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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE thejewishchronicle.net ocTober 20, 2011 tishri 22, 5772

Vol. 55, No. 23

Pittsburgh, PA

$1.50

Monessen synagogue remains active despite diminished membership

At last — the reunion

BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

(This is the latest in a continuing series of stories about synagogues that are outliving their congregations.)

Avi Ohayon photo/GPO

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu looks on as freed soldier Gilad Shalit is embraced by his father, Noam, at Israel’s Tel Nof Air Force Base shortly after Shalit’s release from more than five years of captivity, Tuesday, Oct. 18.

Locals react to news of Gilad Shalit’s release BY ILANA YERGIN Chronicle Correspondent

Israel isn’t the only place where people are celebrating the return of captured IDF soldier Gilad Shalit. “I’m sure, like everyone I’m thrilled at the news,” said Deborah Fidel, executive director of the Pittsburgh Area Jewish Committee. “I hope and pray that he is in good health both physically and mentally.” Shalit has become an Israeli national symbol since his capture by Hamas in Gaza in 2006. He was released Tuesday, as part of prisoner exchange between Hamas and Israel. The deal, which was

struck last week between the two parties to release Shalit, includes 1,027 Palestinian prisoners held by Israel. Although excited by the news of his impending release, some Pittsburghers were waiting to fully celebrate until Shalit is back home. “When I see that he’s released, I’ll be ecstatic,” said Stuart Pavilack, executive director of Zionist Organization of America — Pittsburgh District. As part of the deal, Israeli President Shimon Peres pardoned the Palestinian prisoners, some of whom were transferred by Monday to prisons nearer to their release sites. Families of terror victims petitioned Israel’s Supreme Court

to cancel the swap while Shalit’s father, Noam, told Israeli media that he had not yet received proof that his son is alive. The terms of Shalit’s release are also raising concerns among Pittsburgh residents. “The problem is, when these 1,027 prisoners are set free, how many of them have been rehabilitated,” asked Laurie Zittrain Eisenberg, a modern Middle East historian at Carnegie Mellon University. “How many of them are coming out with different views and political aims and how many of them are going to get right back to the business of plotting terrorist attacks on Israel?” Please see Gilad Shalit, page 13.

While other congregations struggle to find ways to get people in the door on Shabbat, Temple Beth Am in Monessen can boast that it consistently has almost 100 percent attendance of its members at its Friday night services. Never mind that this Mon Valley congregation is down to 20 member families. Once a month, nine times a year, they all gather to worship and break bread in honor of the Sabbath. The driving force that is literally keeping the congregation alive and well — if diminishing — is Mon Valley native, and lifelong member of the congregation, Phyllis Ackerman. “We’re small, but viable,” Ackerman said of Beth Am, which is led by a Please see Monessen, page 23.

Coming to Pittsburgh

Israeli jazz artist Alon Yavnai will bring an Israeli music ensemble to the Manchester Craftsmen's Guild the weekend of Oct. 29. See story, page 12.

B USINES S 18/C L AS SIFIED 21/O BITUARIES 22/C OMMUNITY 16 O PINION 6/R EAL E STATE 20/S IMCHAS 15/S TYLE 10

Times To Remember

KINDLE SABBATH CANDLES: 6:14 p.m. DST. SABBATH ENDS: 7:12 p.m. DST.


2 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE

OCTOBER 20, 2011

Metro 20 years

JHF officials reflect on work accomplished in first score of existence BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

The Jewish Healthcare Foundation (JHF), the Pittsburgh grant-making organization whose mission is to improve health care outcomes not only locally but nationally, is marking 20 years of service. Over its first two decades, the JHF, which was created out of the proceeds of the sale of the former Montefiore Hospital, has approved more than $100 million in grants, including $70 million in grants to the Jewish community. Created in 1991 with the $75 million in proceeds from the sale of Montefiore to Presbyterian University Hospital, the JHF has made a difference in the standard of care to the indigent and underserved, supporting innovative medical practices. “The original vision was to create something that builds on the assets that were sort of our inheritance from Montefiore, but doesn’t rely on them, and also to create an organization, the impact of which was larger than the sum of its grants, ” said JHF President and CEO Karen Wolk Feinstein. Montefiore Hospital opened in 1908, addressing the needs of a Jewish community that was underserved by the area’s existing hospitals. Jews were not

allowed treatment in most other area hospitals. Those that did accept Jewish patients did not provide kosher meals, and other services that Jews required. Moreover, Jewish physicians were rarely permitted to train or practice at those hopsitals. Through the 1970s, Montefiore expanded both its physical facilities and range of services. It became the first hospital in Pittsburgh to set up community health clinics and offer home care, and the first area hospital to have black doctors on its staff. Eventually, it became a qualified teaching hospital, and known for pioneering research. But by 1990, the future of Montefiore as a stand-alone hospital appeared grim. Like other faith-based hospitals, it struggled to compete with larger institutions, recruit doctors and provide the quality of care that had become its standard. When the decision to sell the hospital was made, Jewish Pittsburgh wanted the proceeds used to continue Montefiore’s mission: responding to the health-related needs of elderly, underprivileged, indigent and underserved persons in both the Jewish and general community throughout western Pennsylvania. Looking back over the last 20 years, Feinstein noted that the impact of the JHF on health reform has been “large, and probably not proportional to our size.”

“From its first year, we wanted to make something unique and distinctive that, in the best possible way, would surprise people with what you can do with an endowment,” she said. “We had higher aspirations than just grant-making.” In its early years the JHF became a leader in addressing breast cancer, and funded the first Race for the Cure in Pittsburgh. It got involved early with the campaign to encourage women to get regular mammograms. It even funded a notebook, still used at the Hillman Cancer Center, facilitating a patient’s tracking of her type of cancer and treatment, according to JHF Chief Program Officer Nancy Zionts. Expanding on women’s health, the JHF got involved in managing women’s cardiac care, Zionts added. It also invested $35 million to form the Jewish Association on Aging. “We work to help create a vigorous life for seniors,” Feinstein said. “Women’s health and seniors are the hallmark of our foundation.” JHF is also the fiscal agent for State HIV/AIDS funding in Pennsylvania. On the international level JHF is working with Clalit, one of the major health systems in Israel, where they are

making strides in improving the quality and safety of care, Feinstein said. Additionally, the foundation has published many books, and Feinstein travels throughout the country and abroad speaking about health care advances. It also played a role in developing the controversial Affordable Care Act, according to Feinstein, noting that JHF helped to “shape the quality and care provisions” of the law. “Our commitment to health reform has been formidable,” she noted. “We are not where we should be as a nation in quality of care. It’s woeful, the number of regrettable instances that happen every day. It breaks our hearts. This is an area where we are constantly learning and growing.” Locally, JHF continues to give a $900,000 block grant every year to the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, which is distributed to agencies in the Jewish community that deal with health and social services. The JHF was also one of the initial funders of both the Squirrel Hill Health Center and the Squirrel Hill Food Pantry, Zionts said. Thus, the vision of Montefiore is perpetuated, according to Zionts. “Two-thirds of all human services funding [of the Jewish community] is sourced to the JHF, and therefore sourced to Montefiore,” she said. To mark its 20th anniversary, the JHF has published a report, reflecting on the details of its accomplishments over that period. “I think that I really would love to have people read the 20-year report,” Feinstein said. “I think they would take pride. We are such a resourceful Jewish community. We knew when it was time to go from one strength to another.” (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011 — 3

METRO Briefly Bill Shore, author of “The Imaginations of Unreasonable Men,” will be the guest of the Faith Weinstein Book & Author Program, Monday, Nov. 7, 7 p.m., at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh, 5738 Darlington Road, Squirrel Bill Shore Hill. In addition to his writing, Shore is a philanthropist and businessman who wrote about scientists’ quest to find a cure for malaria. He currently serves on the board of directors of the Timberland Company and Venture Philanthropy Partners. Shore has been an adjunct professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business and is currently the program advisor for the Reynolds Foundation Fellowship program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government’s Center for Public Leadership. Participants are asked to bring a nonperishable food item for the Squirrel Hill Community Food Pantry. Tickets are available in advance or at the door. There is a charge, and the program will include a dessert reception and book signing.

Jewish Family & Children’s Service and the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh Foundation are co-sponsoring the program. The Jewish Community Center of Greater PittsburghSouth Hills, will host its annual Fall Family Open House Sunday, Oct. 23, from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m., at 345 Kane Blvd., Scott Township. The afternoon of free activities and special membership and summer camp offers is open to the community. Activities include a petting zoo, timed obstacle course for ages 2 and older, raffles, popcorn, arts and crafts, guided nature walks on the Scott Conservancy Trail and use of the JCC facilities. Contact Ann Haalman (412) 278-1975 or ahaalman@jccpgh.org for more information. Rodef Shalom Brotherhood will sponsor a pancake breakfast Sunday, Oct. 23, from 8 a.m. to noon, on the corner of Fifth and Morewood avenues in Shadyside. Funds raised from the breakfast will support several charitable causes. Contact breakfast chairman John Spear at (412) 953-2127 for more information. NA’AMAT USA, Pittsburgh Council Lunch and Learn program will feature Marsha Fuge, office manager and assistant vice president of First Commonwealth Bank, Wednesday, Oct. Please see Briefly, page 5.


4 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011

METRO B’nai Abraham hires cantor

Gray-Schaffer’s journey to Judaism started in Shushan BY HILARY DANINHIRSCH Chronicle Correspondent

It’s quite a distance from Shushan to Pittsburgh, but that was the starting point of the decades-long journey for a local, newly invested cantor. This Shushan, however, is a hamlet in upstate New York, not a city in ancient Persia, and it’s the birthplace of Michelle Gray-Schaffer, or Cantor Michal as she is known to her congregants. Gray-Schaffer is the new cantor and spiritual leader of Congregation B’nai Abraham in Butler. She replaces Cantor Gary Gelender, who left over a year ago. A Syracuse University graduate, with a degree in fashion design and theater costume design, Gray-Schaffer and her husband, Eric, moved to Pittsburgh in 1980 to further Eric’s law career. Her husband eventually became president of Rodef Shalom’s junior congregation, and she became active with it as well. Gray-Schaffer is a Jew-by-choice, though she did not convert until after she was married. In the early 1990s, she began studying and taking Hebrew classes at Rodef Shalom. “The more I studied, the more I loved Judaism. I came to the realiza-

Michelle Gray-Schaffer

tion that I had a Jewish soul and I had always been a Jew; I just didn’t know it.” By the time she converted 24 years ago, she had already been living as a Jew for quite a while. Although she had experience singing in choirs and in musical theater, and studied operetta and classical voice, Gray-Schaffer’s Jewish musical education came later. After she converted, she re-started Rodef

