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Metro Cyber mechitza Faceglat makes social networking frum

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE thejewishchronicle.net DECEMBER 1, 2011 KISLEV 5, 5772

Vol. 55, No. 29

Pittsburgh, PA

$1.50

Where Jewish, American history meet

National Jewish museum takes rightful place on Independence Mall BY BETH KISSILEFF JNS

PHILADELPHIA — “We moved from the 50-yard line to the owner’s box,” says Jay Nachman, the public relations director of the National Museum of American Jewish History, quoting the late museum board member George Ross as we look out on the spectacular view of Philadelphia from the balcony of the facility. The Jewish museum has been open to the public at its current location — overlooking Independence Mall, home of the U.S. Constitution and Declaration of Independence —since Nov. 26, 2010, nearly a full year now. The museum was previously at the Fourth Street location

of Congregation Mikveh Israel (a congregation first opened in 1740 to serve Spanish-Portuguese Jews), with a 15,000-square foot exhibit space open since July 4, 1976. Its current home is more grandiose — a 100,000-square foot, $150 million building designed by architect James Stewart Polshek, whose other work includes the “Newseum” in Washington, D.C., an expansion of New York’s American Museum of Natural History and the Clinton Presidential Library in Little

Rock, Ark. Gallagher & Associates designed the exhibits, and the museum’s Deputy Director Josh Perelman aided in curating. On the way to the museum, I pass many Jewish landmarks, including the Jewish Federation building (which contains the Jewish Publication Society, the oldest Jewish publication house in the country), the Beth Zion-Beth Israel Synagogue on 18th Street, and the YM/YWHA on 15th and Pine. Jews have clearly had a presence in Philadelphia since the early days of the city. Since the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were written here, Nachman said, there is no better place to

tell the story of how Jews participated in — and were changed by — the freedoms granted with the founding of America. Brandeis University professor Jonathan Sarna, the chief historian at the museum and a leading scholar of American Jewry, agreed. “It is after all an amazing thing that you have such a museum on the [Independence] Mall in Philadelphia overlooking the Liberty Bell, and a stone’s throw away from the Constitution center,” Sarna said. Beth Wenger, professor of history and director of the Jewish Studies Program at the University of Pennsylvania, was a member of the museum’s advisory Please see History, page 19.

Barry Halkin/Halkin Photography

The National Museum of American Jewish History’s building for the past year. Facing Independence Mall in Philadelphia is a glass prism, expressing “the openness of America as well as the perennial fragility of democracy,” according to the museum.

B USINES S 14/C L AS SIFIED 17/O BITUARIES 18/C OMMUNITY 13 O PINION 6/R EAL E STATE 16/S IMCHAS 12

Times To Remember

KINDLE SABBATH CANDLES: 4:36 p.m. EST. SABBATH ENDS: 5:38 p.m. EST.


2 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE

DECEMBER 1, 2011

Metro Change in leadership

Winn-Horvitz to become new president of JAA; Gritzer moves to COO BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

The Jewish Association on Aging has hired Deborah Winn-Horvitz as its new president and chief executive officer, replacing David Gritzer, who will assume the position of the organization’s chief operating officer. “I’ve got a fresh set of eyes to come in and make some improvements,” WinnHorvitz said. Winn-Horvitz comes to her new post with a background in operational management in the areas of acute and academic medicine. She worked for the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center for the last nine years in various leadership roles, most recently as the executive administrator for the department of medicine. Prior to her turn at UPMC, WinnHorvitz worked for five years at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, with a primary focus on revenue cycle and patient satisfaction. With UPMC and Johns Hopkins as organizational models, she plans to take

the JAA to the next level. “In terms of my expectations of what a health care organization should look like, I am coming from Hopkins and UPMC,” she said. “That’s what I want for this organization.” Winn-Horvitz plans to engage the community in defining the quality of care it wants for its seniors, and to bring new opportunities in the care continuum to Pittsburgh. “I would like the JAA to be the model of care in terms of long-term care for the country,” she said. Winn-Horvitz was hired after a nationwide search, according to Woody Ostrow, JAA board chair. “It was a plus that she happened to be from Pittsburgh,” he said. Although she has no prior experience in working in long-term care, Ostrow believes Winn-Horvitz’s background will complement the direction in which the JAA is headed: nonresidential care. “All the growth is nonresidential,” Ostrow said. “The JAA will help people stay in their homes, while providing services for them there. People are now

living longer and longer in their own residences. Debbie had a great background in all that, and in helping people make their later years their best years.” Ostrow is stepping down as JAA chair in March 2012; Steve Halpern will succeed him. Winn-Horvitz’s experience will benefit the various arms of the JAA, said Halpern, who also served as the chair of the JAA’s CEO search committee. “The most important thing we can benefit from as an agency is Debbie’s tremendous enthusiasm for her role,” Halpern said. “Between her experience at Hopkins and UPMC, she has worked at elite organizations that stress accountability.” “She is a caring person,” he added. “She doesn’t view health care as a business; she cares about people, and she cares about families.” “The agency of the JAA is a very complicated enterprise,” Halpern continued. “It is becoming increasingly nonresidential. We thought that as health care is evolving, organizations will need to develop alliances with other organizations.” Halpern believes Winn-Horvitz will be able to build those alliances, while she draws on Gritzer’s practical experience in managing long-term care facilities. “We wanted the best of both worlds,” Halpern said. “We wanted Dave’s (Gritzer) experience as a platform, and we needed someone to support Dave.” Gritzer said that bringing WinnHorvitz on board will allow him to focus his time on improving the quality of the JAA’s residential facilities. “Bringing another person in at the

senior management level shows the [JAA] board’s commitment to excellence,” Gritzer said. One focus of Winn-Horvitz as CEO will be to improve the quality of care at Charles Morris Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. “Like any other nursing home, there is room for improvement,” Winn-Horvitz said. “Charles Morris is the entity most people identify with when they hear ‘the JAA.’ I will be very involved in the operations to ensure the level of care is raised in terms of quality. I want this to be the model for the country.” Because she is not coming from a background in long-term care, WinnHorvitz said she would be transitioning into her new position by doing research in the field. Still, she said, it is not hard to recognize quality care. “We all know what good care looks like or feels like,” she said. “I will initially be doing research to educate myself to see what it is that the JAA needs to do to get there and to exceed expectations.” Winn-Horvitz will also draw upon her personal background as the daughter of two aging Holocaust survivors in defining her priorities in her new position. “My dad is 88, and my mom is 85, and they live independently,” she said. “I will be looking at them as the model in considering what we can do to make sure people can live as independently as them, as long as possible. They will be my informal advisors.” (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 1, 2011 — 3

METRO Briefly

The American Jewish Museum of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh will display an exhibit of the work of the comic hero Funnyman and his creators, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, from Jan. 10 to March 28, 2012. An opening reception for the exhibit will be held, Saturday, Jan. 14, 6 p.m., at the JCC.

The exhibit, titled “Super Silly! Superman Creators’ Funnyman Fights Crime with Shtick,” showcases the comic hero in a class well apart from his better-known partner in crime fighting, Superman, whom Siegel and Shuster also created. They gave birth to Funnyman in 1948, a good 10 years after Superman. Unlike the Man of Steel, with his flowing cape and tights with the big red “S,” the lesser-known Funnyman wore baggy polkadot pants and a plaid jacket with a flower lapel. And Larry Davis, Funnyman’s real life identity, was a comedian by day, unlike the newspaper reporter identity assigned to Clark Kent — Superman’s alter ego. While the Funnyman comic lasted for just six issues, “Super Silly!” will feature the complete set of original Funnyman storyboards, which have never before been displayed. A series of art workshops, receptions and a Tu B’Shevat activity are being planned around the exhibit. Contact Melissa Hiller, director of the American Jewish Museum, at (412) 521-8011 Ext. 105 for more information. Crossing Limits, an interfaith artbased organization supporting social change, art education, progressive literature and creative thinking, will hold a BESA poetry workshop, Sunday, Dec. 4, from 1 to 5 p.m., at the Jewish Community Center in Squirrel Hill. Please see Briefly, page 5.


4 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 1, 2011

METRO Incubator project supports tech group for 20-something Jewish entrepreneurs BY LEE CHOTTINER Executive Editor

Sophia Berman and Ariella Furman know a little something about start-ups. Furman, after all, is the CEO of her own start-up company in Pittsburgh, Framed in 3D, which produces animated training and prototype videos. And Berman is an industrial designer for Product Lexicon, a “strategic design consultancy” that does design strategy, research and design/engineering for a variety of companies. But now, these 20-something young guns in Pittsburgh’s high-tech sector are applying their energies to the Jewish community, and their success could pave the way for future programs, their purpose being to help retain the best and brightest of Pittsburgh’s Jewish youth. With the help of $300 in seed money and logistical support from J’Burgh, Berman and Furman have started J’Tech, a support group for Jews, ages 20 to 30, entering the high-tech market. They held their kickoff program in October — an event that attracted Web programmers, designers, engineers, even attorneys. J’Tech is the first up-and-running project supported by J’Burgh’s new Program Incubator project, an effort to apply seed money and human resources to bright ideas proposed by Pittsburgh graduate students and young professionals — all designed to make Pittsburgh a more attractive place for them to live. Berman and Furman hatched the idea for J’Tech while networking through groups for young Jewish professionals, and noticing that something was missing. “We noticed a gap in the programming for people in their 20s — young professionals,” Berman said. “We started attending these events and realized there weren’t any young people.”

Sophia Berman (left) and Ariella Furman hope J’Tech can support newcomers to Pittsburgh’s high-tech sector.

