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Style Tortured life PPT production looks at abstract artist Mark Rothko

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE thejewishchronicle.net november 10, 2011 HESHVAN 13, 5772

Vol. 55, No. 26

Pittsburgh, PA

$1.50

Kent State U. professor shouts ‘Death to Israel!’

The thrill of victory

BY MASHA RIFKIN JNS

Evan Kimel, president of the Keystone Mountain Region of BBYO, celebrates on ice during a broomball game Saturday, Nov. 5, in the South Hills. The event was a fundraiser for Amy’s Army. See Community story, page 13.

Hast du gezein in deine leben? Yiddish revival here to attract 2013 international conference BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

At first glance, 25-year-old Jaclyn Granick seems out of place, sitting at a table in the atrium of the South Hills Jewish Community Center, the sole youth surrounded by about 20 senior citizens, most of whom are well into their 70s and 80s. But the amiable student from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva has come to this Sunday morning meeting for the very same reason as her elders: to speak Yiddish. “As an undergrad, I developed an interest in Yiddish and klezmer,” said

Granick, who moved to Pittsburgh last summer with her husband, a doctoral candidate at Carnegie Mellon University. Granick was a regular attendee of the Yiddish club in Lausanne, Switzerland, before she moved to Pittsburgh, having first studied the language at Harvard University. She did not grow up hearing the language at home. The only Yiddish speaker in her family is her grandfather, who is hard of hearing, and with whom it is difficult to converse. So Granick comes from her Shadyside home to join the South Hills Yiddish Conversation Club, which meets monthly. “There are not too many opportunities to speak Yiddish,” she said.

“It is important to me that there are young people to speak the language,” she said. “In some ways, speaking Yiddish is a resistance to complete assimilation.” While many consider it to be a dying language, Yiddish is being preserved, not only by scholars in universities, but also by laymen such as Sol Toder. Toder, who runs the club in the South Hills, says the main purpose of the club is entertainment. “It’s a lot of fun,” he said. “It lends itself to so many funny and interesting things.” That seems to be the case. At last week’s meeting, members were following along with photocopies of a short Please see Yiddish, page 19.

Events took a surprising turn during a lecture at Kent State University last week when Ishmael Khaldi, a guest lecturer and Israeli diplomat, was interrupted by chants of “Death to Israel!” by a faculty member — Professor Julio Pino. Khaldi, the former deputy consul general at the Israeli Consulate in San Francisco, was invited to discuss his book, “A Shepherd’s Journey,” which chronicles his life as a Bedouin in Israel and rise to the Foreign Ministry. “The talk covered a broad range of topics, but focused especially on relations between Muslims Ishmael Khaldi and non-Muslims and the possibility for peaceful dialogue,” Kent State student Evan Gildenblatt said in an interview with JNS. Gildenblatt organized the event, which was co-sponsored by a number of campus departments and organizations. “Ironically, Ishmael harped on the need for respect and understanding to be present in order for such dialogue to occur,” he said. After his talk, Khaldi opened the floor to questions, and Pino was the first to raise his hand. “The whole thing was a minute long,” Jennifer Chestnut, executive director of Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life at Kent State, told JNS. She said Pino was standing toward the back of the room, handing out material that encouraged people to boycott Israel. When Khaldi called on Pino, he launched into a tirade, asking how Israel could justify Please see Kent State, page 19.

B USINES S 14/C L AS SIFIED 17/O BITUARIES 18/C OMMUNITY 13 O PINION 6/R EAL E STATE 16/S IMCHAS 12/S TYLE 10

Times To Remember

KINDLE SABBATH CANDLES: 4:49 p.m. EST. SABBATH ENDS: 5:48 p.m. EST.


2 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE

NOVEMBER 10, 2011

Metro Past ARZA president speaks

Scholars weekend to focus on Reform Jewish rights in Israel BY STAFF

AND

RELEASES

Temple Sinai will present Rabbi Stanley Davids, past president of ARZA (Association of Reform Zionists of America), and his wife, Resa Davids, for a scholars in residence weekend at the synagogue, Nov. 18 to 20. Participants will learn about life in Israel from a Reform Jewish perspective. The usual Shabbat BaBayit, which takes place in private homes, will be held at the synResa Davids agogue to accommodate more peo- Rabbi Stanley Davids ple who want to hear from the speakers. Resa Davids will speak about the The Davidses will speak at a challenges facing women during a Sat“brunch and learn,” Sunday at 9:30 urday afternoon Kol Isha program for a.m., jointly sponsored by Temple women. Brotherhood and Women of Temple Rabbi Davids is considered the “faSinai. The couple will address working ther” of the Reform Zionist Platform, with Knesset leaders, other Israeli adopted by the CCAR (Central Confergovernment officials and groups of ence of American Rabbis) in 1997. He private citizens to increase acceptance currently serves on the board of govof Progressive Judaism in Israel. ernors of the Jewish Agency, the

executive committee of the World Zionist Organization, and the board of overseers of the Jerusalem campus of the Hebrew Union College. Resa Davids has been a national board member of the ARZA and Women of Reform Judaism (WRJ), chair of WRJ-Israel, and a madricha on the March of the Living. She is the founding chair of WRJ-Israel and has formed 25 women’s groups to date among the 35 communities of the Israel Movement for Progressive Judaism.

Corrections/ Clarifications The Nov. 3 rebuttal column by Sheila May-Stein, “Schachter may not value library, but Pittsburgh does,” noted in her tag line that she is a librarian for Community Day School. While accurate, it should be noted that her opinions are her own and do not necessarily reflect those of CDS. •••

Established in 1978, ARZA develops support for and strengthens the Reform movement in Israel and promotes advocacy for a Jewish, pluralistic, just and democratic society in the State of Israel. Register for Kol Isha and brunch and learn by contacting Esther Zawitz at (412) 421-9715 or at esther@templesinaipgh.org. All events take place at Temple Sinai. The weekend is underwritten in part through a grant from Dale and Lynn Lazar. More information is available at templesinaipgh.org.

The opening sentence of Josh Wander’s Nov. 3 column on “How best to improve Pittsburgh living,” had the first sentence cut off during production. The first sentence should have been “Vote for Wander because he’s Jewish?” Also, Wander’s last name was misspelled at the end of the article. ••• In “Lawyers turn to Jewish ethics for continuing education” (Nov. 3), attorney Lynn Snyderman was incorrectly referred to as “Lynn Irwin.” The Chronicle regrets the error.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 10, 2011 — 3

METRO Briefly

The new Tzohar Seminary for Chassidus and the Arts will present a benefit concert for women with Israeli singer/composer/musician Tziona Achishena and visual artist Sheva Chaya, Tuesday, Nov. 15, at 8 p.m. at the Katz Performing Arts Center of the Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. Achishena is a multitalented multi-instrumentalist from northern Israel. Chaya is a visual artist and glassblower from Tzfat. After living in California, performing improvised music with free jazz giants such as Charles Gayle, Achishena returned to her Jewish roots and moved to Israel. She channels her diverse background, which includes intensive

dance and vocal training, Persian classical singing, and creative writing, through a lens of Torah and mitzvot. She has published six albums of music, including recent recordings in her own home studio. Chaya, who grew up in Denver, studied at Princeton University, majoring in visual art and art history, with a concentration in painting. After graduating in 1997, she immigrated to Israel. There, her work took on themes of Jewish women’s expression, landscapes of the land and Chasidic teachings. The Tzohar Seminary is a post-high school program for young women that combines Judaic studies and Chassidus with the study of creative writing, visual arts, music, dance, theater and filmmaking. The inaugural class began its studies in Pittsburgh in September. Tickets are for women only. There is a charge. All proceeds will benefit the Tzohar Seminary. Contact Tzohar Seminary at (412) 521-1197 or concert@tzoharseminary.com for tickets. Aleph Institute in Pittsburgh held its annual conference last week for more than 50 rabbis and mentors in the federal, state and local prisons. Titled “Re-entry,” the conference gave its participants information necessary to counsel inmates and help prepare them for their releases. Larry Ludwig, regional director of Pennsylvania Parole and Probation, addressed the conference on the role rabbis play in rehabilitating inmates. He Please see Briefly, page 5.


4 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 10, 2011

METRO Gemilas Chesed’s 125th anniversary party attracts past and current members BY BRANDT GELMAN

acceptance one receives upon arrival. Eli Greenfeld, who currently lives in Cleveland but returns to McKeesport for the holy days, said Gemilas Chesed is like home to him. “No matter if you come once, or

For the Chronicle

Gemilas Chesed Synagogue has been a McKeesport and White Oak Jewish institution for longer than any current member can recall. This past Sunday, the congregation commemorated its 125th anniversary with a grand banquet that included attendees ranging from young adults, to members who have called Gemilas Chesed home since the 1930s. Collages comprised of dozens of pictures lined the main entrance of the synagogue, sparking memories for many members. Older members of the congregation stared in awe at the withered pictures, which tell the story of a congregation with a rich history. Rabbi Dovid Landesman, who traveled from Israel to be the master of ceremonies at Sunday’s tribute, praised the congregation that he also called home at one point in his life. “If you walk into the shul, it looks brand new,” Landesman said. “The main sanctuary looks as though it was just built. That is the commitment McKeesporters have to their shul.” Gemilas Chesed (kind deeds) was founded in 1886 as the Austro Hungarian Congregation. While some current members of the congregation can faintly remember being at Gemilas Chesed’s original location in McKeesport’s 3rd Ward, there were many in attendance

Gemilas Chesed, interior and exterior.

who played a role in shaping the synagogue where it is today. Aside from weekly prayer services, Gemilas Chesed has served the community as a nursery for young children, a high school focused on Jewish learning and as a means for young adults to find their connection to Judaism. Those who have had the chance to spend time within the Gemilas Chesed family said one thing that makes this community so special is the sense of

come every week, it is like home,” Greenfeld said. “You get treated with the same love no matter what.”