Shalom’s volunteer choir. By the late 1990s, when the congregation was looking for a cantor, they asked her to fill in. “The more I did this, the more I loved it,” she says. “It just fit all of my skills.” Becoming invested as a cantor was the natural next step for Gray-Schaffer. Although the process took nine years, including commuting to New York to complete her certification program and studying with Cantor Richard Berlin of Parkway Jewish Center, she became western Pennsylvania’s first fully invested Reform cantor in September 2009. She and her husband are the parents of three grown children: Abigail, Ethan and Gregory. She says her family has supported her every step of the way. Gray-Schaffer is enthused about her new role with B’nai Abraham. “I know that the board really wants me to bring life back into the synagogue and to reach out to the community,” she added. In that vein, she plans to represent B’nai Abraham in a Butler interfaith religious group as well as a Christians for Israel support group that is forming in the area. “She’s got a beautiful voice,” said Phil Terman, who, along with his wife,

is co-president of the congregation. “She’s very outgoing, and connects with congregants on an individual level. She’s extraordinarily enthusiastic, and she’s been warmly received.” Terman said he is enthused about how the children in the congregation have already connected with her. Gray-Schaffer plans to grow the 70plus family congregation, both musically and spiritually. “I want to form a little congregational band with the religious school,” she said. “It tends to be the kids who play instruments, so I want to involve them in some way.” She already has four congregants signed up for a conversion class, and she is offering a program called “The December Dilemma.” “It’s a program and discussion about helping interfaith families deal with the proximity of Christmas to Chanuka and deciding how to celebrate each holiday.” “I really love every aspect of this job. I love singing, I love teaching kids, I love writing sermons. I like being able to be creative. I love helping people through life cycle events,” she says. (Hilary Daninhirsch can be reached at hdaninhirsch@gmail.com.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011 — 5

METRO Briefly

tions by Monday, Oct. 24, by contacting LBlattner@templeemanuelpgh.org or Temple Emanuel at (412) 279-7600.

Continued from page 3.

Chabad of the South Hills announces two classes. The Teen JLI series begins with “Life on the Line: You Make the Call,” which will run six consecutive Thursdays at 6 p.m., starting Nov. 10. There is a charge. Contact Shaina at (412) 680-9593 or shaina@chabadsh.com for more information. “Fascinating Facts: Exploring the Myths and Mysteries of Judaism,” will run Wednesdays, starting Nov. 9, from 8 to 9:30 p.m. or Sundays, starting Nov. 13, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m. There is a charge. Contact (412) 344-2424 or Rabbi@Chabadsh.com for more information.

26, at noon at the Labor Zionist Educational Center, 6328 Forbes Ave. She will discuss online banking. The program is free and open to the community. Call (412) 521-5253 for more information. Jacob’s Ladder Fund of Temple Emanuel of South Hills will present a seminar with Dr. Mindy B. Hutchinson, board certified child, adolescent and adult psychiatrist, on “When To Worry About Your Child’s Worries,” Thursday, Oct. 27, 7:30 p.m. at Temple Emanuel, 1250 Bower Hill Road, Mt. Lebanon. Admission is free and the seminar is open to the community. Make reserva-

Federation, Community Day rank high in Day of Giving success The Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh and Community Day School combined to raise $264,894 in the recently completed Pittsburgh Foundation Day of Giving. That translated into $38,409 in matching funds combined. The two entities finished in the top 10 of area organizations, which took part in the annual daylong charitable event. They were among many Jewish agencies, charities and schools that participated. Broken down, the federation raised $141,472 ($20,513 in marching funds), while Community Day School raised $123,422 ($17,896). All told, Day of Giving generated funding for local nonprofits at the rate of nearly $75 per second over the 24-hour giving period, according to a statement from the Pittsburgh Foundation. The total raised for charitable organizations in Allegheny and Westmoreland counties was $6.4 million, almost double compared with Pittsburgh’s Day of Giving in 2010. More nonprofits than ever participated in the event — 654 local charities had completed or updated profiles on the Foundation’s PittsburghGives on-line site. And over 96 percent of those received credit card contributions from a total of 13,643 individual donations, up from the 7,788 donations in 2010. Following the completion Monday of financial reconciliations by foundation staff, the amount of matching funds for nonprofits in Allegheny County was confirmed at 14.5 cents for every dollar they received. In Westmoreland, which had a separate match pool, the match is 23 cents on the dollar. Nonprofits received a record outpouring of support from the community, the majority reporting significant increases in the number of contributions and the amounts of money raised during the event. For most of them, social media tools were central to their successful community outreach, engaging new and existing donors and increasing public awareness. According to the foundation’s statement, the federation and Community Day School placed third and fourth in terms of funds raised during the event by individual organizations. The leading organization in Allegheny County was

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, which received donations amounting to $221,925 ($32,179 in matching funds), followed Central Catholic High School, $145,426 ($21,086); then the federation and Community Day. Rounding out the top 10 were Pittsburgh Public Theater, $109,645 ($15,898); Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank, $98,595 ($14,296); The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, $88,866 ($12,885); Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary, $83,535 ($12,112); Carnegie Library, $74,165 ($10,753) and Pittsburgh Opera, $72,515 ($10,514). For Westmoreland, the top ten nonprofits for funds received were: Ligonier Camp and Conference Center, $31,505 (plus match of $7,246); Saint Vincent College, $27,455 ($6,314); Murrysville Community Library, $22,290 ($5,126); Valley Points Family YMCA, $19,620 ($4,512); Ligonier Valley YMCA, $17,190 ($3,953); Westmoreland Cultural Trust, $15,610. Public donations for Allegheny County during the Day of Giving amounted to $5,162,849 which combined with the match pool of $750,000 - an increase of 50 percent against 2010 - created a total of $5,912,849. In Westmoreland, public contributions were $435,599, which receive matching funds of $100,000. All donations receive an equal pro-rated share of the match pools which for Allegheny nonprofits was provided by The Pittsburgh Foundation, supported by funding from the Foundation’s Jack G. Buncher Charitable Fund and local funding partners, including The Buhl Foundation, The Heinz Endowments and the Leonard C. Grasso Charitable Foundation.

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6 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011

The Jewish Chronicle

Opinion

David M. Caoin, CEO EDITORIAL STAFF Lee Chottiner, Executive Editor Angela Leibowicz, Community/ Web Editor Toby Tabachnick, Staff Writer SALES STAFF Susie Mangel, Senior Sales Associate Roberta Letwin, Sales Associate Donna Mink, Classified Sales PRODUCTION STAFF Dawn Wanninger, Production Manager Nancy Bishop Production Artist BUSINESS STAFF Joe Soloski, Comptroller Josh Reisner, Office Manager Marcy Kronzek, Subscriptions BOARD OF TRUSTEES Richard Kitay, President Cindy Goldman-Leib, Vice President Larry Honig, Secretary Andy Schaer, Treasurer Davida Fromm, Past President Carolyn Hess Abraham Brian Balk Daniel Berkowitz Milt Eisner Stephen Fienberg Malke Steinfeld Frank David Grubman Thomas Hollander Larry Honig Evan Indianer David Levine Ari Lightman Mitchell Pakler Amy W. Platt Benjamin Rosenthal Charles Saul Andrew Schaer Ilana Schwarcz Adam Shear Jonathan Wander Published every Thursday by the Pittsburgh Jewish Publication and Education Foundation 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Phone: 412-687-1000 FAX: 412-521-0154 E-Mail: newsdesk@thejewishchronicle.net SUBSCRIPTION: $45 in Pennsylvania $47 East of the Mississippi $49 West of the Mississippi and FL NEWSSTAND PRICE $1.50 PER COPY POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE JEWISH CHRONICLE, 5915 BEACON ST., 3rd Floor PITTSBURGH, PA 15217 (PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS TO JEWISH TELEGRAPHIC AGENCY AND FEATURE SERVICE) USPS 582-740 Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to the Jewish Chronicle become the property of this publication, which is not responsible for the return or loss of such items. The Chronicle does not endorse the goods or services advertised in its pages and makes no representation to the kashrut of food products and services in said advertising. The publisher is not liable for damages if, for any reason whatsoever, he fails to publish an advertisement or for any error in an advertisement. Acceptance of advertisers and of ad copy is subject to the publisher’s approval. The Chronicle is not responsible if ads violate applicable laws and the advertiser will indemnify, hold harmless and defend the Chronicle from all claims made by governmental agencies and consumers for any reason based on ads appearing in the Chronicle.

It’s not over sraeli army Sgt. Gilad Shalit’s release after more than five years as a hostage of Hamas came as joyful news to Jews the world over, even more so to the Shalit family, which has been dwelling in a protest tent outside the prime minister’s residence in Jerusalem for a year to draw attention to their son’s plight. But let’s not let our joy go to our heads; the Shalit episode is far from over. The repercussions of this prolonged incident will be felt for years to come. The price of Shalit’s release was high — more than 1,000 Palestinian security prisoners, many of them murderers. Many of them could come back to haunt Israel, and Diaspora Jews, with a new round of terrorism. To be sure, past Israeli governments have released even more prisoners in similar swaps. But this is not about precedent; this is about security. Shalit was captured in a cross-border raid in June 2006. Now that that action has

I

born fruit for Hamas, are other Israeli soldiers guarding the border with Gaza at risk? How will the government protect them? What will the cost be? Diplomatically, we may never know for sure what pressure the Obama administration placed on Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to make the deal, or on Egypt to broker it. But now that it’s over, what might the White House expect in return? Arguably, with Israel more isolated in the region than at any time since the Yom Kippur War, now may have been the last serious chance to secure Shalit’s freedom. Before long, Egypt could elect a government openly hostile to Israel and the longstanding peace treaty between the two countries. Had that happened while Shalit remained a hostage, what border could the young soldier have crossed on his way to freedom, as he did on Tuesday? But that doesn’t mean his release

creates a new chance for peace. For now, Israelis are euphoric about Shalit’s homecoming. That euphoria could turn to rage if it is determined that former Palestinian prisoners are conducting terrorist activities against the Jewish state. What will that mean for public support for any future peace effort? Will new governments take risks for peace or will they take hard lines? We’re not saying Netanyahu should not have made this deal. Judaism is clear on the subject of pidyon shvuyim (redemption of hostages). Perhaps that is why there have been so many lopsided prisoner swaps in the past. Besides, no one can argue that Shalit and his family haven’t suffered enough. But let’s temper our joy with sobering reality. Difficult issues lay ahead directly or indirectly linked to Shalit’s captivity. For those challenges, Israel, and Jews everywhere, must be prepared.

A declaration of interdependence gary rosenblatt

NEW YORK — Two years into making a full-length documentary, which had its New York premiere last Saturday, filmmaker Tiffany Shlain realized what was missing. “I watched all the footage” for the project, about what it means to be connected in the 21st century, “and saw that it was all about ideas, it was all about the head and not about the heart. I wasn’t exploring emotional connectedness.” Shlain, 42, is founder of the Webby Awards and perhaps best known in the Jewish community for her 15-minute film, “The Tribe,” described as “an unorthodox history of the Jewish people.” That film focuses on the story of the Barbie doll and its Jewish creator, Ruth Handler. In working on the new film, “Connected,” Shlain was using similar techniques — a mix of archival footage, animation, stream-of-consciousness ideas, humor and a thought-provoking narrative — to tackle existential questions about how our society has become so dependent on technology and where it is leading us. While making the film, Shlain was going through a difficult time in her personal life, facing a difficult pregnancy after five miscarriages and worried about the failing health of her father, Leonard Shlain, with whom she was very close. A brilliant brain surgeon, Leonard Shlain was also the best-selling author of books combining and juxtaposing art and science. “I was thinking constantly of connection and loss,” Shlain explained in an interview from her home in California.

