli soldiers were stationed here for the first time following the 2005 Israeli withdrawal from Gaza amid concerns that the security calculus might have changed. But the area has been quiet, for the most part. “I like the peacefulness here, the endless views, the virginity of the place,” Zafrir said, driving up a rocky slope to an overlook. “This place has become my life’s work.” Casting his gaze toward the Egyptian soldiers at a mustard-colored outpost about 300 yards away, he said, “They must be confused. They don’t know what will be.” Zafrir’s neighbor, Moshe Gini, 52, does not know what will become of his job. Since the riots began in Egypt, he has been staying home, unable to go to work driving trucks into Israel from Egypt that are loaded with carbonated gas used for making beverages. Before the unrest Gini would go to the nearby Nitzana border terminal, the only commercial crossing between Israel and Egypt, to pick up supplies. “A lot of people work there,” he said. “In the past, the border might close sporadically because of diplomatic tension, but overall it worked well. “We are all waiting to see what will happen in Egypt,” Gini adds, pursing his lips together. “Nobody knows what will be.”


12 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011

Style Israeli punks crash into U.S. rock with

Tel Aviv trio Monotonix is one of Israel’s most successful rock’n’roll exports. But the band’s latest album lacks memorable songs.

Photo credit Matt Dunlap

Not for Ravers

CD Review BY JUSTIN JACOBS Associate Editor

Monotonix didn’t have a choice — the Israeli punk rock trio from Tel Aviv simply had to come to the States. But it wasn’t ambition for stardom, exactly. While garnering a cult following in Tel Aviv beginning in 2005, the band would skip the stage and play in the middle of a crowd, causing such raucous live shows that they were banned from most of the venues in the city. Monotonix, or drummer Haggai Fershtman, guitarist Yonatan Gat and singer Ami Shalev, headed for the states in 2006, and the band’s been an underground punk sensation ever since, known more for electric, riotous and

ridiculous live shows than actual songs or albums. The band’s second full-length album, “Not Yet,” is a start to giving Monotonix some credit for its music as well as its mayhem. But just a start. The album, full of fast, thrashing guitars, spasmodic percussion and Shalev’s wild howling, simply doesn’t add up to much. Considering the spectacle of Monotonix’s live show, it’s a shame that the same excitement and unpredictability doesn’t translate. Instead, we get 10 songs in just over 30 minutes that sound basically indistinguishable, with nary a catchy melody between them. “Not Yet” was produced by the legendary Steve Albini, and his trademarks are obvious: raw-sounding guitars, stripped down production. “Before I Pass Away” has the same fast, drunken swagger of The Stooges; “Try Try Try” thrives on a darker, harsher riff that would be at home on a Black Sabbath record. The most obvious comparison, though, is certainly Black Flag. These short, terse songs aren’t given much breathing room. Instead,

the band maintains controlled chaos throughout; each song sounds like it’s about to explode. Though those comparisons are sure lofty, Monotonix can’t capture the magic of their influences — what made those bands beloved by rock nerds and casual listeners alike — on record. The songs just aren’t as memorable. The band needs to work harder crafting unique, engaging songs before letting their patented punk fury take over. With both, Monotonix could create some downright great rock music. And yet, this is punk rock, not pop music, after all, and the music is certainly loud and chaotic. Invite some friends over, share and crank this till the walls shake, and you will undoubtedly have a good time. But such a listening environment — just like that of a Monotonix show — is more about mood, not music. But play “Not Yet” while driving to work by yourself, and you might end up going back to bed. (Justin Jacobs can be reached at justinj@thejewishchronicle.net.)

The Israeli music scene is often unfairly categorized as a uniform landscape of glow stick techno and dance music. But just ask the garage rockers of Monotonix — not every Israeli band on the scene is rave-ready. Some just want to rock. Here are some that rock the hardest. 1. Useless ID. This veteran punk rock band formed in Haifa in the mid-1990s. After gigging around Israel for a few years, Useless ID began touring the states and gained a small following, touring with bands like The Ataris and No Use for a Name. In 2009, the band recorded an album in Hebrew — its first. 2. Chaos Rabak. In 2005, a documentary called on Israeli punk rock, “Jericho’s Echo,” named Chaos Rabak Israel’s most popular street punk band. The loud, brash band dress and sound like the origins of punk rock back in 1977. 3. Nikmat Olalim. Talk about a controversial band. This political punk band, calling themselves “anti-Zionist,” wrote harsh diatribes against what they called Jewish terrorism. The band hailed from Kfar Saba and Jerusalem, and songs included the harsh “Selective Blindness” and “Controlled Explosion.”


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011 — 13


14 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2010

STYLE/SPORTS ‘Balfour Declaration’ a comprehensive read — perhaps overly so Book R eview

BY NEAL GENDLER For the Chronicle

Our familiar, too-simple explanation of the Balfour Declaration as a reward to Russianborn chemist Chaim Weizmann for synthesizing acetone for wartime explosives is thoroughly demolished by Jonathan Schneer in his richly detailed account of the intrigue leading to the document. Weizmann, charming and highly regarded by British leaders, fronted British Zionists’ lobbying efforts. But the declaration by Foreign Secretary Arthur Balfour also came from British politicians’ beliefs that Jews deserved a homeland to be created from carving up the empire of a defeated Turkey, Germany’s World War I ally. It also was the result of Britain’s de-

sire for sovereignty over the holy places and for limiting the reach of a postwar, French-controlled Syria. It conflicted with expectations Britain created for Hejaz Arabs to get them to rebel against Turkey, with late-war feelers for a separate peace with Turkey, and with the desires of assimilationist British Jews, who lobbied fiercely against the Zionist goals. British policies planted the seeds of today’s Israeli-Arab conflict by seeming to promise the same sliver of land to two peoples, using both as weapons against Turkey while keeping both nationalist movements oblivious to their collision course. Schneer is a specialist in modern British history, and his story of the politics leading up to the Nov. 2, 1917, declaration is exhaustive — with a huge bibliography — and occasionally nearly exhausting. It includes such details as the London Zionist Political Committee “meeting at the faux-Gothic, faux-Tudor, and long-since-demolished Imperial Hotel on Russell Square.” By the time we get to Weizmann and Britain thwarting a peace mission to Turkey — lest the Ottomans retain Palestine — the account of meetings, memos, recommendations and Please see Balfour, page 23.

Pittsburgh Project defeats JCC, sweeps season series BY ZACHARY WEISS Chronicle Correspondent

In a back-and-forth game between two Greater Pittsburgh Independent Basketball League (GPIBL) teams, Pittsburgh Project defeated the JCC 60-51 Monday at the JCC gym. Jesse Goleman led JCC in scoring with 11 points, followed by teammate Ryan Seiavitch with 10. Pittsburgh Project’s leading scorer shot 19 points. “I don’t think we played their game as much as we didn’t play our game,” JCC Head Coach Andy Pakler said. “I think that a lot of teams in this league play very similar, and it’s the same formula to beat everybody, and the question is can we complete that formula every time we step onto the court.” Pittsburgh Project scored eight consecutive points in the first quarter staking itself to a 10-6 lead, but JCC made up part of the deficit and trailed 12-10 going into the second. JCC took control of the second quar-

ter late, as Seiavitch scored the tying and go ahead points giving his team a 25-23 lead. JCC led at the half 27-26. But Pittsburgh Project went ahead in the third quarter leading 43-41 by the end of the period. Pittsburgh Project then went on a sixpoint run in the fourth quarter taking a 49-41 lead. An animated Pakler then used a timeout, which he spent telling his players what he wanted them to do defensively. The team responded, pressuring Pittsburgh Project and scoring seven points of its own cutting the lead to one point. After another timeout, Pittsburgh Project took control of the game, grabbing rebounds and passing the basketball for lay-ups. Pittsburgh Project ran away with the game and emerged victorious after the final buzzer sounded. Up next for the JCC is a rematch against Career Connections that was rescheduled because of the weather. (Zachary Weiss can be reached at yngzc@yahoo.com.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011— 15

Simchas Engagements

B’nai Mitzva Rachel Virginia Lauzar, daughter of Katie and Adam Lauzar of New Rochelle, N.Y., will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Feb. 12, at the Pelham Jewish Center, Pelham Manor, N.Y. Grandparents are Herbert and Roslyn Sachs and Arlene and Robert Alfred of Pittsburgh and Louis Lauzar and Carole Stone of Philadelphia.