With the steady decline of Jewish families residing in the McKeesport-White Oak areas, the Gemilas Chesed congregation is dwindling. Often times, getting enough men to make a morning minyan is troublesome. Yet, members of the congregation will not give up on the synagogue that has meant so much to them as well as the community. Gershon Guttman, the current president of Gemilas Chesed, said in a prepared statement that he hopes one day Gemilas Chesed can return to a period of prosperity. “I would like to wish Gemilas Chesed a blessing that one day it be restored to the glory days of its past and may we all be here to share,” Guttman wrote.

(Brandt Gelman can be reached at bgelman55@gmail.com.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 10, 2011 — 5

METRO Briefly Continued from page 3. also welcomed Rabbi Moishe Mayir Vogel, executive director of the North East Region of Aleph, to the Citizens Review Board. Dr. Yaakov Guterson, a Pittsburgh psychiatrist, gave a presentation about when inmates being counseled can benefit from medical intervention. And Rabbi Shais Taub, an expert on the 12-step program, lectured on using support groups for all inmates, regardless of addiction. Richard Goldstein, a longtime volunteer at Aleph, was named volunteer of the year. Rev. Martin Statler of the Federal Correctional Institution in Loretto was given the Chaplain of the Year Award for his help over Rosh Hashana when four bochrim were involved in an accident that left them in the hospital for the holy day. The Jewish Studies Program and the Department of German at the University of Pittsburgh will host their annual Kristallnacht commemoration Monday, Nov. 14, at 4:30 p.m. in the Cathedral of Learning at the University of Pittsburgh, room 208B. Ruth Drescher will speak about her memories of Kristallnacht as a child in Germany in 1938, Susanne OrtnerRoberts will play musical selections on the clarinet, and undergraduate and graduate students will read selections from firsthand accounts of the events of Nov. 9 to 10, 1938. The program is open to community members and is made possible in part with the support of the Jack Sittsamer Holocaust Studies Enrichment Fund in the Jewish Studies Program. Past speakers have included Fritz Ottenheimer and Rabbi Walter Jacob. Contact the Jewish Studies Program at (412) 624-2280 or at jewishstudies.pitt.edu for more information.

Jewish Residential Services and Jewish Family & Children’s Service will host a series of free workshops with information provided by The Partnership, a network of organizations that serve people with disabilities and their families. All workshops are scheduled for Mondays at 6 p.m. at Jewish Residential Services, located at Rodef Shalom Congregation. On Nov. 14, a “Planning for Life After High School” workshop will help families design a successful transition for students moving from high school to adulthood. Contact Shani Lasin at (412) 325-0039 or slasin@jrspgh.org for more information. Chabad House on Campus and Chabad of CMU graduate student divisions will hold the second annual Grad Shabbat 200 for all area graduate students Friday, Nov. 11, at 6 p.m. in the University of Pittsburgh O’Hara Student Center Ballroom (formally known as the Concordia Club). Alumni donations and funding from participating organizations will contribute to the budget for this event. Sponsoring organizations are Chabad House J-Grads, Chabad of CMU Grads, J’Burgh, Jewish Graduate Students Association at CMU, Israel on Campus at CMU, Jewish Pitt Grads, Maimonides at Pitt and Jewish Law Students Association at Pitt. Visit gradshabbat.org for more information and to register. The Pittsburgh Area Jewish Committee (PAJC) will hold its annual meeting and host Middle East experts Benjamin Orbach and Col. Warren Gunderman (Ret.), who will discuss the implications of the Arab Spring on Israel’s security and diplomatic relationships, Monday, Nov. 21, at 7 p.m., at Rodef Shalom Congregation, 4905 Fifth Ave. Gunderman served as defense and military attaché in both Tunisia and Israel. Benjamin Orbach is the director Please see Birefly, page 16.


6 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 10, 2011

The Jewish Chronicle

Opinion

David M. Caoin, CEO EDITORIAL STAFF Lee Chottiner, Executive Editor Angela Leibowicz, Community/ Web Editor Toby Tabachnick, Staff Writer SALES STAFF Susie Mangel, Senior Sales Associate Roberta Letwin, Sales Associate Donna Mink, Classified Sales PRODUCTION STAFF Dawn Wanninger, Production Manager Nancy Bishop Production Artist BUSINESS STAFF Joe Soloski, Comptroller Josh Reisner, Office Manager Marcy Kronzek, Subscriptions BOARD OF TRUSTEES Richard Kitay, President Cindy Goldman-Leib, Vice President Larry Honig, Secretary Andy Schaer, Treasurer Davida Fromm, Past President Carolyn Hess Abraham Brian Balk Daniel Berkowitz Lynn Cullen Milton Eisner Stephen Fienberg Malke Frank David Grubman Carolyn Hess Abraham Thomas Hollander Evan Indianer David Levine Ari Lightman Mitchell Pakler Amy Platt Benjamin Rosenthal Charles Saul Adam Shear Jonathan Wander Lou Weiss Published every Thursday by the Pittsburgh Jewish Publication and Education Foundation 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Phone: 412-687-1000 FAX: 412-521-0154 E-Mail: newsdesk@thejewishchronicle.net SUBSCRIPTION: $45 in Pennsylvania $47 East of the Mississippi $49 West of the Mississippi and FL NEWSSTAND PRICE $1.50 PER COPY POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE JEWISH CHRONICLE, 5915 BEACON ST., 3rd Floor PITTSBURGH, PA 15217 (PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS TO JEWISH TELEGRAPHIC AGENCY AND FEATURE SERVICE) USPS 582-740 Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to the Jewish Chronicle become the property of this publication, which is not responsible for the return or loss of such items. The Chronicle does not endorse the goods or services advertised in its pages and makes no representation to the kashrut of food products and services in said advertising. The publisher is not liable for damages if, for any reason whatsoever, he fails to publish an advertisement or for any error in an advertisement. Acceptance of advertisers and of ad copy is subject to the publisher’s approval. The Chronicle is not responsible if ads violate applicable laws and the advertiser will indemnify, hold harmless and defend the Chronicle from all claims made by governmental agencies and consumers for any reason based on ads appearing in the Chronicle.

Papers please his week, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on whether a U.S. citizen may have stamped in his passport, “Jerusalem, Israel,” as his place of birth. It’s a tricky issue for the U.S. government, which, since the birth of Israel in 1948, has never formally recognized the city as belonging to any country, considering that a question to be answered through Israeli-Palestinian peace talks. But Ari and Naomi Zivotofsky are forcing the question now. Dual citizens of the United States and Israel, the Zivotofskys have tried to have “Jerusalem, Israel” listed as their son’s place of birth on his passport, but the State Department has refused, citing the long-standing policy. The couple has sued and the Supreme Court has agreed to hear the case. We understand the diplomatic minefield this poses for the Obama administration, and the administrations that follow it. The president claims the authority to set foreign policy, which a court

T

ruling for the Zivotofskys would compromise. Previous administrations — Republican and Democrat — have taken the same position. But pro-Israel members of Congress, who object to the policy, have sought legislative action to force U.S. recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, including a 2002 act urging the president to move the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, and requiring the State Department to allow American citizens born in Jerusalem to list it as their city of birth on passport documents. So this is not only a question of justice for individual Americans who were born in Jerusalem, but a larger, politically loaded question of who controls this country’s foreign policy, the president or the Congress? Well, since the president is supposed to consult Congress, we say “both” to the latter question, which is why we say the Zivotofskys should prevail. But we have another, less legalistic reason to pull for the Zivotofskys: The

Palestinian Authority is circumventing the peace process by going to the United Nations seeking statehood recognition through admission as a full member — something the United States firmly opposes. P.A. leaders see this as a way to pressure Israel to make concessions it wants before returning to the bargaining table. Recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, if only for purpose of passports, would deflate the P.A.’s effort. It may have lined up dozens of Third World nations to back its U.N. bid, which is sure to die in the Security Council, but what is that effort compared to recognition by the largest developed nation in the world of Israel’s sovereignty over the City of David. Game, set, match. Of course, political considerations have no place when the Supreme Court deliberates (in theory anyway), but what an interesting biproduct of this case. So here’s hoping the Zivotofskys win their challenge. Justice would be done — in more ways than one.

