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Style ‘Focus’ Arthur Miller’s only novel a gripping attack on anti-Semitism

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE thejewishchronicle.net DECEMBER 8, 2011 KISLEV 12, 5772

Vol. 55, No. 30

Pittsburgh, PA

‘Outrageous and insulting’

$1.50

Local woman made extreme decisions following genetic testing results BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

A scene from one commercial in the controversial Israel ad campaign shows two proud grandparents skyping with their family in America during Chanuka. When they ask their granddaughter what holiday it is, she responds, “Christmas.”

Israeli ad campaign upsets American Jews BY THE JEWISH CHANNEL For the Chronicle

An Israeli government ad campaign, encouraging expatriate Israelis to return the Jewish state, was withdrawn last week after igniting a furor among American Jews who found the ads demean American Jewish life as inferior. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu ordered the ads pulled after the criticism came to light. The campaign, which first came to the notice of the American Jewish public through a report on the weekly newscast of The Jewish Channel, a Jewish cable TV channel in the United States, has generated condemnations from the Anti-

Defamation League, the Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA), and scores of prominent writers for publications ranging from Politico and The Atlantic, to the gossip blog Gawker. “I don’t think I have ever seen a demonstration of Israeli contempt for American Jews as obvious as these ads,” said the Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg in a blog post responding to The Jewish Channel’s report, while the JFNA sent out a public e-mail from its leadership declaring the ads contain an “outrageous and insulting message.” The ad campaign targeted Israeli expatriates living in the United States, trying to get them to return to Israel. Consisting of billboards in at least five U.S.

cities and three different television commercials running on satellite TV channels featuring Israeli content, the ads declare in Hebrew “the time has come to return to Israel.” But it’s the message about why a return is worthwhile that has upset so many Americans. In one ad, an Israeli woman and her American boyfriend return to her apartment, where she has left a candle burning for Israeli Memorial Day, or Yom Hazikaron; her boyfriend misinterprets the candle as a romantic message, and the ad concludes with Hebrew text and voice-over saying “They will always remain Israelis; their Please see Ad, page 23.

Kathy Pattak did not have ovarian or breast cancer. Nevertheless, in 1999, she opted to have a hysterectomy, and in 2005, she underwent a prophylactic double mastectomy, as well. Pattak chose to have the procedures as preventative measures because genetic testing indicated she had an 87 percent chance of developing breast cancer, and a 25 percent chance of developing ovarian cancer, if she did not have the surgeries. “I have no regrets,” said the former physical education teacher from the Mt. Lebanon Area School Sistrict. “The key thing is you need to be proactive. You need to get the [genetic] testing. Then there are things you can do.” Pattak will be one of the featured speakers this Sunday, Dec. 11, at Rodef Shalom Congregation’s Jewish Family Concerns Series. The program, entitled “Through the Lens of Shmirat HaGuf (Taking Care of the Body): What You Need to Know about Jewish Genetic Diseases, ” begins at 10 a.m., and is open to the public. The program aims to educate its audience on the importance of Jewish genetic testing, focusing on screening for BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 gene mutations, which are predictors for breast and ovarian cancer, and which are prevalent among Ashkenazi Jews. “About one person in every 500 to 800 who are not Jewish have the mutation, compared to one out of every 40 for Ashkenazi Jews,” according to Megan Marshall, a genetic counselor who will be speaking Sunday at the program. While women in the general population have about an 8 percent chance of Please see Testing, page 23.

B USINES S 18/C L AS SIFIED 21/O BITUARIES 22/C OMMUNITY 17 O PINION 6/R EAL E STATE 20/S IMCHAS 16/S TYLE 10

Times To Remember

KINDLE SABBATH CANDLES: 4:35 p.m. EST. SABBATH ENDS: 5:38 p.m. EST.


2 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE

DECEMBER 8, 2011

Metro Milestones

Perman, Urecki celebrate 25 years on their pulpits BY LEE CHOTTINER Executive Editor

Two regional rabbis are celebrating milestone anniversaries on their respective pulpits this year. Sara Rae Perman, of Congregation Emanu-El Israel in Greensburg, is marking not only the 30th year of her rabbinate, but her 25th as the spiritual leader of the Westmoreland County congregation. To the south, Victor Urecki of B’nai Jacob Synagogue in Charleston, W.Va., is marking his 25th anniversary there. Perman, whose congregation recently celebrated her two milestones in addition to her 60th birthday, is a Reform rabbi, while Urecki, 50, was educated at Yeshiva University and now describes himself as a “traditional” or “post-denominational” Jew. Serving congregations some distance from any major urban area, both rabbis described how their rabbinates have evolved over the past quarter century as their congregations have also changed.

Perman, for instance, noted she is placing more emphasis on adult education these days as the number of young people in her community declines. “We have a lot less children in the religious Sara Rae Perman school,” she said, noting that the next b’nai mitzva won’t be until 2013. “I’ll have two that year [but] there were a couple years [in the past] when I had eight or nine a year.” And Urecki described how his traditionally observant congregation has evolved to reflect the changing demographics of Charleston Jews. For instance, several interfaith families now attend his synagogue when 25 years ago, “it was very rare,” he said. “Now that’s the norm.”

He also said the level of worship his members express runs the gamut from liberal to Orthodox. That diversity among his memis not bers something he created, Urecki Victor Urecki noted. It already existed. “When I came here, it wasn’t like I head to reinvent the wheel, it was already there.” Beyond the synagogue walls, Perman and Urecki are taking their rabbinates to the larger communities in which they live. Perman has taught religion at Seton Hill University and has participated in activities at the National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education, which is based on the Seton Hill campus. In Charleston, Urecki has twice delivered the commencement address at Charleston Catholic High School, where his own daughters attended and his wife teaches. He has engaged in religious forums with Christian clergy and the imam at the University of Charleston,

and he hopes to develop a regular meeting of Jewish, Christian and Muslim clergy during which each studies the others’ religious texts. “Those different eyes looking at different texts really enrich our understanding,” Urecki said. One program he’s particularly proud of is his Thursday Talmud study sessions, which, at first, he held, not at the synagogue, but at a downtown Charleston coffee shop. Many times during those classes, customers would overhear the discussion, recognize certain biblical phrases or parables and even pull up chairs and join the group. Today, several members of his weekly Talmud class are non-Jews. “We did that so people would know it’s not this weird book they’re hearing,” Urecki said. “They would listen in and we would invite them to join us.” Perman has a novel project of her own coming up. She plans to teach Judaism gastronomically. The eight-session class, called “The way to the heart of Judaism is through the stomach,” which begins Dec. 11, will look at Jewish food, kashrut (kosher) and blessings before and after the meals. Please see Rabbis, page 22.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011 — 3

METRO Briefly

Annie Jacobs Davis (left), known as “the mother of Montefiore Hospital,” is shown with her husband, Barnett Davis.

The Rauh Jewish Archives has posted a series of historic photos of Montefiore Hospital online at the Historic Pittsburgh website. It’s the latest series of photos depicting Jewish Pittsburgh’s past the Rauh has contributed to the online archive, which is maintained by the University of Pittsburgh. Other series show historic photos from the Irene Kaufmann Settlement and the Hebrew Institute of Pittsburgh. This latest series appears thanks to

funding from the Jewish Healthcare Foundation. Exactly 161 images — circa 1890 to 1988 — from the larger Montefiore Hospital collection of photographs, which was donated to the Rauh in 1997, have been digitized. Images in the online collection include shots of physicians, nurses, interns, and student nurses in formal groups and work settings, as well as the hospital board of trustees. Annie Jacobs Davis, known as “the mother of Montefiore Hospital,” is shown with her husband, Barnett Davis, with other women at a fundraising event for the hospital, and at a groundbreaking for the new hospital building in Oakland. There also are images depicting the gift shop and lunch counter run by the Ladies Hospital Aid Society, its members involved in organizational activities, a Passover seder and of the mashgiah (supervisor of the kosher kitchen). Rabbi J.J. Schacter will be the next speaker in the Conversations for a Jewish Future Speaker Series, Saturday, Dec. 17, 7:30 p.m., at the Jewish Community Center in Squirrel Hill. The topic of his lecture will be “Will there be a Jewish Religion in the Future of our Community?” The program will feature a second hour of small group discussions with four Pittsburgh rabbis focusing on different aspects of the Jewish future. The Agency for Jewish Learning is organizing those discussions. Please see Briefly, page 14.


4 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011

METRO Area foundation will award $1K grants to first-time Jewish campers BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

Young Pittsburghers, attending a Jewish overnight camp for the first time, are eligible to receive a onetime $1,000 grant to help cover their tuition. The grants are made possible by the Papernick Family Foundation, in partnership with the Jewish Federation’s Centennial Fund for a Jewish Future, and the Foundation for Jewish Camp. To qualify as a “Jewish” camp, the camps attended by grant recipients must “weave Jewish values, culture and traditions into the fabric of camp, helping campers to connect to their own identity and the larger Jewish community,” according to the website of the North American-run Foundation for Jewish Camp, which offers matching funds to local federations that participate in the One Happy Camper initiative. Campers must attend the camp for a minimum of 19 consecutive days. Camps on the approved list include Emma Kaufmann Camp, Camp Ramah, Young Judaea and NCSY. This is the third year that Pittsburgh’s Jewish children have been offered the One Happy Camper grants, according to Jeffrey Finkelstein, president and CEO of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh.