Stein/Rabinowitz: Jessy and Jay Stein announce the engagement of their daughter, Erica, to Lee Rabinowitz, son of Gloria and Morton Rabinowitz of Wallingford, Pa. Erica’s grandparents are Sally Rendall of Montreal and the late Carl Rendall; and the late Goldie and Elder Stein. Lee’s grandparents are Sophie Rabinowitz of Wyckoff, N.J., and the late Bernard Rabinowitz; and the late Jeanette and Harry Kadransky. Erica and Lee received their bachelor’s degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and their medical degrees from Jefferson Medical College. Erica is an intern at Roger Williams Medical Center in Providence, R.I. In July, she will begin her radiology residency in Ann Arbor, Mich. Lee is a second year internal medicine resident at Brown University’s Alpert School of Medicine in Providence. A November 2011 wedding is planned.

eadline for submitting Simchas is Thursday, 4:30 p.m. Send D announcements (preferred method) in body of e-mail with photo attachment in JPG format to announcements@thejewishchronicle.net. There is a $12 charge to publish a photo. Announcements are free for subscribers and $44 for nonsubscribers. You can also mail typed copy, photo and appropriate fee to The Jewish Chronicle, 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Flr., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. For more information call Angela at (412) 687-1047.

Nate Sherer Video “Feel the Video” 412.829.0266 www.natesherervideo.com ASK

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011— 15

Simchas Engagements

B’nai Mitzva Rachel Virginia Lauzar, daughter of Katie and Adam Lauzar of New Rochelle, N.Y., will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Feb. 12, at the Pelham Jewish Center, Pelham Manor, N.Y. Grandparents are Herbert and Roslyn Sachs and Arlene and Robert Alfred of Pittsburgh and Louis Lauzar and Carole Stone of Philadelphia.

Stein/Rabinowitz: Jessy and Jay Stein announce the engagement of their daughter, Erica, to Lee Rabinowitz, son of Gloria and Morton Rabinowitz of Wallingford, Pa. Erica’s grandparents are Sally Rendall of Montreal and the late Carl Rendall; and the late Goldie and Elder Stein. Lee’s grandparents are Sophie Rabinowitz of Wyckoff, N.J., and the late Bernard Rabinowitz; and the late Jeanette and Harry Kadransky. Erica and Lee received their bachelor’s degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and their medical degrees from Jefferson Medical College. Erica is an intern at Roger Williams Medical Center in Providence, R.I. In July, she will begin her radiology residency in Ann Arbor, Mich. Lee is a second year internal medicine resident at Brown University’s Alpert School of Medicine in Providence. A November 2011 wedding is planned.

eadline for submitting Simchas is Thursday, 4:30 p.m. Send D announcements (preferred method) in body of e-mail with photo attachment in JPG format to announcements@thejewishchronicle.net. There is a $12 charge to publish a photo. Announcements are free for subscribers and $44 for nonsubscribers. You can also mail typed copy, photo and appropriate fee to The Jewish Chronicle, 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Flr., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. For more information call Angela at (412) 687-1047.

Nate Sherer Video “Feel the Video” 412.829.0266 www.natesherervideo.com ASK

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16 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011

Community A C L O S E R

Food for thought at Hillel Academy BY MAIA WIESENFELD Guest Columnist

(This is the second in a series of articles the Chronicle will publish by three students from Hillel Academy on environmental changes going on in their school. ) Hillel Academy of Pittsburgh is offering a new, nutritious hot lunch program for its students. The initiative not only encourages healthful eating habits, but the menu also changes by the day, making the wholesome meals popular among the students, faculty and administration. The school’s administration understands the many benefits of maintaining a healthful diet. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture stated in their Dietary Guidelines for Americans that making informed food choices is “vital to good health and is absolutely essential for the healthy growth and development of children and adolescents.” According to the HHS, sensible eating habits also reduce the risk of heart disease, bone loss, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, breathing disorders and other diseases. The HHS concludes that a healthy diet along with physical activity can keep your body active and strong, preventing obesity. When creating a wholesome lunch menu for Hillel Academy Hillel Academy photos students, Chef Mordy Brown takes a couple of things into Hillel Academy Isadore Joshowitz Early account. Childhood Center students Nate Itskowitz “I base it on the criteria for the Pre-K Counts Government Head Start program,” says Brown. “Based on their guidelines, I and Livia Light are enjoying oranges from a lunch prepared by Chef Mordy Brown. work my way around and see which [foods] the kids like best.” Chef Brown focuses not only on the health aspect but also on the On right Brown is preparing lunch for popularity factor. students in the Hillel Academy kitchen. “If I see something kids don’t like, I won’t put it on the menu again. Sometimes I’ll even ask the kids for a new idea and put it in for the next month.” By serving well liked, nutritious meals, which include servings of fruits and vegetables, young students may learn to appreciate the importance of healthful eating. A hot lunch at Hillel Academy might include vegetable beef stew, brown rice and pineapple, or meat loaf, roasted potatoes, green beans and apples. Ninth-grade student Chaya Sara Marizan, a regular in the Hillel Academy lunch line, recommends the lunches because they are nutritious and well priced. The USDA pyramid suggests that a well-balanced diet is comprised of the following food groups: carbohydrates, fruits, vegetables, dairy products, meat and some oils. A typical lunch at Hillel Academy contains just that. Just as the pyramid indicates, a meal should include a serving of fruits and vegetables, a grain portion, and a protein component, either dairy or meat. Fats and oils should be limited when possible. Why is it important for students to maintain a healthful diet? “I think it’s important to eat healthy because it helps you through your day and to focus in school,” said Chaya Sara. The USDA writes that scientists have proven that normal brain function requires nutrients that come from wholesome eating habits. Proper nutrition is necessary for brain development, which is needed for cognitive tasks such as concentration, attention and memory. The advantages of a well-balanced diet are clear. By encouraging sensible eating habits at school through the new lunch program, Hillel Academy is recognizing that a healthy body makes a healthy mind. The students at Hillel Academy now have a lunch program that satisfies their tastes and improves their well-being. (Maia Wiesenfeld is in the 10th grade at Hillel Academy.)

The Chronicle Cooks

Interfaith recognition

CHEF MORDY BROWN’S HEALTHY VEGGIE BURGERS This recipe from Hillel Academy’s Chef Brown is his nutritious alternative to store-bought veggie burgers or hamburgers. One of the things that they’re trying to accomplish, he said, is to keep the menu healthy.