Two-state solution unrealistic; one-state solution isn’t Jay Bushinsky

JERUSALEM — It took a truly open mind as well as journalistic courage for a mainstream Israeli newspaper to publish an editorial calling for a single-state solution to the dispute with the Palestinians. “Yediot Aharonot,” which has the biggest paid circulation of all the Hebrew language dailies, broached this highly controversial idea two weeks ago and backed it up with a constructive, if not politically feasible, rationale. Proceeding from the realistic premise that the prospects of “two states for two peoples” that live in geographical Palestine between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea, it proposed that the Arabs of the West Bank and their counterparts in the Gaza Strip be offered citizenship, equal rights and all the other prerequisites of true democracy. The political logic for this is that the Strip’s inclusion in the formula to which the so-called “Quartet” — the United States, United Nations, European Union and Russia — pay lip service is unattainable for several reasons: • Hamas, the Islamic party that rules the Gaza Strip, refuses to accept the existence of Israel as a Jewish state; it contends that all of Palestine belongs to the Arabs; • The West Bank is not a viable economic entity and would be permanently dependent on foreign aid (mainly from the United States and the existing Arab states) if the existing Palestinian Authority were to be transformed into a sovereign entity; • Israel’s preconditions for the renewal of

talks are unacceptable to the P.A. administration, i.e. that it recognize Israel as a Jewish state and that the negotiations be based on the armistice line of 1949, commonly known as the Green Line or the “1967 borders” (the latter being a misnomer); • Unilateral settlement initiatives by Jews imbued with the belief that the West Bank (which most Israelis as well as Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government call Judea and Samaria) have resulted in more than 350,000 Jews living beyond the line that was crossed in the SixDay War of 1967 by the Israel Defense Force. To organize, finance their evacuation and rehabilitation inside the Green Line, Israel would be a daunting task. Today, at least 20 percent of Israel’s population is Arab. The Israeli Arabs (some call themselves Israeli Palestinians or vice versa) constitute a vibrant segment of the national economy. They contribute a significant percentage of professional personnel in the nation’s work force, especially in the fields of medicine, law and construction. Many West Bank Palestinians admit privately that they would prefer to live under the same governmental roof as Israel’s Jews with all the democratic rights that Israel provides than be subject to the artificial offshoot of the Palestine Liberation Organization and its unrealistic ideology, i.e. the Palestinian National Authority. They would like to have free access to the entire country, take off on pleasure trips to Tel Aviv or enjoy the Mediterranean beaches rather than be required to obtain special permits to do so from the P.A. government and pass through the security checks imposed by Israeli authorities. One of the main obstacles to this Middle Eastern utopia is that most of Israel’s Jews (including many if not most of those who campaign for peace and co-existence with the Palestinians such as Peace Now’s local advocates) fear the addition of 1.5 millionplus Palestinians if the Gazans were included in contemporary Israel. They warn those numbers would inevitably result in

the loss of the Jews’ numerical majority and could have dire political consequences for them in the long run. This attitude explains the theoretical support here for the “two-state solution.” It was exemplified by the simplistic slogan “We Here, They There” used by Ehud Barak in his 1999 campaign for Israel’s premiership. He won the election and served as prime minister for the next two years. To some, those words may sound like a call for apartheid. However, most Israelis, including those who fervently advocate peace with the Palestinians, see it as politically correct. The overriding problem now, however, is whether the status quo is tenable. One prominent commentator here contends that it cannot last. Those who criticize the seemingly blind pursuit of the “two-state solution,” by American foreign policy experts in and out of office, argue that if the negotiations with the Palestinian Authority were resumed, and an agreement were reached, it would result in three, rather than two, states west of the Jordan: a West Bank state, a Hamas state and Israel. Bearing all this mind, enlightened and realistic Israelis and their well-wishers abroad, Jewish and non-Jewish, at least should explore the feasibility of a one-state solution, if only because it may be the only way to go. It is time more Israelis came to realize that living in this country means living with Arabs as well as Jews and that greater familiarity with Arab culture and above all the Arabic language could make the one-state solution worth considering. (Columnist’s footnote: All existing terrorist organizations in the West Bank and Gaza Strip would have to be eliminated totally for a binational state to come into being.) (Jay Bushinsky, an Israel-based political columnist, can be reached at jay@actcom.co.il.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 10, 2011 — 7

OPINION

Letters to the editor We invite you to submit letters for publication. Letters must include name, address and daytime phone number; addresses and phone numbers will not be published. Letters may not exceed 400 words and may be edited for length and clarity; they cannot be returned. Mail, fax or e-mail letters to: via e-mail :

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More Jews choosing cremation I just finished reading Toby Tabachnick’s article on Judaism and cremation (“Rabbis wrestle with cremation amid its growing appeal to Jews,” Oct. 27) and I wanted to congratulate you on the even-handed nature of exploring a very emotional subject in the Jewish community. As a consultant to funeral homes, a writer of a professional book on cremation as well as being a Conservative Jew, I have often seen people write one-sided pieces on the subject. Cremation can evoke a great deal of emotions within the Jewish community, especially the Jewish community in the northern United States. Your article was without judgment or prejudice. It was educational. It gave the historic and the modern day. You quoted those blessed with the responsibility of helping families from both a religious and actual side of the decision making. You found the informative route to take. Ironically, in the southern, western and northwestern United States, the Jewish community has a cremation rate much higher than that of the Pittsburgh area. We see a 50 percent cremation rate in Florida, about 40 percent in the Southwest, about 40 percent in Southern California and 60 percent in the California Bay Area. The northwest cities of Seattle and Portland have small Jewish populations but their cremation rate is

close to 50 percent. For the entire United States population, in data released just last week from the Cremation Association of North America, cremation is now the choice of 40 percent of the United States families while studies show more than 50 percent favor cremation for themselves or their loved ones. Studies show that higher the education and higher average income result in a higher than average cremation choice. The Jewish community has been regarded for a long time as having an average income higher than the national average and a higher education than the national average. Yet their lower than average cremation rate in many markets is a contradiction. In the future, the question will not be, “why has cremation been so small of a decision within the Pittsburgh Jewish population” but rather, “what happened to have it increase so rapidly?” I will refer to your article as I counsel my clients who are funeral home operators, some of which are focused on serving the Jewish community. It was very well done. Daniel M. Isard Phoenix (The author is president of the The Foresight Companies, LLC.)

Military leaves no one behind I read Justin Jacobs’ recent article, “The Shalit lesson: No enemy will demean us,” Oct. 27, and I could hardly believe his comment with regard to the U.S. military not having the same ethos with regard to bringing back captured American soldiers and the remains of soldiers killed in combat. Please see Letters, page 9.


8 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 10, 2011

OPINION Israel’s response to rocket attacks key to preventing future conflict Guest Columnist ISI LEIBLER Israel’s tepid response to the latest stream of missiles launched against us from Gaza is chillingly reminiscent of our failure to adequately respond to this threat since the advent of the primitive Kassam missiles over a decade ago. The world was trained to take for granted the idea that the launching of missiles against Israeli civilians was an acceptable fact of life in this region. Since then, the missiles have become infinitely more lethal, especially now with the employment of Russian-made Grad multiple rocket launchers mounted on small trucks possibly originating from the Libyan arsenals of Gadhafi. The source of this latest exchange was again a totally unprovoked Islamic Jihad attack from Gaza under Hamas jurisdiction. For a number of days, 1 million Israelis came under missile fire, forcing the closure of schools for 200,000 children and the postponement of university studies for 40,000 higher education students. Other activities were also curtailed and residents were required to stay close to shelters. On this occasion, an Israeli father of four got out of his car in Ashkelon and was killed by a missile. Eight others were injured in other attacks; a rocket exploded into an empty school in Ashkelon; a Grad missile blew up nine cars in a multistory building in Ashdod. Our initial response killed a number of Islamic Jihadists, including a senior officer, engaged in the launches, but close to 40 missiles were subsequently launched in retaliation against us. We then failed to respond with force and instead, the IDF exercised “restraint,” effectively making a tit-for-tat response with IDF officials even stressing that re-

sponses would be “gradual.” The standard empty threats and dismal statements were made about not tolerating aggression. Instead, we left it to the Egyptians to renew a truce at a time when an Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood group was making its first visit to its fraternal ally Hamas in Gaza — an organization that they take pride in having created. It would seem that we have not learned our lesson from the past. We are again failing to display genuine deterrence and act with restraint as the terrorists gauge our response and resolve. This will unquestionably once again lead to a situation in which the quality of life for Israelis in the south will be determined by the tactical considerations of Hamas who will continue to probe until they deem it expedient to unleash their full potential and missiles will fall throughout the entire country, including on Tel Aviv. Only then will we respond and the probability is that this will lead to an allout conflict. It is now surely time for our government to make it clear that it will implement its prime responsibility for ensuring the safety of its citizens. We should tell our allies and warn our enemies that we will no longer engage in a debilitating series of restrained and proportionate responses to suit Hamas. It should be made clear that if Israel continues to be bombarded by missiles, like any other normal nation, we will employ the full might at our disposal to bring an immediate end to such lethal assaults on our citizens. Failure to halt missile attacks and restricting ourselves to responding on a case-by-case basis will in the long term guarantee the inevitability of a full scale and costly conflict, something none of us seek. The regional situation is worsening daily, as Islamic extremists become more powerful in the neighboring states. Conditions are likely to further deteriorate over the next couple of years as the

Buy, Sell, Trade in the Classifieds, Call Donna 412-687-1000

new regimes become established. We are in a better position to act now than we will be in two years, at which time the Muslim Brotherhood could be in control or have a greater influence in Egypt. We live in a tough world, but unless we revert to genuine deterrence, the writing is on the wall and all the alternate scenarios are far worse. The Shalit exchange encouraged a flow of delusionary interpretations suggesting that this would ease the tensions between Hamas and Israel. Nothing could be further from the truth. Today Hamas leaders are more determined than ever and have deluded themselves into believing that we are weak and can be destroyed in stages over a period of time. They will continue launching missiles, obtain more lethal armaments and will act in concert with the Iranians, employing their full arsenals, when they consider it is to their best advantage. We cannot accept such a state of affairs. Our government is now obliged to display leadership and strength. Hamas is flagrantly breaching international law

but there will be no censure of the missile attacks from the United Nations and we can be certain that when we do respond we will be condemned. But this must not deter us one iota from taking whatever action is required to ensure that our citizens are protected. The leaders of Hamas in Gaza who enable these attacks on Israeli civilians must be made aware that if this carries on they too will become legitimate targets for the IDF. Yesterday an Israeli was killed and others were wounded. Do we need to await a major disaster, God forbid, before we defend ourselves? Are Israelis living in the south inferior to those in Tel Aviv? If missiles were to reach Tel Aviv, our response would be different. Do we need to wait for this to happen before we act? (Isi Leibler is the former head of the Australian Jewish community and a former senior official at the World Jewish Congress. He lives in Jerusalem and is a regular columnist for the Jerusalem Post and Israel Hayom. This column first appeared in Israel Hayom.)