Jewish Federation photos

Jewish campers at Emma Kaufmann Camp, Morgantown, W.Va., engage in special activities and Shabbat services.

“We are trying to encourage families to send their children to Jewish camps to help strengthen their Jewish identity,” Finkelstein said. There is no cap on the number of grants to be awarded, according to Finkelstein. “We have always budgeted enough money to send every kid that applies,”

he said, “and we have done that again this year.” Children who have attended Jewish

overnight camp are more than twice as likely as noncampers to have a strong emotional attachment to Israel, almost twice as likely to attend synagogue on a monthly basis, and substantially more likely to light Shabbat candles, be synagogue members and donate to Jewish charities, according to a survey conducted by the Foundation for Jewish Camp in the summer of 2011. The One Happy Camper grants are intended to provide an incentive to those families who are less engaged in the Jewish community to try a Jewish camp for their children, rather than a secular camp or no camp at all, said Jeremy Fingerman, the CEO of the Fo u n d a t i o n for Jewish Camp. The hope is that, after providing an initial financial incentive to try a Jewish camp, families will continue to send their children to that camp in subsequent years. Please see Campers, page 20.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011 — 5


6 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011

The Jewish Chronicle

Opinion

David M. Caoin, CEO EDITORIAL STAFF Lee Chottiner, Executive Editor Angela Leibowicz, Community/ Web Editor Toby Tabachnick, Staff Writer SALES STAFF Susie Mangel, Senior Sales Associate Roberta Letwin, Sales Associate Donna Mink, Classified Sales PRODUCTION STAFF Dawn Wanninger, Production Manager Nancy Bishop Production Artist BUSINESS STAFF Joe Soloski, Comptroller Josh Reisner, Office Manager Marcy Kronzek, Subscriptions BOARD OF TRUSTEES Richard Kitay, President Cindy Goodman-Leib, Vice President Larry Honig, Secretary Andy Schaer, Treasurer Davida Fromm, Past President Carolyn Hess Abraham Brian Balk Daniel Berkowitz Lynn Cullen Milton Eisner Stephen Fienberg Malke Frank David Grubman Carolyn Hess Abraham Thomas Hollander Evan Indianer David Levine Ari Lightman Mitchell Pakler Amy Platt Benjamin Rosenthal Charles Saul Adam Shear Jonathan Wander Lou Weiss Published every Thursday by the Pittsburgh Jewish Publication and Education Foundation 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Phone: 412-687-1000 FAX: 412-521-0154 E-Mail: newsdesk@thejewishchronicle.net SUBSCRIPTION: $45 in Pennsylvania $47 East of the Mississippi $49 West of the Mississippi and FL NEWSSTAND PRICE $1.50 PER COPY POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE JEWISH CHRONICLE, 5915 BEACON ST., 3rd Floor PITTSBURGH, PA 15217 (PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS TO JEWISH TELEGRAPHIC AGENCY AND FEATURE SERVICE) USPS 582-740 Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to the Jewish Chronicle become the property of this publication, which is not responsible for the return or loss of such items. The Chronicle does not endorse the goods or services advertised in its pages and makes no representation to the kashrut of food products and services in said advertising. The publisher is not liable for damages if, for any reason whatsoever, he fails to publish an advertisement or for any error in an advertisement. Acceptance of advertisers and of ad copy is subject to the publisher’s approval. The Chronicle is not responsible if ads violate applicable laws and the advertiser will indemnify, hold harmless and defend the Chronicle from all claims made by governmental agencies and consumers for any reason based on ads appearing in the Chronicle.

The RJC’s misstep ne has to wonder what the Republican Jewish Coalition was thinking when it excluded maverick presidential candidate Ron Paul from its Dec. 7 candidates’ forum while extending invitations to the other six major GOP hopefuls. For those who don’t understand what’s at work here, Paul, a Republican congressman from Texas, a libertarian with a small “l” (who once ran for president in 1988 as the national Libertarian Party candidate), and a Pittsburgh native, holds controversial views on many issues, including Israel. He equates U.S. aid for Israel to corporate welfare. He claims the U.S. government intervenes too much in Israeli affairs and should just get out of the way of the Jewish state, even if it were attacked. He also claims the reasons for al-Qaida’s attacks on 9/11 had more to do with their belief that the United States occupies Arab lands and mistreats Palestinians than its distaste for American values and lifestyles. We don’t necessarily agree with Paul’s positions, but many Jews do, including some Jewish Republicans.

O

So what did the RJC — the organization that represents Jewish interests within the GOP — have to lose by including him in its forum? Excluding Paul sends an odious message to the electorate; it suggests that Jews aren’t interested in a free and open debate on Israel, that we can’t handle tough questions and uneasy answers, that the only positions we’re interested in hearing are the ones we like. Of course, all that is nonsense, as anyone who follows Israeli politics knows. Every position, from the extreme left to the extreme right is represented in the Jewish state — among Diaspora Jews, too. But there are Americans who are prepared to believe the worst about Jews, and the exclusion of Paul from the RJC forum played right into their hands. The impact will be felt most on college campuses where Jewish students are facing a strong, well-financed antiIsrael campaign and calls for “BDS” (boycotts, divestment and sanctions). The alternative would have been to let Paul take part in the forum, let him have his say — the same say he has had in many other debates — and likely no

harm to Israel or American Jews would have come. But RJC Executive Director Matt Brooks called Paul’s positions “misguided and extreme views” — particularly those regarding aid to Israel. Perhaps, but turning Paul into a political martyr certainly isn’t the answer. History teaches us that lesson many times over. Let’s be clear; this is not an attack on Jewish Republicans, whose positions on Israel and domestic affairs are just as valid as Jewish Democrats’ and Independents’. We would be just as taken aback had the National Jewish Democratic Council excluded a major candidate from one of its debates; there’s simply nothing to gain from such a move. The latest polls show Paul trailing Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney in Iowa leading up to that state’s first inthe nation caucus in January. Despite some early straw poll victories, he is not likely to be nominated, but thanks to the RJC, he became the beneficiary of more media attention than he could hope to receive had he participated in the forum. It didn’t have to be this way.

Obama and the do-something Congress ABBY WISSE SCHACHTER

President Obama has made it clear; he wants to channel Harry Truman and run for reelection against a do-nothing Congress. Only trouble is that Congress doesn’t want to oblige, and that includes Obama’s fellow Democrats. Take the recent vote on sanctions against Iran. The Senate passed legislation to sanction Iran’s central bank, which is the least the US can do in the face of Iranian intransigence, violence against a US ally, as when the British embassy compound in Tehran was sacked, and to punish Iran for continuing to plow full-steam ahead with development of a nuclear weapon. It was Democratic Senator Robert Menendez who highlighted the need for the sanctions. “Given what appears to be a shortening timeline until Iran has a potential nuclear weapon, it would seem that we are not doing enough fast enough,” said Sen. Menendez (D-N.J.). What is President Obama’s response? He’s threatening to veto the sanctions because it comes to his desk as part of a defense bill he doesn’t like. Who is the do-nothing is this scenario exactly? Stopping Iran from getting the bomb is an especially pressing issue for American Jews and those citizens for whom Israel’s safety is of primary concern. And yet, President Obama refuses to do the right thing when it comes to Tehran,

even when such a position has bipartisan support in Congress and it might even help shore up the President’s support among American Jewish voters, who are asking legitimate questions about his harsh stance toward Israel. When it comes to jobs, Obama likes to claim that he’s working on the problem while the Congress is waiting on the sidelines. Obama’s latest fancy is energy efficiency through retrofitting older buildings. His private-public partnership plan called the Better Buildings Initiative is supposed to create tens of thousands of new jobs. “We can’t wait for Congress to act, so I’m directing all federal agencies to make at least $2 billion worth of energy efficiency upgrades over the next two years,” Obama said. Funny, but President Obama just killed 20,000 new jobs because he opposes certain domestic energy development on ideological grounds (it isn’t wind or solar) and it makes one of his special interest groups happy (extremist environmentalists). The Keystone XL pipeline would have been a jobs boom and an energy shot in the arm, but the route was opposed by environmentalists, who were getting restless because Obama hasn’t been the ecowarrior they want. To placate this constituency, and to get celebrity “experts” like Daryl Hannah off his front lawn, Obama said the pipeline wouldn’t go forward before “further review” sometime in 2013. Now it is some members of Congress who are pushing to have the administration do the unnecessary review in 60 days rather than waiting another year, and after the election. So far the White House has been silent and likely won’t say anything at all unless the legislation ends up on Obama’s desk. Finally, to take an issue that is sup-