J’Tech, they say, is a safe place where 20-somethings just starting out and lacking the business experience can network with like-minded people, discuss the hurdles they’re facing in getting their ideas off the ground, find moral support

and maybe some helpful advice. “For me, one of the most important things is consistency — members returning to the events,” Furman said. “It’s an outlet they can take advantage of and utilize. And each event they come to,

they are a step further in their process and they have things they can share. For me it’s a way to reach out, get support and not be judged. With $2,000 from a Jewish Federation outreach grant, the J’Burgh Program Incubator project started last summer, said David Katz, director of J’Burgh. Already it has received five applications for assistance. J’Burgh, which is part of the Hillel Jewish University Center, is a social and professional network for Jewish graduate students and young professionals. “The goal [of the incubator project] was to give J’Burgh participants the opportunity to create grassroots programs in the community,” Katz said, “and we have a total of five ideas that we’re incubating.” Those ideas, which aside from J’Tech, are not yet up and running, are a Yiddish club, an indoor tennis group, a J’Burgh band and a “dress for success” group. “We want participants to think about how they can make a personal impact on the community,” Katz said. J’Tech holds regular meetings the third Thursday of every month at different locations around the area. Its next event is a cocktail social on Dec. 16 at Dave and Busters. Its activities can be followed at jtechpittsburgh.wordpress.com. It also is planning speaking engagements with leaders in the high-tech sector who happen to be Jewish. They recently visited Rhiza Labs on the South Side where they met with its CEO, Josh Knauer. “It’s nice to get more exposure to the city and find all the cool things people are doing,” Berman said, “and ultimately the goal of J’Burgh [and J’Tech] is to keep people in Pittsburgh.” (Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.)

FaceGlat Social networking goes frum as sharing site protects users from ‘inappropriate’ postings BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

Sign onto FaceGlat, the new social networking site for the ultra-Orthodox, and up pops a directive for women to click on the arrow to the left, while men are sent to the right. It’s like a cyber mechitza. FaceGlat was launched last summer by Yaakov Swisa — the Israeli Haredi answer to Mark Zuckerberg. Swisa, 24, has been building websites for the past two years, but has had no formal training in computers. He created FaceGlat to allow people of the same gender to share posts and photos, while blocking contact deemed immodest. “We see a rise in Internet use in the religious [Orthodox community], and so we need to reduce exposure to harmful content as [much as] possible,” Swisa wrote in an e-mail to the Chronicle. For example, if an Orthodox woman wants to publish her personal profile, and share that information with her female friends, she can sign onto FaceGlat knowing that men will have no access to her photographs and other content. “Perhaps it may seem too strong,” Swisa said, “but these are the needs in

The home page of FaceGlat directs male and females users to separate sign-in pages.

the community, and the site was established for a particular community.” Social networking sites, such as Facebook, are unsuitable for the ultra-Orthodox, according to Swisa.

“The downside at the various sites is a few things,” he said. “First, the contents are not being filtered, and contain images that [are inappropriate for] the ultra-Orthodox community. And there are

promotional materials that do not fit the community.” The protected, cyber-world of FaceGlat seems to be catching on. In just four months, more than 7,000 users have registered, and the numbers are rising every day, according to Swisa. Members come from all over the globe, including Europe and the United States, as well as Israel. Swisa has built safeguards into his site to ensure the content posted is suitable for his community. For example, a program tracks and deletes inappropriate words, and a “report” tool allows users to report inappropriate content, or another user whose sole purpose seems to be to post improper information. FaceGlat then reviews the items or users reported to decide if they should be removed from the site, Swisa said. Although he has not visited FaceGlat, Rabbi Yisroel Rosenfeld, director of the Lubavitch Center of Pittsburgh, believes it could be “very helpful” for those wanting to be connected on a social networking site, but who do not want to be exposed to things they find objectionable. “As a rule, we do not encourage Plese see FaceGlat, page 16.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 1, 2011 — 5

METRO Briefly Continued from page 3. The workshop is based on the BESA exhibit — photographs of righteous Albanian Muslims during World War II — currently on display at the JCC. Participants will engage in discussion and literary activities that explore the importance of the photographs and stories of the BESA exhibit. They will be paired in an effort to create two group poems that will examine both the inward and outward responses to this exhibit. The program is free. Congregation B’nai Abraham will offer a 20-week “Introduction to Judaism” class taught by the congregation’s spiritual leader, Cantor Michelle Gray-Schaffer. Many aspects of Judaism will be covered in the class, including Jewish history and culture, biblical studies and worship practices. The free class will meet Fridays at 6 p.m. at B’nai Abraham, 519 N. Main St., Butler. Contact Gray-Schaffer at (724) 287-5806 for more information. Jewish Family & Children’s Service’s Career Development Center will offer job seekers 15 workshops in December. Some of the workshops include: Franchising as a Career Option, Dec. 1; Magnetic Resumes Dec. 6; Speed Networking, Dec. 8; and Cover Letters & More, Dec. 20. Phone Interviews. Monthly LinkedIn for Beginners, LinkedIn Advanced, AARP WorkSearch 40+, Networking Club and Job Seeker Support group workshops will be held also. Visit careerdevelopmentcenter.org to register or call the Career Development Center at (412) 422-5627 for more information. Women of Temple Sinai Gift Shop will hold its annual Chanuka Bazaar Sunday, Dec. 4, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the auditorium. The event, “Shop, Snack, and Schmooze,” will include snacks and coffee. Chanuka-related gifts for all ages include games, crafts, boutique items, Hanita Kossowsky jewelry, menoras and dreidels, Chanuka greeting cards, gelt and gift bags. Sydelle Pearl, a local storyteller and children’s author, will sign her books. Also highlighted will be original Chanuka table-runners created by local artists. Contact the shop at (412) 421-6787 for more information or to arrange a special shopping time. The Israel Heritage Classroom Committee at the University of Pittsburgh will host its annual meeting and information session, Sunday, Dec. 4, 6 p.m., in the Israel Heritage Classroom, on the third floor of the Cathedral of Learning. The meeting, which is co-sponsored by the Jewish Studies Program at Pitt, will highlight student research and funding opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students for travel and study to Israel and other countries related to Israel and Jewish studies. This year, Dan Chyutin, a doctoral student in film studies at Pitt, will discuss his research in a brief lecture

entitled, “Orthodox Cinecorporeality: Fleshing out the Haredi Male Body in Contemporary Israeli Cinema.” Additionally, the Ethel M. Halpern Award for Jewish Studies, awarded through the Jewish Studies Program, for domestic or international travel and study opportunities, will be presented. The event is open to students, faculty and members of the community. Contact Adam Shear, director of the Jewish Studies Program, at (412) 6242280 or ashear@pitt.edu, or Susie Rosenberg, chair of the Israel Heritage Room Committee at snooziq38@hotmail.com for more information. Mitzvah Day 2011 will be held Sunday, Dec. 25, throughout the Pittsburgh area. Registration for the event opened Nov. 28. This year, Mitzvah Day, traditionally a time when Jewish Pittsburghers volunteer at hospitals, nursing homes, halfway houses and community kitchens around the area, freeing Christian volunteers to be with their families, takes on even more of a Jewish theme because it comes during Chanuka as well as Christmas. Therefore, the day’s activities will include a candle lighting at 2 p.m. at the Palm Court of the Jewish Community Center in Squirrel Hill. Judi Kanal is this year’s Mitzvah Day chair. Contact Emily Stang at (412) 9925229 or estang@jfedpgh.org for more information. Biblical Archeology Society of Pittsburgh Lecture Series will host Professor Ann Killebrew, CAMS and Jewish Studies, Pennsylvania State University, State College, who will speak on “Who Owns the Past,” Sunday, Dec. 4, at 7:30 p.m. at Rodef Shalom Congregation, 4905 Fifth Ave. Killebrew will focus on archeological, ideological, and economic considerations in interpreting the presentation of the past in Israel. Her emphasis will include filtering of the past to build the future: tradition and politics in the Middle East. The basis for her discussion involves archeological sites in Israel, the Palestinian West Bank and the Golan Heights. Contact Ram Kossowsky at (412) 6216117 or ramkossowsky@gmail.com for more information.

Congregation Beth Shalom in Squirrel Hill will present its annual winter concert, “Old, New, and Different”; a lyrical, Broadway revue featuring vocalist Leon Zionts, Saturday, Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m. in the Samuel and Minnie Hyman Ballroom. Zionts, a member of Beth Shalom, will be accompanied by Amanda Russell, music coordinator for Temple Ohav Shalom in the North Hills and the Beth Shalom Band. A dessert reception is included. There is a charge for the concert. Contact Beth Shalom at (412) 421-2288 or communications@bethshalompgh.org for more information.