Rodef Shalom Congregation photo

Rabbi Aaron Bisno of Rodef Shalom Congregation, seen here with Bishop David A. Zubik of the Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh, was presented with two distinguished awards during a special Catholic Mass at Saint Paul Cathedral Jan. 30. Zubik named Bisno a recipient of the Diocese’s Church Alive! Award in recognition of his work for interfaith relations, and Pope Benedict XVI, through Zubik, awarded him the Benemerenti Medal, a papal honor in recognition of “outstanding contributions to interfaith relations.” Both awards came seven months after Rodef Shalom honored Zubik with its inaugural “Pursuer of Peace” Award.

2 pints cleaned and peeled portabella mushrooms 1 large onion 2 medium sized carrots 3 stalks of celery 4-5 peeled and boiled potatoes 3 eggs Up to 1/2 cup potato flakes (if needed for thickness)

L O O K

Chop vegetables. Sautee until cooked through (soft). Add potatoes then process in the food processor. Pour into bowl and mix eggs and beans into the mixture. Add salt, pepper and garlic powder to taste. Add potato flakes if needed (if mixture is too loose). Bake on a greased pan in oven at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes on each side or until golden brown.

COMPILED BY ANGELA LEIBOWICZ angelal@thejewishchronicle.net


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011 — 17

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412-824-3540 HANDYMAN

Patch Work French Drains Tie Wall Trash Removal Reliable & Honest Work

Delivering honest and experienced computer services to your door. Max Hersch: 412-519-4176 Email: Info@PittsburghTCS.com Web: www.pittsburghtcs.com

The Jewish Chronicle on the web -- www.thejewishchronicle.net

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INTERIOR - EXTERIOR CARPENTERY WORK PAINTING • DRY WALL WALL REPAIR REPAIR KITCHEN KITCHEN • BATH BATH • FLOORING FLOORING REPAIR REPAIR • TIE WALLS WALLS CONCRETE WORK VERSLOC VERSLOC WALLS WALLS CLEAN UP DEBRIS REMOVAL REMOVAL

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MASSAGE SPECIAL Full Body Clean Back with Lufa Hot Rocks • Deep Tissue $

45 HOUR NEW CLIENTS 2 LOCATIONS SQ. HILL • S. HILLS, INDIAN SUMMER

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ELECTRICAL

Marc Mendelson and Mendelson Electric, LLC are ready to help you with your residential and light commercial electrical contracting needs. From service calls to new electrical services - rewiring to recessed lights - renovations to changing fixtures - we would like to help you with your winter projects. Please contact us at mendelsonelectric@gmail.com or 412 521-7652 for an estimate or an appointment. PA ID 040523

SLOW/DEAD COMPUTER? Technological Consulting Services®

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME HEALTHCARE

CALL DONNA 412-687-1000 TO PLACE YOUR AD REAL ESTATE • CLASSIFIED • BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL

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originalkraftpainting.net

412-461-8114


18 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 24, 2011

BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL JUNK REMOVAL

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Jewish news around the world and around the block ...as it happens!


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011 — 19

GLOBE Briefly JTA

Continued from previous page. Criminal charges were filed against 11 Muslim students who disrupted a speech at the University of California, Irvine, by Israel’s U.S. ambassador. During the Feb. 8, 2010 speech by Michael Oren, the 11 defendants stood one by one and shouted at the ambassador, calling him a “mass murderer” and a “war criminal,” among other insults. The disruptions, organized to protest Israeli actions in Gaza, prompted Oren to walk off the stage twice. The charges were filed late last week against nine Irvine students and two students from the University of California, Riverside. Arraignment is set for March 11 in Santa Ana, Calif. Jewish Voice for Peace, a Berkeleybased national organization that describes itself as a pro-peace group but which critics say works to undermine the State of Israel, blasted the arrests and noted in a statement that Jewish groups have not been charged for similar disruptions. The organization said two Jewish Voice for Peace members will hand-deliver a 5,000-signature peti-

The Jewish Chronicle

tion against the charges Wednesday to the Orange County District Attorney. The Zionist Organization of America, which opposes Israeli concessions to the Palestinians and has complained about harassment of pro-Israel groups in the United States, praised the district attorney’s decision to bring the charges. The charges carry sentences ranging from probation with community service or fines or up to six months in jail. “We’re pleased to see that the District Attorney’s office is not hesitating to hold members of the Muslim Student Union responsible for possibly criminal behavior,” Morton Klein, ZOA national president, and Susan Tuchman, director of the ZOA’s Center for Law and Justice, said in a statement. “Had the District Attorney decided not to prosecute, he’d be sending the message that the disrupters’ conduct was acceptable, effectively making a mockery of the First Amendment and a mockery of our laws. “Members of the Muslim Student Union aren’t entitled to special treatment. If they violated the law, they should be held accountable and punished,” Klein added. The Muslim Student Union at UC Irvine, which organized the Oren heckling, was suspended for violating the university’s code of conduct for a year,

2 & 3 Bedrooms Corner of Fifth and Wilkins Spacious 1500-2250 square feet

”Finest in Shadyside”

412-661-4456 www.kaminrealty.kamin.com

Argentine Foreign Minister Hector Timerman visited the AMIA Jewish community center in Buenos Aires two months after his government recognized a unilateral Palestinian state. Timerman, who is Jewish, met with Jewish community leaders Feb. 2 to tell them that the government is working to bring the AMIA bombers to justice. The 1994 attack killed 85 and wounded hundreds. He promised to seek cooperation from the countries he visits as foreign minister. He also discussed the recent mass Latin American recognition of a unilaterally declared Palestinian state and the ongoing uprisings in the Middle East. The Jewish leaders and Timerman agreed that “democracy is the best way to solve conflicts” in the Middle East, especially in Egypt. Timerman told AMIA leaders that he has accepted an invitation made by his Israeli counterpart, Avigdor Lieberman, to visit Israel and to help advance the peace process. He is scheduled to travel in the coming weeks to Jerusalem, and invited AMIA leaders to join him. “My first reaction is to agree,” AMIA

President Guillermo Borger told JTA, “so I think that we would accompany him.” On Dec. 6, Timerman issued an official government statement recognizing a unilateral Palestine state, joining Brazil and triggering mass Latin American support for Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas. In response, Borger at the time expressed “concern over the recognition of a state which is not such, and cannot guarantee the security of Israel.” A month later in Brasilia, Timerman met with Abbas, and they issued a joint statement condemning terrorism and the AMIA attack. Timerman is well known in the Jewish community for his previous career as a journalist and also as the son of newspaper editor Jacobo Timerman, who was kidnapped in 1970 by the military dictatorship and later released in 1979. Forced into exile following his release, Jacobo Timerman moved his family to Israel, where he wrote and published two years later “Prisoner Without a Name, Cell Without a Number.” A year later Jacobo Timerman published “The Longest War,” a detailed and personal response to the first few months of Israel’s 1982 invasion of Lebanon.

Real estate directory FOR RENT

5125 Fifth Ave.

later amended to four months, and is now on probation.

EXQUISITE...

Incredibly Beautiful 1, 2 & 3 BR Apartments!!! Spacious floor plans, tremendous closet space, eat-in-kit, formal DR, laundry rooms, rooftop sundeck, social room, fitness center & garage parking. Convenient Oakland/Shadyside Area.

Sherwood Towers/ Chalfont Apartments 412-683-8683

This space could be yours.