posed to be right in President Obama’s wheelhouse, let’s look at what’s going on with immigration. This president promised voters that he’d prioritize immigration reform, he hasn’t. President Obama claims that immigration reform has to be done by the Congress and though he’d like to “do it on his own” that he’s got to wait for the supposedly deadlocked Senate and House to pass comprehensive immigration reform. In the meantime, President Obama made the political decision to slow the deportation process to a near-complete halt because after having deported hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens (as the law demands), the White House realized it had better do something to appeal to Latino voters by changing its practices. After all, Obama isn’t used to getting booed, but that’s just what happened in March in El Paso, Texas when Obama brought up his administration’s immigration enforcement policies. The administration announced last month that some 300,000 deportation cases would be re-reviewed by a joint panel from two separate agencies (that has to be created from scratch) making it very likely that deportations will not happen in any significant number through the next election. Congress meanwhile is actually passing legislation on the issues it can agree on. For example, the rules for temporary skilled-labor visas were changed in recent legislation doing away with country-specific quotas. Now, if there are more applications for temporary highskilled work permits from India, as many applicants as apply can be approved. Unfortunately, Congress didn’t do away with the limitation on the annual number of high-skilled work visas it Please see Wisse Schachter, page 8.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011 — 7

OPINION

Letters to the editor We invite you to submit letters for publication. Letters must include name, address and daytime phone number; addresses and phone numbers will not be published. Letters may not exceed 400 words and may be edited for length and clarity; they cannot be returned. Mail, fax or e-mail letters to: letters@thejewishchronicle.net via e-mail : via fax:

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During my father’s last day, my mother and I sat at his bedside holding his hands. Throughout the day, many staff members came in to say goodbye to Dad. Their warmth toward him was clearly heartfelt. And they gave my mother and me great comfort and good advice. So thank you for having such a great staff for those who need it. Russellyn S. Carruth Oakland

Great care My father, Robert Jones, died Oct. 20 at the age of 93 from the complications of Alzheimer’s disease. He was a resident of Allderdice Unit at Charles Morris since 2008, and before that, he was in the Arbor Unit. In his last months, he was also enrolled in Sivitz Hospice. Our family is very grateful for the excellent care Dad received over the years. The front-line staff who cared for him are very capable and treated him with warmth and fondness, which meant a lot to us. Between us, we visited my Dad almost every day, so we had the opportunity to observe that they treat all the residents with competence and compassion. It is a great group — supervisors, nurses, activity directors, attendants, physical therapists and other therapists, hospice staff, social workers. Even the housekeeping staff always have an eye out for residents’ safety and welfare, plus a smile and friendly word. We have recommended Charles Morris to several friends and acquaintances because of the wonderful care provided by your employees.

Unjust policy I just wanted to thank you so much for your marvelous Nov. 10 editorial, “Papers Please.” Since my middle daughter, Roni, was born in 1998 in Jerusalem, we have tried unsuccessfully to get the American government to recognize her birth as an “Israeli” rather than a “Jerusalemite,” but to no avail. To this day, her birth certificate still reads, “Roni Weil, born in Jerusalem, No Country.” It is insulting, unjust and inconsistent with U.S. policy that has always recognized Israeli sovereignty over west Jerusalem, where she was born. Aaron Weil Squirrel Hill (The author is executive director and CEO of the Edward and Rose Berman Hillel Jewish University Center.)

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8 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011

OPINION

UNESCO fuels cultural conflict between Israel, Palestinians Guest Columnist ANAV SILVERMAN It is a clear blue and busy day in the holy city of Hebron. A small crowd of press gathers around Israeli Minister Yuli Edelstein outside the Tomb of Patriarchs. A bar mitzva celebration is taking place and a procession of musicians lead the Israeli family whose son is celebrating his coming of age to the world’s most ancient Jewish site. Meanwhile, a group of Mennonite Christians from North Carolina makes its way up the steps to the tombs, while a local Palestinian tour guide leads a group of Germans to a tourist shop selling handmade pottery nearby. Beyond the rather picturesque scene in Hebron today, conflict rears its head elsewhere. Now that the Palestinians are accepted as UNESCO’s 195th member, they can apply for World Heritage classification for cultural sites they deem exclusively theirs. Such sites would be protected by the United Nations and could receive funding from UNESCO for restoration. The Israeli minister’s visit last Monday came in light of Palestinian attempts to persuade UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) to declare the Cave of Patriarchs as a World Heritage Site belonging to Palestinians only. Also known as Ma’arat HaMachpela in Hebrew and the Ibrahim Mosque in Arabic, Edelstein declared that Israel “was now more motivated than ever to show that the connection of the Jewish people to the site goes back thousands of years ago.” The cave houses the tombs of the patriarchs and matriarchs of the Jewish

people: Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Rebecca and Leah. According to the Bible’s Book of Genesis, Chapter 23, Abraham purchased the cave and the adjoining field from Ephron the Hittite, to bury his wife Sarah there. Late last month marked the anniversary of Sarah’s death as recorded in the biblical portion read in synagogues across the world. More than 20,000 Jews from Israel and abroad visited Hebron to pay homage to the first matriarch of the Jewish people. UNESCO has worked tirelessly to undermine Israel’s cultural and historical connection to holy sites. In November 2010, the agency classified Rachel’s Tomb, the third holiest site in Judaism as a mosque, Bilal bin Rabah Mosque, “an integral part of the occupied Palestinian territories.” A study of Palestinian Authority school textbooks in 2008, however found that the site was never referred to as such, and instead was known as the “Dome of Rachel,” until 2001,

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when the term, Bilal bin Rabah Mosque suddenly emerged in new educational textbooks. According to the Palestinian Minister of Tourism Khouloud Daibes Abu Dayyeh, in addition to Hebron, the Palestinians are also asking UNESCO to recognize 19 other sites in the Holy Land to be incorporated as Palestinian World Heritage Sites including Jericho and Bethlehem. Franciscans in charge of Bethlehem’s holy places do not want UNESCO to designate Christian shrines in the city as Palestinian World Heritage Sites. Father Pierbattista Pizzaballa told the Italian bishops’ news agency, SIR, that the Greek Orthodox and Armenian patriarchates have asked the Palestinian Authority to exclude the Church of the Nativity from the UNESCO application. “The holy places may be used for political reasons … we do not want to be exploited for issues in which the holy places must not be involved,” Pizzaballa was quoted as saying. The Catholic Franciscans fear that UNESCO recognition will make it difficult for the church to run the holy sites because the sites would be under the jurisdiction of UNESCO and would have to abide by the agency’s rules. Meanwhile, Edelstein believes that the current Palestinian Authority government is trying to excommunicate Israel from the Jewish site. “They want to wipe out our ties, and any Jewish trace from this area,” he said. Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, during his address to the U.N. General Assembly in September, referred to the entire Holy Land, as the

Wisse Schachter: Continued from page 6. can approve, which is what Microsoft, Mayor Mike Bloomberg and other business leaders have been asking to happen for years. But at least changing the quota system is a place where there was bipartisan support for a common-sense reform, and Congress got it done. Not much you can say that makes common sense about the Obama administration approach meanwhile. President Obama is right to be

“land of Palestine, the land of the Prophet Muhammad and the birthplace of Jesus,” no mention of Jewish history. “We don’t want to exclude anyone from holy sites in Israel,” Edelstein emphasized. “Under Israeli policy, Christian, Muslim and Jewish sites have always been open to people of all faiths.” For about 700 years, Jews were forbidden to enter the Cave of Patriarchs, following a Muslim Mameluk decree that restricted Jews from praying past the seventh step leading to the entrance. The Mameluks, who captured Hebron following the Byzantines and Crusaders in the 13th century, declared the structure a mosque, which non-Muslims could not enter. During the British mandate, the Jews were still forbidden inside the tombs to pray, although a Jewish presence had always been maintained in the city prior to British rule. When Jordan seized control of the area in 1948 during Israel’s War of Independence, the Jordanians forbade the Jews from even living in the city and built an animal pen on the ruins of the ancient Avraham Avinu Synagogue built in the 16th century by the Jewish community then. It was only in 1967, after Israel’s Six Day War, that Jews were allowed into Hebron again. Following Israeli control of the Tomb of Patriarchs, arrangements were made to enable Moslems and Jews to worship and pray in an orderly manner on the basis of mutual respect. The tomb’s Isaac and Rebekah Hall, the largest and most important hall to Judaism and Islam, as it contains the Mimbar (Imam’s Pulpit) is kept exclusively for Moslem prayers. Jewish services cannot take place in that particular hall except for 10 days during the year on special holidays and occasions. “Only under Israeli rule can we be sure that this open policy continues,” said Edelstein. “We want to continue to ensure that people of all faiths have access to holy sites here in Israel and can worship freely at them.” Walid, the local Palestinian tour guide in Hebron on the day of Edelstein’s visit, thinks differently. “We will have peace here once we get the Jews out of this city,” he adamantly declared, as his group of German tourists lingered in the pottery shops a few feet away from the Cave of Patriarchs. (Anav Silverman is an educator at the Hebrew University’s Secondary School of Education in Jerusalem. She has written for the BBC, Huffington Post, The Center for Near East Policy Research and Sderot Media Center.)