ONE APPLICATION

G I V E S YO U A C C E S S T O NUMEROUS COMMUNITY SCHOLARSHIPS If you are a Jewish student with financial need who is attending high school, college or graduate school, and if you have been a resident of Allegheny, Beaver, Butler, Washington or Westmoreland county for more than two years, you can find information and apply for many scholarships with just one application at www.centralscholarship.org͘/ƚ͛ƐŽŶůŝŶĞĂŶĚŝƚ͛ƐĞĂƐLJ͘ ‡ Applications for the 2012-2013 school year are due by February 7, 2012 ‡ First-time applicants must be interviewed by CSLRS staff ‡ Students whose applications are received by December 15, 2011 may be interviewed during winter vacation Central Scholarship & Loan Referral Service (CSLRS) A program of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh

ĚŵŝŶŝƐƚĞƌĞĚďLJ:ĞǁŝƐŚ&ĂŵŝůLJΘŚŝůĚƌĞŶ͛Ɛ^ĞƌǀŝĐĞ

The Organizations Directory will be running in December Mail, fax or e-mail changes to: The Jewish Chronicle 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Flr., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Attn: Josh fax: (412) 521-0154 or e-mail: joshr@thejewishchronicle.net


6 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 1, 2011

The Jewish Chronicle

Opinion

David M. Caoin, CEO EDITORIAL STAFF Lee Chottiner, Executive Editor Angela Leibowicz, Community/ Web Editor Toby Tabachnick, Staff Writer SALES STAFF Susie Mangel, Senior Sales Associate Roberta Letwin, Sales Associate Donna Mink, Classified Sales PRODUCTION STAFF Dawn Wanninger, Production Manager Nancy Bishop Production Artist BUSINESS STAFF Joe Soloski, Comptroller Josh Reisner, Office Manager Marcy Kronzek, Subscriptions BOARD OF TRUSTEES Richard Kitay, President Cindy Goodman-Leib, Vice President Larry Honig, Secretary Andy Schaer, Treasurer Davida Fromm, Past President Carolyn Hess Abraham Brian Balk Daniel Berkowitz Lynn Cullen Milton Eisner Stephen Fienberg Malke Frank David Grubman Carolyn Hess Abraham Thomas Hollander Evan Indianer David Levine Ari Lightman Mitchell Pakler Amy Platt Benjamin Rosenthal Charles Saul Adam Shear Jonathan Wander Lou Weiss Published every Thursday by the Pittsburgh Jewish Publication and Education Foundation 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Phone: 412-687-1000 FAX: 412-521-0154 E-Mail: newsdesk@thejewishchronicle.net SUBSCRIPTION: $45 in Pennsylvania $47 East of the Mississippi $49 West of the Mississippi and FL NEWSSTAND PRICE $1.50 PER COPY POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE JEWISH CHRONICLE, 5915 BEACON ST., 3rd Floor PITTSBURGH, PA 15217 (PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS TO JEWISH TELEGRAPHIC AGENCY AND FEATURE SERVICE) USPS 582-740 Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to the Jewish Chronicle become the property of this publication, which is not responsible for the return or loss of such items. The Chronicle does not endorse the goods or services advertised in its pages and makes no representation to the kashrut of food products and services in said advertising. The publisher is not liable for damages if, for any reason whatsoever, he fails to publish an advertisement or for any error in an advertisement. Acceptance of advertisers and of ad copy is subject to the publisher’s approval. The Chronicle is not responsible if ads violate applicable laws and the advertiser will indemnify, hold harmless and defend the Chronicle from all claims made by governmental agencies and consumers for any reason based on ads appearing in the Chronicle.

Take Golan off the table his has been a bad month for Syria’s ruthless dictator, Bashir al-Assad. Maybe Assad thought he could get away with a brutal crackdown on his own people. After all, his father, the equally authoritarian Hafez al-Assad, did the same thing years earlier in the city of Hama, murdering thousands of innocent Syrians unhappy with his rule, and the world barely flinched. Maybe he thought the Western powers, after supporting the rebels in a protracted civil war in Libya, would have no stomach for another regime change mission in the same region. Or maybe he thought his people would simply give up after facing gunfire from his modern day storm troopers. If so, Assad, who was wrong on all three counts, never anticipated the global response his policies have spawned: • Defecting Syrian soldiers are organizing into a so-called “Free Syrian Army,” going so far as to fire rocketpropelled grenades at the ruling Baath Party offices in the capital, Damascus. • The Arab League has frozen Syrian assets and imposed a travel ban on the country. This after the League, on Nov. 24, called on Syria to admit 500 international observers within 24 hours to monitor the human rights

T

situation or face economic sanctions. • Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has been moving his country closer to the Arab and Iranian spheres of influence and further from its historic ties to Israel, just called on Assad to resign. With such significant developments, we feel safe in saying it’s not a question of if the Assad regime falls, but when. The question for our readers is, what does this mean for Israel? The answer will take years to determine. After all, no one knows who or what will follow Assad. But this much is clear: The Golan Heights, long considered a possible concession Israel could make to Syria in return for peace on its northern border, is now, and likely for good, a part of Israel. Many Israel observers, including some whose columns have appeared in this paper, have preached bold peace talks, which would include Syria, and a deal on a full or partial Israeli withdrawal from Golan. But to deal a strategic piece of ground, one from which Syrian soldiers once fired indiscriminately upon Israeli settlers farming their Galilean kibbutzim prior to 1967, to such an unstable country, would fly in the face of Israel’s national security.

Any thoughts that Golan could be safely ceded to Syria were dashed on May 15, when a mob of hundreds of Palestinians rushed the Syrian-Israeli border on Nakba (Catastrophe) Day — Israel’s Independence Day to us. Assad, in a transparent attempt to divert world attention from his troubles at home, orchestrated this incident, according to news reports. Had Golan been ceded in an earlier deal, that incident would have happened in the Galilee instead, and the consequences would have been much more dire, possibly even inspiring some Israeli Arabs to join the fray. As we said earlier, no one knows who or what will follow Assad, but we have seen increasingly anti-Israel governments take over — or, in some cases, poised to take over — in Turkey, Egypt and Lebanon. There’s no reason to believe Syria will be any different. And that is why at long last Golan must be taken off the table. We hope someday a pro-peace government does come to power in Syria. If that happens, we believe Israel will again be a partner for peace, regardless of which party is in power in Jerusalem. But Golan should not be a price for that peace. That diplomatic ship has sailed. The region is part of Israel, and that fact must be recognized.

Arens’ book sheds new light on Warsaw Ghetto defenders Jay Bushinsky

JERUSALEM — The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising was one of the turning points of World War II. It was the first armed revolt by European civilians subjected to the brutality of Nazi Germany’s occupation. SS Chief Heinrich Himmler feared that it would generate more uprisings elsewhere in his previously obedient domain. Because of the courage and determination of the outnumbered, poorly equipped Jewish fighters, there was indeed a subsequent uprising by non-Jewish Poles outside the destroyed ghetto. There also were revolts in other occupied countries, but not on the same scale as those that occurred in Warsaw. Himmler wanted the ghetto revolt to be crushed by April 20, 1943 — a day after it had gone into high gear — but his forces were unable to suppress it until May 16. Former Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Arens has just come out with the English edition of his excellent book, “Flags Over the Warsaw Ghetto” in which he points out that actually there

were two Jewish fighting organizations — the ZOB and the ZZW. The former initials stand for Zydowska Oganizacja Bojowa (Jewish Fighting Organization) and the latter, Zydowskie Zwiazek Wojskowi (Jewish Military Organization). They failed to unite despite months of fruitless negotiation. Their inability to overcome ideological and political differences exacted a heavy price. Most of the ghetto’s Jewish population, which had exceeded 300,000 when it was established shortly after the German conquest of Poland in 1939, had been deported to Treblinka or executed individually or en masse by the contending parties. The ZOB and ZZW resigned themselves to waging separate (though parallel and sometimes coordinated) campaigns. Barely 70,000 remained in the ghetto by early 1943, when the first armed operations took place. However, by April 19, the anti-Nazi resistance had assumed significant proportions — so much so that Himmler’s desire that it be crushed by April 20 (Adolf Hitler’s birthday) proved impossible to realize. The fighting persisted until May 16. The Nazis had to deploy artillery, armored cars and hundreds of soldiers to defeat the Jewish rebels, whose arsenal was limited to a relatively small array of pistols and homemade grenades and mines. Most of this equipment was either stolen from the Nazi forces or smuggled into the ghetto by couriers who maintained contact with the Polish underground outside

its perimeter. In any case, there were very few rifles and machine guns in Jewish hands. Arens stresses that because of its affiliation with the Zionist Revisionist movement and its offspring in Palestine, the Irgun Zvai Leumi (which was at loggerheads with the Jewish political establishment there headed by the Jewish Agency), the ZZW has not been given the credit it deserves for resisting the Nazis. In contrast, he points out that the ZOB, which was comprised mainly of Socialist-Zionists and the leftist, nonZionist Bund, has been hailed since the end of World War II for its heroism. Its heroic status was emphasized especially and consistently by the Socialist-Zionist Mapai party, which governed Israel almost single-handedly from the Jewish state’s independence in 1948 until 1977, when it was defeated in a national election by the Zionist-Revisionist Likud party. By the same token, the ZZW’s charismatic commander, Pawel Frenkel, is virtually unknown in Israel, while his ZOB counterpart, Mordechai Anielewicz, is venerated here as one of the outstanding figures of modern Jewish history. Arens noted in an interview granted on the occasion of the English edition’s publication, that both men were only 23 years old when they led their organizations’ respective operations (ZOB and ZZW) against the SS, the latter under the Please see Bushinsky, page 9.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 1, 2011 — 7