Marking Kristallnacht without my father Guest Columnist JANET R. KIRCHHEIMER This is the 73rd anniversary of Kristallnacht, and the first one I will mark without my father. Kristallnacht is referred to as the “night of broken glass.” But it was much more. It was the beginning of the end of most of European Jewry. It was two days of Nazi government-sponsored riots on Nov. 9 and 10, 1938, in Germany and Austria. Reported numbers vary, but about 270 synagogues were burned, 7,000 businesses and homes were damaged or destroyed, and 100 Jews were killed. Between 26,000 and 30,000 Jews were arrested and deported to concentration camps. My father was one of them. A 16-yearold boy living in Niederstetten, Germany, he was arrested on November 10 and sent to Dachau. My father died this past July and, in mourning his loss, I’ve thought about how the Holocaust will be remembered, or if it will be remembered at all. Survivors of the Shoa are dying each day, and how can the next generations remember something they haven’t experienced? One way is to tell our stories. On Pesach we tell the story of our slavery in Egypt and liberation from bondage. There are Yom HaShoa services, memoirs by survivors, and organizations working to keep the stories alive. Children who are of the age to go to the services will be the last to meet survivors. The telling of the Holocaust is not just for survivors, it is for all of us — a part of the ongoing Jewish story. Another is to take action. There is a midrash, a rabbinic commentary that says when the Jews were freed from Egypt and about to cross the Red Sea

they were afraid to go in. Only one man, Nachshon ben Aminadav, marched into the water, and when it reached his nose, the sea split, allowing the people to cross. Judaism does not want us to stand idly by. We must act, we must have the courage to jump in and make a difference. It is up to each of us to find a way to contribute toward a more just society. I don’t believe there are lessons to be learned from the Holocaust — that some people were good while others were evil, and that we can learn life lessons from those who died. Six million are gone. The only lesson is to ensure that another Holocaust does not happen again, to anyone, anywhere in the world. We also have an obligation to remember the victims and to make certain that their stories are not lost — not just the stories of the horrors, but about life before the Shoa and the extraordinary efforts of the survivors to begin new lives. The poet Cornelius Eady says that poets write to navigate their way in the world. I wrote How to Spot One of Us, a collection of poems about the Holocaust and my family. My writing and teaching have helped me to navigate as I grapple with the Shoah and its legacy. In the aftermath of such horrific events, there are no easy answers. Most of the time I’m left trying to understand something that cannot be explained. My parents (my mother is a survivor as well) showed me that, as hard as the struggle is, it’s better to live a life filled with love and faith in the future than a life of anger and hate. My father taught me many things: how to ride a bicycle, change a tire, about his life in Germany before the Shoah, and about how to live after such tragedy. But the most important thing he taught me was that life goes on and every day is precious. Each year, on Kristallnacht, my father told his story. It is now my turn. (Janet R. Kirchheimer is a teaching fellow at Clal — The National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 10, 2011 — 9

OPINION Letters to the Editor: Continued from page 7. Obviously, Mr. Jacobs doesn’t know the history of the military with regard to the situation about recovering prisoners of war and the remains of MIAs. During World War II, the United States sent a special combat patrol to free American prisoners held in Japanese hands behind the lines in the Philippines. In Europe, Gen. Patton sent an America combat patrol behind German lines to attempt to free American prisoners, which included his son-in-law. A Jewish officer commanded this patrol. Unfortunately, it was not a success. The mantra of the Marine Corps throughout its history has been to never leave a Marine behind, dead or alive. I suggest that Mr. Jacobs read a little bit about the Marine and Army retreat under Chinese communist fire in the Korean War where they brought out all of their wounded and dead from the Chosin Reservoir area. The Vietnam War saw American fliers downed in North Vietnam or contested territory and being rescued by the Air Force air rescue groups via helicopter and plane. Throughout the conflict many American fliers’ lives were saved by the heroic missions into enemy territory, many times under fire, to save our flyboys. During the Balkan Campaign, the Air Force suppressed the Serbian military when an American flier was shot down behind Serbian lines. The Air Force found him, sent rescue effort, and brought him out to safety. I really hope that Mr. Jacobs would

learn a little bit about American military history to understand the devotion of all our services to recover U.S. POWs and MIAs. This is a heartfelt, ongoing concept of the military. Capt. David Malakoff Marco Island, Fla. (The author is a retired Army captain.)

level of independence, comfort and safety consistent with their capacity and preference for care. So whether adult children are exploring options to help a loved one remain in their home with the supports required to enable them to do so comfortably and safely or deciding if an outside setting may be the right choice, asking the right questions early can help everyone reach a desired outcome.

Ask the right questions In response to your article “Leaving the house? For area senior citizens, the question isn’t that simple,” (Oct. 26) the answers aren’t always simple either. Starting the conversation about whether a parent or loved one needs help and asking hard questions requires sensitivity, respect, information and an individual assessment of need. Some changes in aging may not be easily recognized and developing a trusting relationship with a trained professional can help. Jewish Family & Children’s Service is well positioned to guide both older adults and their families through these changes. Our licensed clinical geriatric social workers provide comprehensive assessments in your home to identify strengths, health care needs, safety issues and resources to meet your changing needs and challenges related to aging. As noted in the article, there is often disagreement between the older adult and their adult children, and this relationship with a trained professional can be invaluable. The goal is to enable older adults to obtain the highest

Pearl Averbach Squirrel Hill (The author is a certified care manager at the Jewish Family & Children’s Service.)

An apology Although I stand by the content of my rebuttal letter to Abby Wisse Schachter’s article about library funding, somehow transformed without my knowledge or permission into a “Guest Columnist” section, I should not have written it while angry. I used terms in the letter that were unnecessary and ill-advised. I apologize sincerely to Mrs. Wisse Schachter for the personal tone of those comments. They were inappropriate, and as I have been reminded, at odds with my mission as a Jewish educator in a Jewish community. I hope that the mistake I made in the original rebuttal letter will not overshadow my message. For less than we spend on Starbucks, change for a parking meter, or a slice of

pizza, we can guarantee equal access to computers, Internet, educational programming for children, books and services for our entire community. I have little doubt that the community will support this referendum and their fellow citizens in a time when $900 million has been cut from the state public schools, resulting in preschool programs shutting their doors, school libraries going unstaffed and unfunded and class size getting bigger. We owe it to the little children of Pittsburgh, their older brothers and sisters, their parents and grandparents. It is the right thing to do. Sheila May-Stein Squirrel Hill

Civil discourse needed Sheila May-Stein’s op-ed piece would have been a cogent and impassioned response regarding Carnegie Library funding had it not carried with it personal insults to Abby Wisse Schachter. While the school encourages intellectual discourse, we expect it to be free of personal insult and we hold our staff and school community to that standard. Thankfully in our society one does not have to choose between civil liberties and civil discourse. In this case I regret that our truly passionate librarian and the Jewish Chronicle did not choose to exercise both. Avi Baran Munro Squirrel Hill (The author is the head of school at Community Day School.)


10 - THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 10, 2011

Style Rothko in ‘Red’ PPT production portrays tortured life of abstract artist

Above, Mark Rothko; right, actor Jeff Still portrays Rothko in “Red” Chronicle photo by Ilana Yergin

BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

When Mark Rothko accepted the commission to paint a series of murals for the elegant Four Seasons restaurant in Manhattan, his aim, he famously said, was to “ruin the appetite of every son-ofa-bitch who ever eats in that room.” Those murals — and the conflicts they represented for the famous abstract expressionist artist — provide the backdrop for “Red,” a play by John Logan, which opens at the Pittsburgh Public Theater, Thursday, Nov. 10. Set in 1958, “Red,” which won the 2010 Tony Award for Best Play, portrays Rothko and a fictional young assistant, Ken, laboring on the murals in his Bowery studio, as Rothko struggles with his place in the art world — having “crushed” the cubists, such as Picasso, yet suffering the pop artists, such as Andy Warhol, nipping at his heals. Rothko’s acceptance of the Four Seasons commission may help satisfy his hunger for recognition, and his fear of oblivion, but he remains conflicted by the truth of the intended use of his paintings: decoration of a posh restaurant where he himself feels “too goddamn Jewish.” Born Marcus Rothkowitz in Cossackoccupied Latvia in 1903, Rothko immigrated to Portland, Ore., with his family when he was 10 years old. His Orthodox Jewish upbringing, which he rejected at a young age, left him acutely ethnically Jewish, in some ways shaping the way in

which he saw the world. “He was a real yeshiva bocher,” said Pamela Berlin, the show’s director. “He was clearly extraordinarily bright. He studied [in a yeshiva] in Latvia, and in Portland, until he announced he was not going to do it anymore. But he was a secular Jew, and many of his closest artist friends were Jewish.” The set at the Public recreates the studio where Rothko worked on the commissioned paintings: the gymnasium in a former YMCA building at 222 Bowery. “It was a big barn of a place down in Greenwich Village,” recalled Rothko’s cousin, Patricia Rothko Walther, speaking to the Chronicle from her home in Wheeling, W.Va. “I only met Mark twice. The first time I was 21, and I came to New York on my way to Europe in 1958. He was lovely to me, and spent time with me at his studio.” Walther does not remember the specifics of what she saw that day at Rothko’s studio, but the timing indicates he may well have been working then on what came to be known as the Seagram murals (named for the Manhattan high rise where the Four Seasons was located). The Seagram murals, however, never actually made it to the Seagram. After dining with his wife at the Four Seasons where his paintings were to be hung, Rothko returned the $35,000 commission — a mammoth sum in 1958 — refusing to showcase his work to “anyone who eats that kind of food for that kind of money in that kind of joint.” “It gnawed at him from the beginning