She said she realized that she needed to combine the abstract ideas about science and technology with her own personal story to humanize and deepen the film. “I felt that if I speak my truth it will be a universal truth,” she said. She started consulting with her father and filming him, chronicling his progress after doctors gave him nine months to live, and describing her own difficult pregnancy. Suddenly Shlain’s exploration of science and technology had become very personal, a matter of life and death. The result, two more years in the making, is a remarkably ambitious and provocative film of ideas and feelings — half documentary, half memoir and completely engrossing. It opens with Shlain addressing us directly on camera, confiding that she recently flew across the country to dine with a dear friend, only to find herself faking a trip to the restaurant restroom during the lunch so she could check her e-mails. What’s happened to us, she asks, that we’ve become so dependent on technology? Following her father’s advice that she go back to the beginning of civilization and look for patterns of behavior, Shlain describes the evolution of mankind in the film. She focuses on a theory advanced by her father in his writings, that the gradual emergence of left brain characteristics — logical thinking and reasoning — over right brain traits like art, creativity and imagination, led to the dominance of men over women in society. Another theory explored in the film is the scientific approach to breaking down problems categorically rather than seeing them as an inter-related whole, and of viewing humanity as independent from nature. Shlain, following her father’s ideas, makes the case that all living things are interconnected through networks of relationships, and need each other to survive. Theories and images come at you

quickly in “Connected,” but somehow it all hangs together, reinforced and made more poignant by the parallel story of Dr. Shlain’s battle with a stage-4 brain tumor, and the director’s efforts to complete the film before he dies. It’s also a family story, including Shlain, her husband, daughter and siblings, as they deal with the illness of someone central to their lives. Inevitably, “Connected” concludes with a death, and new life, and the hopeful challenge that if people recognized their ability to harness their collective brainpower, they could change the world in wondrous ways. Tiffany Shlain makes the point in her film, implicitly and at times explicitly, that “survival depends on our connecting to each other deeply,” a reference to mankind as a whole as well as to individuals. In exploring what we lose and what we gain as technology rewires our brains and speeds up the pace of our existence, she came to appreciate and embrace the concept of Shabbat, especially of “unplugging” for a day each week. She said she recently gave a talk on the power of technology and surprised her audience by extolling the virtues of turning off from the world. “People think it’s harder than it really is, but there’s a time to unplug,” she said, adding: “Shabbat is beautiful because we are able to be fully present. We need to do things that bring us back” to our real selves. Shlain is hoping that her film will get people thinking and talking. She has produced an educator’s guide for the classroom and “conversation cards” with stimulating quotes, facts and questions — from a line by naturalist John Muir that “when you tug at a single thing in the universe, you find it’s attached to everything else,” to asking “what stories would you include if you were making a film of your life?” In Tiffany Shlain’s case, she has made a film that is a tribute to the mind and spirit of her late father, and a challenge Please see Rosenblatt, page 9.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011 — 7

OPINION

Letters to the editor We invite you to submit letters for publication. Letters must include name, address and daytime phone number; addresses and phone numbers will not be published. Letters may not exceed 400 words and may be edited for length and clarity; they cannot be returned. Mail, fax or e-mail letters to: via e-mail :

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Jewish youth are prepared As the youth director at Congregation Beth Shalom in Squirrel Hill, I found Lee Feldman’s letter to the editor on Sept. 29, “Give teens responsibility,” particularly disturbing. Feldman claims, “Nothing is being done to cultivate the leaders we will need in the future. … We are not doing anything to create leaders.” This is simply not true. At Beth Shalom, and dozens of other synagogues in Pittsburgh and around the country, teens do practice leadership skills and cultivate strong Jewish identities with great creativity and enthusiasm. By participating in our four synagogue youth groups, taking on a variety of Jewish responsibilities (such as davening Shacharit in our adult services,

reading Torah and Haftarah and running their own teen services, and planning their own fundraising events), our youth are already demonstrating their commitment and honing the skills they’ll need to guide our Jewish community in the future. All congregational committees at Congregation Beth Shalom, including Religious Services, Membership, the Youth Commission, and more, have at least one teen member on the committee, if not several. These teens participate alongside our adult congregants by promoting events, providing input and feedback for synagogue life, and bringing their own creative, new ideas to fruition. Nearly 100 youth participate in our youth programs here, taking on great responsibilities, developing their leadership skills, and actively contributing to synagogue life. Feldman writes, “Give [teens] real responsibilities within the Jewish community. … Expect that they will succeed. Help them succeed.” At Beth Shalom, we do this every single day. Carolyn Gerecht Squirrel Hill


8 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011

OPINION

A Palestinian state should be the result of negotiations Guest Columnist MERVYN DANKER SAN FRANCISCO — To establish its independence, Israel had to win a war against the combined might of the Arab nations in 1948. The Arab failure to destroy the nascent Jewish state became known, in Orwellian Arab vernacular, as “Nakba,” a catastrophe. For the next 20 years, neither Jordan nor any of the other Arab states even spoke of giving Palestinian Arabs their independence, concentrating instead on boycotting and delegitimizing Israel. Only some years after the Six-Day War of 1967, when Israel, beating back the annihilation attempt by Egypt, Jordan and Syria, found itself in possession of the West Bank and Gaza Strip did the Arabs suddenly develop a passion for Palestinian statehood. Even though Arab national aspirations in Palestine are little more than a century old and developed in response to Zionism, Israel, whose Jewish roots in the land go back thousands of years, repeatedly has sought a negotiated settlement so that Israel and a Palestinian state could live side by side in peace. Generous Israeli offers

were made at Camp David and Taba under President Clinton’s aegis in 2000-01, but Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat walked out on the talks. Prime Minister Ariel Sharon pulled all Israelis out of Gaza, but instead of developing into an embryonic Palestinian state, the region became a Hamas-ridden launching pad for anti-Israel terror. Subsequent Israeli attempts to restart negotiations have met a wall of Palestinian refusal to recognize it as a Jewish state and insistence on a refugee “right of return” to Israel proper — both posi-

tions clearly intended to keep up the conflict, not solve it. Combining this with the demand that anyone claiming to be a descendant of a Palestinian who left what is now Israel should be allowed to return confirms that the Palestinian strategy is indeed to snuff out the Jewish state demographically, turning Israel into a second Palestinian state alongside the one to be created in Gaza and the West Bank. Hamas, classified by the United States and the European Union as a terrorist organization, condemned the killing of

Osama bin Laden and has categorically rejected any acceptance of Israel. Coming at a time when the Palestinian Authority is allied with Hamas, passage of a U.N. resolution backing the creation of a Palestinian state could put an abrupt end to any hope for the resumption of peace talks with Israel. It also could reverse Palestinian economic progress by triggering a cutoff of the annual $400 million that the Palestinian Authority gets in American aid and possibly lead to violence in the West Bank when the Palestinians realize that an empty U.N. declaration makes not an iota of difference to the situation on the ground. While it is tempting to imagine that the United Nations can magically create a Palestinian state, only a return to the peace table and negotiations with Israel can do that. While it may take a little longer, a settlement reached that way is the only kind that can last, preparing the groundwork for an agreement whereby a new Palestinian state and the existing Jewish state agree to an end of the conflict. Once such a deal is reached, Israel should be the first to propose U.N. membership for the democratic and peaceloving Republic of Palestine. (Mervyn Danker is the regional director of the American Jewish Committee’s Northern California office. This column previously appeared in j weekly of northern California.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011 — 9

OPINION The Wagner problem in Israel: It’s not about Wagner Guest Columnist SETH J. FRANTZMAN Roberto Paternostro, conductor of the Israel Chamber Orchestra, is proud that he brought his orchestra to Bayreuth, the cult festival devoted to Richard Wagner that is still run by the Wagner clan in Bavaria, Germany. Paternostro brushes away the notion that Wagner should be subjected to an informal ban in Israel. In interviews he reminds us that many oth- Richard Wagner er Nazi icons are alive and well here in the Jewish State, among them Siemens, Volkswagen, composer Carl Orff, psychiatrist Carl Jung, philosopher Martin Heidegger, and many other companies and personalities that were tied to Nazism or who were active collaborators. Therefore, the problem with Wagner is not Wagner in itself. The multitalented and brilliant Wagner died in 1883, long before Nazism. He was an anti-Semite, as his essay “Das Judenthum in der Musik” (The Jewishness in Music) condemns the Jews for polluting the pure Germanic music. But Wagner can’t really receive a cordon sanitaire for his paltry works of anti-Semitism in a country like Israel, where no one shrugs a shoulder before reading the fanatical anti-Semite Karl Marx or the Nazi philosopher Martin Heidegger. It can’t really be argued that Wagner must be banned because he was Hitler’s favorite composer. To ban him on that account would mean, logically, banning all the other things Hitler liked: German shepherds, mountain retreats, homely women, vegetarianism, hatred of smoking and uniforms. The Wagner problem in Israel is not about Wagner. It is actually about something else that is more tragic and more pernicious to the Israeli-Jewish consciousness. One could understand if the conductor of the Israeli Chamber Orchestra simply felt that Wagner should be part of the pantheon of great composers. But in fact, what Paternostro and others who played Wagner in Israel, like Daniel Berenboim, have done is deliberately set out to pro-