Call Donna 412 687-1000

FOR RENT

SQUIRREL HILL 5720 Solway Street

Nice 3 BR, 1st floor duplex for rent. $1,250 + all utilities. For more information lease call Nancy

412-401-9848 or 412-261-6500

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

MT. LEBANON SALE BY OWNER LEASE-BUY OPTION

FABULOUS BUYS IN NORTH OAKLAND

5 Unique homes All remodeled and updated Move-in condition $140,000-$275,000 3 years interest only financing available GLICKMAN REAL ESTATE 412-521-9555

154 N. BELLEFIELD — 2 BR, 2 Bath — $99,900 4625 FIFTH AVE. — 2 BR, 2 Bath — $79,000 4601 FIFTH AVE. — 2 BR, 1 Bath, — $55,000 Stefanie Behrend, Realtor HOWARD HANNA REAL ESTATE 412-302-3408 or 412-687-6000

FOR SALE

“ M o r t g a g e R a t e s A r e L o w ” Think of the advantage of Buying or Selling OAKLAND CONDOS WINCHESTER — 2 Bed & 2 Bath Contemporary, pool, exercise & guest suite, great location Priced $229,500 220N DITHRIDGE — Terrific 2 bed 2 bath, balcony, pool & party rm, 2 guest rms, exercise & party rm. Priced $219,500 220 N. DITHRIDGE NEWLY OFFERED! 3 BR, 2 1/2 bath. Beautiful condition. W/D in unit. Asking $389,000. PARK PLAZA — Large 3 Bedrooms, 21/2 Baths, eat-in kitchen, Tons of closets - Extra large private storage room. Priced $329,500 OAKLAND CO-OP BRISTOL - Most desirable, Parquet floors, 3 Bed, 2 Baths. Beautiful View, Maintenance includes all taxes & utilities Priced $165,000

SQ. HILL CONDO BEACON PLACE - 1 Bed & Bath Move in - perfect condition Priced $102,000. Reduced $97,500 SQ. HILL TOWNHOME SCHENLEY RD. - Stunning end unit. Very warm with contemporary touches, 4 bed 3 1/2 baths, 2 car int. garage. Price upon request.

POINT BREEZE Walk to schools & parks. Custom built, 1 of a kind! Wonderful Contemporary. Most Unusual & Desirable. Looks as though it was built today, 4 bed 21/2 Baths, eat-in kitchen, family rm, study off master bed, 3 car garage, 2 wood burning fireplaces. Reduced $695,000

SQ. HILL BEECHWOOD BLVD. — A home for all to enjoy. Truly a beautiful gem of a grand old house completely restored but kept its original charm. Asking $1,250,000 SHADYSIDE “Restored Victorian” in the Heart of Shadyside. 5 bed 21/2 Baths, Leaded glass windows, enclosed urban garden. Reduced $375,000 Will lease or do owner financing.

For information call Tamara Skirboll 412-521-2222 x220 Cell 412-401-1110


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011 — 19

GLOBE Briefly JTA

Continued from previous page. Criminal charges were filed against 11 Muslim students who disrupted a speech at the University of California, Irvine, by Israel’s U.S. ambassador. During the Feb. 8, 2010 speech by Michael Oren, the 11 defendants stood one by one and shouted at the ambassador, calling him a “mass murderer” and a “war criminal,” among other insults. The disruptions, organized to protest Israeli actions in Gaza, prompted Oren to walk off the stage twice. The charges were filed late last week against nine Irvine students and two students from the University of California, Riverside. Arraignment is set for March 11 in Santa Ana, Calif. Jewish Voice for Peace, a Berkeleybased national organization that describes itself as a pro-peace group but which critics say works to undermine the State of Israel, blasted the arrests and noted in a statement that Jewish groups have not been charged for similar disruptions. The organization said two Jewish Voice for Peace members will hand-deliver a 5,000-signature peti-

The Jewish Chronicle

tion against the charges Wednesday to the Orange County District Attorney. The Zionist Organization of America, which opposes Israeli concessions to the Palestinians and has complained about harassment of pro-Israel groups in the United States, praised the district attorney’s decision to bring the charges. The charges carry sentences ranging from probation with community service or fines or up to six months in jail. “We’re pleased to see that the District Attorney’s office is not hesitating to hold members of the Muslim Student Union responsible for possibly criminal behavior,” Morton Klein, ZOA national president, and Susan Tuchman, director of the ZOA’s Center for Law and Justice, said in a statement. “Had the District Attorney decided not to prosecute, he’d be sending the message that the disrupters’ conduct was acceptable, effectively making a mockery of the First Amendment and a mockery of our laws. “Members of the Muslim Student Union aren’t entitled to special treatment. If they violated the law, they should be held accountable and punished,” Klein added. The Muslim Student Union at UC Irvine, which organized the Oren heckling, was suspended for violating the university’s code of conduct for a year,

2 & 3 Bedrooms Corner of Fifth and Wilkins Spacious 1500-2250 square feet

”Finest in Shadyside”

412-661-4456 www.kaminrealty.kamin.com

Argentine Foreign Minister Hector Timerman visited the AMIA Jewish community center in Buenos Aires two months after his government recognized a unilateral Palestinian state. Timerman, who is Jewish, met with Jewish community leaders Feb. 2 to tell them that the government is working to bring the AMIA bombers to justice. The 1994 attack killed 85 and wounded hundreds. He promised to seek cooperation from the countries he visits as foreign minister. He also discussed the recent mass Latin American recognition of a unilaterally declared Palestinian state and the ongoing uprisings in the Middle East. The Jewish leaders and Timerman agreed that “democracy is the best way to solve conflicts” in the Middle East, especially in Egypt. Timerman told AMIA leaders that he has accepted an invitation made by his Israeli counterpart, Avigdor Lieberman, to visit Israel and to help advance the peace process. He is scheduled to travel in the coming weeks to Jerusalem, and invited AMIA leaders to join him. “My first reaction is to agree,” AMIA

President Guillermo Borger told JTA, “so I think that we would accompany him.” On Dec. 6, Timerman issued an official government statement recognizing a unilateral Palestine state, joining Brazil and triggering mass Latin American support for Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas. In response, Borger at the time expressed “concern over the recognition of a state which is not such, and cannot guarantee the security of Israel.” A month later in Brasilia, Timerman met with Abbas, and they issued a joint statement condemning terrorism and the AMIA attack. Timerman is well known in the Jewish community for his previous career as a journalist and also as the son of newspaper editor Jacobo Timerman, who was kidnapped in 1970 by the military dictatorship and later released in 1979. Forced into exile following his release, Jacobo Timerman moved his family to Israel, where he wrote and published two years later “Prisoner Without a Name, Cell Without a Number.” A year later Jacobo Timerman published “The Longest War,” a detailed and personal response to the first few months of Israel’s 1982 invasion of Lebanon.

Real estate directory FOR RENT

5125 Fifth Ave.

later amended to four months, and is now on probation.

EXQUISITE...

Incredibly Beautiful 1, 2 & 3 BR Apartments!!! Spacious floor plans, tremendous closet space, eat-in-kit, formal DR, laundry rooms, rooftop sundeck, social room, fitness center & garage parking. Convenient Oakland/Shadyside Area.

Sherwood Towers/ Chalfont Apartments 412-683-8683

This space could be yours.