OPINION Buttlerfly at rush hour leaves environmental wake-up call Guest Columnist JOY BRAUNSTEIN Last week I saw the most remarkable thing while sitting in traffic on Smithfield Street (don’t worry, I drive a Prius so my idling in traffic has less impact on our air quality than most vehicles currently on the road) — a beautiful, large, orange and black butterfly was making its way down the center of the street. With each of her movements I drew in a sharp breath,

half expecting to see her get hit, or as she alighted on the ground, run over; but for the full minute that she was in my line of sight she deftly flitted in and around the heavy traffic and then moved out over the river to apparent safety. I wondered how many other people in traffic had noticed the butterfly, and, of those, how many stopped what they were doing for a moment to watch as her delicate wings brought a splash of color and a moment of wonder to their otherwise average commute. I hoped that we all did. I wanted to believe that everyone on that street with me got just as tuned in with how connected we all are to everyone and everything else on this planet. I have spent a lot of time in the last nine months thinking about the dichotomy of the natural gas boom that is confronting southwestern Pennsylvania. (Admittedly, for the two and a half years that I lived in Charlotte, while this industry rapidly exploded onto the scene and into the forefront of controversy, I never really thought about it. Only upon returning to Pittsburgh, where emotions are running extremely high, and signs grace the front yards of my neighbors reading such slogans as “fracking poisons our water” did I begin to pay attention). During this time I have tried to sort out my own feelings and position, balancing those with, and at times against, institutions and organizations that I represent professionally and as a volunteer. The natural gas industry is enormous, fairly unregulated, and largely unwieldy. The potential long-term effects of extraction using fracking, when considered as a total lifecycle, while uncertain, are distinctly frightening. The immediate and visible impact to the land subjected to drilling platforms is no less than any heavy industry. The idea that our public parks would be turned over to companies

that will profit in the short term, leaving behind a depleted recreational and aesthetic experience is disturbing. That our regulatory systems are not doing full-cost accounting of externalities when they formulate taxes, levies and impact fees is baffling. What really gets to me, though, is that I cannot figure out, for the life of me, why as a society we have not learned to take a long-range view of where we are trying to go, what we want our land, air and water to support and which species we want to cohabitate with, prior to incentivizing any type of resource-extraction, heavy industry based, rush that once started cannot easily (if at all) be turned back. And if I relate this back to my butterfly, who I hope has successfully continued her fall migration, should we not then know as much as we can know about the impacts on those parts of our future that we treasure prior to taking intentional action to disrupt what exists now? In other words, are we really formulating an intelligent energy policy in which we have

carefully calculated the benefits and costs of all of our options, and then, and only then, chosen the one that causes the least overall harm and gets us the most benefits? I would say, no, we have not. At this point the decision makers seem to only be responding to an immediate economic pressure and corporate interest in quarterly profit and loss statements and share prices. This is not to say that I come down on either side of the debate; trust me, I feel the environmentalists’ dilemma as much as the next intelligent modern-life loving consumer. I am frozen when asked if I care more about solar energy or desert tortoises. Having spent more than half a decade as a federal regulator, I am no fan of coal and laugh when people claim that it can be “clean” and shudder when I think of what we have done to the Appalachian Mountains. I understand the dangers of nuclear power with its practically eternal threats of devastating contamination. I will never get the images of oil-covered birds and sea life out of my head when I think about gasoline. I applaud that Citizen Power recently brought to the Pittsburgh market the opportunity to buy 100 percent wind power electricity at a lower rate than Please see Braunstein, next page.

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8 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 1, 2011

OPINION Braunstein: Continued from previous page. most of us currently pay; but I cry for the cruel devastation of beauty and grace lost as eagles (and other birds) migrate along what are now becoming highways of killing wind turbines. I am thankful for the heat that warms my house on cold days; thankful for the other modern amenities of life that give me easy access to entertainment and communications; and thankful that I can go to Trader Joes and buy a readymade Tofurky to eat on Thanksgiving. I sit on a committee of the Jewish

Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, which held a Marcellus Shale Open House a week ago at the Jewish Community Center. The purpose of that event was to encourage the community to learn, to think, and then to make intelligent decisions. It was a well-attended affair, graced by the presence of experts working in the industry, in academia, in advocacy, in policy and in the media. This week, I also had the opportunity to sit down with the White House Council on Environmental Quality’s Nancy Sutley, along with 15 other people working in Pittsburgh on sustainable design. The conversation turned to the question of the long-term vision and

the policy of our future as a sustainable country, and as a sustainable world. It struck me, in all the conversations that I have on a weekly, or monthly, basis, on all of the committees and boards that I sit on — in all of the environmental and sustainability organizations that I touch, and that touch me, I am not convinced that we have a collective vision for a future that is as good as this one, nor a path-certain to get there. Certainly, we do not have such for a future that is better than now. I am, however, firmly convinced that we have an obligation to come up with one. Tikkun Olam. Most of us will have spent this past week taking moments out of our day to

give thanks for what we have — maybe we should take the moment after that and think about what we want our collective grandchildren to be giving thanks for in the generations to come. Do we want them to inherit the freeflying great-great-great grandchildren of the butterfly that graced our city’s rush hour traffic with its delicate beauty? Do we care if they notice? (Joy Braunstein, executive director of the Rachel Carson Homestead Association and a member of the environmental subcommittee of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, blogs on environmental topics for the Chronicle at thejewishchronicle.net.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 1, 2011 — 9

OPINION Bushinsky: Continued from page 6. command of the virulently anti-Semitic Gen. Juergen Stroop. The reason, he said, was that the older Jewish leaders, Zionist and non-Zionist, managed to leave Poland before the mass deportations began. Among the many heartbreaking as-

pects of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising was the opposition of the main Polish underground groups based outside the ghetto walls, the AK (Armia Krajowa) to ZOB and ZZW requests that it wage a simultaneous campaign against the Nazis. The AK was against the very idea of a revolt by the Jews inside the ghetto. On April 19, when the uprising went into its final and most violent phase, Frenkel and his ZZW comrades decided

to fly the Zionist flag (now the blue and white flag of Israel) from one of the ghetto’s tallest buildings. Arens pinpoints the location at Muranowska 19, a few doors away from ZZW headquarters at Muranowska 7. The next day, they hoisted the red and white Polish flag alongside it. Both could be clearly seen by the ghetto’s population as well as those in the city districts beyond the walls. This was a source of profound aggra-

vation and dangerous provocation for the Germans, who responded with an all-out effort by Stroop’s SS personnel to bring down the offending flags. But this objective was not accomplished until the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising finally was overcome. (Jay Bushinsky, an Israel-based political columnist, can be reached at jay@actcom.co.il.)

Visit The Jewish Chronicle on the Web at thejewishchronicle.net


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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 1, 2011 — 11


12 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 1, 2011

Simchas B’nai Mitzva Eli Abo, son of Steve Abo and Holly Swartz, will become a bar mitzva Saturday, Dec. 3, at Rodef Shalom Congregation.

Sarah Crowley, daughter of Rebecca Crowley and Kevin Crowley, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Dec. 3, at 10:30 a.m. at Temple Sinai. Grandparents are Jane Klein and Robert Rosenberg of New York City, the late Judith Rosenberg and Barbara and Joseph Crowley of Cambria, Calif. Noah Zunder, son of Paula and Michael Zunder, will become a bar mitzva Saturday, Dec. 3, at Congregation Beth Shalom Grandparents are Naomi and Bernard Rosen of Montreal.

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 1, 2011 — 13

Community A

Emerging leaders Hillel JUC photo by Stephanie Aaronson

The Jewish Federation of North America invited emerging Jewish leaders from across the country to a threeday General Assembly conference in Denver Nov. 6 to 8. Aaron Weill, executive director and CEO of Hillel Jewish University Center in Pittsburgh, spoke on behalf of the community-based program, The Power of the Collective, focusing on campus life for Jewish young adults. Hillel JUC participants pictured, from left, are Mia Jacobs, David Wishnow, Stephanie Aaronson, Ardont Shorr, Yevgeniya Monisova, Brian Alderman, Shayna Hilburg, Alex Hess and Jordy Cohen.

C L O S E R L O O K

Jew’colades COMPILED BY ANGELA LEIBOWICZ Community/Web Editor

Squirrel Hill native David Shirey is the author of “Rare Confidence: Strategies & Inspiration to Strengthen Your Belief That You Can Achieve Anything!” The book sets out to demonstrate how to obtain self-confidence living in one of the worst economic climates in history. As the director of new business development for Computer Enterprises, Inc., Shirey managed sales teams David Shirey for the IT services firm in Pittsburgh, New York and Los Angeles while helping the organization receive a high ranking on Inc. Magazine’s list of America’s fastest growing privately held companies before becoming the director of sports sales for Landro Play Analyzer. From 2006 to 2011, he directed all sales and marketing activities for the largest of Lamar Advertising’s 165 offices, where his team’s motto was “We’ve decided not to participate in this recession!” He now delivers programs on sales success and confidence, as well as consulting companies on growth strategies and coaching individuals on how to be top performers. Shirley R. Barasch is the author of “For Professional Purposes: An Artistic Journey,” a book about the power of the determined will in all of us. This celebration of family life includes a chapter of comfort food recipes and funny anecdotes. Barasch, a Mt. Lebanon resident, is a composer, lyricist, singing teacher, published poet/playwright and Shirley R. teachereducator. Along the way Barasch has Barasch collected awards: recognition for her appearance in the Warner Cable Television award-winning

“The Value of Music: Movement in Early Childhood Education,” the Performing Arts Partnership Award for contributions to the arts, 15 ASCAP (American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers) awards as well as being featured as a guest poet of Taproot Literary Journal. At Point Park University, she served as chair of the Conservatory of Performing Arts, director of music and fine arts, and as teacher educator/director of student teachers. She created the Starmakers Gala and the PAPA Award for the Conservatory, raising money for the Pittsburgh Playhouse and University. Clinical psychologist and award-winning humorist Nancy Berk is the author of “College Bound and Gagged: How to Help Your Kid Get Into a Great College Without Losing Your Savings, Your Relationship, or Your Mind.” In the book, Berk offers parents survival strategies, perspective, and laughs on the road to higher education. Berk is a blogger for The Huffington Post, USA Today College and MORE MagaNancy Berk zine, and has been spotlighted in The New York Times and interviewed by The Wall Street Journal, CNN and MSN. She has appeared on television and radio, and hosts two podcasts: Whine At 9 and College Mom Minute. Beverly King Pollock’s new play, “Looking for Magic,” will premiere at the Henry Heymann Theatre of the University of Pittsburgh, Friday and Saturday Dec. 2 and 3, at 8 p.m., with a Sunday matinee Dec. 4 at 2 p.m. There will be a talk-back immediately following the Sunday performance with the director, actors and playwright. Director Marci Woodruff has directed plays in the United States, Europe, Israel and Japan. Producer is Debra Gordon, head of the Actors Co-op. Broadway actor Ron Siebert and Pittsburgh actors Karen Baum and Don DiGiulio, founder of No Name Players, have leading roles in this tale of parents, coming out and AIDS. Pollock authored Quoth the Maven, the national column that originated in The Jewish Chronicle,

and the Slightly Irreverent column in the Monroeville Times-Express. With Shirley Katz, she co-wrote and co-hosted a daily local radio show, “Those Two,” for the “average American housewife and the ordinary, everyday nuclear physicist.” The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette honored Pollock with the “Community Champion Award” because of her work in the AIDS Community. As a tribute to two sons who died of AIDS, Robert in 1991 and Larry in 1995, she and her husband Mel founded Jews with AIDS in the Family with the support of Jewish Family & Children’s Service and the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Proceeds will benefit the Shepherd Wellness Community. Tickets can be purchased at the Pitt Student Union Box Office at (412) 648-7814 or showclix.com/event/82412. Pollock confesses she turned 87 this year. “I worked on and off this script for 17 years,” she said. “Mebbe I better write my next play a little faster!” (Angela Leibowicz can be reached at angelal@thejewishchronicle.net.)