campaigning for his own re-election, and he even has a significant advantage this time out that he didn’t have three years ago, an actual record. He might want to start making the case for why he should get four more years on that basis. The reality is that Congress isn’t donothing; it’s just not doing what Obama wants. (Abby Wisse Schachter is a Pittsburghbased political columnist who authors the New York Post’s politics blog Capitol Punishment (nypost.com/blogs/capitol). Email her at awschachter@aol.com.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011 — 9

OPINION Fallible Infiltrated by CIA spies, Hezbollah takes hits to its prestige, reveals its weaknesses Guest Columnist LEE SMITH WASHINGTON — In June, Hezbollah announced that it had captured two, perhaps three, CIA spies who had infiltrated its organization. Last week, the story finally made headlines in the U.S. press. According to some former U.S. officials, Hezbollah may have identified as many as a dozen CIA informants within its organization. This is only the agency’s latest setback at the hands of a terrorist organization. In December 2009, an al-Qaida suicide bomber killed seven CIA officers at an American compound in Afghanistan. In April 1983, a Hezbollah car bomb destroyed the U.S. embassy in Beirut, killing 60 people, including 17 Americans, eight of whom were CIA employees. Given the agency’s track record, very few intelligence and Middle East experts were surprised by last week’s revelation that the CIA had been handed another loss in the region. But the analysts have gotten it wrong on the bottom line. Though most experts and commentators are making this out to be bad for the CIA — and many current and former U.S. officials believe it is — it’s actually Hezbollah that comes out the big loser. Hezbollah’s entire prestige is built on the idea that it is a highly disciplined organization that is nearly impossible to infiltrate. Indeed, Hezbollah General Secretary Hassan Nasrallah’s June speech announcing that Hezbollah had rolled up CIA assets was the party’s first public admission that it had been compromised by hostile services. Hezbollah, said Nasrallah, had the “courage to confront the truth.” The truth is that no matter how many American spies Hezbollah ultimately captured, being infiltrated by a hostile clandestine service is evidence of weakness. Moreover, as the Cold War showed, uncovering moles may result in tighter security measures, but the fact that they went unnoticed in the first place almost invariably demoralizes any organization built on loyalty and secrecy. In the 1960s and ’70s, paranoia crippled the CIA’s head of counterintelligence, James Jesus Angleton, after he became convinced that the agency had been penetrated by Soviet agents. In Hezbollah’s case, the damage will likely be worse, because this incident exposes the utter falsehood of the party of God’s divinely fashioned self-mythology. Nonetheless, Hezbollah officials are putting up a good front. “The resistance blinded American intelligence eyes,” one Hezbollah member of Lebanese parliament said last week. Perhaps he’s right — even as there are plenty of good reasons for the American intelligence community to encourage Hezbollah to think it bested the CIA. But contrary to its reputation, Hezbollah may be more vulnerable to hostile clandestine services than any organization in the history of espionage. Hassan Nasrallah certainly thinks so. Unique among world leaders,

Nasrallah lives in hiding. He has spent the last five years since the end of the party’s 2006 war with Israel bunkered underground because he fears his organization is so porous that the Israelis have a good shot at assassinating him. Other recent intelligence triumphs against Hezbollah include Israel destroying most of the party’s long- and mediumrange missiles within the first few hours of the 2006 war. Perhaps most spectacularly, Hezbollah’s legendary commander, Imad Mugniyeh, was assassinated in February 2008 in the middle of Damascus. Then there was an Israeli spy ring that penetrated Hezbollah. And even though more than 100 people have been detained by Hezbollah and arrested by Lebanese security forces for espionage since April 2009, things keep blowing up — literally — in Hezbollah strongholds. Maybe the blast last week at a Hezbollah arms depot in Tyre was just an accident. Or perhaps it was a timely reminder that there are plenty of hostile assets still operating successfully in some of Hezbollah’s most sensitive areas. It is best, then, to treat Hezbollah’s Spartan reputation with a grain of salt. Unfortunately, many Western experts legitimize the party’s propaganda. For instance, Hezbollah leadership denied for many years that Mughniyeh had any official relationship to the organization. It was bad enough that researchers and journalists swallowed the party’s line. But even after Hezbollah buried Mughniyeh with full honors — not merely as a Hezbollah martyr, but as a pillar of the party’s revered leadership — regional experts never stopped to wonder: If Hezbollah lied about that, maybe they were lying about other things as well. Obviously, Hezbollah, like all security and intelligence institutions, dissimulates. What’s different about Hezbollah is that its fictions are the foundation of a self-image that touches not only on earthly matters, but on heavenly ones as well. The CIA is the intelligence service of a regular state; it is designed and ruled by human beings and therefore imperfect in its very nature. Hezbollah, however, is not a regular political organization, but the party of God. The arms of the resistance are sacred, entrusted with the duty of liberating Jerusalem,

and its victories, like the 2006 war, are divine. But as it turns out, Hezbollah is not divine. It’s in fact quite flawed. And so, the CIA story comes as another blow in a series of shocks to the Islamic resistance’s prestige. Only credulous Western media sources believe that Hezbollah won a “divine victory” over Israel in 2006. The Shiite community in southern Lebanon knows better, which is why tens of thousands of them tried to flee when a rocket was fired from their area during the middle of Cast Lead in 2008-09. Even Hezbollah knows it is deterred, which is why the border with Israel has been relatively quiet since then. On the domestic front, Hezbollah isn’t faring much better. In 2009, a financier close to the party and nicknamed the Lebanese Madoff was found to have stolen more than half a billion dollars from the Shiite community. Hezbollah’s May 2008 attack on Sunni neighborhoods in Beirut and on Druze regions in the mountains sullied the resistance — through the use of weapons that, according to Hezbollah mythology, are only to

be used against the Zionist invaders, not fellow Lebanese. Even more significantly, Hezbollah has been named in the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri. In August, the Special Tribunal for Lebanon indicted four Hezbollah operatives, including two of Mughniyeh’s brothers-in-law, for their role in the killing. In other words, the party of God stands accused of murdering one of the Middle East’s major Sunni leaders, which puts Hezbollah in a dangerous position with its Sunni neighbors inside Lebanon and around the region. It certainly doesn’t help the party’s reputation that its Syrian patron, President Bashar al-Assad, has been slaughtering members of the Sunni-majority uprising in neighboring Syria. Without Assad, Hezbollah will lose its supply lines. Even with Assad fighting to survive, circumstances are trying for Hezbollah. In the eyes of the regional Sunni majority, the regime in Damascus and Hezbollah are no longer Arabs at war with Israel — they are minorities, killing fellow Arabs on behalf of the Iranians. It’s true the CIA has made plenty of mistakes in Beirut over the last several decades, and the U.S. intelligence community may have blundered badly in this instance, too. And yet, no one knows exactly the parameters of the game now under way in Lebanon, where a number of regional and international actors — including, among others, Syria, Iran, Saudi Arabia, France, Israel and the United States — all have a stake in the outcome. All we know for certain is that the timing is bad for Hezbollah, divine no more.

(Lee Smith, a senior editor at the Weekly Standard and a fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, is the author of “The Strong Horse: Power, Politics, and the Clash of Arab Civilizations.” This column previously appeared on the Jewish news site, Tablet.)