Call Donna 412 687-1000

FOR RENT

SQUIRREL HILL 5720 Solway Street

Nice 3 BR, 1st floor duplex for rent. $1,250 + all utilities. For more information lease call Nancy

412-401-9848 or 412-261-6500

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

MT. LEBANON SALE BY OWNER LEASE-BUY OPTION

FABULOUS BUYS IN NORTH OAKLAND

5 Unique homes All remodeled and updated Move-in condition $140,000-$275,000 3 years interest only financing available GLICKMAN REAL ESTATE 412-521-9555

154 N. BELLEFIELD — 2 BR, 2 Bath — $99,900 4625 FIFTH AVE. — 2 BR, 2 Bath — $79,000 4601 FIFTH AVE. — 2 BR, 1 Bath, — $55,000 Stefanie Behrend, Realtor HOWARD HANNA REAL ESTATE 412-302-3408 or 412-687-6000

FOR SALE

“ M o r t g a g e R a t e s A r e L o w ” Think of the advantage of Buying or Selling OAKLAND CONDOS WINCHESTER — 2 Bed & 2 Bath Contemporary, pool, exercise & guest suite, great location Priced $229,500 220N DITHRIDGE — Terrific 2 bed 2 bath, balcony, pool & party rm, 2 guest rms, exercise & party rm. Priced $219,500 220 N. DITHRIDGE NEWLY OFFERED! 3 BR, 2 1/2 bath. Beautiful condition. W/D in unit. Asking $389,000. PARK PLAZA — Large 3 Bedrooms, 21/2 Baths, eat-in kitchen, Tons of closets - Extra large private storage room. Priced $329,500 OAKLAND CO-OP BRISTOL - Most desirable, Parquet floors, 3 Bed, 2 Baths. Beautiful View, Maintenance includes all taxes & utilities Priced $165,000

SQ. HILL CONDO BEACON PLACE - 1 Bed & Bath Move in - perfect condition Priced $102,000. Reduced $97,500 SQ. HILL TOWNHOME SCHENLEY RD. - Stunning end unit. Very warm with contemporary touches, 4 bed 3 1/2 baths, 2 car int. garage. Price upon request.

POINT BREEZE Walk to schools & parks. Custom built, 1 of a kind! Wonderful Contemporary. Most Unusual & Desirable. Looks as though it was built today, 4 bed 21/2 Baths, eat-in kitchen, family rm, study off master bed, 3 car garage, 2 wood burning fireplaces. Reduced $695,000

SQ. HILL BEECHWOOD BLVD. — A home for all to enjoy. Truly a beautiful gem of a grand old house completely restored but kept its original charm. Asking $1,250,000 SHADYSIDE “Restored Victorian” in the Heart of Shadyside. 5 bed 21/2 Baths, Leaded glass windows, enclosed urban garden. Reduced $375,000 Will lease or do owner financing.

For information call Tamara Skirboll 412-521-2222 x220 Cell 412-401-1110


20 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011

CLASSIFIED

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For 10 Words or Less 25¢ For Each Additional Word

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412-687-1000

HELP WANTED

POSITION WANTED

CHILD CARE 35+ hrs. /wk. Sq. Hill. Inquisitive, lively & fun 6 year old girl seeks engaging energetic & devoted nanny before & after school. Must drive & be nonsmoker. 412-341-1995 or jrhnanny4u@mac.com. ••• GUARDIANSHIP CASEWORKER, Degree in Social Work or related field. Excellent analytic, organizational and interpersonal skills. Driver’s license/dependable car required. Ability to work as a team player and advocate on behalf of individuals who are unable to do so on their own. Experience and knowledge of County MH/MR programs, providers, ISC units, and treatment facilities. Act 33/34 and FBI clearance required. Experience as an ISC a plus. Please email cover letter and resume to niole@jfcspgh.org. EOE ••• CONGREGATION SEEKS Aron Kodesh for our three Torahs. Old or new, willing to refurbish. Contact Daniel 412-422-9078. ••• NANNY a HEALTHY 5 month old needs a nanny 12 hours/week, afternoons in my home. Must be fluent in English with experience, references & physically fit. Call 412-404-8781.

LAUNDRY/IRONING/CLEANING. Will clean your home or business, basement, garage or yard. Reliable with good references & reasonable rates. 412-708-4647. ••• HOME HEALTH CARE specialist in hospice, dialysis & direct care. Will work any shift. Call Patricia Spencer 412-229-8760. ••• EXCELLENT NANNY available. Professional, honest, reliable caring person is looking for a full-time position. Experienced with kids with special needs. Fluent in English & Spanish. References available upon request. Ask for Alexandra 786-521-4365. ••• EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Will also do light housekeeping & cooking for your loved one. Available daylight, reasonable. Call 412969-2386. ••• DETAILED CLEANING just the way you like it to be done. Great references. Janet 724-359-7800 or Lyn 412-403-7287. ••• CAREGIVER WITH all criminal clearance certifications in CPR, first aid & exercise. Good references, call Carol 412-606-7372. ••• LPN/CNA/SITTER seeks private duty employment, in home, nursing home or hospital. Licensed to give medication, can transport. 412-678-1223. ••• HOUSE CLEANING COUPLE available with 20 years’ experience, great references & reasonable rates. 724-994-7830. ••• CAREGIVER AVAILABLE For male patient, night shift, Act 33/34 clearance, experienced with references. 412805-5375.

POSITION WANTED THE CARE REGISTRY INC. is a state licensed company providing screened & experienced nurse aids & companions. Reasonable rates, top quality & caring management also available. For more information Call Andrea Seewald, LSW 412421-5202 or visit www.TheCareRegistry.com. ••• BRANNON HOME & HEALTH Care, INC. is a licensed by the PA Dept. of Health and meets all its requirements for screening and placement of nurse aides and companions. Affordable rates for hourly or live-in service. Out of town support. Call 412341-2666 or 412-682-2279. www.brannonhomehealthcare.com. ••• CAREGIVER CONNECTION A PA. Licensed home-care registry, Jewish Family & Children’s Service refers screened, JF&CS trained caregivers providing short/long-term personal care services to seniors at affordable rates. Available 24/7, call 412-422-0400 or 877-243-1530 (toll free).

ART SHOW “FINE ART SHOW: Yurry Mudrenko” artist from Moscow, Russia. Sq. Hill, Carnegie Library, regular hours through Feb. 28.

BUYING AUTO/TRUCKS C A R S -T R U C K S -VA N S SUVS- Quite driving, death, wrecks, antiques, classics, Junkers. Denny Offstein 724287-7771 dennyoffsteinusedcar@zoominternet.net.

CERAMIC TILE O’LEARY CERAMIC Tile SVC. New & repair work since 1977. Re-groutingcaulking, fully insured. PA HIC Lic. #004228. Call 412731-0440.

COMPUTER NICE JEWISH Boy, offering the full range of computer services, from advising and teaching to repair and support. I will come to your house or apartment, fix any problem you’re having & teach you what you need to know to use it. I have 14 years’ experience working with people of all ages. . No job is too large or small, and nobody is too computer illiterate. (Really) CALL JASON 412-401-1204, or visit my web www.computerwizard.us. references available.

CONCIERGE SERVICE FAERY CONCIERGE & Errand Service. One call; from shoveling to shopping, pet sitting, light housekeeping. What can we do for you? 412-421-2024.

DRIVER NEED A RIDE? Call Norm, he will drive you. Doctors, shopping, anything that needs to be done. Experienced, insured, great references and reasonable rates. Available le for airport pickup or departure. Norm 412521-6999.

ELECTRICIAN ARMSTRONG PLUG & Switch, LLC. Registered-Insured, electric breaker box upgrade, lighting, additional outlets, code corrections, dedicated circuits, rewires & repairs. PA075442pgh.elo4802. Call 412-2983423 or 412-751-2693.

HANDYMAN NO JOB TOO SMALL or a honey to do list! Call Dave at Maids & More 412-8243540.