that he was selling out to commercialism,” Berlin said. “And many of his fellow artists really went after him and accused him of selling out by taking the commission. He must have been tortured the entire time. “The coup de grace was when he went to dine there,” Berlin continued. “The next day, he made the call [to return the commission]. I think he avoided going to the restaurant. I think he put blinders on. He was in deep denial until he had to face it.” In reality, Rothko’s own life was at odds with that of the clientele of the Four Seasons. “He was sort of a slob,” Berlin said. “His clothes were old, and he ate like a slob. He once made a statement that you should never have to pay more than $5 for a meal.” The Seagram murals are large, abstract, irregular blocks of color — maroon, dark red, and black. Like most of Rothko’s later work, they evoke raw and visceral emotions. But Rothko did not begin his painting career as an abstract expressionist — a label he never embraced. Rather, he began with figurative works, including landscapes, still lifes and portraits. It was only over time that his paintings evolved into abstract, pulsating clouds of color. Berlin believes that Rothko’s identity as a Jew contributed to the evolution of his work. “I don’t know how his Judaism could not have informed what he finally arrived at,” Berlin said. “He was prone to hyperbole, and at one point he said to

someone, ‘I remember the Cossacks throwing pieces of people into pits.’ Then he wasn’t sure if he actually remembered seeing it, or if he had just heard about it. But then he said that the shapes in his paintings were reminiscent of the holes in the ground that he saw — the graves.” Rothko feared that the pop art that was supplanting him was superficial, Berlin said. Following World War II and the Holocaust, he and fellow abstract expressionists such as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning needed their art to speak from their deep subconscious. Anything less was petty and irrelevant. “Looking at tomato soup cans and cartons was incomprehensible to him,” Berlin said, referring to the pop art works of artists such as Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. The Rothko in “Red” is at once egotistical and insecure, funny and morose. The artist battled depression for most of his life. “Several people have said about him, ‘I think he was the loneliest man I ever met.’ ” Berlin said. Rothko eventually sent most of his Seagram paintings to the Tate Modern national gallery of international modern art in London. They arrived at the Tate Feb. 25, 1970 — the same day the artist killed himself in his studio. The Public Theater’s production of “Red” will run through Dec. 11. (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 10, 2011 — 11

FILMS Documentary looks at split identity of priest who discovers his Jewish past BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

On March 25, 1943, the Jewish mother of an 8-day-old boy placed her infant son in the care of a Polish Catholic family, in order to save him from certain death at the hands of the Nazis. The devout Catholic family raised the boy as Romvald Waszkinel, who did not discover until 12 years following his ordination into the priesthood that he was a Jew. Now, 68, Waszkinel goes by the name of Yakov, lives in Jerusalem, and works at Yad VaShem. Although he has embraced his Jewish heritage, and attends synagogue regularly, he has not abandoned the Catholicism in which he was raised. Waszkinel’s struggle with his dual identity is the subject of the documentary “Torn,” which will have its Pittsburgh premier Sunday, Nov. 13, at the Regent Square Theater. Ronit Kertzner, the director of the film, will

be in town for the event. Kertzner first met Waszkinel 13 years ago when she was working on another documentary titled “The Secret,” about others in Poland who were born Jewish, but raised Catholic. “When I met him [Waszkinel], I knew I had a film,” said Kertzner. “He deserved a film of his own.” The film follows Waszkinel from Lubin, Poland, where he conducts mass in a church, to a religious kibbutz in Israel, where he is forbidden from openly practicing Catholicism. Once in Israel, he is neither embraced by the Catholic communities there, nor permitted to become a Jewish citizen of the state through the law of return. Kertzner believes that Israel should not deny Waszkinel full citizenship

because he is a practicing Catholic, as his Catholicism was a product of the Holocaust. “He has these two identities,” Kertzner said. “There are these two religions within him. It’s our job to accept him as he is. It isn’t his fault. What happened to him directly resulted from the Holocaust.” “Personally, I feel the State of Israel was built to be a home for people like him,” she continued. “It’s very sad.” Kertzner estimates there are at least

20,000 to 30,000 people living in Poland who, like Waszkinel, were born Jewish, but raised as Catholics to escape the Holocaust. Many do not know of their Jewish identity, she said, and many who do discover it, “do nothing about it.” The Pittsburgh premier of “Torn,” along with the visit of its director Kertzner, are sponsored by Classrooms Without Borders, a nonprofit educational organization founded in February Please see ‘Torn’, page 16.

This is jumping to page 16. Just proof.


12 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 10, 2011 — 15

Simchas Engagements

Faskow-Feller/Katz: Anita and Herb Richman of Pittsburgh and Donald Faskow of Canonsburg announce the engagement of their daughter, Debbie Faskow-Feller, to Lee Katz, son of the late Janice and Ron Katz. An April 2012 wedding is planned in Charlotte, N.C., where they reside.

B’nai Mitzva Sigalle Bahary, daughter of Janice and Nathan Bahary, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Nov. 12, at Congregation Beth Shalom. Grandparents are Suzette and the late Heskel Bahary, Muriel and Art Lorring, and the late Herbert Perlin. Alexa Hope Bleiweis, daughter of Melanie and Craig Bleiweis, became a bat mitzva Saturday, Nov. 5, at Temple Emanuel.

Visit The Jewish Chronicle Website thejewishchronicle.net

Russell Faigen, son of Gayle and David Faigen, will become a bar mitzva Saturday, Nov. 12, at 10:30 a.m. at Temple Sinai. Grandparents are Anne and Mark Faigen of Pittsburgh and Joyce Taub of Munster, Ind., and the late Harry Taub. Ethan Noah Farber, son of Lynn and Lance Farber, will become a bar mitzva Saturday, Nov. 12, at Tree of Life*Or L’Simcha. Grandparents are Judy and Melvyn Farber of Lake Worth, Fla., and Barbara and Lester Parker of Pittsburgh.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NIOVEMER 10, 2011 — 13

Community A C L O S E R L O O K

BBYO teens take to the broomball rink for Amy’s Army BY AMY DICKER For the Chronicle

The South Hills boys of BBYO, otherwise known as David Iszauk AZA Chapter #1938 (DI for short) have an informal and unofficial inside joke they like to use as a slogan when they meet: “We’re DI — wanna fight about it?” “Fight about it” is exactly what they did, Saturday, Oct. 29, at the Mt. Lebanon Recreation Center while playing broomball with their peers for a fundraiser. These young men invited the other BBYO, Inc. male chapters (AZA) of Pittsburgh’s Keystone Mountain Region to join them on the ice for a $3 per point donation to Amy’s Army, eventually raising $99 for the worthwhile charity in just an hour in the rink. “Everyone was really friendly and I felt like I was a part of the group even though I’ve only been to one or two events and I don’t know that many guys,” said DI member and freshman Ben Spock. “Plus, the money is going to a good cause and this was a fun way to raise it. Some of the All of the evening’s participants are pictured above just before hitting the ice. guys had never heard of broomball before. It looked like they liked it too.” volvement, volunteerism, tzedaka and youth-led Greg Bennett and Andrew Oleinick worked hard Its second major event of the fall, DI decided to leadership development that inspired this group to on its planning and we’re grateful to everybody take a broomball social and incorporate additiontake his legacy into their local identity. who participated. Special thanks also go to the al BBYO programming folds of community servAccording to Cohen, the boys take that legaPark family for hosting the DI guys afterward for ice into the night. cy seriously. their first chapter overnight of the year. Participants started a new week by beginning “He [Iszauk] was as kind and as nice as can be, For more information about BBYO activities, the evening with a havdala service, hosted by Fox always willing to listen to your story and find out contact Keystone Mountain Regional Director Chapel’s Ruach AZA members Joe Schermer and what’s going on in your life,” Cohen said. “He just Chuck Marcus at cmarcus@bbyo.org or (412) 421Jeremy Witchel. Following that, they played gave a lot of his time and it’s so nice to see that that 2626. To learn more about Amy’s Army, visit broomball, listened to an after-game discussion, the kids are carrying on his legacy tonight with www.amysarmy.org. and laughed with each other at other inside jokes Amy’s Army.” they created. Amy’s Army is an organization founded by the (Amy Dicker is an advisor to the David Iszauk “It was really exhilarating, coming back and family of Amy Katz. It strives to raise awareness, chapter of AZA.) seeing these kids, remembering all the good donor registrations and funding to help Amy — who times I had and now seeing my son experience was diagnosed with CML in 2003 — and all cancer the camaraderie that AZA brings, watching him sufferers find matching bone marrow donors. Amy have such a good time with boys from all around is currently a 19-year-old college sophomore in rethe city,” said guest chaperone and former Monmission, according to her mother, Lisa Katz. roe AZA member Stuart Cohen. “You feel Jewish “It just makes me smile to know they all want to when you’re with these kids and, living in the help. We appreciate their support and it means a COMPILED BY ANGELA LEIBOWICZ suburbs, you don’t often get that feeling.” great deal to us,” Katz said of the DI program. Community/Web Editor Giving funding to causes is unquestionably a As well-rounded programs happen frequently all Jewish activity and Amy’s Army is the adopted over Keystone Mountain Region and around the chapter philanthropy of David Iszauk AZA, a Rabbi Aaron L. Mackler, received the world for any interested Jewish teen, BBYO is group that renamed itself after the death of Pittsdegree Doctor of Hebrew Letters, honoris causa, proud to support important causes and the lessons burgh native David Iszauk several years ago. It for his distinguished service to the Jewish comlearned from partnering with them. was his spirit of friendship, Jewish communal inmunity from the Jewish Theological Seminary. Chapter leaders Ben Ruttenberg, Barry Snyder,

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 10, 2011 — 15

MUSIC

‘Kumi Ori’ explores Jewish chanting in creative ways BY LEE CHOTTINER

And “Im T’dabernah S’fatai Avlah” (My lips will not speak unrighteousness, nor will my tongue utter deceit — Job 27:4) reminds listeners of the Godspark within them, urging them to live up to that force by using speech in a positive way — not in malicious ways, such as gossip. Goldstein, a Cleveland native who now lives in the North Hills with his partner, Jeffry Johnson — he plays piano on the album — is a composer of sacred music. He completed the twoyear Kol Zimra course for Jewish chant leadership, taught by Rabbi Shefa Gold, in 2008. He also is director of distribution services at the Pittsburgh Glass Works. For listeners drawn to cantorial music, which interprets traditional Jewish liturgy, this CD is not for you. But the album is an honest interpretation of Jewish text through perhaps the oldest form of music. “Kumi Ori” is not for everyone, but for those who seek music of inspiration and guidance, this album is well worth a listen.