10 - THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011

Style iller’s only novel ‘Focus’ holds up as timeless condemnation of anti-Semitism BY HILARY DANINHIRSCH Chronicle Correspondent

Arthur Miller is best known for being a playwright (and perhaps second best for being Marilyn Monroe’s husband), but many readers may not realize that he penned only one novel: “Focus,” written in 1945, which was made into a movie in 2001, starring William H. Macy, Laura Dern and David Paymer. The son of Polish-Jewish immigrants, Miller grew up in Harlem and then later in Brooklyn. Until his death in 2005, Miller wrote essays and plays, many of which explored man’s struggle with personal or societal conflict. “Focus” is no exception, and it does not dance around its subject. It is a smack-in-your-face diatribe against anti-Semitism. In the waning days of World War II, the protagonist, Larry Newman, is a personnel manager at a large corporation in Manhattan, though he lives in Brooklyn with his wheelchair-bound mother. Never married, the middle-aged Newman hires the “wrong” secretary (i.e., she is Jewish). His boss gives him a warning and suggests he gets glasses. When he puts his glasses on, he suddenly “looks” Jewish. From that point on, his life becomes complicated, to say the least, and it doesn’t help that he has a Jewish-sounding surname. He is refused service at hotels, people are now staring at him, and his garbage cans are kicked over, all because people think he is a “Sammy.” Newman is thus in the unique position of experiencing antiSemitism firsthand, even though he is not Jewish and in fact, is somewhat antiSemitic himself. When Newman becomes a target for this violence on the mistaken assumption that he is a Jew, his whole world spirals out of control. This perspective, seeing anti-Semitism through one who is experiencing it, even though it is misdirected, is a brilliant tool used by Miller as social commentary. In a twist of irony — one of many in the book — Newman marries Gertrude

Book Review “Focus,” by Arthur Miller, 1984 (new release with introduction by Miller), Penguin Putnam, 217 pages

Hart, a woman he doesn’t hire because he thinks she is Jewish (though she is not). His opinion of her changes when he finds out her true identity: “As a Jewess she had seemed dressed in cheap taste, too gaudily. But as a gentile, he found her merely colorful in the same dress, a woman who expressed her spirited nature in her clothes. As a Jewess she had seemed vitriolic and pushy and he had hated himself even as he was drawn fearfully to her, but now he no longer feared her for now his love could flow unstained by the guilt of loving what his dignity had always demanded he look down upon.” Gertrude is everything he is not and through her, he loses his inhibitions, though paradoxically, that ultimately gives him the strength to be true to his character. N e w m a n ’ s neighbor Fred is part of the Christian Front, a KKK-like organization that uses threats and violence to intimidate Jews. Newman and Fred initially share a tentative friendship until Fred starts to believe that Newman is a Jew. The only actual Jew in the neighborhood is Finkelstein, a shop owner. Arthur Miller Though Finkelstein isn’t particularly religious, he functions not only as a target of the Christian Front, but also as a symbol for the attempted assimilation of Jews into America. Shocked to see that Finkelstein does not fit the stereotype (neither he nor his home or storefront are “dirty,” he is not cheap and has never cheated his

Miller refers to his main character as Mr. Newman, while others are referred to by their first names, perhaps as irony since Newman is the one who is being disrespected by society. T h e glasses put Newman’s life into

customers), Newman begins to see the light toward book’s end: “Newman looked around the kitchen as he stood with his hand holding down the compress. The room was astonishingly clean. It’s true, he thought, the Jews are a sanitary people. And then it occurred to him that they were supposed to be dirty.” Eventually, hating a person because of his religion or race or any random categorization seems pretty ridiculous to Newman by book’s end: “ … He longed deeply for a swift change of lightning that would with a fiery stroke break away the categories of people and change them so that it would not be important to them what tribe they sprang from.”

focus in more ways than one — he sees how others see him and he sees others with a wider, truer lens. He also learns that things are not always how they seem. The characters in the book are more characterizations than real people, used as a vessel in this fulmination against anti-Semitism. As it long preceded the Civil Rights Movement, it was a bold book at the time that it was written, and today, it still works as both a riveting read and a history lesson for those who grew up in more modern times, thinking of New York as the quintessential melting pot and not a hotbed of racism against Jews. (Hilary Daninhirsch can be reached at hdaninhirsch@gmail.com.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011 — 11

BOOKS ‘Torah Garden’ poses stubborn Jewish questions through poet’s eyes Book Review

BY JUDITH ROBINSON For the Chronicle

Philip Terman’s new poetry collection, “The Torah Garden,” reflects a local writer who is deeply concerned with what most of us know as well as the palms of our hands: the many struggles encountered living as Jews in America — and the turbulent world — in the beginning of what appears to be the very challenging 21st century. “The Torah Garden” addresses, through poetry, some of the most difficult issues confronting contemporary Jews. Terman explores the tension between a heritage rich with commandments as well as proscriptions for living, and the ways in which that unique religious and cultural heritage impact who we are and how we can manage to live in this time and place.

Book Review “The Torah Garden,” by Philip Terman, Autumn House Press, 2011.

The work is informed by the integration, in one voice, of a skilled poet thoroughly at home in the mainstream culture of America, as well as that of the thoughtful, Toraheducated Jew. Issues emerge in his ongoing attempt to blend, to integrate, to re-inform himself of his duties, his obligations, his longings. Would it surprise you to know that in these vivid pages we meet Terman’s mother, his grandfather, his Uncle Hy, Moses, Kings David and Solomon, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, poets Osip Mandlestam and Robert Frost? That he finds himself at once connected and disconnected from his Judaism, from Israel? That he cares deeply and asks earnestly what G-d expects of him? These are matters we know of. Terman’s talent lies in the eloquent mirroring of ourselves —the rendering of our deepest feelings about identity and purpose. There is also a section of “The Torah Garden” that deals with the tragic loss of Terman’s brother, Bruce. This is “Part Two: To a Scientist Dying Young.” There are seven poems, beginning with “The Accident,” and ending with “Speaking to the Woman With My Brother’s Heart,” that take us through the harrowing experience of premature death of a precious loved one —

on their shared past, Terman, an English professor at Clarion University and co-president of B’nai Abraham Congregation in Butler, addresses Bruce in “What We Own”: “ ... and we own the whole country we passed through, all the way to the ocean, . . . and I remember how quiet you were, and I asked about it, and you said it’s a feeling you get ... ... Oh, my brother of the other world, my brother who will perhaps greet me when I arrive at that place prepared for by our father, who is now joined by his own flesh and blood, which is not blood, which is not flesh, but bones and perhaps spirit, which we believe in, like the moon, or the unpredictable Cleveland weather, or the way the snow descends on the fallen leaves, or how the sun glazes them now, for their moment, stirred in the slight wind, the same wind that blew the Jerusalem dust in our faces, which we own.” Thank you for taking us with you, too, Philip Terman.

the shock, the searing grief of separation, the limitations and blessings of memory, the anger, the Jewish ways of mourning, the yearnings for some form of immortality. As a brother in mourning, reflecting

(Judith Robinson, who blogs about the Jewish Pittsburgh poetry scene for the Chronicle — “Good Poems”— can be reached at Pghdazzler@aol.com.)


12 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011

THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011 — 13


14 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011 —

METRO Briefly Continued from page 3. Jewish thought at Yeshiva University, Schacter is former dean of the Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik Institute in Boston and former rabbi of the Maimonides Minyan in Brookline, Mass. He has written and edited several books, articles and reviews in Hebrew and English, has taught at Harvard University and Yeshiva’s Stern College for Women, and has directed Yeshiva’s Torah Umadda Project. The rabbis participating in the discussions following Schacter’s lecture, and their topics, are: • Rabbi Daniel Yolkut, Congregation Poale Zedek, “Opportunity and Obligation: Halacha as a Guarantee of the Jewish Future”; • Rabbi Aaron Bisno, Rodef Shalom Congregation, “The Future of Pittsburgh Judaism — A Perspective from the Left”; • Rabbi Jonathan Perlman, New Light Congregation, “What is in a Name? The Death of Denominationalism”; and • Rabbi Yisroel Altein, Chabad of Squirrel Hill, “Key to the Future — Study or Action?” The series is a Jewish Federation program in partnership with the AJL and funded by the Centennial Fund for a Jewish Future, an endowment campaign of the federation’s Jewish Com-

munity Foundation. Schacter’s visit is in partnership with Congregation Poale Zedek. There is a charge for the session. Register online at jfedpgh.org/conversations.aspx, or contact Amy Karp at (412) 521-1101 Ext. 3204 or akarp@ajlpittsburgh.org for more information. Dan Ben-David, an Israeli economist, will speak Thursday, Dec. 15, 7 p.m., at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh, Squirrel Hill. His presentation is titled “Israel: The Threat from Within.” The Community Relations Council of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh is sponsoring his appearance. The program will address Israel’s unprecedented rate of academic emigration, the decline in its education system, how many Israelis are disengaging themselves from society and the country’s low employment rate. Ben-David is executive director of the Taub Center for Social Policy Studies in Israel, which provides the country’s leading policy makers and the general public with perspective and policy options in the economic and social spheres. He also is a professor of public policy at Tel Aviv University, and a past advisor to the World Bank and to the Director-General’s Office at the World Trade Organization. The program is free to the public, but space is limited. Register at jfedpgh.org or contact Nancy Hruska at (412) 9925233 or nhruska@jfedpgh.org.