HOME REPAIRS GENERAL HOME Repairs, interior/exterior, retaining walls, dry wall, flooring, ceramic, laminate, painting, plastering, pressure washing, kitchen & bath remodeling. PA licensed & insured. 412-731-1496.

TORAH Tetazaveh – Where is Moses? Portion of the Week RABBI AARON BISNO, RODEF SHALOM CONGREGATION Tetzaveh, Exodus 27:20-30:10

Jewish tradition teaches that as Moses was the Israelites’ first political leader, his older brother, Aaron, was their first religious leader. Yet for all their unique accomplishments, neither Aaron nor Moses could have achieved their respective greatness had it not been for the other. Slow of speech, Moses required the older Aaron’s command of language when he confronted Pharaoh; and Aaron, for his part, would never have been anointed high priest had it not been for the younger Moses. Where we read of one, we can always be sure the other is close at hand. But where these brothers travel their paths to prominence in virtual parallel, in this week’s Torah portion, it appears Aaron moves onto center stage alone. Indeed, it is in Tetzaveh that we learn about the priesthood in greatest detail and, as we do so, for the first and only time in a Torah portion since we are first introduced to Moses early in the Book of Exodus, his name appears not a single time. To sharpen the point, as Aaron assumes his place as the Israelites’ high priest, Moses is seemingly absent from our text. Significantly, this is but one of three times tradition finds Moses missing in action. The other two instances are worth recalling. In the first, while Moses is atop Mt. Sinai to receive the Torah, the Israelites (who are alone for the first time) allow themselves to believe that he has disappeared. Because Moses is not physically alongside this first generation of free men and women, they convince themselves Moses (out of sight for 40 days and nights) has abandoned them; and thus, for all intents

and purposes, he has. In the second instance, in an effort to ensure that future generations would not mistake Moses’ role in leading us out of Egypt with God’s having redeemed us with an outstretched hand, the second century rabbis responsible for redacting the Passover hagada deliberately excise Moses from the retelling of the Exodus. In both cases, I submit, Moses’ MIA status is based on fear. The young Israelites’ child-like fear causes them to believe that to not see someone is the same as to have lost them; the ancient rabbis’ paternalistic fear prompts them to cut Moses out of the hagada to ensure that you and I would not misidentify the true hero of the Passover story. But Tetzaveh is a different case entirely. Throughout the Book of Exodus, Moses’ and Aaron’s names are listed interchangeably. In one place we read of “Moses and Aaron;” in another, we read of “Aaron and Moses.” From this, tradition teaches both brothers are due equal honor. In the real world, of course, even as we say all persons are equal, we recognize there are situations in which there are “firsts among equals.” And surely we can agree that as the Exodus story plays out, the younger Moses clearly tends to outshine the older Aaron. Thus, I like to imagine that the greater luminary Moses is absent only in name from Tetzaveh. Out of sight does not mean out of mind, and neither has he been deliberately dropped from the page. Rather, appreciating that he might well eclipse his older sibling at just the moment Aaron most deserves to shine; Moses chooses to absent himself — not out of fear but as a result of fraternal pride. And while not visible just now, Moses, I feel certain, is proudly cheering his brother on from the wings — celebrating every new height he achieves.

(This column is a service of the Greater Pittsburgh Rabbinic Association.)

MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT THE HOT MATZOHS, Pittsburgh’s #1 Klezmer Band, is available for your Wedding, Bar/Bat Mitzvah, Corporate or other special event! The dynamic band, featuring violinist Barbara Lowenstein (founder), offers many styles of music in addition to Klezmer, e,g, classical, jazz, swing and folk. Call 412-344-3338 or 412-3030746. Or e-mail:barbsviolin@gmail.com.

TRANSLATOR HEBREW, ENGLISH & Spanish translator looking for more clients. 412-918-1836 or 412-853-5109.

VOICE/PIANO VOICE/PIANO LESSIONS with CMU graduate. Info. 412-327-1753 or EastEndMusicPa@gmail.com.

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ESTATE NOTICES Letters have been granted on the estate of each of the following decedents to the personal representative named, who requests all persons having claims against the estate of the decedent to make known the same in writing to him or his attorney, and all persons indebted to the decedent to make payment to him without delay:

LEGAL NOTICE WACHTEL, Sandra, deceased, of Pittsburgh, PA, Allegheny County; No. 02-1007644 or to: Joel Pfefffer, Esq., Meyer, Unkovic & Scott LLP, 535 Smithfield St., Suite 1300, Pittsburgh, PA 15222. 3Th 338, 331, 324 Letters have been granted on the estate of each of the following decedents to the personal representative named, who requests all persons having claims against the estate of the decedent to make known the same in writing to him or his attorney, and all persons indebted to the decedent to make payment to him without delay: STRICKER, Rose C., deceased, of Scott Township, PA, Allegheny County; No. 02-11-00524 or to: Joyce A. Slaughter and Susan M. Chabala, Co-Executrices, c/o

Philip H. Rubenstein, Esq., 312 Second Avenue, Carnegie, PA 15106. 3Th 338, 331, 324 Letters have been granted on the estate of each of the following decedents to the personal representative named, who requests all persons having claims against the estate of the decedent to make known the same in writing to him or his attorney, and all persons indebted to the decedent to make payment to him without delay: LEVINE, Barbara., deceased, of Wilkinsburg, PA. No. 0211-00664 or to: Kimberly S. Steinberg,Executrix, c/o Philip H. Rubenstein, Esq., 312 Second Avenue, Carnegie, PA 15106. 3Th 338, 331, 324


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011 — 21

ENVIRONMENT Population vs. consumption

MORNING SERVICES - 9:30 A.M.

Population control is not the silver bullet that will solve climate change, rather overconsumption is the real issue.

Can having fewer babies really save the world?

BY ARWA ABURAWA

According to the latest data coming from the United Nations, the world population will reach a staggering 30 billion people by 2300. Now, that’s a lot of people and a real sobering thought for those concerned with the impact of a growing population on the earth’s finite resources. As the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region has experienced some of the highest population growth since the 1950s — second only to sub-Saharan Africa — you could argue that it’s time the region took population control seriously — if only to save the planet. The link between a high population and climate change is a simple one. More people equals less resources and more emissions, which ultimately leads to resource conflict and more climate change. Subsequently, some have argued that by controlling the population, through better family planning facilities, we can have more control over our resources and emissions and so mitigate climate change. In terms of population growth, the MENA region, which is made up of a large Muslim population, is one of the top offenders. However the fertility rates in the region is believed to have fallen over the last 20 years, according to a journal by Nadia Diamond-Smith, Kirk Smith and Nuriya Nalan Sahin Hodoglugil exploring the link between climate change and the Muslim world.

Even so, the population in the region has been steadily increasing and the MENA region is expected to rise from 423 million (2007) to 800-900 million by the end of the 21st century. With all this in mind, it seems to make sense to take on board population control as a solution to climate change. However, the only problem with the “control population = more resources = less conflict = less climate change” equation is that it’s rather simplistic. The fact remains that while the figures do show that the earth’s population has skyrocketed, in reality it is consumption, and not the existence of people alone, that is bringing the earth to near collapse. So, even if we somehow managed to control population growth, if these people were still consuming the earth’s resources without check then we would still be doomed. For example, Fred Pearce the environmental writer calculated that on average the carbon emissions of one American is equivalent to those of around four Chinese, 20 Indians, 30 Pakistanis, 40 Nigerians, or 250 Ethiopians. And so it is the rich consumers of the West that are doing more harm than the supposed “breeders” of the developing world. While many people like to think that climate change may be the fault of overbreeders in some countries/regions/religions — or at least that family planning is the answer — it is (unfortunately?) not that simple. (Stories from The Green Prophet appear here by agreement with its editor, Karin Kloosterman. For more Green news from the Middle East, visit The Green Prophet at greenprophet.com. Contact the Green Prophet at karin.kloosterman@gmail.com.)