Rosenblatt: Continued from page 6. to each of us to step back and think about where we’re going and what’s our hurry. “Connected” was screened at The Angelika Theater in Manhattan for one week, starting Oct. 14, with evening dis-

voke the public. They not only love Wagner, but they want Wagner jammed down our throats. They want Israelis to join in the weirdo cult antics at Bayreuth, and in the case of Berenboim, they wanted to bring Wagnerian opera to the Palestinians. Perhaps they would like Wagner played for Israeli Independence Day. Furthermore, Paternostro and Berenboim exploit their Jewishness and the Holocaust in order to justify their Wagnerization of Israeli music. Paternostro speaks about walking through Yad Vashem with his mother (who saw how her aunt was murdered by the Nazis) and how his mother shouted “Wonderful!” at the notion that he would be playing Wagner. Paternostro thus attempts to tell us “See, even those intimately affected by the Holocaust love Wagner.” But this is an exploitation of the Holocaust for masochistic reasons. If we take the “my relatives survived the Holocaust and they like Wagner” argument out of the equation, what are we then left with? The purposeful desire to provoke, to use Wagner as a tool against Israel. The conductors who bring Wagner to Israel do it completely with an understanding of its political-racist overtones, rather than a naïve love for the music itself. Paternostro says that this “is the beginning of a reconciliation, a step on a new path … it was my greatest conviction to bring together these two sides — Israel and Wagner … the conflicts and emotions associated with the history of Wagner are exactly those which make it so special for us.” Berenboim, who loathes Israel and has a Palestinian passport and likewise exploits the Holocaust to excuse his hatred of the country and love for Wagner, played a piece by Wagner in 2001, during the intifada no less, at the Israel Festival. Argentinian-born Berenboim and Viennese-born Paternostro are crusaders in the attempt to bring Wagner to the shores of Israel. In the latter’s case at least his championing of Wagner is not paired with a hatred for the state. Both composers have received a lot of support among the intellectual audiences that are partial to chamber music in Israel. It is a shame that many people like myself, who instinctually oppose the political imposition of Wagner, are not classical music lovers. We cannot boycott the concerts, since we don’t go to them anyway. But the least we can do is understand what is happening. Wagner is not being foisted upon Israel merely because it is good music. It is being pushed upon us because of a very clear understanding of the goal; the Jews are being asked to “appreciate” anti-Semitism and the type of music that was played in the concentration camps. It would be akin to asking Armenians to listen to Turkish music at their weddings or demanding Palestinians fall in love with the tune of “Hativka” and ignore its national message. (Seth J. Frantzman is a writer, journalist and scholar residing in Jerusalem.)

cussions around the film, including an Oct. 15 Jewish-themed talk with director Tiffany Shlain and representatives from Reboot, Jumpstart and Natan. See connectedthefilm.com for details. (Gary Rosenblatt, editor and publisher of The New York Jewish Week, can be reached at Gary@jewishweek.org. This column previously appeared in the Week.)


10 - THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011

Style ‘I have a nice boy (girl) for you’ Website lets Jewish moms set up their single kids

BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

Alexandra’s 28-year-old daughter, Alina, did not have trouble meeting eligible men to date; she was just having trouble finding the right one, her beshert. So, as Jewish mothers have been doing for centuries, Alexandra decided to take matters into her own hands. After reading in her local Jewish paper about TheJMom.com, an Internet site designed for Jewish mothers trying to find matches for their children, Alexandra logged on, creating first a profile about herself, and then uploading information about Alina. “I first asked my daughter if it was OK, because she was negative about Internet dating,” said Alexandra, who was born in Ukraine and moved to New Jersey with her family in 1996. “She said ‘OK,’ to please me.” That was in December 2010. Alexandra checked the site periodically, looking for a potential match for Alina. In March 2011, Alexandra found him. “I happened to see this guy. He was cute and he had a lot of similarities to my daughter,” Alexandra said. “I told her if you give me your permission, I’ll send his mom an e-mail.” After Alexandra and Anatoly’s mom made their own connection, they shared photos and other information with their

children. Alina and the young man, Anatoly, who lived in Texas, soon began emailing each other directly. Four and half months later they met, and Anatoly proposed shortly after that. They were married last month. “Kids don’t have much time for dating,” Alexandra said. “And it’s hard to meet people. I think the website is a great thing. Parents should be involved. Kids may be busy and not have the time.” The JMom is the brainchild of Chicago siblings Brad and Danielle Weisberg, who had the idea for the site one day when they were visiting their mother. She was unhappy with Brad’s relationship status (i.e., single), and she asked Brad if she could look at his JDate profile. “I had just turned 30,” Brad Weisberg said. “And I just let her do it.” He and his sister left the house for about an hour, and when they returned they found their mother glued to the computer screen, pencil and paper in hand, with the names of 10 girls she thought might make a good match for Brad. “We were laughing hysterically,” Weisberg said. “Then my sister said, ‘Wait. This is not a bad idea.’ ” Realizing that moms often have more time — and money — to spend on perusing dating websites than their busy offspring, Brad and Danielle decided to set

up a network of Jewish parents all wanting their children to find Jewish mates. The Weisbergs also realized that sometimes, in matters of love, mom does know best. “My mom was looking at much more than the pictures [when perusing JDate], which is pretty much all I look at,” Weisberg said. “She was looking at common interests, and for an emotional connection.” Family comes first on TheJMom, with moms posting photos and information about their families, as well as photos and information about their single children. Alexandra believes that information about a child’s family is invaluable when looking for a match. “If it’s a nice family, the kids are usually good, too,” she said. The mothers using the site do not actually arrange the dates for their children, but rather make suggestions once they have pre-screened eligible men and women and their families. “The moms don’t actually set up their kids,” Weisberg said. “But when both moms feel they have found a match, they press a button on the site with their contact information and profile information. It’s then 100 percent up to the kids to contact each other and go on a date.” Busy singles have been turning to Internet dating sites for years. Seventeen percent of couples that were married in

the last three years met on an online dating service, and one out of every five singles in the United States has dated someone he or she met online, according to a study done in 2010 by Chadwick Martin Bailey. “It’s hard to meet people, particularly in bigger cities,” Weisberg noted. “But I am open to being set up. Using the Internet is one way to have Jews meet other Jews.” TheJmom, which currently has over 1,500 members from the United States, Israel and Canada, is now free of charge, although Weisberg says there will soon be a small fee to join. The site has been well received, Weisberg said. “One mother said, ‘This is like giving me the key to the bank vault,’” he recounted. “This is every Jewish mother’s dream.” As for Alexandra, she believes that any Jewish mother hoping to find a match for her son or daughter should encourage her child to be open to the Internet concept. “I would say don’t give up,” she advised. “Sometimes you have to push. If I didn’t push, my daughter wouldn’t have met this guy she loves. If you are Jewish, and you want to marry Jewish, this is the best way.” (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011 — 11

BOOKS Frank’s book an informative read on Democratic Socialism in Israel Book Review

BY LEE CHOTTINER Executive Editor

The Israel of today is the so-called “start-up” nation with a free market and high-tech industries that employ thousands around the world. In other words, it’s a capitalist’s dream come true. So it may surprise many younger Jews, whose collective memory doesn’t reach beyond the Six-Day War, that Israel’s origins are largely rooted in socialist experiments. Modern Zionism inspired many starry-eyed ideologues from Russia, eager to put their democratic-socialist ideologies into practice on start-up collective farms in late 19th and early 20th century Palestine. Often, their high ideas clashed with the harsh realities of their new country, but out of those collectives came the Jewish state that we know today. Pittsburgh author and professor Ivan C. Frank seeks to chronicle this period in his new book, “Origins of

Democratic-Socialism in Israel: Foundations and Leadership.” In it, Frank lays out in minute detail the history of the socialist groups, collective farms, workers unions, their leaders and the conflicts they experienced as they tried to make their utopian ideas for a Jewish homeland a reality. Many of the players and groups Frank looks at in this book will be unfamiliar to many Jews, making this thin 108-page volume a challenging read. That said, Frank also reminds us that some of the most famous names in Israeli history — David Ben-Gurion, Berl Katznelson, A.D. Gordon, to name a few — had their origins in this movement. Frank also writes that the aliya movement of the 19th and 20th centuries was not one period, but three, each broken down into three individual chapters explaining their own unique challenges. Chronicling the development of the kibbutz and moshav systems of agrarian communities and their varying philosophies, Frank sheds light on the issues these settlements dealt with, including distribution of food and other resources to the members, the equality of women (or lack thereof) in day-to-day life and the question of using Arab workers in collective settlements. Israelis continue to wrestle with some of these questions even today. While the book pays scant attention

to the drama and individual lives of these communities, and the people who chose to live in them (this is clearly an academic work), Frank does make an effort to describe the hardships with which the early settlers of these communities wrestled. For instance, the reader learns about the hardships in obtaining the equipment needed to till the land and scant medical supplies beyond quinine powder workers sprinkled on their food.

Socialists took many forms, from Marxists to Tolstoyans. Frank also nods to the cultural Zionists such as Ahad Ha’Am and Chaim Nachman Bialik. Strictly speaking, though, this is not a book about socialist Zionism in Israel. Frank introduces readers to efforts to establish these movements within the Russian Pale of Settlement and even efforts to start autonomous Jewish collectives in the Soviet Union, however unreceptive Soviet leaders were to the idea. An educator for more than 50 years, Frank’s adult life is steeped in the socialist Zionist idea. He lived the kibbutz life in the 1950s and again with his family from 1977-1982. He is a member of Ameinu, a Labor Zionist organization and has worked for Histadrut, an Israeli federation of trade unions. To the unindoctrinated reader, the book can be difficult to follow and is certainly not meant for a mass audience, but for those students of Israeli history keenly interested in the country’s socialist roots, the book is a valuable resource.

(Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.)


12 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011

STYLE From Cuban to classical

Israeli jazz musician Alon Yavnai plays at MCG BY LEE CHOTTINER Executive Editor

Alon Yavnai, as many of his fans say, is an accomplished jazz musician, but Yavnai himself might disagree. About the jazz part, that is. “I don’t describe myself as jazz musician,” the Israeli pianist and composer told the Chronicle. “It’s not possible; the music is going on in so many directions and not just mine, but many musicians.” In fact, Yavnai, who will perform with a quintet of Israeli artists at the Manchester Craftsman’s Guild from Oct. 29 to 30, sees it as part of his mission to teach how all genres of music influence one another. He will take part in a workshop at Oberlin College from Nov. 2 to 4 to bridge perceived gaps between classical music and other styles not normally associated with it, especially Cuban and other Latin styles. “They come from the same roots, close roots and they complete each oth-

Want to go? What: “Alon Yavnai Presents Jazz & World Rhythms” When: Saturday, Oct. 29, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Oct. 30, 2:30 p.m. Where: Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild, (412) 322-0800, mcgjazz.org.

Alon Yavnai believes classical music has more in common with other styles than listeners think.

er,” he said of classical and other styles. But first in foremost, Yavnai, who has a new CD out, “Travel Notes,” is a composer, heavily influenced by Cuban and African styles. “Travel Notes,” includes big band arrangements, a musical rendition of a love poem by Israeli poet Yonatan Gef-

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fen, Latin rhythms, and other Israeliinfluenced ballads. In other words, the music on the album can’t be pegged to any one genre, and that’s just how Yavnai likes it. The son of an Argentinean mother and Israeli father, Yavnai grew up in a home where both parents played music, so it’s no wonder he started playing

the piano at age 4 and performing professionally by age 14. After his stint in the Israeli army, he moved to Costa Rica, beginning a period in his life that heavily influenced his music style. “I heard Latin music in the house [back in Israel]; my mother is Argentinean, [so] I heard it and it kind of penetrated,” he said. “But in Costa Rica, I started to get this concentration, and it really stayed with me. While there he formed a trio called Orpheous. The band toured and recorded for three years. And it was Costa Rica where Yavnai met Paquito D’Rivera, the famous Cuban-born jazz artist who would have a profound effect on Yavnai’s career. Yavnai soon joined D’Rivera’s Latin Jazz Quintet in 2001 and became an integral member of the ensemble, playing with the likes of cellist Yo-Yo Ma and performing works by Brahms and the 19th century Cuban composer Ignacio Cervantes. The band, including Yavnai, won a 2008 Grammy Award for its album “Funk Tango.” Of Yavnai, D’Rivera said, “among all the pianists I’ve worked with, Alon Yavnai is the most versatile musician.”

(Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.)

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011 — 13

GLOBE/METRO Briefly At synagogue, Majority Leader Cantor responds to Obama on jobs bill Singled out by President Barack Obama during a speech in Texas for opposing economic reform, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) responded to the president at a Manhattan synagogue Sunday night, The Daily Beast website reported. Obama said last week that he“would like Mr. Cantor to come here to DalERIC CANTOR las and explain what exactly in this jobs bill does he not believe in, what exactly he is opposed to.” Cantor answered just that at the West Side Institutional Synagogue on Sunday, explaining that the bill’s proposed cap itemized deductions at the 35 percent tax bracket would hurt the cause of nonprofits. “It doesn’t make any sense to me to pursue what the president is talking about in the economy we’ve got,” Cantor said, according to The Daily Beast. “Why would you do something that makes it less attractive to give to charities when so many people are in need?” — JointMedia News Service

Al Davis, legendary Jewish NFL owner, dies on Yom Kippur Al Davis — longtime owner of the Oakland Raiders National Football League franchise who also served as a coach, general manager and league commissioner — died at age 82 on Yom

Kippur last Saturday. Davis, who was born to a wealthy Jewish family in Brockton, Mass., and went on to spend his childhood in the Flatbush neighborhood of Brooklyn, guided the Raiders organization to three Super Bowl Championships and was known for the mantra “Just win, baby.” “He was an innovator, a pioneer with a deep love and passion for the game of football,” the Raiders said in a statement on Davis. “His contributions to the game are innumerable and his legacy will endure forever through generations of players, coaches, administrators and fans.” Davis hired Art Shell, one of the first black coaches in NFL history, among other trailblazing moves. “As a Jewish person, he understood discrimination,” Eric Golub wrote of Davis in the Washington Times. On the Silver & Black Pride Raiders’ blog, Raymond St. Martin noted the religious significance of the timing of Davis’s passing. “Can it get any more Jewish than dying on the day of atonement?” St. Martin wrote. —JointMedia News Service

ADL: Anti-Semitic incidents rise for first time since 2004 The Anti-Defamation League’s annual audit for U.S. anti-Semitism, unveiled last week, revealed a rise in anti-Semitic incidents for the first time since 2004. Incidents went up from 1,211 incidents in 2009 to 1,239 in 2010, following a decrease in the occurrences each year since 2004’s U.S. record of 1,821, according to ADL. The audit tracks “incidents of vandalism, harassment and physical assaults against Jewish individuals, property and community institutions across the U.S.,” using reports Please see Briefly, page 19.

Gilad Shalit: Continued from page 1. What Zittrain Eisenberg found most interesting about the deal was the timing. “Hamas and Israel are kind of responding to the same catalyst, which is Mahmoud Abbas’s [United Nations] bid,” she said, referring to the Palestinian Authority president’s petition to the world body for recognition as a state. “Both Israel and Hamas are unhappy with that action by Abbas, and I think they’re both looking to subvert it and they have found a quite impressive distraction from it.” The swap, she explained, gives Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu a way to take attention away from the United Nations and gives Hamas a tangible accomplishment to show the Palestinian people. Although both sides may see gains from this deal, Pavilack said they’re not necessarily even. “A win-win? I don’t know, but it’s certainly very good in light of everything going on,” he said. “It gets this young guy home.” However, “there are some people to be released who have blood on their hands, and you hate to see that,” Pavilack added, “but you’re not negotiating with a friend. You’re negotiating with an enemy.” The Community Relations Council (CRC) of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, which helped organize a pilgrimage to Rome and Israel last year for 28 Jewish and Catholic leaders from Pittsburgh, including Bishop David Zubik and Rabbi Aaron Bisno, released a statement Monday welcoming the then-pending release. While in Israel, members of the pilgrimage team visited Noam and Aviva Shalit in the tent where the parents were holding a vigil for their son. The CRC “has waged a persistent campaign to focus and sustain attention on Gilad Shalit's plight,” the statement read. “Only six weeks ago, on

Avi Ohayon photo/GPO

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu greets Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit at the Tel Nof Air Force Base in Israel shortly after his release from captivity, Tuesday, Oct. 18.

Aug. 30, the CRC worked with Pittsburgh City Councilman Doug Shields to have Gilad named an Honorary Citizen of Pittsburgh, a rarely bestowed form of recognition.” It continued, “also this year, on June 28, CRC teamed with JFilm on a special Pittsburgh screening of the documentary film ‘Family in Captivity,’ which chronicles the Shalit Family's tireless efforts to secure their son's release. Added CRC Chair David Ainsman, “the treatment of Gilad Shalit at the hands of Hamas violates every international law governing the treatment of prisoners. It is a crime against all cultures that celebrate life. But now is not the time to dwell on that. Now is the time to celebrate his freedom.” (Ilana Yergin can be reached at ilana.yergin@gmail.com.)

Check out the blogs at www.thejewishchroncle.net


14 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011 —

OBITUARY Larry Good was businessman, philanthropist, humanitarian BY

STAFF AND RELEASES

Larry Good came downstairs one morning and asked his youngest daughter, Heidi, if she wanted a bagel. She did. Heidi didn’t know that this was not your ordinary bagel run. The Goods lived in Wheeling, W.Va., and the bagels Good had in mind were in New York City. The day trip included a visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Modern Museum of Art. Apparently everyone who was close to Good had their own unique story to tell. His son Jay took a trip to Israel with Good. While there they visited Mt. Sinai. As they descended the slope, Good took a bottle of aspirin from his pocket and pulled out two tablets. “Take my picture,” he told Jay. Seriously, Good, a successful retailer who, together with his brother, Sidney, ran L.S. Good & Co., a chain with department stores throughout the eastern and Midwestern United States, was a civic leader, a philanthropist and activist in Jewish life. But his friends and family remember him most for his generosity, kindness and sense of humor. Good died Wednesday, Oct. 12, at his home in Wheeling. He was 79. Good’s most significant gift to the

Larry Good

city of Wheeling was the Good Zoo at Oglebay Park, which he founded with his first wife, Barbara Mayer Good, in 1977, in memory of their son Philip, who died at age 7. “What was most important to him about the zoo is that it is a space that is

used and loved by a full community of people, and that is what makes it what it is,” said daughter Heidi. “[It’s] a special place to be with family, and to explore, to play, to learn new things. That Philip's memory sparked this, and is known by those who visit, brought it full circle for Dad and Mom.” The Goods also donated funds for flowers and gardens for Good’s mother, Jeannette Good, at Wheeling Hospital. And they supported Faith in Action, Oglebay Institute, American Cancer Society and the United Jewish Appeal, to name just a few projects. Civically, Good served on the boards of the Oglebay Institute, the Wheeling Symphony Society, Wheeling Development Conference, the Ohio Valley Industrial and Business Development Corp. and West Liberty State College. One of his most significant affiliations was the NAACP where Good was a charter member. After closing L.S. Good & Co., he was the director of the Office of Gift Planning, Medical Park Foundation; the executive director of Wheeling Works, Inc.; and he worked as a life underwriter and employee benefit specialist. In Jewish life, Good was the archivist of Temple Shalom, where the archives still bear his name (KraftGood Archives) and served as chair of

the finance committee. Born Laurance Frederic Good Sept 26, 1932, in Wheeling, Good later graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy, Brown University and served two tours of duty in the Navy before returning to the family business. The Good family has been in Wheeling since 1873. Good’s grandfather, L.S. Good, started the department store chain as a dry goods business in 1884. Good created “My Lifetime Book” and founded Personal History Systems to share his love of genealogy with others. He was an avid gardener and a skilled photographer. Among his bestknown shots were some of his friend, Rabbi Jacob Rader Marcus, founder of the American Jewish Archives in Cincinnati, who grew up in Wheeling. In 1976, Good became a charter recipient of the Distinguished West Virginian award. He is survived by his second wife, Ellie Good; two sons, Jay and Paul (Carolyn) Good; and two daughters, Jenny (Gary Brozek) and Heidi (Harouna Boncana) Good; three grandchildren, Lauren, Henry, and Paloma Good; one brother, David (Jane) Good; and one sister Ruth (Allen) Miller. Services were held Sunday in Wheeling.

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011 — 15

Simchas Engagements

Births Melnick: Susie (Chernoff) and Brad Melnick announce the birth of their son, Ethan James, Sept. 15. Grandparents are Isabel and Herb Chernoff, Les and Ina Melnick, and Carol Adelman. Ethan is the brother of Joshua and Reese. Ethan is named in loving memory of his great-great-aunt, Ethel Briskin, and his maternal great-grandfather, Jerome Chernoff. Ethan’s Hebrew name, Fivel, is in loving memory of his maternal great-grandmother, Florence Chernoff.

Zachary Aaron Zeff, son of Michelle and Kenneth Zeff, became a bar mitzva Saturday, Oct. 15, at Temple Sinai. Grandparents are Gail Murman of Pittsburgh and the late Leonard Murman and the late Sandy and Gerald Zeff.

B’nai Mitzva Fong-Cohen/Diamond: Ellen and Mark Diamond of Mt. Lebanon announce the engagement of their son, Jonathan Lee Diamond, to Natasha Fong-Cohen, daughter of Laura and Bud Cohen of San Francisco. Jonathan’s grandparents are Selma Jackson of Mt. Lebanon, Hilda Diamond of Squirrel Hill, the late Mel Jackson and the late Saul Diamond. Jonathan graduated from Washington University in St. Louis and Natasha graduated from University of California San Diego. Natasha and Jonathan are candidates for master’s of business administration degrees at the George Washington University School of Business. Natasha and Jonathan are planning an October 2012 wedding in San Francisco.

Weddings

Jonah Satchel Berger, son of Rachel and Adam Berger, will become a bar mitzva Saturday, Oct. 22, at Tree of Life*Or L’Simcha Congregation. Grandparents are Alan and Marcia Berger and Sol Pardes and Joan Weinreich. Melinda Ritter, daughter of Marcie and Steven Ritter, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Oct. 22, at 10:30 a.m. at Temple Sinai. Grandparents are Renee Ritter of Jericho, N.Y., and the late Seymour Ritter and Constance Wallace of Cooperstown, N.Y., and the late Lavinder Wallace. Eli Roth, son of Nadine Kruman and Andrew Roth of Pittsburgh, became a bar mitzva Oct. 15 at Rodef Shalom Congregation. Grandparents are Estelle Kruman and the late Jack Kruman and the late Ina and Melvin Roth.