Executive Editor

Chanting is more than Gregorian monks or cantors on Kol Nidre. It’s music worth listening to as well. Wexford resident David Goldstein, who is out with a new chanting CD, “Kumi Ori” (Arise and Shine) demonstrates as much. His music has versatility. It’s not just ghostly a capella chants. He incorporates percussion and string instruments, Hebrew and English lyrics, male and female voices. It’s a balanced album that creatively explores Jewish chanting — an ancient dimension to the faith, but something many Jews don’t give a second thought to when they’re in their synagogues. Goldstein, who composed all 14 tracks on the CD, draws extensively from the words of the Tanakh (Bible) for each selection. Theologically minded music lovers will recognize passages form Genesis, Isaiah, Jeremiah, CD Review “Kumi Ori” (Arise and Shine), davidpgoldstein.owlweb.org

Job, Psalms and Jeremiah. For instance, the title track, “Kumi Ori,” is based on the line, “Arise and shine for your light has come,” (Isaiah

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60:1). Goldstein calls the chant “an invitation to allow all of the beauty that lives within us to shine forth into the world.”

(Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.)


16 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 10, 2011

METRO ‘Torn’: Continued from page 11. 2011 by Dr. Zipora Gur. Classrooms Without Borders provides educational experiences for teachers and students, including travel opportunities to Poland and Israel in conjunction with Holocaust studies. “The film and Ronit Kertzner are coming here as part of the follow-up to the programs Classrooms Without

Want to go? What: “Torn” When: Sunday, Nov. 13, 5:30 p.m. Where: Regent Square Theater Director Ronit Kertzner will speak following the film.

Borders is doing,” Gur said. “I took 40 people, including 20 teachers, to Poland last summer. The teachers were from public, private and charter schools. Then, 10 of the teachers came to Yad Vashem.” While in Israel, Gur introduced the 10 teachers on the trip to Waszkinel. “When I take groups [abroad], I introduce them to interesting people,” Gur said. “He is only one example of someone finding out that he is Jewish. He left Poland, and tried Israel. He really doesn’t fit there. He walked with Jesus for 60 years. Now, it’s a big issue. It’s a fascinating story.” “Torn” will be presented by JFilm and the Three Rivers Film Festival. (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

Briefly Continued from page 5. of America’s unofficial ambassadors project and author of “Live from Jordan: Letters Home From My Journey Through the Middle East.” The program is free and open to the public; a dessert reception will follow. Visit pajc.net for more information. The Jewish War Veterans will hold a special veterans Shabbat, Friday, Nov. 11, 7:30 p.m. at New Light Congregation, 1700 Beechwood Blvd. Forty Jewish service members who died in Iraq and Afghanistan as well as those members of the Jewish War Veterans who passed away this year will be honored.

Call Jacob Notovitz at (412) 243-4523 for more information Squirrel Hill AARP Chapter 3354 will hold its next meeting, Wednesday, Nov. 16, at 1 p.m. at New Light Congregation, 1700 Beechwood Blvd. at Forbes Avenue. Following the business meeting, Tim Leighton from Highmark will speak. Contact Frieda D. Safyan at (412) 521-2804 for more information. New Light Congregation Men’s Club and Sisterhood will have a lox and bagel brunch Sunday, Nov. 13, at 10 a.m. Jennifer Antkowiak of KDKA-TV, will be the guest speaker. Kollel Jewish Learning Center has postponed its Nov. 13 Torah dedication until March 18, 2012.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 10, 2011 — 17

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TORAH

Speaking to the future Portion of the Week PARSHAT VAYEIRA 5772 GENESIS 18:1-22-24 Rabbi Jonathan Perlman New Light Congregation

On Rosh Hashana, we read the story of the Akeida, the near-sacrifice of Isaac by Abraham, taken out of the context of the Genesis narrative. We weave Abraham as hero into the High Holy Day themes of justice and mercy as one who acknowledges God as the final authority of his life (and the life of his son) and at the end of the story, comes to a full understanding of God’s mercy. So too should we feel on Rosh Hashana our relationship with the Lord of all existence and the balance of strictness and compassion. Not every commentary on the Akeida agrees that Abraham was a hero. Many believe Abraham took a leap of faith and trusted in God. He kept Isaac in the dark and soldiered his way through to the top of the mountain as a knight of faith. Others believe that God’s order was a challenge to Abraham to argue the case for justice. If Abraham could bargain with God over the sinners of Sodom and Gomorra, saying, “Shall the Judge of the earth not do justice” (Genesis 18:25), could he not save the life of Isaac, his “miracle” son born in his advanced age? Say these commentators: Abraham loses the test of faith with his blind obedience and God never speaks to him again. Is it possible to read the Akeida in the context of Abraham’s life narrative and not as a mark in either the win column or loss column? I believe we need to honor Abraham’s humanity and know — at all times — that his is up against something that is larger than himself. Abraham’s gestures betray a kind of slowing down of the events of the days after he is called. There are long silences between himself and the boy, a three-day journey into the wilderness, the presence of servants as “witnesses,” and specific details about finding the right place and arranging the wood. This is the way the weak often act in the presence of the strong as an act of civil

disobedience. If we cannot fight the strong, let us delay the inevitable as gesture of spiritual resistance. We will overcome someday. At the end, the ram appears instead of the expected lamb sacrifice and the ram and its horn becomes a symbol for embattlement and spiritual resistance within Jewish life. The British, during their mandate over Palestine, forbade Jews to pray out loud at the Kotel (Western Wall) lest one upset the Arab residents who lived close to the area. It was forbidden to read from the Torah; it was forbidden to sound the shofar on Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur. On Yom Kippur of 1930, Rabbi Moshe Segal was at the Kotel and, as it was getting close to Neila, thought to himself, “Can we possibly forgo the sounding of the shofar, which symbolizes the redemption of Israel?” He opened the drawer in a prayer stand and slipped the shofar into his shirt, wrapped himself in his tallit and thought, “All around me a foreign government prevails, ruling over our people on their holiest day; but under this tallit is another domain. Here I am under no dominion save that of my father in Heaven; here I shall do as He commands me, and no other force on earth shall stop me.” When Neila concluded, Rabbi Segal took the shofar and blew a long, resounding blast and the British police grabbed him before he was finished. He was released, but for the next 18 years, before the Arab conquest of the Old City, other rabbis would follow, piping the wail of the shofar, facing arrest, as an act of spiritual resistance of the weak over the strong. The British well knew that the shofar would bring down their authority as the walls of Jericho crumbled before the shofar of Joshua, and they did everything to prevent it from happening. Abraham needs to be understood in this way as a kind of hero that did not succumb nor fully protest the authority of a God who makes absurd demands. He reached into his humanity and found a dignified way of bearing the weight of the demand — slowly, slowly — until he met the true God Who embraced him with His compassion. Abraham’s act was an act of civil disobedience. (This is a service of the Greater Pittsburgh Rabbinical Association.)

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18 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMER 10, 2011

OBITUARY/GLOBE COLNES: On Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011, in Silver Spring, Md., Martin B. Colnes, 84, formerly of Pittsburgh; beloved husband of Toby Colnes; father of Madelyn and Robert Colnes; also survived by 5 grandchildren. Colnes was born Sept. 4, 1927, in Pittsburgh to Marie and Robert Colnes of Squirrel Hill. A graduate of Carnegie Tech, Colnes co-founded Engineered Products Inc. of Forrest Hills. He was known for his sense of humor and warm nature. Services were held at the Ewing Cemetery in Trenton, N.J. Contributions may be made to Autism Speaks, 1 E 33rd St., 4th Floor, New York, NY 10016, Attn. Rich Brown, or to www.autismspeaks.org. Arrangements by Orland’s Ewing Memorial Chapel, 1534 Pennington Rd., Ewing, NJ 08618-1384 www.orlandsmemorialchapel.com FRIEDMAN: On Monday, Oct. 31, 2011, Doris L. Friedman, of Ocala, Fla. and originally Pittsburgh; beloved wife of the late Barry Friedman; mother of