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OBITUARIES

HORVITZ: On Friday, February 4, 2011, Robert S. Horvitz; beloved husband of Esther (Helfand) Horvitz; beloved father of Mark (Rhonda) Horvitz, David Horvitz and Bruce (Debbie) Horvitz; grandfather of Scott, Jacob, Joey, Rachael, Shana, Sarah, Stacey, Lindsey and Andrew Horvitz; brother of Harvey Horvitz and the late Lee and Fred Horvitz. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5600 Centre Ave., Shadyside. Interment Poale Zedeck Memorial Park Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Poale Zedeck Horvitz Library, 6318 Phillips Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15217 or Sivitz Jewish Hospice, 200 JHF Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15217.

KWALWASSER: On Wednesday, January 26, Robert “Bob” Kwalwasser, 86, of Renfrew, PA; beloved father of Wendy Kwalwasser of Avon, CT, and her children, Darren and Francisco; Ted Kwalwasser (partner Marina Lagler) of Safety Harbor, FL, and his children, Jacob and Justin; and Amy Kwalwasser (Chris Kjeldsen) of Round Rock, TX, and their children Grant and Vanessa; son of the late Jacob and Pearl (Little) Kwalwasser; also survived by dear cousin, Fern Diamond, of Pittsburgh, PA; nephew Dr. Robert Feiss; sister, Helen Kwalwasser Wedeen (Harvey Wedeen); and nieces, nephews and cousin; preceded in death by wife Barbara (Kalish) Kwalwasser; and brother, Edgar Kwalwasser. Contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association at alz.org, or the Alzheimer Disease Research at ahaf.org/alzheimers/. SCHWADRON: On Monday, January 31, 2011, Richard Jan Schwadron, beloved husband of Gloria Davis Schwadron; dear father of Stacey Schwadron, Rachel (Christopher Spencer) Schwadron and Adam (Elizabeth) Schwadron; loving grandfather of Zackary Schwadron and Alexandria Spencer; beloved brother-in-law of Neil

Please refer to www.thejewishchronicle.net for regularly updated obituary information.

(Lauren) Davis; also survived by relatives and friend. Services were held at Congregation Shaare Emeth. Interment at Beth Hamedrosh Hagodol Cemetery. Arrangements by Rindskopf-Roth Service. STROHL: On January 27, 2011, Sylvia Strohl, 93, of Pitcairn, formerly of Pittsburgh; loving wife of the late Phillip H. Strohl; daughter of the late Harry and Sarah Cohen; beloved best friend and buddy to Johann Fratangelo; sister to the late Rose Cohen and Jacob Cohen; also survived by many nieces and nephews, especially Liz, Mary Beth and Myrna Sameth; new cousin to Nan-

cy Cahill. Services were held at George I. Green funeral Home Inc., 3511 Main St. Munhall. Interment Shaara Torah Cemetery. ZISMAN: On Thursday, February 3, 2011, Michael A. Zisman; beloved son of the late Morton and Theresa Zisman; beloved brother of Roberta Zisman; also survived by Aunt Arlene Zisman. Graveside services and interment were at Homewood Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Animal Rescue League of Western PA, 6620 Hamilton Avenue, Pgh., PA 15206. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc.

Court upholds agunah’s right to damages By JTA

JERUSALEM — A Tel Aviv court upheld the right of women denied a religious divorce by their husbands to sue for damages. The District Court ruled that an Israeli woman who has been refused a religious divorce, or get, by her husband for the past 16 years has the right to receive nearly $200,000 from him in damages that had been awarded by a family court, The Jerusalem Post reported. “The respondent had the right to a get from the moment she wanted one, and all the more so when she married the appellant at the age of 24, was with him for all of three months, and knew no comfort from him,” the judge wrote in a decision issued last week. “Today, almost 40 years old, she continues to suffer from his cruelty towards her. He prevents, and prevented her, from experiencing life’s joys, establishing a family, and especially from having children. We are talking about immeasurable damage that increases by the day.”

According to Jewish law, a woman may not remarry until she receives a religious divorce from her husband. A woman refused this get is called an agunah, or chained woman. In Israel, all marriages and divorces between Jewish couples must be in accordance with Jewish law. The National Council of Jewish Women welcomed the court’s decision, calling it an important precedent for women in the Jewish Diaspora as well. “The ability to win damages when the get process is abused by husbands will bring much needed relief to agunot, especially in the absence of legislative action that provides a legal, just, and moral solution to remedy the marriage inequality suffered by women,” the group’s president and CEO, Nancy Ratzan and Nancy Kaufman, said in a statement. “The ruling by the court in Tel Aviv must be allowed to stand, but it does not relieve the Knesset of its responsibility to enact a comprehensive remedy. We hope the ruling brings that day closer.”

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BERKMAN: On Sunday, January 23, 2011, Ruth Suttin Berkman, 96; beloved wife of Louis Berkman; beloved mother of Joan Suttin (Jonathan Fee) of Washington, D.C., and Nancy (Bruce) Tobin of Pittsburgh; loving Grandma of Abigail and Stephen Fee and Erica and Brian Tobin; sister of the late Dr. Michael Friedberg. Services and interment were private. Contributions may be made to American Cancer Society, 320 Bilmar Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15205. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc.

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011 — 23

METRO Disability: Continued from page 1. education religious school program, as well as a simultaneous support group for parents. “Unfortunately,” she said, “that type of program is not in Pittsburgh.” Nevertheless, “some synagogues are doing wonderful things with special needs programming and support groups,” she said. “Everyone wants to help, but the problem is no one really knows how. There is lots of good will and kindness, but there is also a lack of understanding. And it’s hard to explain what you need because, sometimes, you don’t know yourself.” Steinberg currently serves on the

Protestors: Continued from page 1. of students and the public. We never expected that big of a crowd. We meant the event to be for the general student population.” Campus police viewed the large number of protestors as a security issue, according to Jacobs, who is also a Chronicle blogger. “The [anti-Israel protestors] showed up with signs and anti-Israel T-shirts,” Jacobs said. “They were ready to create a scene.” The situation was similar to a program last year when another IDF soldier came to speak at Hillel. At that time, “the students from SJP protested outside the Hillel building, shouting slogans and yelling ‘murderer,’ ” Jacobs said. “They had to be escorted out. With that as a precedent, the Pitt police and Sgt. Anthony’s team decided to play it safe and only

Balfour: Continued from page 14. actions becomes somewhat eye-glazing. There are enough characters here for a Russian novel; fortunately, the book provides a helpful glossary of names. And it’s not Schneer’s fault that two of the players were British official George Lloyd and Prime Minister David Lloyd George — who was supportive of Zionist aspirations. At times, though, close attention is needed to avoid confusing them. Perhaps the Zionists’ strongest ally was Sir Mark Sykes — he of the 1916 SykesPicot agreement that, although never confirmed as a treaty, laid the general parameters of postwar British, French and Arab control. Sykes, once an anti-Semite, worked tirelessly to shape developments to assure a Jewish homeland. Jews owe greater recognition to the man Schneer calls “Zionism’s enabler.” An interesting sidelight for our day is a post-declaration letter from Syrian leaders to Balfour, protesting that “Palestine

Book Review “The Balfour Declaration, Origins of the Arab-Israeli Conflict,” by Jonathan Schneer, Random House, 432 pages.