Rabbi Alvin Berkun, emeritus of Tree of Life*Or L’Simcha Congregation, will lead the weekly current events class, Friday, Dec. 9, from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh’s AgeWell’s Adult Department, room 307. The program is free to the community. Contact Nicole Mezare at (412) 5218011 Ext. 278 or nmezare@jccpgh.org for more information. Deborah Friedman, executive director of Jewish Residential Services, will address the Squirrel Hill Historical Society on the history of her agency, Tuesday, Dec. 13, 7:30 p.m. at Church of the Redeemer, 5700 Forbes Ave. Contact Mike at (412) 417-3707 or visit squirrelhillhistory.org for more information. Hadassah, Greater Pittsburgh Chapter will mark the Hadassah centennial with birthday celebrations at local senior care facilities, which will include updates of the Sarah Wetsman Davidson Tower, and the latest medical research at Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem. The Hadassah Chapter past presidents, headed by Sondra Glasser, will be the party organizers. The schedule for this month’s celebrations is: Dec. 7, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Riverview Towers; Dec. 8, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Schenley Gardens; Dec. 14, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Forward Shady apartments; Dec. 26, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Weinberg Pavilion and Charles Morris Nursing and Rehabilitation Center; and Dec. 29, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Lighthouse Point. Rodef Shalom Sisterhood and Beth Shalom are jointly sponsoring a 2011-2012 winter film series. “The World of Shalom Aleichem,” a compilation of three different plays

based on the stories by the famed Yiddish writer, will be screened Sunday, Dec. 11, at 7:30 p.m., at Rodef Shalom Congregation, Levy Hall. There is no charge but a small donation is suggested. Light refreshments will be served. Rodef Shalom Discussion Group presents “The Future of Higher Education” with Alan Lesgold, dean of the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Education, Thursday, Dec. 22, at 10:30 a.m. There is a charge for the discussion and lunch. Reservations are not required. Rodef Shalom Brotherhood sponsors the program.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, will give an insider’s perspective titled, “The court as an American Institution Today, and its Shaping of the Future,” Sunday, Dec. 11, as part of the 92nd St. Y series, “Making Our Democracy Work.” The program, which originates live from New York, will be broadcasted to Temple Sinai, where a community study session, led by Rabbi James Gibson, will be held. The study session begins at 6:45 p.m. followed by the program at 7:30 p.m. Breyer, one of three Jewish justices on the high court, will discuss what it must do to maintain public confidence and interpret the Constitution in a way that works in practice, and discusses the relationship between the court and the president, Congress, administrative agencies and the states — along with the role each plays in our democracy. There is a charge for admission. Tickets are available at the door. College students are free with valid ID. Visit templesinaipgh.org/92nd-streety/ for more information.

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011 — 15


16 — HE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011

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Witt/Schwartzman: Mr. and Mrs. Tom Witt announce the engagement of their daughter, Anney, to Brad Schwartzman, son of Alan and Mindy Schwartzman of Hamden, Conn. Anney’s grandparents are the late Rose and Dave Frank and Marian and Al Witt. Brad’s grandparents are Audrey and the late Eugene Kushner, Norman and Roslyn Schwartzman and Marilyn and Mark Gredinger.

Weddings

Gillespies’ home. Gwen’s attendants were her sister, Laura Gillespie; the bridegroom’s sisters Arin Levine Keough and Laura Herman; and friends Claire Hawley, Julie Hein and Kelly Hopkins. Josh’s groomsmen were Pittsburgh friends Elan Fessler, Louie Barr, Eli Dolgansky and Lyle Dresbold; brotherin-law Ryan Keough; and Gwen’s brother-in-law, Michael Martinez. Nieces Ella Martinez, and Gabrielle and Natalie Keough were flower girls and nephews Spencer and Jackson Martinez were ring bearers. Gwen graduated from Trinity College in Connecticut and Case Western Reserve School of Law in Cleveland. She is an associate with the firm of Calfee, Halter and Griswold, LLP in Cleveland. Josh graduated from Indiana University and is a project manager with MRN, Ltd., in Cleveland. After a honeymoon in Bali and Thailand, Gwen and Josh are at home with their dog, Canus, in Shaker Heights, Ohio.

B’nai Mitzva Nathan Lev Wecht, son of David N. and Valerie Wecht, will become a bar mitzva Saturday, Dec. 10, at Adat Shalom. Grandparents are Sigrid and Cyril Wecht and the late Melvin and Jane Lovenz.

Gillespie/Herman: Patricia Cluss and Jeff Herman of Squirrel Hill announce the marriage of their son, Joshua Herman, to Gwen Gillespie, daughter of Ann and Robert Gillespie of Gates Mills, Ohio, Aug. 20. Bruce Akers, mayor of Pepper Pike, Ohio, officiated at the outdoor ceremony at the

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011 — 17

Community A

Outstanding volunteers

An evening of baking

C L Congregation Beth Shalom photo

O S

Congregation Beth Shalom recognized four outstanding volunteers at its Annual Awards Brunch. From left are Joel Greenhouse, Helen Feder, Elinor Young and Julian Elbling.

Jew’colades COMPILED BY ANGELA LEIBOWICZ Community/Web Editor

E R L O O

Amen Corner, a civic association celebrating its 141st year, will present its first Excellence in Leadership award to Cyril Wecht, M.D., J.D., in recognition of his many years of dedicated service as a physician, lawyer, scholar and public servant. The award was presented at the Association’s holiday event Cyril Wecht Wednesday evening, Dec. 7, at the Mansions on Fifth. Amen Corner has no religious or political affiliations; it supports persons and organizations for their civic contributions.

(Angela Leibowicz can be reached at angelal@thejewishchronicle.net.)

APPLE LATKES From smittenkitchen.com Included in this posting were some tips worth repeating: Keeping latkes in a warm oven doesn’t only keep them crisp for a long time after baking, but helps even out any uneveness from pan-frying. Well-seasoned cast iron skillets make the brownest, crispiest latkes. Makes 12 2- to 3-inch latkes 1 pound tart, firm apples such as Granny Smiths (2 large or 3 medium) 1 tablespoon lemon juice 6 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon granulated sugar 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon baking powder 2 large eggs Butter (about 2 tablespoons) Rich plain yogurt, sour cream or crème fraîche for serving Preheat oven to 200 degrees and place a baking sheet inside. Peel and core apples and then grate them, either on the large holes of a box grater or in a food processor, on the shredding blade. (If you use the food processor, lay the apple chunks the long way if you want longer strands.) Transfer to a clean dishtowel or cheesecloth sling and wring out as much juice as you can into a small bowl. Set it aside if you wish to make a dessert sauce with it later. Transfer grated apple to a medium bowl and toss with lemon juice. In a small dish, whisk flour, sugar, cinnamon and baking powder and toss with the apples, coating them evenly. Whisk eggs in this small dish until lightly beaten and stir into apple-lemon-flour mixture. Heat a large cast-iron skillet to medium with 1 tablespoon butter. Once it has coated the pan, drop tablespoons full of apple batter in little piles, gently pressing them a bit flatter with a spatula. Fry until they are nicely brown underneath, about 3 to 5 minutes, then flip and continue to cook until they are browned and crisp. Drain briefly on paper towels and transfer to preheated oven to keep warm. Add a pat of the remaining butter for each new batch in the pan, and repeat with remaining batter. You can keep apple latkes in the oven for up to an hour.

K

Emily Gorby and Hannah Frank of the Keystone Mountain Region BBYO have been appointed to serve on the BBYO Teen Leadership Network for one year. Emily is a junior at Fox Chapel Area Senior High School and serves Keystone Mountain Region BBYO as Morah (member-in-training mom for the girls division, known as BBG). Her position will help lead the BBYO Connect program in Keystone Mountain Region. BBYO Connect’s mission is to create a community of Jewish sixth-, seventhand eighth-graders through social and

meaningful experiences that will serve as a gateway to continued involvement in Jewish life. Hannah, a junior at Woodland Hills Senior High School in Churchill, is currently the Regional N’siah (BBG president) of Keystone Mountain Region BBYO, and will serve as the Speak UP education expert. Speak UP is a global Israel advocacy campaign that engages Jewish teens across the nation to get more involved in pro-Israel activism. Keystone Mountain Region BBYO has eight chapters in 13 separate communities in Greater Pittsburgh and plans are under way to expand into other communities as well as Morgantown, W.Va. Contact Chuck Marcus, senior program director at (412) 421-2626 or cmarcus@bbyo.org to learn about BBYO and the Keystone Mountain Region.

Fox Chapel Chabad photo

Jill Horvat, on left, and Cindy Vayonis enjoy an evening of “Loaves of Love” challa baking at the Chabad Fox Chapel Womens Circle.


18 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011 — 19

GLOBE Briefly

2,000 young Jews can visit Israel thanks to American billionaire

JointMedia News Service

Jewish-American billionaire Sheldon Adelson has doubled his annual donation to the Taglit-Birthright organization, which sends more young Jews to tour Israel each summer and winter, the Jerusalem Post reported. According to Adelson’s wife Miriam, the couple couldn’t bear seeing thousands and thousands of young adults who wanted to visit Israel not able to go so they increased their 2011 gift to $10 million. “Greater participation means we can change the lives of more young adults,” Sheldon Adelson she said. In total Adelson has given more than $100 million to the program. Thanks to the additional donation this year, an additional 2,000 students who applied but were waitlisted will now be able to go, according to the Israel National News. “This year alone, the Adelsons will enable a total of 4,000 young adults to visit Israel. These are 4,000 lives changed. These are 4,000 people who almost certainly will identify more closely as Jews and with Israel,” said International CEO of Taglit-Birthright Israel, Gidi Mark.