Reiber/McKenney: Mitch and Debbie Levy McKenney of Pittsburgh announce the marriage of their son, Ethan Benjamin McKenney, to Laura Mercedes Reiber, daughter of Barbara Reiber of Webster, N.Y., and David Reiber of Rochester, N.Y., Sept. 10 at Sonnenberg Gardens in Canandaigua, N.Y. Ethan’s grandparents are Joan and Maurice Levy of Pittsburgh and Lorraine and George McKenney of Warwick, N.Y. Laura graduated from the State University of New York College at Fredonia and is vice president of sales at Nik Entertainment Company. Ethan graduated from the University of Rochester and is currently a student in its Simon Graduate School of Business. He is a certified financial planner with Manning and Napier Advisors. Laura and Ethan reside in Rochester.

Allie Rachel Ryave, daughter of Judy and David Ryave, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Oct. 22, at Temple Emanuel. Grandparents are Gail and the late Arnold Ryave, and Dolly and the late Donald Landay. Maya Balk Schaer, daughter of Judy Balk and Andy Schaer, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Oct. 22, at Beth El Congregation. Grandparents are Phil and Bette Balk and Cookie Schaer, all of Pittsburgh, and the late Sidney Schaer.

5

Deadline for Simchas is Thursday, 4:30 p.m. Announcements are free to subscribers; there is a $12 charge for each photo. The nonsubscriber rate is $45 for announcement plus $12 for the photo. Send announcements in the body of an e-mail and photo attached in JPEG format to announcements@thejewishchronicle.net. Call Angela at (412) 6871000 for more information.


16 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011

Community A C L O S E R

Friendship Circle photo

Marc Elliot, posing with members of The Friendship Circle’s teen leadership board, spoke to the Jewish community Sunday, Oct. 9. Some 400 people attended the program, “Get Over It! Everyone is Different.”

I was flipping through some other Jewish newspapers from around the country that we get in the office and found these recipes in the holiday edition of The Reporter. The article accompanying it was by Sybil Kaplan, Jerusalem, for JTA. Although I have not made either recipe yet, they are both easy and sound delicious – and still perfect for the holiday season.

CHICKEN WITH HONEY FRUIT SAUCE

L O O K

Becoming friends

¾ cup apricot jam 1 ½ cups orange juice 1 ½ cups red wine 1 tablespoon ginger 2 teaspoons garlic powder 1 ½ teaspoons thyme 2 tablespoons honey 2 teaspoons corn starch 2 teaspoons cold water 6 ounces apricots 6 ounces prunes 3 to 4 pounds cut-up chicken

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a baking dish. Place chicken parts in dish. Set aside. Place apricot jam, orange juice, red wine, ginger, garlic powder, thyme and honey in a saucepan. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer to reduce to 3 cups. Stir in corn starch and water and blend. Add apricots and prunes. Pour over chicken. Bake in preheated oven 45 minutes or until chicken is done.

POPPYSEED HONEY DRESSING ¼ cup honey 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons cider vinegar ½ cup oil 2 teaspoons poppy seeds Beat honey, mustard and vinegar in a bowl or shake well in a jar with a lid. Add oil and poppy seeds and shake some more. Use in a salad with mixed greens and fruit such as grapefruit. Makes about 1 cup. COMPILED BY ANGELA LEIBOWICZ angelal@thejewishchronicle.net

Jew’colades COMPILED BY ANGELA LEIBOWICZ Community/Web Editor

Marvin S. Lieber has been included in Best Lawyers in America. He is a partner in the Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel LLP Pittsburgh office and member of the firm’s health care practice group Marvin S. Lieber and business and finance department.

Your friends at The Jewish Chronicle with you a very joyous Sehmini Atzeret


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011 — 17

FREE SCREENING

Attend our free screening at the Maggie Dixon Heart Health Fair! Find out your risk and take it to heart. Early detection of a heart problem could save your life. If you have one or more of the following risk factors, consider attending this free screening: › › ›  ›

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Saturday, Oct. 22, 2:30 to 5 p.m. Maggie Dixon Heart Health Fair, Petersen Events Center, Pitt Campus Pre-registration is not necessary. Event admission and parking are free.

Heart screenings sponsored by UPMC Heart and Vascular Institute Join in the fun! The Health Fair offers a variety of screenings and activities in tandem with the University of Pittsburgh Fan Fest. Visit PittsburghPanthers.com for more information.

UPMC.com/HeartScreenings


18 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011

BUSINESS &

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C ontinued from page 13.


0


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011 — 21

Cl aSSiFied

advertisements • Deadline Friday at Noon • All Classified Ads Are Payable in Advance For 10 Words or Less 25¢ For Each Additional Word

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE 5915 BeaCon ST., 3rd Flr., PiTTSBurgh, Pa 15217 HELP WANTED

POSITION WANTED

THE HOLOCAUST CENTER of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh seeks a full-time Director. Responsibilities include overall management of the 2-3 person staff, fundraising, oversight of educational programming, exhibits and special events. The Director is also responsible for working with the volunteer advisory board, overseeing the Holocaust Survivors group and carrying out the recently completed strategic plan. Applicants should have a strong background in education, fundraising and organizational management. Compensation will be commensurate with experience. Please email cover letter and resume to pcalabro@jfedpgh.org. ••• SALES & MARKETING Associate 20 hours per week, mostly Mon-Fri, 2-5 years’ experience required & or bachelor’s degree in sales/marketing. Hotel/conference center background preferred. Must have strong communication skills (personal & electronic), great organizational skills & high level of confidence. Familiarity with Pittsburgh business community a plus. Responsible for managing clients to achieve customer satisfaction & to solicit past & new business to ensure revenue goals are achieved or exceeded. Partial work from home OK. Contact: tomasic@rubinoffcompany.com. ••• BRIDAL BOUTIQUE IN Murrysville is looking for a wellqualified seamstress. Flexible schedule must be detail oriented & have experience with bridal gown alterations. Must have transportation, turnaround time varies. Alterations to be pinned at boutique work done at your home. If you are interested please call 412-491-5614. ••• HOME INSTEAD SENIOR Care needing week-end caregivers. Rewarding work with seniors, make a difference in the life of an elderly person by joining our #1 non. Medical team of caregivers. Car is required, training is provided, Flexible schedule, all shifts EOE. 412-731-0733.

THE CARE REGISTRY, INC provides nurse aides and companions to offer one on one care for you in your home. The workers are screened and bonded. All shifts and live in care available. The Care Registry is licensed by the PA Dept. of Health. Low rates! Care management also available. 412-421-5202 or www.TheCareRegistry.com ••• CAREGIVER CONNECTION A PA. Licensed home-care registry, Jewish Family & Children’s Service refers screened, JF&CS trained caregivers providing short/long-term personal care services to seniors at affordable rates. Available 24/7, call 412-422-0400 or 877-243-1530 (toll free). ••• HOME HEALTH CARE specialist in hospice, dialysis & direct care. Will work any shift. Call Patricia Spencer 412-229-8760. ••• BOYD COMMUNITY Service proving personal care, transportation, light housekeeping, meal preparation & shopping. Reasonable rates and hourly services. Contact Sonya Boyd 412-731-0279. ••• CAREGIVER/ Caring Hands, Personal Touch Elder Care. Experienced with references & reasonable rates. Call 412-841-0146. ••• CNA SEEKING evening position over 20 years’ experience, all clearances & CPR is up to date. If you’re loved one is in need of great personal care call Dorothy. 412537-0567 or 412-321-4994. ••• HOUSE CLEANING Reasonable rates, free in-home estimates. 412-583-1420 or 412-583-1420. ••• DO YOU NEED help clearing out an estate? Do you have to climb over mess to find other mess? Are you living in disharmony, have too much to do & don’t know where to start? Help is on the way call Jody at 412759-0778 or e-mail:collegeconclergejdiperna@gm ail.com. ••• CLEANING 10 YEARS Experience. Will treat your home with TLC, great with antiques. Excellent references 412-452-5518.

POSITION WANTED HEAVENLY HOUSE CLEANING Service. My cleaning service is a blessing. Residential/small party services, great rates, reliable, experienced & detailed. Call for free estimates. Michelle 412-277-2565. ••• MALE CAREGIVER looking to take care of your male love one. References, Act 33/34 clearance & year of experience. 412-805-5375. ••• IF YOU ARE Seeking quality respite care for your loved one, please contact Carmella at 412-607-2056. ••• CAREGIVER WILL take loving care of your loved one. Available any shift, experienced & reliable. 412-628-4381. ••• PRIVATE DUTY Home health aide looking for a rewarding opportunity to provide companionship, and assistance with daily living skills and errands, etc. Reliable transportation, availability is open. Hourly rate or salary negotiable. Contact Mylia Jackson 412-812-8033. ••• LAUNDRY & IRONING also available to do home or office cleaning, clean out basement, garage or yard. References available. 412-390-9151.

APPRAISALS COINS, Currency, Sports cards, comic books, toys, electric trains. Longtime commercial experience, reasonable rates. Call Paul 412-421-6583.

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COMPUTER NICE JEWISH Boy, offering the full range of computer services, from advising and teaching to repair and support. I will come to your house or apartment, fix any problem you’re having & teach you what you need to know to use it. I have 14 years’ experience working with people of all ages. . No job is too large or small, and nobody is too computer illiterate. (Really) CALL JASON 412-401-1204, or visit my web www.computerwizard.us. References available.

DRIVER NEED A RIDE? Call Norm, he will drive you. Doctors, shopping, anything that needs to be done. Experienced, insured, great references and reasonable rates. Available le for airport pickup or departure. Norm 412-521-6999.

GLOBE Without jobs in U.S., college grads are finding opportunities in Israel BY DANIELLE FLEISCHMAN JTA

NEW YORK — In her final months as a political science major at the University of Pittsburgh, Susanna Zlotnikov had a positive outlook about landing a job. But as the months passed and her network of contacts led only to dead ends, Zlotnikov decided she needed a backup. Instead of spending the summer after her May graduation sending out more resumes, Zlotnikov took a pair of internships and moved to Israel. It worked out well: In November she expects to be starting a full-time job in Israel as grants coordinator with Save a Child’s Heart, an Israeli-based humanitarian organization that provides cardiac surgery for children from the developing world. With the U.S. economy still sputtering, a growing number of college graduates are turning to Israel programs to bridge their educational and professional careers. In many cases, these young American Jews are drawn to the programs not out of Zionist sensibilities but because they’re looking for workplace experience or seeking a way to do something Jewish. Some are even finding jobs in Israel and staying. After losing a job in Hollywood, Jessica Fass decided to go on a Birthright Israel trip and then stayed in the country for an extra month. Upon returning to the United States, Fass felt as if she were in culture shock and kept thinking about returning to Israel. She decided to do an internship through WUJS Israel Hadassah, which helps college graduates find opportunities in Israel.