T

he Jewish Chronicle invites students from day schools and religious schools to present their cover designs for our Chanuka edition, which will be published Dec. 15. The winning cover will appear in print, and all submissions will be posted on our website, thejewishchronicle.net. A few guidelines: • The cover dimensions are 10 inches wide, 13 inches deep • No black and white • The deadline for submissions is Dec. 8 Once your cover is done, send your signed artwork submission, in JPEG format only, to Angela Leibowicz at angelal@thejewishchronicle.net. Only e-mails will be accepted.


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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 1, 2011 — 15

BOOKS ‘German Autumn’ takes dispassionate, real look at post-war Germany Book Review

BY NEAL GENDLER For the Chronicle

Although the Torah frowns on joy at other people’s suffering, perhaps Jews may be permitted at least some lack of sympathy at the post-war hardship of millions of Germans. In “German Autumn,” Stig Dagerman paints an unremittingly dismal picture of the defeated perpetrators of World War II in the gloom of November 1946. This first American edition is worthy reading, especially for those for whom the war is mostly a distant event in black and white. Essential background is provided in American author Mark Kurlansky’s foreword and translator Robin Fulton Macpherson’s introduction. Dagerman, an acclaimed Swedish writer at 23, traveled across the U.S. and British zones as rain, cold and snow enveloped a crumbled, occupied and impoverished nation. Although many country Germans apparently lived much as before, particularly in little-damaged Bavaria, those struggling amid the skeletons of shattered and burned cities get most of Dagerman’s attention. There was a hierarchy of shelter: the least poor in their prewar homes, the middling poor one family to a room in abandoned tenements, the poorest in former prison cells, bunkers or cellars of ruins — sometimes in a foot or two of fetid water.

Book Review “German Autumn,” by Stig Dagerman, University of Minnesota Press trade paperback, 136 pages.

Dagerman writes of the difficulty of finding food and coal; of ragged children in windowless classrooms with single light bulbs and few books or supplies; of difficulty traveling, and of farcical denazification courts. Dagerman, an anti-fascist, is dispassionate, not saying these people deserved their misery, but showing scant sympathy for anyone but children. Allied occupiers appear mostly as drunken young soldiers with young German women who live off them. Some Germans still didn’t get it. “It is high time the Allies stopped punishing us,” a woman tells Dagerman. “Whatever people say about us Germans and what our soldiers have done in other countries, we have not deserved the punishment we are now getting.” Jews, Poles and Russians might have begged to differ. The woman tells him “the popular and unfortunately too-well-confirmed story” of a British captain who, asked “why the

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English would not let Hamburg’s railway stations be rebuilt, replied: ‘Why should we help you Germans to get on your feet in three years when it could just as well take 30?’ “ Why indeed? Germany only bled Britain nearly white twice in 21 years. Eighteen months into peace, Germans are not at peace with themselves: city vs. country, the poorest vs. the less poor, young vs. old. A Nazi prosecutor now is a prosperous farmer; his victims starve. Hordes of homeless, pfennig-less Germans have fled the Soviet Zone, overwhelming their western countrymen. Further burdensome are ethnic Germans expelled from Poland, Czechoslovakia and further east. That refugee tsunami, which some estimate at 12 million, now is all but forgotten amid fixation on the descendants of about 800,000 Palestinian Arabs — people replaced by a near-equal number of Jews whose flight from Arab lands also is nearly forgotten. If conditions were this bad in Germany 18 months after war’s end, they

must have been even worse in November 1945. But while reading Dagerman’s calm description of squalor and despair, my mind plays newsreels from a decade earlier: joyous throngs at rallies and parades, right arms held out stiff. Germany, of course, rose from the depths thanks to its industriousness and to Allied transformation of it from enemy to ally against a Soviet expansionism that also eroded Western interest in prosecuting Nazis. Today’s Germany is peaceful, very supportive of Israel — as well it should be — and the prosperous powerhouse of Europe. The last two must have been unimaginable when Dagerman’s accounts appeared as a series of newspaper reports, then as a book in 1947. I wonder about the reactions of his Swedish readers. Perhaps some felt Germans were getting their due. Perhaps others viewed their suffering Aryan cousins with pity. I don’t. (Neal Gendler is a Minneapolis writer and editor.)

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persons having claims against the Estate of this Decedent make known the same in writing to her or her attorney, Thomas E. Pandaleon, Esq., 6824 Thomas Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA 15208, and all persons indebted to this Decedent make payment to the same. 030, 023, 016


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METRO/GLOBE FaceGlat: Continued from page 4. anyone to use Facebook,” Rosenfeld said, “because once you are on it, you are not in control of what you see and what you hear.” Because contemporary society is already fraught with negative influences, he continued, “we don’t have to add additional challenges to our children’s lives.” While Rosenfeld does not discourage his community from using the Internet as an absolute, he cautions that it must be used appropriately. “The Internet, like everything in the world, has its plusses and minuses,” he said. “We encourage it to be used properly. A child using the Internet should have parental supervision. As we get older, we are more able to recognize what is proper. But for our children, we must be careful to be on top of it. “The Lubavitcher Rebbe was one of the first Jewish leaders in the world to use TV,” Rosenfeld noted. “His addresses could be heard nationally and internationally. He saw [TV] as an opportunity to share his words of inspiration.”

As for Facebook, “we tell our children not to go on it,” Rosenfeld said. “We discourage it.” Swisa is not the first Israeli entrepreneur to come up with a way of making the Internet more palatable to the ultraOrthodox. Rimon, a company founded by Rabbi Yehoshua Shapira, head of the Ramat Gan hesder yeshiva, was the first Internet provider in Israel to block sites that include pornography, violence or gambling. Still, Swisa may have found an underserved niche in providing Internet resources for the ultra-Orthodox. He is currently hard at work on two more projects, including a video-sharing site for his community that will integrate YouTube, and other video sites, but filter the content so that anything objectionable will be removed. The new site, which will open next week, “will include video with only a high level,” he said, like music and lessons.”

(Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

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Barney Frank to retire from Congress U.S. Rep. Barney Frank, the blunt spoken liberal and first openly gay member of Congress, has announced he will not seek reelection in 2012. The Massachusetts Democrat, 71, who made the announcement at a news conference Monday, cited his redrawn congressional district, which includes new more con- U.S. Rep Barney Frank servative areas, (D-Mass.) will not as one reason seek reelection in he decided to 2012. retire from the House of Representatives. “The newly configured district contains approximately 325,000 new

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constituents, many of them in a region of the state that is wholly new to me as a member of Congress, Frank said in his written statement. “A significant number of others are in the area along our east-west border with Rhode Island, which I have not represented for 20 years. This means that running for reelection will require — appropriately in our democracy — a significant commitment of my time and energy, introducing myself to hundreds of thousands of new constituents, learning about the regional and local issues of concern to them and, not least importantly, raising an additional $1.5 million to $2 million.” Frank, who had considered retiring two years earlier, said there were other things he wanted to do at this stage in his life. “I believe that I have been effective as a member of Congress working inside the process to influence public policy in the ways that I think are important. But I now believe that there is more to be done trying to change things from outside than by working within.” Republican leaders in Massachusetts were jubilant at the news, one of which called the departure of the Jewish congressman “an early Christmas present.”

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PEOPLE ARE OFTEN CURIOUS ABOUT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CONDOMINIUM AND A COOPERATIVE. IN SHORT, A CONDOMINIUM IS A FORM OF JOINT OWNERSHIP WHILE A COOPERATIVE IS A CORPORATION WHICH OWNS THE BUILDING A condominium is a form of joint ownership in which each unit owner owns the airspace in her unit and a percentage of the common area in the property. So, if you purchase a condominium unit with one percent of the common areas, you would own one percent of the building. The “airspace” would include the right to live there and the right to decorate the interior walls and floors. Everything else is a matter of common maintenance. A condominium is transferred by deed, recorded in the public records. Each condominium unit is separately assessed for real estate tax purposes. Each owner pays her own real estate taxes separately. You can obtain a mortgage loan to buy a condominium unit. A cooperative, however, is a corporation which owns the entire building. Each unit owner owns shares of stock in the corporation for their percentage interest. Each unit owner receives an occupancy agreement for their unit. This gives you the right to live in your home, and the right to decorate the interior. The share of stock represents your percentage interest in the entire property. Cooperative apartments are sold by transferring the stock and having the board issue a new occupancy agreement. No deed is required. The transfer may, but need not, be recorded in the public records. It will not appear in the newspaper. A cooperative apartment can be mortgaged. One important difference between a condo and a cooperative is that cooperative units are not separately assessed for real estate taxes. Instead, the corporation pays real estate taxes on a single assessment for the entire building, and the tax bills are apportioned among the shareholders based upon their stock interest. You pay a portion of the real estate taxes to the corporation every month along with your maintenance fee and utilities.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 1, 2011 — 17

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE 5915 BeaCon ST., 3rd Flr., PiTTSBurgh, Pa 15217 HELP WANTED

POSITION WANTED

THE JEWISH FEDERATION of Greater Pittsburgh a nonprofit fundraising and community planning organization is seeking a full time Administrative Assistant to provide support to the Development team. Candidate should have excellent interpersonal skills and demonstrate high level of customer service and professionalism interacting with volunteers and donors. Candidate must have excellent attention to detail, English and grammar. Good organizational and strong support skills and important. Candidate should have general operating knowledge of computers and be proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint. Candidate should have 2+years of administrative experience. Please email cover letter and resume to Pat Calibro at pcalabro@jfedpgh.org. ••• HOLIDAY DINNER Server & Kitchen help needed in Sq. Hill home on 12/23 – 12/25, experience helpful. Reply nbeassistant@verizon.net or 412-421-8498. ••• NEED SOMEONE to do ironing & light housework. References needed, call 412-889-5960 between 3 pm & 5 pm. ••• HOME INSTEAD SENIOR Care needing week-end caregivers. Rewarding work with seniors, make a difference in the life of an elderly person by joining our #1 non. Medical team of caregivers. Car is required, training is provided, Flexible schedule, all shifts EOE. 412-731-0733.