Alan Gross’s mother and White House officials plead for his release The mother of Alan Gross, who is imprisoned in Cuba, has spoken in a video statement pleading for his release. Simultaneously, White House officials have also called on Havana to release the American prisoner, Voice of America reported. The law firm Chlopak Leohnard Schecter and Alan Gross Associates released the video in which Evelyn Gross, 89, directly appeals to Cuban President Raúl Castro on Dec. 3, the second anniversary of Gross’ incarceration. White House spokesman Jay Carney also said it was “past time” to allow Gross to return home to his family. Gross was arrested for allegedly bringing communications equipment into Cuba while working for a private firm contracted with the U.S. Agency for International Development. Gross and his employers claim he was only trying to set up Internet access to Cuba’s Jewish community. Despite these claims, Gross was arrested for alleged “acts against the independence and territorial integrity of the state.” Gross’s wife Judy recently told JointMedia News Service that she is able to speak to her husband on the phone once a week.

Suspect arrested for New Jersey anti-Semitic vandalism Police have arrested a suspect in connection with the recent smashing of windows at several Jewish businesses in Highland Park, N.J. Vandals threw bricks through the glass windows, according to media reports. Richard Green was charged with five counts of criminal mischief. If convicted, he will face a maximum penalty of 18 months in prison and a fine of $10,000. A few other Jewish business in nearby New Brunswick were also targeted on Nov. 29, the anniversary of the 1947 United Nations vote to create the state of Israel. Patrons at a local falafel store were also reportedly threatened with a “second Kristallnacht,” although it not clear if these threats are related to the vandalism. Windows of the Rutgers University campus Chabad were also smashed. Anti-Defamation League New Jersey Regional Board Chairman Lawrence Cooper called the vandalism “shocking.” “We are appalled by the targeting of Jewish stores and Jewish campus institutions at Rutgers,” he said.

ATTENTION Netanyahu unfreezes P.A. money but gets German U-Boat President Benjamin Netanyahu had to unfreeze tax money collected by the Palestinian Authority in order for Israel to buy a Dolphin-style military submarine U-boat from Germany, the Israel National News reported. Despite this, the country now possesses a weapon that could deter Iran. Netanyahu had frozen the taxes in retaliation for the Palestinian Authority’s bid to join the United Nations but affectively released the taxes after German Chancellor Angela Merkel approved the sale only under this condition. Despite the unfreezing of the taxes, P.A. President Mahmoud Abbas said the Palestinian Authority will continue its U.N. efforts. However, according to the German newspaper Die Welt, Merkel also approved the sale of the submarine because with its medium-range missiles it can be armed with nuclear warheads. Since it is widely believed that Israel possesses nuclear weapons, the newspaper said, such a weapon could be an enormous deterrent against Iran. “The security of Israel is for me, as German Chancellor, never negotiable. And if that’s the case, there should be no empty words in time of threat,” Merkel said.

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20 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011

METRO Campers: Continued from page 4. The North American program, which was launched six years ago by an anonymous donor in Chicago, has seen its intended results, Fingerman said. “What we found after our second summer is that the kids were coming back to the Jewish camps at the same rate as the kids who did not receive the grants,” he said. The proof that kids otherwise unengaged in Jewish activities would choose to return to a Jewish camp once they tried it was enough to get

other communities excited by the program, Fingerman said. “This is a powerful North American initiative,” he said. “We have so far sent 30,000 kids to a Jewish camp on incentive grants. Fifty-five percent of those kids who went to Jewish camp for the first time with the grant would have otherwise stayed home or gone to a non-Jewish camp.” “Camp has a stickiness factor,” Fingerman continued. “Once you get in and start building friendships, there is a 75 percent retention rate. That is a high percentage of kids to stay in the system.” At Emma Kaufmann Camp, the most common destination for Pittsburgh’s Jewish kids, almost 90 percent of

grantees chose to return there after their first year, exceeding the national average, according to a survey of local parents whose children received grants. “Jewish camp provides the joy of being Jewish in such a fun and positive and spirited way, and leaves a lasting impression,” Fingerman said. There are currently 63 One Happy Camper partners including the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. The Foundation for Jewish Camp generally provides matching funds to communities for three or four years, in the hope that the local programs will become self-sustaining. Because the aim of the North American program is to reach out to Jewish

families less engaged in the community, it does not match grants for those children who attend a Jewish day school. Pittsburgh, however, uses its local funding to provide first-time camper grants to any child attending a Jewish camp, including those who attend day school. Locally, the One Happy Camper program so far has helped almost 200 kids go to Jewish overnight camp over the past two years, including over 120 who do not attend Jewish day school.

(Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

Please see Briefly, page 18.

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011 — 21

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TORAH What’s in a name? A lot! Portion of the Week RABBI MICHAEL WERBOW CONGREGATION BETH SHALOM Vayishlach, Genesis 32:4-36:43

“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” — Shakespeare Each one of us received a name when we were born. Our parents thought long and hard to give us a name that was meaningful to them. We are often named after a loved one. In Ashkenazic tradition it is common to name after someone deceased as a way of honoring this relative and keeping them with the living family. It is also a way for the parents to raise expectations for the child to emulate values and actions of their ancestor. In Sephardic communities, it is not uncommon for a child to be named after a living relative. There is talmudic support for this from a story when a child was named after a scholar who was still living. Both the Sephardic and Ashkenazic traditions are customs. They certainly carry much weight in their communities, but they are customs nonetheless. These customs give parents some direction in giving names to their children. There is often much deliberation when deciding upon a name — an act that Judaism holds in high regard. Rabbinic texts indicate this by mentioning that parents giving their child a name obtain 1/60 of prophecy. We can look at this teaching and either interpret it as

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names being given by God, through our parents, to us or that by giving a name our parents had insight into who we would be in the future. People obtain a name when they are born but make a name for themselves as they grow. While our parents have the gift of prophecy in choosing our name, through our actions, we determine the value of our name. We are told in Pirkei Avot (The Sayings of our Ancestors), “One who acquires a good name has acquired something precious.” In this parsha, Jacob acquires a new name. He is told that he will no longer be called Ya’akov, but instead will be Yisrael. Rashi sees these two names as two different ways that Jacob presents himself in the world. Other people, specifically Abraham and Sarah, whose names are changed, are no longer referred to as their original name but throughout the remainder of the TaNaCh Jacob is called both Yisrael as well as Ya’akov. We know that we are called different things by different people in different situations. We may be called by our first name, a nickname or even a title. Sometimes what people call us may even be contradictory. We can be both mother and daughter, we can be grandpa and dad. Our different names are an expression of the relationship that we have with the individual person or group of people who use them. We all have the ability to live up to the names we were given, to fulfill the prophecy of our parents and to make a good name for ourselves. When we do, we truly have acquired something good. (This column is a service of the Greater Pittsburgh Rabbinic Association.)

LEGAL NOTICES Letters of Administration of Testamentary Letter of Administration of the Estate of Frances J. Bradosky, Jr., deceased, of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA No. 021106184 have been granted to April Lewis, 376 Wall Ave., Wall, PA 15148, who requests that all persons having claims against the Estate of this Decedent make known the same in writing to her or her attorney, Thomas E. Pandaleon, Esq., 6824 Thomas Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA 15208, and all persons indebted to this Decedent make payment to the same.

named, who requests all persons having claims against the estate of the decedent to make known the same in writing to him or his attorney, and all persons indebted to the decedent to make payment to him without delay: CLAIR, Sidney, a/k/a Clair, Sidney Sholem, deceased, of Pittsburgh, PA, Allegheny County; No. 07006 of 2011 or to: Ira Clair, Executor, 2719 West Chase Avenue, Chicago, IL 60645 c/o Gail Kraut, Esq., Greenfield & Kraut, 1040 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15219-6201. 3Th 023, 016, 009

030, 023, 016 ESTATE NOTICES Letters have been granted on the estate of each of the following decedents to the personal representative

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22 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011