Bart A. Friedman and Jon Mark Friedman; daughter of the late Alice and Lewis Leventon; sister of Carol D. Adelsheimer; mother-in-law of Janet Friedman and Lisa Friedman; sister-inlaw of Harry Adelsheimer and Stanton T. Friedman. Services were held at Conrad & Thompson Funeral Home in Kissimmee, Fla.; interment Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell, Fla. Arrangements by Conrad & Thompson Funeral Home, 511 Emmett St., Kissimmee, FL 34741-5493 www.conradandthompson.com HECHT: On Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011, Morris Hecht; beloved husband of Ruth Linder Hecht; loving father of Mimi (Russell) Eschbacher and Neila (Danny) Bendas; son of the late Jenny and Abraham Hecht; brother of the late Arnold Hecht; brother-in-law of Helen Hecht; grandfather of Gilit and Pete James, Carin and Ben Blazer and Alon Bendas; also survived by many loving nieces, nephews and friends. Services

were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment Poale Zedeck Memorial Park Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Poale Zedeck Congregation, 6318 Phillips Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 or Hillman Cancer Center, 5115 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232 www.schugar.com KRASH: On Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2011, Lois M. (Snyder) Krash; beloved wife of the late Harry Krash; mother of Joseph (Shuli) and Jacqueline Krash; grandmother of Hirsh Reuven and Gavriel Nosson Krash; daughter of Ann Krassner Snyder and the late Barney Snyder; sister of Irene (Edward) McDonald, James (Cheryl) Snyder, Charles Snyder (Carol Shriber), Karen (Anthony) Captline, Robin Snyder, Sally (Doug) Kitchen, Bill (Patty) Snyder, Jay (Bonnie) Snyder and Dan (Shelly) Snyder; also survived by many nieces and nephews. Services were held at William Slater Funeral; interment

Canton Hebrew Cemetery in Canton, Ohio. Arrangements by William Slater II Funeral Service, 1650 Greentree Rd., Scott Twp., PA 15220 www.slaterfuneral.com THAW: On Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011, Cecyl M. Thaw; wife of the Late Murray C. Thaw; beloved mother of Deborah (Milt) Valera, Robert (Barbara Cooley) Thaw; daughter of the Late Barnett Marcus and the Late Rose Marcus; sister of the Late Beatrice (Petty Schwartz), the Late Jeannie (Winston), the Late A. Richard Marcus; grandmother of Rachel and Marcus. Services and interment were held at West View Cemetery of Rodef Shalom Congregation. Contributions may be made to Beth Samuel Jewish Center, 810 Kennedy Dr. P.O. Box 219, Ambridge, PA 15003 and Rodef Shalom Temple, 4905 Fifth Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232 www.schugar.com

Peres: Strike on Iran becoming ‘more likely’; IAEA may confirm nukes BY ISRAEL HAYOM Exclusive to JNS

A military strike on Iran is growing “more likely than the diplomatic option,” Israeli President Shimon Peres said Friday, adding that it seems that “Iran is getting closer to a nuclear bomb. It will probably happen within one year.” In an exclusive interview with the Israel Hayom newspaper, Peres said, “Iran is nearing atomic weapons and in

the time left we must turn to the world’s nations and demand (they) fulfill their promise ... which is not merely passing sanctions. It must be understood that this problem is not Shimon Peres just ours but the

entire world’s. Iran threatens not only Israel. What needs to be done must be done and there is a long list of options.” Media reports speculating about whether or not Israel had decided to strike were premature, Peres said. “I do not think a decision has been made, but there is a sense that Iran is well on its way to having nuclear arms.” Peres said he believes the Iranian regime’s days are numbered. “They are corrupt people who exploit their population, most of whom are poor. Their government continues to arm Hezbollah and in the end it will work against them. What message are they trying to send their people?” Peres told Israel Hayom. Any potential military strike, however, would be kept entirely confidential, he said. “Telling the enemy our intentions is unacceptable. We must maintain our operational plans discretely.” Peres was speaking days before the U.N.’s nuclear watchdog is to release its much-anticipated latest report into Iran’s nuclear program. The IAEA has obtained its strongest confirmation yet that Iran is pursuing nuclear weapons at its Parchin military base, and is poised to release a report this week that includes photographic evidence of the Iranian base. The report by the International Atomic Energy Agency will prove that Iran built a large steel container for carrying out tests with high explosives that could be used in nuclear weapons, sources briefed on the document said on Friday. The facility at Parchin, near Tehran, lends credence to allegations by IAEA member states that the installation was intended for nuclear-related explosives testing, the sources said. The IAEA has carried out several previous inspections on Iran’s nuclear program, but as opposed to the investigations in the past, which looked at Iran’s efforts to create uranium and plutonium, materials that can be used both for nuclear weapons as well as generating electricity, the new report focuses on their efforts to put the radioactive material directly into a warhead. Iran, which opposes Israel’s existence, has long said it is enriching uranium only to power reactors for elec-

tricity generation, but these photos will serve to disprove that claim. Speaking to the AFP, one Western diplomat, who declined to give his name, said, “The report is not going to include some sort of ‘smoking gun,’ but it will be an extensive body of evidence that will be very hard for Iran to refute as forgery, as they have done in the past.” The IAEA will also reveal evidence that Iran carried out computer modeling of a nuclear weapon, one source said. Western diplomats say the keenly awaited report will strengthen suspicions that Tehran is seeking to develop the capability to make atomic bombs but stops short of explicitly saying it is doing so. It was unclear when the container was built or whether it was actually used for nuclear-related work. Suspicions of nuclear arms work at the Parchin military complex southeast of Tehran date back at least to 2004 when a prominent nuclear expert said satellite images showed it may be a site for research, testing and production of nuclear weapons. Iran, which continues to insist its nuclear program is peaceful while at the same time routinely questioning the Holocaust and issuing vitriolic statements against Israel and Zionism, has previously denied the allegations. In 2005, Iran allowed U.N. nuclear inspectors to visit Parchin. The IAEA in May listed seven areas of concern regarding possible military dimensions to Iran’s nuclear program, including high explosives manufacturing and testing and the development, manufacturing and testing of explosive components. One of the main hurdles in making an atomic bomb is designing a ring of conventional explosives used to compress atomic material in the warhead core, igniting a nuclear chain reaction. Experiments have to be carried out to test the impact of explosions on bomb components. The IAEA report is expected to include other evidence of research and other activities that make little sense if not weapons-related, Western diplomats said.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 10, 2011 — 19

METRO Kent State: Continued from page 1. providing aid to Turkey with blood money that came from the deaths of Palestinian mothers and children. “To be honest, I’m not quite sure what he was trying to say or what he was getting at, but it seemed to me that the way he said it indicated it was planned,” said Gildenblatt. According to Chestnut, Khaldi said Pino was lying, and refused to answer his question based on its lack of respect. Khaldi invited Pino to ask him a more respectful question, but Pino left the room chanting “Death to Israel!” three times. Pino, a convert to Islam and tenured associate professor of history at Kent State, is no stranger to controversy. In 2002, he wrote a column eulogizing and praising a suicide bomber for the Daily Kent Stater, and in 2007, the Drudge Report accused him of contributing to the self described “jihadist news service” blog Global War. The Secret Service served a search warrant on his home in an investigation in 2009. David Lee, a spokesman for the Secret Service’s Akron Bureau, told JNS that the investigation was instigated due to “a matter that involved one of our core violations.” Lee declined to specify which core violation, but did say that the investigation was completed, and “as far as we’re concerned, the case is closed.” According to Chestnut, students in the room were surprised by Pino’s actions, but since she is aware of Pino “and his outbursts, which have happened before,” she was not surprised. “Anti-Israel sentiment happens across campuses, and it’s an unfortunate reality,” she said. The main concern shared by students and parents alike, Chestnut continued, is what Pino is saying behind the closed doors of his classroom, considering that he was willing to make these statements in public.

Yiddish: Continued from page 1. story, as another member read it aloud in Yiddish. Everyone laughed out loud at the end, all in on the joke. There are clubs like Toder’s all over the world, including a group that meets weekly in Squirrel Hill. The clubs gather every 18 months, under the auspices of the International Association of Yiddish Clubs, for a four-day conference. The next conference will be hosted by Toder’s South Hills group in 2013. The event will be held at the Radisson Greentree, and Toder’s group is already planning the event, which is expected to attract more than 200 Yiddish-speakers. “The international group gets into some pretty serious shtick,” Toder said. “They had some good speakers in Detroit [a prior conference venue]. They even had a Yiddish puppet show. I thought, ‘What kind of mishegoss is this?’ But this was an adult puppet show. They got a standing ovation.” The conference also typically features daily breakout sessions on topics as diverse as paper cutting and films. Not all the attendees of the conference can speak Yiddish. “It was wonderful to be there, and to join with people in a Yiddish community,” said Renee Gerger, of Detroit, who came to the South Hills last weekend with her husband Jerry to help get

Kent State President Lester A. Lefton distanced himself from Pino’s words. In an official statement, Lefton wrote that Pino had a right to voice his opinion, but “it is my obligation, as the president of this university, to say that I find his words deplorable, and his behavior deeply troubling.” While the incident should not serve as support for abolition of the tenure system, Gildenblatt said, “it goes beyond academic freedom when a supposed academic professional calls for the outright destruction of a people instead of constructively arguing his points.” Tom Neumann, associate vice president of university communications and marketing, said that any disciplinary action against Pino would be kept confidential. However, Chestnut said that an incident report has been filed, and Hillel would meet with university administrators to request a further look into the matter “This was hate speech,” he said, “and what happens when a tenured professor makes hate speech?” Cary Nelson, national president of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), supported Pino, saying “Calling out a political slogan during a question period falls well within the speech rights of any member of a university community,” according to Inside Higher Ed. Greg Scholtz, secretary and director of the Department of Academic Freedom, Tenure, and Governance at the AAUP, told JNS that tenured professors must generally have demonstrated gross misconduct, incompetence, or a severe neglect of duties to be dismissed. According to Scholtz, “it is a myth” that it is virtually impossible to fire tenured professors, citing 50 to 60 such instances during his three years on the job. However, he said cases similar to this one — where a professor has actually been successfully dismissed due to hate speech — are “very few.” (Masha Rifkin is the managing editor of JNS.)