CAREGIVER CONNECTION A PA. Licensed home-care registry, Jewish Family & Children’s Service refers screened, JF&CS trained caregivers providing short/long-term personal care services to seniors at affordable rates. Available 24/7, call 412-422-0400 or 877-243-1530 (toll free). ••• BOYD COMMUNITY Service proving personal care, transportation, light housekeeping, meal preparation & shopping. Reasonable rates and hourly services. Contact Sonya Boyd 412-731-0279. ••• CAREGIVER/ Caring Hands, Personal Touch Elder Care. Experienced with references & reasonable rates. Call 412-841-0146. ••• MALE CAREGIVER looking to take care of your male love one. References, Act 33/34 clearance & years of experience working with Stroke, Dementia & Parkinson’s, call 412-805-5375. ••• IF YOU ARE seeking quality respite care for your loved one, please contact Carmella at 412-607-2056. ••• LAUNDRY & IRONING also available to do home or office cleaning, clean out basement, garage or yard. References available. 412390-9151. ••• CLEANING 10 YEARS Experience. Will treat your home with TLC, great with antiques. Excellent references 412-452-5518. ••• HEVENLY HOUSEKEEPING My Cleaning service is a blessing. Residential or small business cleaning, party services, great rates, reliable, experienced & detailed. Call Michelle for free estimate. 412-277-2565. ••• CAREGIVER AVALIABLE to take care of your loved one. Reliable with references. 412-418-8511. ••• EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Available 24/7, excellent references. Trained in First Aid & CPR, all clearances. 412224-0439. ••• CLEANING LADY Exceptional, experienced with references & fair price. Call Laura 412-277-7133.

POSITION WANTED THE CARE REGISTRY, INC provides nurse aides and companions to offer one on one care for you in your home. The workers are screened and bonded. All shifts and live in care available. The Care Registry is licensed by the PA Dept. of Health. Low rates! Care management also available. 412-421-5202 or www.TheCareRegistry.com ••• HOME HEALTH CARE specialist in hospice, dialysis & direct care. Will work any shift. Call Patricia Spencer 412-229-8760.

POSITION WANTED HOUSE HOLD Clean-outs/ Carpet & Upholstery cleaning, Clean out basements / garages, wall washing, painting, window cleaning, stripping & waxing floors. 412-377-5885.

BUYING AUTO/TRUCKS/ JUNK REMOVAL SELLING & BUYING Auto’s & JUNK Removal. Cars, Trucks, Vans, SUVs, Quit Driving, Death, Wrecks, Antiques, Classics & Junkers. FREE Legal Title Transfer! Vehicle Removal from Your Property. Denny Offstein Auto Sales 724-287-7771. Paying Cash, Honest Fair Prices!

CHAIR CANING CANE & ABLE Chair caning, hand pre-woven cane rush reed & wicker repaired. Reasonable rates pick up & deliver. Charyl Hays 412-655-0224.

COMPUTER NICE JEWISH Boy, offering the full range of computer services, from advising and teaching to repair and support. I will come to your house or apartment, fix any problem you’re having & teach you what you need to know to use it. I have 14 years’ experience working with people of all ages. . No job is too large or small, and nobody is too computer illiterate. (Really) CALL JASON 412-401-1204, or visit my web www.computerwizard.us. References available.

DRIVER NEED A RIDE? Call Norm, he will drive you. Doctors, shopping, anything that needs to be done. Experienced, insured, great references and reasonable rates. Available le for airport pickup or departure. Norm 412-521-6999.

HOME REPAIR INTERIOR/ EXTERIOR, retaining walls, drywall, flooring, ceramic laminate, painting, plastering, pressure washing, kitchen & bath remodeling. Call 412731-1496.

TORAH Great good comes from ordinary people Portion of the Week RABBI JOSEPH S. WEISS BNAI EMUNOH CONGREGATION Vayetze, Genesis 28:10-32:3

The Torah is always very economical with its words. We have very little biographical detail about any of the patriarchs, of Moses growing up in the household of Pharoah. We are introduced to Abraham when he is 70 years old and the years of Moses as a young man until he is 80 years old are not mentioned at all. Yet we have, relatively speaking, a massive amount of text in the Torah describing day-to-day interactions between Laban, Jacob (his son-in-law) and his daughters Rachel and Leah. Why is there so much detail about Laban? Laban is a respected member of his community and has great concern about proper etiquette regarding the marriage of his daughters. He is a shrewd businessman and gives his son-in-law Jacob a job. Laban doesn’t appear to be such a terrible father-in-law. But, close examination of the text in Genesis indicates something different. Laban furiously chases his daughters and grandchildren after Jacob and his family run from him. When he is finally about to reach them and sets up his overnight camp, God communicates with Laben while he sleeps and commands him to say nothing to Jacob, “not anything good, certainly not anything evil.” The next morning, when Laban reaches Jacob and his family, he indicates that “he could wipe them all out,” but

God spoke to him last night about Jacob, so he will refrain. So the truth is that he did want to destroy Jacob and his whole family, but he controlled himself because God appeared to him in a dream. On the surface, however, we really don’t see much of a threat from Laban, even though Jacob understood the danger that his father-in-law posed to him and his family. Were it not for the Torah telling us about God’s conversation during Laban’s dream, we would have no concept of the real danger that he did present to Jacob and his family. We can learn a few things from this. God’s protection of Jacob and us — his descendants — is not always so obvious when everything goes well. More significantly, the Torah is teaching us an important insight about the nature of evil people. They are not born as devilish creatures; they are like the rest of us, and they have the same wishes, desires and goals as all ordinary people. The evil that Laban exemplifies — of wanting to destroy the family of Jacob — which was the fledgling nation of Israel, did not develop overnight. It is a result of the day-to-day decisions and choices that Laban made over the years. The Torah is showing us that the greatest evil can come, and does come, from ordinary people making choices over an extended period of time that lead them to the path of evil. Ordinary human beings who made wicked choices perpetrated the greatest evils in human history. The positive corollary to this lesson is that creating that which is good does not require angels; great good can come from ordinary people as well. So let us all get to working on it. (This column is a service of the Greater Pittsburgh Rabbinic Association.)

LOOKING FOR DESENDANTS

MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT

PLASTERING

WE ARE LOOKING for descendants of Katz family that came from Lithuanian Shtetl Utian (Utena) at the beginning of 20th century to Pittsburgh. We know some names, Matla, Leyzer (born 1883). Contact: adi-aro@netvision.net.il or write to Boris Aronovich, 12 Debora Baron Street, Rishon Le Zion, 75224, Israel.

THE HOT MATZOHS, Pittsburgh’s #1 Klezmer Band, is available for your Wedding, Bar/Bat Mitzvah, Corporate or other special event! The dynamic band, featuring violinist Barbara Lowenstein (founder), offers many styles of music in addition to Klezmer, e,g, classical, jazz, swing and folk. Call 412-3443338 or 412-303-0746. e-mail: barbsviolin@gmail.com.

PLASTER/PAINTING Marbleized painting & drywall, free estimates, excellent references. Call Herzel 412422-5486.

TUTOR/ EDUCATIONAL SPECIALIST IN-HOME TUTORING & Learning Support K-12. 412760-9560, e-mail:debbiechottiner@yahoo.com, visit my web-site: www.debbiechottiner.com.