“It seemed like the perfect time go,” she said. Within six months, Fass had found a full-time job in Israel and now is working in marketing for a company in Tel Aviv, which she described as being like Los Angeles “but with Hebrew.” Fass said she was surprised to find how much more willing Israelis were to take a chance on a new hire. “I don’t think that would have happened in the States because I had no experience in marketing,” she said. Organizations that bring Jewish youth to Israel are trying to capitalize on the bleak job prospects for college graduates in the United States, and programs that offer internships in Israel say they have seen a spike in applicants since the recession hit in 2008. “I remember in 2008 when our numbers skyrocketed,” said Amy Gross, the program recruiter at WUJS Israel Hadassah. “It’s mostly recent college graduates because they have trouble finding a job, but they want to experience Israel as well.” WUJS offers five-month internships in Israel. Participants also have weekly trips to explore the country, Hebrew classes twice a week and immersion in Israeli culture. MASA Israel, which helps place Diaspora Jews in long-term Israel programs, created a program called A Better Stimulus Plan targeted at recent college graduates looking for internship opportunities in Israel while they wait out the economic troubles in the U.S. Avi Rubel, MASA’s North American director, says about 1,800 participants are doing postcollege internship experiences — double the rate of recent years.

ESTATE SALE

PERSONAL

LEGAL NOTICES

SHADYSIDE, 15213 — Saturday, October 22, 7:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Dir: Fifth Ave., 623 Devonshire St., Follow The Yellow Arrows! Bikes, Exercise Equipment, Bookcases, Books, Storage Units/Cabinets, Chests/ Dressers, Bedroom Sets, Artwork, Old Stove & Refrigerator, Patio Furniture, Pottery, Lawn & Garden, Kitchen Table & Chairs Set, Occasional Tables & Chairs, Linens, Vacuum, Lamps, Decorator Items, Sofa, Upholstered & Hardwood Furniture, Loveseat, Printer, China, Glassware, Old Kitchen Cabinets, Tools, Lots of Misc. Items, Delivery Available, Golden Estate Sales.

SUCCESSFUL BUSINESSMAN in 60’s is seeking a kind, compassionate single Jewish woman in her 50’s to 60’s. Please send photo & letter of interest to The Jewish Chronicle 5915 Beacon Street 3rd Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Box 111

ESTATE NOTICES

MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT THE HOT MATZOHS, Pittsburgh’s #1 Klezmer Band, is available for your Wedding, Bar/Bat Mitzvah, Corporate or other special event! The dynamic band, featuring violinist Barbara Lowenstein (founder), offers many styles of music in addition to Klezmer, e,g, classical, jazz, swing and folk. Call 412-344-3338 or 412-303-0746. e-mail: barbsviolin@gmail.com.

PLASTERING PLASTER/PAINTING Marbleized painting & drywall, free estimates, excellent references. Call Herzel 412422-5486.

TUTOR/ EDUCATIONAL SPECIALIST

Letters have been granted on the estate of each of the following decedents to the personal representative named, who requests all persons having claims against the estate of the decedent to make known the same in writing to him or his attorney, and all persons indebted to the decedent to make payment to him without delay: FREEDMAN, Rosella, deceased, of Pittsburgh, PA, Allegheny County; No. 0211-05499 or to: Ruth Henteleff, Executrix, 5901 Phillips Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 c/o Joel Pfeffer, Esq., 535 Smithfield St., Suite 1300, Pittsburgh, PA 15222.

IN-HOME TUTORING & Learning Support K-12. 412760-9560, e-mail:debbiechottiner@yahoo.com, visit my web-site: www.debbiechottiner.com.

3Th 086, 079, 072

Visit The Jewish Chronicle Website

thejewishchronicle.net


22 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011

OBITUARY BEERMAN: On Friday, Oct. 14, 2011, Arthur “Art Mann” Beerman; beloved husband of the late Dava “Babe” Beerman; devoted father of Celia Beerman, Margy Beerman and

Brian (Molly) Beerman; loving grandfather of Michael; also survived by nieces and nephews. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment private. Contributions may be made to Hebrew Free Loan Association, 4315 Murray Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com COHEN: On Thursday, Oct., 13, 2011, Margaret “Peg” Cohen, age 93; Peg went suddenly and gently into that good night. She was the proud and beloved godmother of Abby, Ethan, and Gregory Schaffer, and beloved friend of their parents, Michele Gray-Schaffer and Eric Schaffer. She was predeceased by parents Philip and Fannie, and sisters Lillian and Ruth. Peg’s loving friends were devoted and attentive to her during her final illness, and she will be sorely missed. In addition to the Schaffer family, they include Lynne Morrow, Gary and Karen Sinwell, Donna and Larry Blanchard, Linda Buccina, Judy Robinson, Lois Blaufeld, Posy and Jack Brill, Connie Pelmon, and Sara and Meir Shur and children. She also leaves behind de-

A Life Worth Remembering is a Life Worth Sharing The Jewish Chronicle’s new Extended obituary is a thoughtful way to honor your loved ones. In addition to Standard* obituary, the extended obituary offers: • Black and white photos (1.25 wide x 1.5 inches high @ $12 per photo) • Color photos (1.25 wide x 1.5 inches high @ $25 per photo) • Unlimited words ($0.25 per word beyond the Standard format) A life is greater than the sum of those it touched...it’s full of images, stories, laughter and tears. Let the Chronicle help you tell the tale that should be told. As every life has a natural length, so too does the story of that life.

*Standard Obituary: $50 flat fee that includes name & date of passing, family members and relatives, funeral home and graveside services, interment & contribution information.

voted aide Tierra Fitzgerald and cousins Roz and Mitchell Yankowitz of Los Angeles. Peg was a career woman who was the office manager for the Pittsburgh office of the National Labor Relations Board. She was widely travelled, with Paris holding a special place in her heart. She adored all things French. She was a lifelong gardener, and her garden is a place of magic and beauty. She cultivated and coaxed the best out of both plants and friends. Services and interment were held at Poale Zedeck Memorial Park Cemetery. Contributions can be made to the Biblical Garden at Rodef Shalom Temple, 4905 Fifth Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 or Hadassah-Greater Pittsburgh Chapter, 1824 Murray Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Funeral arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com HOLZER: On Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2011, Charlotte “Lottie” Holzer; beloved wife of the late Max Holzer. beloved mother of Sy (Cathy) Holzer, Dennis (Adrienne) Holzer and the late Ronald Holzer; mother-in-law of Margaret Ann Holzer; grandmother of Brian (Lucy), Jodie (Jarrod), Brittany, Lindsey, Dayanna and Alicia; greatgrandmother of Jacob, Tyler and Kayla. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc; interment Mount Lebanon Cemetery, Beth El section. Contributions may be made to Beth El Congregation, 1900 Cochran Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15220 or Holocaust Center of Greater Pittsburgh, 5738 Darlington Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com MINSKY: On Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2011 Howard “Buddy” Minsky, age 80; Buddy was Joan’s true love and treasured husband of 58 years, the adored and adoring father of three children and six grandchildren. His friends and relatives and colleagues will also remember Buddy as a lawyer, president of his congregation, supporter of his synagogue, Navy man, poker player, fraternity brother, minyan regular, filmmaker, wordsmith, devoted Steelers and Pirates fan. Wherever he travelled, he never missed a sunrise or a sunset. He took pictures of everyone and everything, and has the photo albums to prove it. He made epic Halloween costumes, drove convertibles, deeply appreciated a good steak and his wife’s chocolate chip cookies. He loved his yorkies, and all technological gadgets, even the 8-tracks and the Betamax. He had an extraordinary talent with a yo-yo, which none of his children inherited. He once caught a bank rob-

ber and never tired of telling the story. Buddy was known for his warmth and affection, he was an inveterate hugger, tickler and nuzzler. He lived by the motto: Life is uncertain, so start with dessert. Buddy is survived by his wife Joan, his children Terri, Jeffrey and Maura, his grandchildren Sam, Anna, Lucy, Sasha, Edie and Dasha, and by his brother Jay. Services were held at Beth El Congregation; interment Mount Lebanon Cemetery/Beth El Section. Donations in Buddy’s memory may be made to Beth El Congregation, 1900 Cochran Road, Pittsburgh, PA., 15220. Arrangements entrusted to Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc. www.schugar.com POSTER: on Saturday Oct. 15, 2011, in Springfield, Va., Vivian Spector Poster, 93; beloved wife of the late Milton Poster; mother of Dr. Marsha Poster of Bonita Springs, Fla., Debra Poster (Stephen L.) Altman of Fairfax Va.; grandmother of Judd Poster Altman of Arlington, Va., Leah Meredith Altman and her fiancé, Todd D. Soiefer of New York City; sister of the late Jack Spector and the late Molleye Simon. Services were held at B’nai Israel Cemetery in Hempfield Township. Contributions may be made to the Greenspring Benevolent Care Fund, attention: Kimberly Nelson, 7410 Spring Village Drive, Springfield, VA 22150. Arrangements by the Galone-Caruso Funeral Home, 204 Eagle St., Mt. Pleasant, PA 15666. www.galone-carusofuneralhome.com ROSEN: On Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2011, Richard I. Rosen; loving son of Gloria and the late Norwin Rosen; loving brother of Barbara J. Rosen (Ilkka Ikavalko) and the late Judy Rosen; cousin of Adrienne and Dennis Drapkin, Dr. Jan Miller Schwartz, Abby and Dr. Chuck Hyman, Myrna and Joe Strapp and their children. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment Beth Shalom Cemetery. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com

UNVEILINGS REIDMAN: A monument in loving memory of Sylvia Joy Reidman, will be unveiled Sunday, Oct. 30, at 11 a.m. at the Original Gemilas Chesed Cemetery on Center Street in Versailles Borough, Pa. Family and friends are invited. MARKOVITZ: A monument in loving memory of Edward A. Markovitz, will be unveiled Sunday Oct. 23, at noon at Poale Zedek Cemetery. Friends and family are invited.

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011 — 23

METRO Mon Valley Jewry

The exterior of Temple Beth Am in Monessen.