Toder’s group started on the next conference. “I don’t speak Yiddish or understand it, but I loved it.” While the conference, like the South Hills club, tends to attract mostly senior citizens, Yiddish’s popularity is surging among the young, Jerry Gerger told the group. “Unfortunately, there are a lot of seniors [at the conference],” Jerry Gerger said. “But there are more and more younger people who are interested. The entertainers are generally all younger.” “There was a tremendous re-birth of Yiddish in the late 19th and early 20th century,” he continued. “It was a literary revival. There were all of these great authors and poets. We’re going through another revival now, but it is an entertainment revival. The younger generation — all in their 20s — sing a beautiful Yiddish and entertain in Yiddish. They mingle with the older crowd, and the older crowd becomes younger.” Granick, who is a klezmer vocalist, is a case in point. “I joined a klezmer band [while at Harvard], and learned about what the Yiddish actually meant,” she said. “Then I took other classes and realized how important Yiddish was. It’s the Jewish language. If you’re interested in where you came from, and where you’re going, it’s important to know Yiddish.” (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

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In MeMory of

BEVERLY S. MARKS .........HARBERT B. MARKSMARY B. MARKS ................SALLY CHUDSCOFF MARY B. MARKS .............JOSEPH THOMPSONFERNE ROGOW.......................SYLVIA VINOCUR AUDREY B. ROTH........................ADOLPH ROTH AUDREY B. ROTH................MYRA FERN SEDER NAIDA & JOEL SCHWARTZ ..........................MILDRED CAPLAN JAMES C. SIMON ..................ANNE FIRESTONE VIOLET SOFFER...................DOROTHY BENDER GERTRUDE TEPPER...................HARRY TEPPER HOWARD & RHEA TROFFKIN ...............................IRVING TROFFKIN

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 13: FREDA S. BARBROW, SADIE BRAND, PHILIP L. ESCOTT, JACOB FRANK, LOTTIE HAAS FRIED, ESTHER GREEN, RUSSELL JOSEPH KARDON, BEN D. KROSNEY, RONELLA LEVEY, HYMAN LEVINE, MOLLIE MALT, ADDIE MAYER, BERTHA GRINBERG MILLER, IDA STEIN MORGAN, NATHAN MYERS, SARAH OSTRAGER, DR. IRVING PERLMUTTER, GRETTA PICK, LOUIS POLLOCK, FANNIE RADIN, NATHAN RICE, ROSE RICHMOND, SAUL ROTHMAN, MAY SCHWARTZMAN, LENA SHEINBERG, ANNA SNYDER, YETTA SOLOMON, DOROTHY J. SPOLAN, MAX STEIN, HAROLD STONE, ARTHUR MARTIN WALLACH, BENJAMIN WEINBERGER, JEANNETTE E. WHITE, SELMA ZOBER. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14: IRVING CLOVSKY, BESSIE COHEN, SIMON COHEN, IDA K. FEURMAN, MEYER KRASNER, JOHN T. LAVEY, SARAH LEVINE, ROBERT LEWIN, ABRAHAM I. LEWIS, DR. DAVID G. LICHTER, MAX LIPKIND, DORIS LIPNER, TILLIE BERKMAN LOUNDY, DAVID MANDEL, JOSEPH MANDEL, HERBERT B. MARKS, GRACE MILLER, NATHAN POSTER, BESSIE FEIGENBAUM REITMAN, I. RICHARD ROSENBERG, SARA KAPLAN SALABES, LENA SCHUSTER, MYRA FERN SEDER, JEAN SEGALL, REBECCA B. SHAFFER, JOHN SHAPINSKY, ADA SHULGOLD, MAX SOLOMON, EMIL STEINBACH, IRWIN YAMRON. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15: DOROTHY BENDER, JEROME COHEN, JULIUS COHEN, SGT. CHARLES COHEN, HAROLD I. FREED, JOSEPH FRIEDMAN, ELIZABETH D. GUSKY, GITTEL PEARL HECHT, ALFRED M. KARLIN, MURIEL LANDWEHR, DAVID LEDERMAN, DAVID JACOB LERNER, GRACE LEVENSON, ANNA ROTH LEVITAN, SIDNEY LEWINTER, FANNIE E. LONDO, SARAH LUBIC, CHARLOTTE MALAMUD, MARILYN MALLINGER, MOSES MALLINGER, EUGENE MARCHBEIN, ANNE MARMINS, BENJAMIN MILLER, PEARL MILLER, FREDA (FRITZI) PAUL, MICHAEL PIRCHESKY, ESTHER PORTNOY, BERTHA RESNICK, BETTY RESS, EDITH ROGOFF, ROSE SCHULTZ SALTSBURG, SAYRA E. SAMUELS, ISAAC SERRINS, JACOB SHAPIRO, FANNIE SPOKANE, LENA STEINBERG, ELIZABETH STERN, HARRY TEPPER, SAMUEL WEINHAUS, JENNIE WEIS, MORRIS WEITZEN, JESSIE S. YORKIN, WILLIAM ZAPLER, ARTHUR I. ZEIGER, PHILIP ZUCKERMAN. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16: LAURA AARON, HERZL L. AMDUR, LOUIS J. AZEN, WILMA ROSENBERG BLAU, DOROTHY BRAND, SALLY BRENNER, NAT M. CHERKOSLY, MORRIS COHEN, PAULINE DANIELS, GERTRUDE DEKTOR, GERTRUDE FRANK, BELLA FRIEDMAN, RUTH A. GOLD, DR. ROBERT GRAUER, MORRIS O. GUTTMAN, ARTHUR J. HARRIS, ANNA LEWINTER HIRSH, ROSE HOFFMAN, SYLVIA ISRAEL, JOHN KOLER, LOUIS LAUFE, ISRAEL LEFF, JAMES SAMUEL LEVINE, FANNIE LICHT, GITTLE LIPMAN, ALBERT LOVE, ISADORE MALLINGER, SOSCHA MEYER, TILLIE SAMUEL MIEROWITZ, AARON OLBUM, BENJAMIN R. PROTAS, ABRAHAM H. RAPPORT, ELIZABETH ROME, LOUIS ROTHMAN, ZELDA RUBIN, SAMUEL RUDICK, RUTH WITT SIMON, CHAYE DINA SPODEK, ANNA UNIKEL, SIDNEY WEIN, NATHAN A. WILLIAMS. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17: BERNARD ALPERN, SARAH ANSTANDIG, FAY BLUMBERG, ESTHERITA COHEN, EMANUEL FELDMAN, SOLIS L. GOLDMAN, WILLIAM GOLDSTEIN, HELEN GOTTESMAN, GERTRUDE HERMAN, BARBARA ROM KRUM, RACHEL BELLA LEVINE, WALTER MANDELBLATT, ABE M. MILLER, MEYER PEARL, PEARL REINSTEIN, GEOFFREY ROBERTS, JACK L. SAFIER, MORRIS SCHULMAN, DAVID SNYDER, LIBBIE RATUSCH TOBE, SAMUEL P. WARREN, RABBI SIMON B. WEISS, JACOB WOLF. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18: DR. MAX A. ANTIS, DELLA BAROTZ, HARRY BERNSTEIN, FRANK COHEN, ROSE FEIGENBAUM, BERNARD AARON FELDMAN, WILLIAM L. FOGEL, ROSE GLICK, BLANCHE MOSKOWITZ GOULD, SAUL KOPELSON, DAVID LANGER, LILLIAN LAPIDUS, RACHEL LAZARUS, LOUIS LITTLE, LEO LIVINGSTON, MAX MALLINGER, CELIA MARCUS, CELIA MEYER, CELIA MEYERS, SADIE MOSENSON, HARRY I. NEAMAN, WILLIAM HANTMAN ORR, BERTHA ROSENTHAL, HAROLD L. ROTH, SADIE G. RUSH, ALBERT R. SACKS, SARAH SAFIER, MAX SAMUELS, THEODORE SOKOLER, SOLOMON STORMWIND, DAVID VOLKIN, MORRIS MEYER WEIN, REGINA WEISS, LENA WESOKY, LOUIS WIND, LOUIS WINER. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19: ROBERT SCOTT ACKERMAN, BENJAMIN DOBKIN, BENJAMIN JULES FEINBERG, EMERY J. FELDMAN, GERALD GOLDBERG, NATHAN ISRAEL, HYMAN J. KAUFMAN, PAUL KIMBALL, MORRIS B. KIRSCHENBAUM, FLORENCE I. KLINE, PHILLIP KRAVITZ, TAUBE LABOVICH, MARY MANNHEIMER, JACQUELINE MARDER, NATHAN MESSER, SAUL I. PERILMAN, SARAH ROSA PERLMAN, MAJOR ARTHUR PRISE, FRED ROSENZWEIG, BELLE SAPEER, MINNIE SCHILIT, ALBERT SHEPARD, MITCHELL SHULMAN, ROSA SIGAL, MIRIAM SILVERMAN, ISRAEL A. SIMON, WOLF SIMON, MICHLEY SPANEL, LEON STEIN, ROSE STERN, LOUIS M. STRAUSS, EDWARD SZOBEL, PAUL EMANUEL TAUBERG, SAMUEL VIESS, SIDNEY S. WALLACH, CLARA WEINER, WILLIAM WEINSTEIN, LOUIS ZWEIG,

Call DeeAnna Cavinee at 412.521.1975 or e-mail donations@jaapgh.org for more information or to make a contribution to the Jewish Association on Aging.


20 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 10, 2011

The Jewish Chronicle Nov. 10, 2011  

The Jewish Chronicle Nov. 10, 2011

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