18 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 1, 2011

OBITUARY/GLOBE DINKIN: On Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2011, Betty Brourman Dinkin; beloved wife of David Dinkin; loving mother of Cantor Marc (Debbie) Dinkin, Rachael (Bruce) Rosen, Joel (Elana) Dinkin, and Elliot (Laura) Dinkin; sister of Dr. Harold (Phyllis) Brourman, Jacques Brourman, the late Samuel (Leah), Saul (Helen-Ruth), Irving (Bernice), Phil Brourman, Della (Charles) Fischer, Ida (Sy) Friedman, Sadie (Ed) Blum, Lee Ann (Samuel) Wolfson; sister-in-law of Judy Brourman; cherished Bubbe of Jerod (Ali), Sasha (Seth), Sara, Marcie, Alyson, Gabrielle, and Blaine, and two greatgranddaughters, Julia and Claire; also survived by many nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews. Betty was a building manager for Beechwood Gardens, Imperial House and Maxon Towers for over 30 years. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment Tree of Life Memorial Park Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Tree of Life/Or L'Simcha Congregation, 5898 Wilkins Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 or Jewish Community Center, 5738 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com

PADOLF: On Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2011, Eleanor (Ellie) Padolf; wife of S. Bruce Padolf; mother of Michael, Ron, Susan and Amy; dear grandmother of Melinda, Daniella, Aria, Joy, Noah and Elijah. A shining light was dimmed as we mark the passing of Eleanor (Ellie) Padolf. Although our hearts are broken, we do not mourn her death but celebrate her life. Ellie was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, friend and inspiration to many. She can be remembered for her infectious giggle as it poured from the radio as a beloved Pittsburgh radio personality. Through her power of conviction, strength of character, innate wisdom and commitment, Ellie continued to use her talents to help her community. Whether it was through her work with nonprofits or being second mother to many, she touched everyone she met. Her memory and spirit will be carried on by her husband of 57 years, her children and her grandchildren. Services were held at the Homewood Cemetery Chapel. Contributions may be made to The Make-A-Wish Foundation of Greater Pennsylvania, 707 Grant St. # 3700, Pittsburgh, PA 15219-1938. Arrangements by The Rapp Funeral Home, Inc., 10940 Frankstown Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15235. www.rappfuneralhome.com

Briefly

tection watchdog agency at the Federal Reserve and checks on taxpayer bailouts of financial firms, a council to address systemic financial risks. It also closes loopholes permitting risky financial practices. The act, which The Washington Post called “the most sweeping overhaul of the nation’s financial regulatory system since the Great Depression,” had many detractors as well.

JointNews Media Service

Continued from page 16. Frank served eight years in the Massachusetts Legislature before winning his first term in Congress in 1980. While he will be remembered for his role in breaking down barriers to future Gay politicians seeking high office, one of his signature legislative achievements is the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, which created a consumer pro-

P.A. using U.S. funds to pay released terrorists, congressmen say

SCHOENEN: On Monday, Oct. 24, 2011, Sara Needle Schoenen, 67, of Ocean City, N.J.; beloved wife of David Schoenen; mother of Melissa (Jason) Rackliff; daughter of the late Mildred and Nat Needle; sister of Myra Needle of Pittsburgh and Jay Needle of Allentown, Pa.; grandmother of Jason, Noah and Jaxon Rackliff; aunt of Bobbi, Max and Josh Needle. Services were held at Congregation Beth Israel in Northfield, N.J. Arrangements by Roth Goldsteins’ Memorial Chapel, Pacific and New Hampshire Avenues, P.O. Box 1908, Atlantic City, NJ 08404. www.rothgoldsteins.com

Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc. 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com

TANNENBAUM: On Saturday, Nov. 26, 2011, Frances Clara Tannenbaum, 95; beloved wife of the late Herman Tannenbaum; beloved mother of Dr. Stephen (Shirley) Tannenbaum and Diane (Richard Leone) Tannenbaum Leone; grandmother of Gary (Eileen) Tannenbaum, Jamie Snyder, Stacey (Michael) Friedman, Andy (Michele) Wilkoff and Suzy Wilkoff; great-grandmother of Steven Patrick and Kate Cecilia Tannenbaum, Eli Friedman and Mia and Zachary Wilkoff. Services and interment were held at Adath Jeshurun Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Charles M. Morris Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, 200 JHF Drive,

TELL: On Thursday, Nov. 17, 2011, Gary S. Tell, 44, of Washington, D.C., formerly of Wilkins Township; adored husband of Julia Berman; cherished son of Marvin S. Tell and the late Sylvia Tell; grandson of the late Leo and Edith Schaer of Pittsburgh and the late Julius and Gertrude Tell of New York; beloved brother of Michael (Susan) Tell of Monroeville and Melinda (Marc) Jordan of Clarksville, Md.; brother-in-law of Rebecca Berman of Irvine, Calif.; treasured uncle of Laurence and Laynie Tell and Arianna and Zoe Jordan; also survived by devoted cousins and many friends and colleagues. Gary was a graduate of Shady Side Academy, Brown University and the University Of Chicago School of Law and was a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of O’Melveny & Myers LLP. Graveside services were held at Pacific View Memorial Park Cemetery, Corona Del Mar, Calif. A memorial service will be held in Washington, Sunday, Dec. 11 at 5 p.m. at Temple Micah, 2829 Wisconsin Ave. N.W., Washington, DC 20007-4702. www.templemicah.org

U.S. Comptroller-General Gene Dodaro was asked to investigate how the Palestinian Authority (P.A.) uses American funding, the Jerusalem Post reported. U.S. Reps. Ted Deutsch (D-Fla.) and Steve Israel (D-N.Y.) made the request after Moshe Matalon of the Israeli political party Israel Beiteinu revealed in a letter that P.A. President Mahmoud Abbas systematically pays $5,000 to convicted Palestinian prisoners freed from Israeli prisons. He also builds them new homes. Abbas is basically rewarding “unrepentant terrorists” according to Matalon.

In their letter, the congressmen stated, “many of the released prisoners were convicted of orchestrating and carrying out Hamas-sponsored terrorist attacks in Israel, including the bombing of a Tel Aviv nightclub that killed 21 people, the attack on a Netanya hotel that killed 29 people, and the bombing of a Sbarro Pizzeria that killed 15 people.” Deutsch and Israel insist that there be more transparency and accountability regarding the amount of tax-payer’s money contributed to Palestinian Investment Fund (PIF), which they say is now controlled by Hamas.

A Life Worth Remembering is a Life Worth Sharing The Jewish Chronicle’s new Extended obituary is a thoughtful way to honor your loved ones. In addition to Standard* obituary, the extended obituary offers: • Black and white photos (1.25 wide x 1.5 inches high @ $12 per photo) • Color photos (1.25 wide x 1.5 inches high @ $25 per photo) • Unlimited words ($0.25 per word beyond the Standard format) A life is greater than the sum of those it touched...it’s full of images, stories, laughter and tears. Let the Chronicle help you tell the tale that should be told. As every life has a natural length, so too does the story of that life.

*Standard Obituary: $50 flat fee that includes name & date of passing, family members and relatives, funeral home and graveside services, interment & contribution information.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 1, 2011 — 19

METRO History: Continued from page 1. panel, which met for 11 years. “We hope that visitors leave with a sense that freedom has brought creativity, innovation, and opportunity for Jews, but that it has also entailed responsibilities and choices … and it sheds light on broader themes in American history,” she wrote in an e-mailed statement. According to Sarna, many of his college students assume that American Jewish history began after World War II, believing that America’s Jewish community also began to flourish when Israel became a nation. The museum, with its layout in stages, counters that misconception. Visitors can go through each of three chronologically arranged floors to see artifacts and hear stories from different eras: • 4th floor — Foundations of Freedom: 1654-1880 • 3rd floor — Dreams of Freedom: 1880-1945 • 2nd floor — Choices and Challenges of Freedom: 1945-Today. This design and layout showcases “the simple fact that Jews have been part of this nation’s history since 1654,” Sarna said, establishing that Jews are not “interlopers” but “integral to the history of America.” One of the museum’s strengths is the breadth of its holdings. Two of its oldest artifacts are a list of the original passengers on the ship from Recife, Brazil, to New Amsterdam (present day New York) in 1654 and the letter from Peter Stuyvesant, then-governor of the colony, to the Dutch West India Company saying that he does not want Jews there. The company overruled him. As Sarna pointed out, there is a trove of objects that were never seen before, because there had not been a place to house them. Visitors can see a letter from George Washington to the members of Touro Synagogue, Newport, R.I., with the famous line that “we will give bigotry no sanction, persecution no assistance;” portraits of Jews at that time; circumcision kits; and a 1737 Torah scroll written in Morocco and sent by a British Jew as a gift to the Jews of Savannah, Ga. Certain items showcase the ways Jews were integrated into the new republic from its inception. A document from July 4, 1788, describes how Jacob Cohen, then-leader of Philadelphia’s Mikveh Israel synagogue, marched in a celebratory parade with leaders of Christian churches, and that there was a kosher table allowing Jews to participate in the subsequent celebra-

tory banquet following. Yet, Jews also faced difficulties. Jews from Savannah fled en masse in 1740 because of fears of a Spanish invasion and the inquisition that could come in its wake. Isaac Touro fled to Jamaica during the Revolutionary War as a loyalist to the British crown. Aaron Lopez was denied citizenship in Rhode Island, and was only granted it in neighboring Massachusetts in 1762. A 1789 acrostic prayer written in Richmond, Va., praises George Washington by spelling out his name in Hebrew letters. An 1840 document from Charleston, S.C., decides that a civil court has no role in the religious disputes between the Orthodox and those agitating for religious reform — those who eventually became part of the Reform movement. In the more contemporary times, there is a video about the 1915 trial in Atlanta of Leo Frank, the only known Jew ever lynched in America. The role of American Jews during the Holocaust is represented by a display of the 1942 telegrams to Rabbi Stephen Wise exposing Hitler’s Final Solution, and photos of the 1943 march of ultraOrthodox rabbis on Washington days before Yom Kippur to demand more action from the federal government. Virgilia Rownsley, a Philadelphia resident visiting the museum, said she hadn’t realized that Jews had such an impact in America, namely the contributions of early feminist leaders Betty Friedan (author of the 1963 book “The Feminine Mystique”) and Bella Abzug, a New York politician. Eleven-year-old Yael Perlman, already a veteran museum-goer, emphasized the breadth of the Philadelphia museum’s offerings, saying the experience is “not like visiting Ellis Island or the Tenement Museum [in New York], where you learn about something specific.” Instead, the variety of artifacts on display — and the commanding architecture of the building itself — have created a place that encourages both Jews and non-Jews to think about the American experience, through the unique lens of the Jewish experience on these shores.

(Beth Kissileff lives in Pittsburgh and has taught Hebrew Bible and Jewish studies at Carleton College, the University of Minnesota, Smith College and Mount Holyoke College and for the Florence Melton Adult Mini School in three states. She is the editor of a forthcoming anthology of academic writing on Genesis [Continuum Books, 2013] and is at work on a novel and a scholarly book of essays on the Bible.)