AJL’s special needs advisory committee, which is comprised of professionals and representatives from all the major Jewish organizations in the city, as well as some parents of special needs children. Its mission is to “help make Jewish education accessible to all Jewish people, and to promote inclusion and disability awareness.” The committee works with congregations throughout the area to help adapt b’nai mitzva services, and to include special needs children into youth groups. “We will work with every Jewish organization, trying to get them to open the doors,” Steinberg said. Likewise, the Jewish Family & Children’s Service (JF&CS) offers yearround training workshops to any organization that works with people with disabilities, according to Marino.

“We have interactive activities to give people an idea of what it’s like to have autism, ADHD and learning challenges,” she said. JF&CS also sponsors a “Growing Together” group to support family members of adults with special needs, and to help find housing and jobs as special needs children transition into adulthood. The group also helps families advocate for medical resources. Marino will speak at Beth El during Jewish Disability Awareness Shabbat services Feb. 19. Her talk is entitled, “Are You Included?” Other upcoming events promoting Jewish disability awareness include a community film screening of “Including Samuel: A Documentary,” by photojournalist Dan Habib, at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh, Sun-

day, Feb. 13, at 1 p.m.; and Jewish Disability Awareness Shabbat, at Temple Ohav Shalom, Friday, Feb. 11, with Steinberg as a featured speaker. While Pittsburgh has a lot of support in place for Jews with special needs, there is still work that needs to be done, according to Steinberg. “I think we need more systematic attention to the issue,” she said. “Each agency and synagogue needs its own watchdog group to be working on this. The AJL could be a resource to these committees, but there needs to be much more grassroots.”

allow students in.” Because Vinokor failed to fill out a campus police security form in advance of the event, officers were not expecting the potential security issue with which they were faced, said Weil. “Campus police would have had proper security there to head this thing off,” he said. “These were people known to the police to disrupt events,” Weil said. “The police decided for security reasons to keep this as a student event.” A spokesperson for the Pitt police said there was no police report on record about the incident. The shift supervisor on duty that night could not be reached for comment. “We felt comfortable with the decision [to exclude nonstudents] at Hillel,” Weil said. “It was still an open event, though it was not open to the community. Members of the [nonstudent] Jewish community also did not come in, and even those students opposed to the speaker were allowed into the room.”

Once inside the lecture, students from SJP, did, in fact, attempt to disrupt the event. For security reasons, Anthony had requested that no video cameras be brought into the lecture. Nonetheless, the SJP brought hidden cameras into the lecture, and shot footage. In addition, as soon as they were seated, SJP students put electrical tape across their mouths, and began waving anti-Israel banners. “About one third of the way into the talk, a leader for the SJP stood up and held up a Palestinian flag and walked out,” Weil said. “Just prior to that, proPalestinian community members were at the door shouting, ‘free Palestine,’ to drown out the speaker.” The SJP students then joined other protestors outside the lecture room, and “were so loud, you couldn’t hear the speaker,” Weil said. “They also took a video camera, and through the glass walls, put it on the speaker. They put the video on YouTube.” The Pitt police came and removed them. Weil compared the reaction of the Pitt

police to other university police departments, citing the incident last week at Rutgers University, where campus police were accused of barring some 400 Jewish students from attending what was billed as an anti-Zionist gathering. “The Pitt police worked with the students, and the event went on with propriety,” Weil said. “I was impressed.” While the University of Pittsburgh is still plagued by anti-Israel incidents, Weil said, Jewish students’ response to those incidents is becoming stronger and more effective. In previous years, students often assumed a weak and insecure position in defending the Jewish state. Now, according to Weil, they are “going on the offense” and strongly advocating on behalf of Israel. “The tide is turning,” he said. “In the eight years I’ve been here, I have not seen this large a number of Israel advocates. I think it speaks to the power of the Birthright experience.”

forms a vital part of Syria — as the heart is to the body — admitting of no separation politically or sociologically.” Schneer displays some annoying habits, foremost of them inserting himself as narrator with such phrases as “our tale” and “we will discover in our next section;” they diminish the feel for this intensely researched book as a serious history. He also uses precise but at best obsolescent or foreign terms as “dragoman” for “professional interpreter” and the French “pourparlers” when a simple “conversations” would convey enough meaning. Yet Schneer also produces such gems as British Zionists’ hope when the Great War began that “perhaps the ingot of Palestine could be pried loose from the great slab of Turkey’s Middle Eastern empire.” And: “The tectonic plates of Britain’s Jewish policy began to slide.” Telling us more than most of us ever expected — or perhaps wanted — to know, “The Balfour Declaration” is interesting, very readable, and an enormous education in the complicated creation of that seminal document, the issuance of which was considerably less than certain. (Neal Gendler is a Minneapolis writer and editor.)

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RUTH ALTSHULER . . . . .HYMAN L. HAUSMAN CHARLOTTE G. BLUESTONE . . . . . . . . . . .MAX L. BLUESTONE LARRY BRODELL . . . . . . . . .JOANNE BRODELL ALPERN MARSHA BURDMAN . . . . . . . . .SALLY MILLER JOSEPH S. COHEN . . . . . . . . .SARA F. COHEN CONTINENTAL SMOKE SHOP/ IVAN HARRIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JAMES WEETZ LOIS S. CRONE . . . . . . . .BENJAMIN B. CRONE AL K. DEROY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ED ISACK MIRIAM G. DICKMAN EMIL GLICK SHERWIN F. GLASSER . . . .JEANNETTE G. KURTZ SHERWIN F. GLASSER . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CLARA GOLDHAMMER PAULA GLICK . . . . . . . . . . . . .WILLIAM ROSEN STEVEN GLICK . . . . . . . . . . . .WILLIAM ROSEN AUDREY HATFIELD . . . . . . . . .BERTHA LIEBER MARVIN KAMIN . . . . . . . . . . . . .HARRY KAMIN

(Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

(Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

DONOR

IN MEMORY OF

JOEL N. KAUFFMAN . . . . . .ROSIA KAUFFMAN MARCY LEBOVITZ . . . . . . . . . .EARL LEBOVITZ DAVID H. NEFT . . . . . . . . .FRANCES P. SNIDER DAVID PECHERSKY . . . . . .LOUIS PECHERSKY DAVID PECHERSKY . . . . . .MOLLY PECHERSKY EVELYN K. REBB . . . . . . . . . . .SIDNEY BILDER RICHARD L. REISNER . . . . . . . . . . .STANLEY E. ROSENBLOOM DOROTHY SAMITZ . . . . . .MIRIAM STEERMAN DAVID L. SCHMUCKLER . . . . . . . . . . . . .A MAX SCHMUCKLER GERTRUDE SIGMAN . . . .ABE WEINER-UNCLE SEYMOUR A. SIKOV . . . . . . . .JACOB M. ROSE JOEL F. SMALLEY . . . . . . . . .REBECCA BARON VIOLET SOFFER . . . . . . . . . .MARVIN L. GUSKY LOIS STEINBERG . . . . . . . . . . .JACK SLOMOFF ROSE WALLACE . . . . . . . . .ESTHER NOLOVITZ NORMA & LARRY BRODELL . . . . .WILLIAM DAVIS


24 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 10, 2011

The Jewish Chronicle February 10, 2011  

The Jewish Chronicle February 10, 2011

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