Monessen: Continued from page 1. visiting student rabbi from the Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of Religion in New York. Ackerman, born in 1936, remembers a time when the congregation thrived, accomodating more than 100 children in its religious school. But times have changed. “Now, we have no children here at all,” she said. The building on Watkins Avenue that is now Temple Beth Am was constructed in 1952. Originally a Conservative congregation, it replaced the Kneseth Israel synagogue that was built in downtown Monessen in 1908. The congregation changed its name to Temple Beth Am after it merged with Charleroi’s Temple Rodef Shalom. While Beth Am used to have services biweekly, the tiny congregation now only brings in its student rabbi once a month. “That’s what we can afford,” Ackerman said. Once a month the sisterhood, under the leadership of Ackerman, prepares a Friday night dinner for about 20 people. “Phyllis does the cooking,” said her husband, Sidney Ackerman, who grew up across the river in Donora. “When she doesn’t cook, we order pizzas, or Italian food. Most of our members come.” Beth Am also has services on the High Holy Days, this year drawing more than 30 people, some from neighboring towns that no longer have a synagogue. Ackerman saw to it that there was a festive break fast at the conclusion of Yom Kippur. “We have flowers, and colored tablecloths,” she said. “People are shocked to see how nice we do these things.” Back in its heyday, in the 1940s and 1950s, Monessen’s only Jewish congregation had about 150 member families, recalled Jack Bergstein, who was born in Monessen in 1940 and still lives there. “You went [to the synagogue] on Friday nights and Saturday mornings,” he said. “There were services on a weekly basis. It was a pretty traditional congregation, with everyone walking on the High Holidays.” “We had an AZA chapter, and B’nai B’rith, and a very active sisterhood,” Bergstein continued. “We had a unique

pre-AZA and BBG organization called the Saturday Nighters Club for 10- and 11-year-olds. We would meet for social functions.” Nearby Donora had an Orthodox synagogue that closed its doors for good about 10 years ago, Bergstein said. That town also had a kosher butcher. “There used to be a big Jewish community in Monessen,” said Phyllis Ackerman. “We used to have a lot of dances. After Yom Kippur, there was a dance. Now we just don’t have the people.” While Beth Am’s finances are not sufficient to make needed improvements to the synagogue, the building is nonetheless well kept. The carpeting in the sanctuary looks brand new, although it was installed about 10 years ago for the congregation’s last bar mitzva. The social hall is clean and tidy, having just been used for the break fast. Siddurim are neatly lined up on the wooden shelves, ready to be used for the next monthly Shabbat service. But at Beth Am, the past seems almost as alive as the present. Tacked on the walls of the Sunday school classrooms are photographs of students enjoying picnics and holiday parties; the photos must be at least 20 years old. Hebrew lessons remain written on the chalkboards, although the rooms have not been used for ages. “The whole valley has changed,” said Sidney Ackerman. “Everybody has moved away. The whole town has shrunk.” The Jewish community began to leave Monessen before the mills began shutting down in 1967, said Sidney Ackerman. He worked in a mill for 27 years, while also operating a furniture re-sale business. Most of the Jews in town, though, were merchants, he said. They left when the Monessen economy began to slump, and when big stores such as A&P and K-Mart proved too competive. But Phyllis Ackerman is trying her best to keep Judaism alive in the Mon Valley. “I want to keep it [Beth Am] going, because we are the only Jewish presence in the Valley, and that’s important,” she said. “I try to talk her into going away for the holidays,” husband Sidney said of his wife. “But she won’t leave.” (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

Buy, Sell, Trade in the Classifieds, Call Donna 412-687-1000

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23: SIMON J. ANATHAN, ISADORE E. BINSTOCK, JACK CITRON, MARY LEVINSON COHEN, ETHEL DAVIS, SARAH SILVERBLATT EPSTEIN, BELLA HADAS, MARY JOSSELSON, EDWARD L. KLEIN, RACHEL KOPP, ESTHER ROGOW LANDAU, HARRIS LANGE, ANNA LEVINE, JOSEPH LEVY, SIDNEY LEWIS, ADELE LEYTON, RUTH LIEPSITZ, DR. PAULINE NEIMAN, PAULINE DR. NEIMAN, BESSIE PERSKY, PETER RIESBERG, SOLOMON S. ROSENFIELD, ANNA LEVENTON RUBEN, SAM SCHWARTZ, YETTA STEIN, LOUISE COMINS WAXLER, DR. ALFRED L. WEISS, SAMUEL J. WISE, MILTON WITTEN, EMMA REBECCA ZOBER. MONDAY, OCTOBER 24: E. LOUIS BRAUNSTEINDAVID BURGER, TOBIAS COHEN, HARRY COOPERMAN, JACK FIENBERG, DOROTHY HARRIS, BARNEY HOLTZMAN, CHARLOTTE DEBRA F. KAWOLSKY, DR. ALEXANDER A. KRIEGER, SIDNEY H. LEFKOWITZ, JACK LEVINSON, LOUIS LEVINSON, LAZOR LEWIS, IDA LINDER, HELEN A. MARKOWITZ, HARRY P. MEYERS, HARRY P MYERS, ADOLPH NEWMAN, DAVID S. PALKOVITZ, JOSEPH WILLIAM PARNES, RACHEL POVARTZIK, ROSE PUDLES, CELIA RAKUSIN, EMANUEL RANDALL, LOUIS H. ROSENTHAL, SALI PILLER SCHECHTER, SOPHIE SCOTT, FLORENCE SHRAGER, SARAH SILVERBERG, RITA JO SKIRBLE, HARRY S. SMIZIK, SEYMOUR SPIEGEL, WILLIAM STERN, HARRY E. SUSSMAN, HANNAH WEINSTEIN, SAM WEINSTEIN, HAROLD B. WEISSMAN, BORIS WINSTON. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25: ZORACH CHAIM ABRAMS, JONAS ADLER, JOSEPH ADLER, MIRIAM BANDEL, SHIRLEY BARR, JEAN SINGER CAPLAN, SAUL EISNER, MILDRED ESKOVITZ, MARVIN S. FRIEDBERG, LOUIS FRIEDMAN, SAM GOLDBERG, PEARL COHEN GOODMAN, JACK GREENBERG, SADYE R. KANTOR, MAX LANDO, CHARLES LEEFER, HYMAN LERNER, MARY LEVITT, GOODMAN LEVY, LOUIS LEVY, IGNATZ MARKSTEIN, REGINA MARX, VIOLET C. MILLER, LOTTIE MOGILOWITZ, NATHAN A. MOSS, ABRAHAM RADEN, JONAH RAPPORT, JOSEPH RAUH, ALEXANDER REICH, FREDA DAVIS SEEGMAN, FLORA MAY SHADDEN, BERTHA ETHEL SHAMBERG, ANDREW H. SHAPIRO, GRACE G. SHAROVE, ELLA SIEFF, WILLIAM SIMON, RICHARD STUTZ, E. ROBERT TITELMAN, ADOLPH WEINBERGER, HARRIS WEINSTEIN, JOSEPHINE SOLLOSY WEIS, BERNARD WEISS, BERTHA P. WEISS, NAT H. WINKELMAN, ESTHER H. WINKLER, NELLIE WISEMAN, ADA MARIE WOLFE, SARAH SABLE YOUNG. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26: WILLIAM ABRAMS, MARY ASTROV, LUCY CAPLAN, SARAH N. COHEN, PETER DAVIDSON, EDWARD A. FEINERT, SOLOMON GLICK, ABRAHAM HANSELL, SYLVIA B. KARPO, HARRY M. LASDAY, HYMAN LEFF, ALICE LEVINE, WILLIAM S. LICHTENSTUL, HARRY D. LINDER, EDWARD MANDELL, RAE MONT, I. EDWARD PLESSET, PHILIP REICHER, HARRY ROFEY, JESSE ROGERS, MORRIS ROSENBLUM, FRANK SAMOWICH, ROSE SHERIN, ISADORE SIEGAL, LENA SILVERMAN, SARA SADIE SOBEL, ANNA SOKOL, DR. DANIEL SOLOMON, ALBERT SOMERMAN, FANNIE STEIN, JACOB STERN, MARY STOLLER, ALBERT I. TOBIAS, HARRY ULANOFF, ANNA WEDNER, NATHAN WEINER, SAMUEL WELLS, DONALD ELI WITKIN, ROSE ZASLOFF. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27: SARAH BERMAN, JACK CAPLAN, MORRIS CHAIMOVITZ, ISAIAH COOPER, LAUREL B. DEVON, ROSE K. FREED, HARRY FREEDMAN, PAULINE J. ISAACS, SARAH JACOBSON, ROSE BIGMAN KALMANOWITZ, DR. PAUL KAPLAN, ANNA KLEE, ETHEL I. KRAUSS, IDA MAGDOVITZ KROUSE, JACOB JOSEPH KURTZ, MILTON LEHMAN, PEARL LEVY, JESSIE LICHT, LEON E. MARKOWITZ, DR. LEONARD M. MONHEIM, SYDNEY REITER, ROGER E. RESNICK, RUTH RIZIKA, ROSE ROLNICK, ROSE ROSEN, SAMUEL ROSENFELD, EMANUEL ROSENTHAL, ETTA SASLOW, EDITH F. SIMON, DR. HENRY SLOAN, SIMON SOLOW, JOSEPH WEINTRAUB, FLORA LANGE WOLF, LOUIS WOLF, I. LEROY (LEE) YAHR, DAVID ZERELSTEIN, SONIA GROSSMAN ZION. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28: EMMA G. ALLEN, HARRY BARASH, BELLE BEIGEL, JACOB BELINKY, BERNARD M. BENNETT, HELEN BERKMAN, HANNAH BLAUFELD, RUBIN BRENNER, JACOB L. CAPLAN, RUTH MERMELSTEIN CRAMER, MINNIE BELLMAN FOX, JACOB FRIEDMAN, WILLIAM GOLDBERG, RHODA FISHER JONAS, FRED KITMAN, ELLA PINCUS KURTZ, MORRIS LAPIDUS, DR. SAMUEL I. LEBEAU, FREDA LEFF, JACOB LEVENSON, HYMEN LIFF, CHARLES S. LINDNER, LILLIAN B. MARTIN, CHARLES MONHEIM, TRACI MICHELE PERILMAN, WILLIAM RICHTER, SAMUEL ROTHMAN, JACOB H. SCHLESINGER, SADIE SCHNITZER, JACOB SCHWARTZ, SAMUEL M. SEGEL, ROBERT SHENSON, DR. SAUL YORK, JANE BRAND ZINS. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29: DR. RALPH H. BAUM, BENJAMIN BERMAN, FAGIE COHEN, OSER COHEN, EDWARD DOBRUSHIN, I. LOUIS ECKHOUSE, ELLA C. FEINBERG, NATHAN G. FISHER, PEARL FISHKIN, MORRIS FREEMAN, ROBERT R. GERBER, ISRAEL GERSHON, FANNIE GORMAN, ALBERT HENDEL, JACOB KATZ, SIMON KLEIN, DR. I.A. LASDAY, JACOB LAZIER, SAMUEL LEDERMAN, CHARLES LEUIN, DAVID MILLER, EUGENE MOSKOVITZ, MORRIS PECHERSKY, MAX PERER, SAM PERLUT, PETER PINK, SAMUEL PRELUTSKY, JACOB M. PRICE, MARY RAPPORT, SARAH RUTH SAUL ROSENBERG, ANNA RUBENFIELD, SARAH RUSKIN, BERDE S. RUTTENBERG, DR. ALEC RUZEWICH, SARAH SABLE, CELIA SILVER, MYER SKIRBOLL, MILTON SLESINGER, GERTRUDE STEINMAN, LOUIS STERN, FANNIE SUROVITZ, SARA MIRIAM TOLOCHKO, KATIE WEISMAN, ROSE WYATT, BERTHA COOPER YOUNG, HENRY L. ZACKS.


24 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 20, 2011

The Jewish Chronicle, October 20, 2011  

Edition from October 20, 2011

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