We acknowledge with grateful appreciation contributions from the following: Donor

In MeMory of

MICHAEL R. & CHRISTINE B. CUSHNER....................HELEN PEARL CUSHNER STEPHANIE L. GLICK..................FANNIE RUBEN MARILYN GOLDMAN.................ANNA SWARTZ BELLA HEPPENHEIMER .................SELMA LEVY MARTIN B. KAPLAN ..................KAREN KAPLAN DRERUP BARRY C. LEMBERSKY..................FAE VELARDI ROSLYN M. LITMAN ...........................DOROTHY MARGOLIS

Donor

In MeMory of

MRS. STUART ROSEN .................SIMON BLATT MRS. AUDREY ROSENTHALL ....WALTER SIGEL DAVID & SHARON SCHACHTER.......................MARTIN A. BEREZIN RUTH Z. SEIAVITCH .........MEYER L. & HELEN R. SEIAVITCH RUTH Z. SEIAVITCH ..................HARRY & LIBBIE SEIAVITCH RUTH N. WINER ...........................JACOB WINER SUSAN S. WOLFF ..............SAMUEL SHAEFFER

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4: JOSEPH BARDIN, IDA G. BARNIKER, SAMUEL L. BORNSTEIN, EMMA ELIGATOR, SARAH FINE, SAUL GLASS, NATHAN GRANOFF, HERBERT ALVIN HAASE, ABE HERMAN, DAVID KAUFMAN, DAVID KLEIN, RACHEL LEVY, MARY GORDON LISOWITZ, PHILIP LOEVNER, ROBERT LUBOW, FANNY MANDELBATT, NATHANIEL MANDELL, HARRY MERVIS, FLORENCE OSGOOD, MORRIS PEARLMAN, ROSE ROSENBERG, LUCY SACHNOFF, MOSHE YOSSEF SAPEER, FANNIE SCHLEIFER, NORMAN M. SCHWARTZ, ABRAHAM SHAPIRO, SARAH SHAPIRO, IDA SOLOMON, PHYLLIS RUTH STEIN, JACOB L. SURLOFF, ETHEL COHEN SUSSMAN, JENNIE WOLFSON, LIZZIE WOLINSKY. MONAY, DECEMBER 5: BENJAMIN ABERMAN, HUGO BAUM, HAROLD BERLINSKY, MARCI LYNN BERNSTEIN, JETTI BIRNBAUM, MELVIN CAPLAN, CECELIA EDITH GREENBERGER, MILTON E. HELFER, SARAH HERRING, BERTHA BROWN HOROVITZ, SAMUEL KAUFMAN, FANNIE LEBOWITZ, ADOLPH LEFKOWITZ, EVA MAE LEVENSON, MORRIS L. LEVEY, LOUIS LEWIN, HERBERT LIEBMANN, BESSIE JENOFF LINCOFF, NELLE N. LIVINGSTON, SYDNEY LOWENSTEIN, DOROTHY MARGOLIS, LESTER MARSHALL, HARRY MEYERS, ISAAC MEYER MYERS, BEULAH PHILLIPS, WILLIAM RAKUSIN, ROSE ROSENBERG, SARAH M. ROSENTHAL, DR. ELIZABETH R. RUBEN, CHARLES RUTTENBERG, ELKA FRADA SAPEER, ISRAEL J. SAUL, YALE SCHWARTZ, BENJAMIN SHEINBERG, LOUIS DAVID SIMON, MORRIS SOUPCOFF, SOLOMON SPITZLER, PHILLIP STONE, ANNA SUSSMAN, JACOB WEILL, SAMUEL WESTERMAN. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6: LEO L. AMERICUS, FANNIE BOWYTZ, KAREN KAPLAN DRERUP, BENJAMIN FALK, IRVING GIBBONS, CLARA HELFAND, EVA HERRON, MINNIE VAN PRAAGH JACOBS, PAULA MULLER JAEGER, BENJAMIN KOBE, RIVA REIZA LAFER, REBECCA LEVY, JENNIE W. MOGILOWITZ, ANNA MORRIS, JACK MYERS, FREDA ROBINSON, GEORGE A. ROGALINER, DR. GEORGE ROSENTHAL, SAMUEL RUBENSTEIN, LOUIS SADOWSKY, MORRIS LAZAR SARKOFF, ALAN SCHNITZER, KENNETH SCHWARTZ, SARA SHURE, NATHAN SKLAN, DAVID LOUIS SMITH, MARTHA SPOKANE, SAMUEL SRULSON, DENA STEIN, ADOLPH STEINBERGER, B. WILLIAM STEINBERGER, SAMUEL STERN, SYLVIA E. SWARTZ, SARI R. TALENFELD, BETSY MARK VOLKIN, DAVID A. WEISS, IDA C. WISE, ANNA ZACKS, MORRIS ZAPLER. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7: NETTIE R. BROUDY, PESCHA DAVIDSON, PAUL DROSNES, HARRY GUSKY, ISRAEL LEVINE, SELMA LEVY, MARGARET KRUVITZ LUDIN, MAX MALLINGER, ISAAC MATES, NATHAN PHILLIPS, SADIE PRICE, MORRIS REISER, FANNIE ROBERTS, MARY RACHEL ROTHMAN, IDA GLAPHY RUBIN, ROBERT SAMUELS, BECKY SAVITZ, MAY SCHACHTER, MILTON W. SCHWEIZER, BEN E. SHERMAN, CHANA SMULOVITZ, ABRAHAM STADTFELD, ANNA STEINITZ, MAURICE STUTZ, LOUIS THOMASHEFSKY, LOTTIE WASSERMAN, CHARLES WEDNER, ABRAHAM WEISBERG, PEARL ZAPLER. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8: DR. SOLOMON ABRAMSON, MAX ADLER, MIRIAM ALBERT, NATHAN BERKOWITZ, HELEN LEE CHATKIN, SAUL COHEN, ETHEL SIMON COOPER, ROBERT DAVIDSON, CHAYA DOBKIN, MARCELLA DREIFUSS, NATHAN FIREMAN, RUTH HIRSCH, ISADOR KATZ, EUGENE S. KLEINERMAN, BLANCHE KLEINMAN, ANNA SARAH KOPELMAN, SAMUEL LANDAY, PAULINE LANDO, MILTON DAVID LEFF, BESSIE LEVINE, MORRIS MALLINGER, IRENE MARCHBEIN, DAVID S. MENDELSON, GOLDIE NATHANSON, DORA NORWIND, SAMUEL ORTH, HERMAN PINCUS, PHILLIP PLACK, RAY REZNIK, LENA RIEMER, FRANK H. ROTH, SARA BERKOWITZ ROZMAN, SAMUEL SHAPIRO, ETTA M. SIGAL, CECELIA SIGEL, FANNYE SIMON, JOSEPH SPIEGELMAN, REIZA WOLK. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9: LEON ABRAMS, DAVID ACKERMAN, BERTHA LILLIAN BERLINER, R. ROBERT BERMAN, BELLA BERON, SIMON BLATT, MORRIS BRAUN, DAVID BREMAN, HYMAN BRENNER, SARAH CRAMER, SAMUEL DEBROFF*, FLORENCE S. FINKEL, GUSSIE FINKELSTEIN, JACOB FIRESTONE, HAROLD A. GOLDSTEIN, SOL Z. HELLER, REBECCA HOFFMAN, HYMAN KALOVSKY, ITHAMAR LANDO, JACOB LEBOWITZ, FRANCES ELLING LEVINE, MORRIS LEVINE, TEMA LEWINTER, HARRY LIPSICH, SAM MAKLER, BENJAMIN MITCHEL, ESTHER BLUESTONE MORROW, JACOB OFFSTEIN, ANNA PEARLMAN, ELLY MARS GOLDSTEIN RESNIK, SAM SACKS, DOROTHY SHAPERA, H. J. SHAPIRO, SILAS J. SIMENSKY, SAM SIMON, ETHEL SOLOMON, LIBBIE B. STEINSAPIR, JACK TALENFELD, HARRY L. TAUBER, DOBISH Y. WASSER, RABBI J.A. WEINBERG, DR. LOUIS WEISS, BENJAMIN WEISSMAN, BESSIE ZAKOWITZ, SAMUEL ZAREMBERG, DAVID JOSEPH ZOUPCOFF. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10: MAX BLATT, DAVID H. FISCHMAN, WALTER FRANK, LEORA GOLDSTEIN, ESTER ANNA HAMOVITZ, FERN HALPERN KAYE, THOMAS LANDO, LEONARD D. LANGE, GUSSIE LEVINE, MINNIE LEVITIN, LAWRENCE L. LIFSHEY, DR. MAX ALFRED MENDELSON, CHARLES MERVIS, EDWARD C. MEYER, JACOB J. NEVINS, SAM SALKOVITZ, HARRY B. SALTMAN, CHARLES SCHLOSSER, RUBY SCHWARTZ, LILLIE SIEGEL, DINAH SILVERMAN, ESTHER SILVERSTEIN, FANNIE SINGER, HARRY SOLTZ, ABE SROLOVITZ, HENRY STEIN, WILLIAM STEINBERG, LENA STEINER, ABE STOLOVITZ, SOPHIE PATZ STRAUSS, SAMUEL TUFSHINSKY, MOLLIE WAYNE, DR. FRED WEINTRAUB, CHIA WILKOFF, JACOB WINER, MENDEL WOLK, JACOB ZASLOFF.

Call DeeAnna Cavinee at 412.521.1975 or e-mail donations@jaapgh.org for more information or to make a contribution to the Jewish Association on Aging.


20 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 1, 2011

The Jewish Chronicle December 1, 2011  

The Jewish Chronicle December 1, 2011

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