OBITUARY AGNEW: On Thursday, Dec. 1, 2011, Reneè Agnew, 85 of White Oak; wife of the late Robert Agnew; daughter of the late Samuel and Sadye Spiegel Lichtenstein; sister of Stanley (Helen) Lichtenstein; also survived by aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins. Born Aug. 28, 1926 in McKeesport, Reneè was the former dean of the University Of Pittsburgh School Of Business. After graduating from the University of Michigan, she became the secretary for the American Embassy in Prague. Agnew then returned to the United States where she became the secretary to the Israeli ambassador, Abba Eban, in Washington D.C. Finally, she became a foreign student advisor at the University of Pittsburgh where she also taught in the university's School of Business master’s degree program. Services and interment New Gemilas Chesed cemetery, White Oak. Arrangements by Jennifer S. Jordan Funeral Home, Inc., 1638 Lincoln Way, White Oak, PA 15131-1714 KOSOWSKY: On Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2011, Gertrude Kosowsky of Phoenix; mother of Elaine (Shirin) Hashimi, Jerry Kosowsky and Wendy (Peter) Mars; grandmother of Yosef (Tamar) Hashimi, Rachel (Rafael) Tapia, Sideqa (Dan) Padawer, Ryan (Keyle) Kosowsky, Larry (Candace) Kosowsky, Bryn Mars and Remy Mars,

and 14 great-grandchildren. Gertrude will be remembered for her great love of her family and as the family matriarch. She had a great affection for Beth El Congregation of Phoenix, of which she was an active member for over 50 years. Services were held Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011. Contributions may be made to JF&CS, 5743 Bartlett St., Pittsburgh, PA 15217; or Beth El Congregation, 1118 W. Glendale Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85021. Arrangements by Sinai Mortuary, 4538 North 16th St., Phoenix, AZ 85016. www.sinaimortuary.net SCHACHTER: On Thursday, Dec. 1, 2011, Andrea G. Schachter, 62, of Forest Hills; beloved wife of Jonathan Schachter; loving mother of Lauren Schachter; sister of Patricia (Michael) Hourvitz; daughter of the late Louis and Florence (Dorfman) Green of Johnstown, Pa.; daughter-in-law of Jacob and the late Jeanne Schachter; sisterin-law of David (Debra), Avram (Estaire) Schachter; also survived by nieces and nephews. Services and interment Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger, 10495 Santa Monica Blvd., Suite 100, Los Angeles, CA 90025. Arrangements by D'Alessandro Funeral Home, LTD., 4522 Butler St., Pittsburgh, PA 15201. www.dalessandroltd.com

SCHOENEN: On Monday, Oct. 24, 2011, Sara Needle Schoenen, 67, of Ocean City, N.J.; beloved wife of David Schoenen; mother of Melissa (Jason) Rackliff; daughter of the late Mildred and Nat Needle; sister of Myra Needle of Pittsburgh and Jay and Bobbi Needle of Allentown, Pa.; grandmother of Noah and Jaxon Rackliff; aunt of Max and Josh Needle. Services were held at Congregation Beth Israel in Northfield, N.J. Contributions may be made to Hadassah Greater Pittsburgh Chapter, 1824 Murray Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Roth Goldsteins’ Memorial Chapel, Pacific and New Hampshire Avenues, P.O. Box 1908, Atlantic City, NJ 08404. www.rothgoldsteins.com

SCOTT: On Friday, Dec. 2, 2011, Maxine Scott; beloved wife of William Scott; loving mother of Lee and Jeffrey (Amy) Scott; cherished grandmother of Samantha, Jamie and Matthew Scott; sister of Howard (Loraine) Shapiro and Edward Shapiro. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment Homewood Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Temple Sinai, 5505 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com

Rabbis:

it’s the littlest kids or adults in the congregation the mission is the same.” Both Perman and Urecki preside over communities, which, due to declining numbers, must make greater efforts to keep Jewish life alive and vibrant. In Charleston, many of Urecki’s families also belong to Charleston’s other congregation, Temple Israel, which is located just a few blocks away along the Kanawha River. “They want both congregations to survive,” Urecki said, adding that Charleston “is a community that’s been around since the 1800s and has tried to maintain Judaism in an isolated area. “How cans we give up on that?” he asked. The same is true in Westmoreland County, according to Perman, where several of her members also belong to Temple Beth Am in nearby Monessen. “There are Jews scattered all over the area … Jews who live up in Seven Springs and Ligonier,” many of whom are interfaith couples, Perman said. It’s critical, she added, to find ways to reach out to them. “They’re Jews,” she added, “and we need to serve them wherever they live.”

Continued from page 2. “There’s actually hands-on kitchen time,” she said of the course, which is based on a model developed in Pittsburgh. “I’m really excited about this course.” But not as excited as she is about the way she has spent her past five summers, studying at the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem. “It renews me in ways I can’t explain. It just totally, totally renews me,” Perman said. “I’m still on a high from Israel.” Last summer, she said she studied the influence of Israeli music, the treatment of Jesus and Christianity in the Talmud and she visited an “urban kibbutz” in a Jerusalem slum that supports the poorest of Jerusalemites without government support. These experiences, she said, influence the sermons she gives her congregants when she returns to Greensburg, as well as how she reads certain books of the Bible, such as Jonah and Daniel. “I see my job as a teacher and sharing my love of Judaism,” she said. “Whether

(Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.)

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011 — 23

METRO Ad: Continued from page 1. partners won’t always understand what this means. Help them to return to Israel.” Another ad has Israeli grandparents video-chatting with their American granddaughter during Chanuka; they ask their granddaughter what holiday it is, and adopt expressions of horror when she responds that it is “Christmas.” The third TV commercial has an American child failing to get his Israeli expatriate father’s attention by calling him “Daddy,” and only succeeding when he calls him Abba. These ads conclude with the message “They will always remain Israelis; their children will not. Help them return to Israel.” In a public statement, Israel’s ambassador to Washington, Michael Oren, lamented any ill feelings the ad campaign caused among American Jews. “Prime Minister Netanyahu deeply values the American Jewish community and is committed to deepening ties between it and the State of Israel,” Oren said in the statement. “He has pulled the ad campaign that clearly did not take into account American Jewish sensibili-

Testing: Continued from page 1. developing breast cancer by age 70, the risk of developing breast cancer for a woman with a BRCA gene mutation is about 10 times as high. Those odds were enough to convince Pattak to have the surgeries, thus reducing her risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer by about 95 percent. Ashkenazi women, with family histories of breast or ovarian cancer, should consider getting tested for the BRCA gene mutation, Pattak said, but making such a decision is not always easy. One has to be prepared to accept the results. Pattak had a strong family history of both cancers. Her mother, aunt and grandmother all had breast cancer, and her mother and aunt also had ovarian cancer. Pattak’s sister, after getting tested, found she had the BRCA mutation, and tried to convince Pattak to get tested as well. “I didn’t want to at first, because I didn’t know what I would do with the results,” Pattak said. “My sister kept telling me to stop being an ostrich, putting my head in the sand.” It wasn’t until 1998, when Pattak heard of a study at the University of Pittsburgh that focused on the mental and emotional process of being tested and dealing with the results, that she decided to do what she had been avoiding. “Once I signed up for the study, I decided to have the testing done,” she said. “I didn’t make the decision to be tested until I was ready to accept the results, assuming they would be positive.” Pattak did, in fact, test positive for the BRCA gene mutation, and in 1999, had a hysterectomy. “It was easier to decide to have the hysterectomy than the mastectomy because it was internal,” she said. But in the early 2000s, her gynecologist suggested she speak to a breast surgeon to discuss the possibility of a mastectomy as well. Pattak also spoke to a plastic surgeon about reconstruction.

ties, and we regret any offense it caused. The campaign, which aimed to encourage Israelis living abroad to return home, was a laudable one, and it was not meant to cause insult.” But American upset at the ad campaign is “foolishness,” according to the government official responsible for the campaign, Israel’s Minister of Immigrant Absorption Sofa Landver, in an interview with Shmuel Rosner of the Jewish Journal of Greater Los Angeles. “We took upon ourselves to try and connect with Israelis abroad; this has nothing to do with American Jews for which I have the highest respect,” Landver said. Indeed, many Israelis have said that Americans shouldn’t be surprised about Israel maintaining such attitudes toward American Jewry. “The classic Zionist position,” wrote Rosner, an Israeli, is “that not just Israeli culture and heritage is hard to maintain in the U.S., but also Jewish culture and heritage.” (The full report from The Jewish Channel can be found on cable television, or on the web at newsdesk.tjctv.com. The Chronicle staff contributed to this report.)

“Once I knew what was going to happen, and what was involved, I decided to go ahead and have the surgery,” she said. “This is something more and more Jewish families need to know about,” Pattak said. “They need to know about the risks, and that with this you can be proactive. There is something you can do to reduce your risks of breast or ovarian cancer.” Sheila Solomon, one of the genetic counselors scheduled to speak at Sunday’s program, called genetic testing “a very important issue in the Jewish community.” Nevertheless, she noticed while working with Marshall at Allegheny General Hospital several years ago that few Jewish patients were opting for it. “We wondered why those in the Jewish community were not coming in for testing for hereditary cancers,” she said. “We wanted to become informed on what are the barriers, and what are the best methods to get the information for the community.” “We don’t see the correct percentage of Jews coming in for genetic counseling,” Marshall said. Ashkenazi ancestry by itself does not necessarily indicate a need for genetic testing, according to Marshall. Age and family history are also factors. “Having this information is really important,” said Rabbi Amy Hertz of Rodef Shalom Congregation, who will also be speaking at Sunday’s program. “How we take care of our bodies is a Jewish value.” Other speakers at the Sunday program include Rachel Pearlman, a graduate student in genetic counseling, and Barbara and Jay Rogal, whose daughter lives with Gaucher, another genetic disease prevalent among Ashkenazi Jews. The genetics event is co-sponsored by Allegheny General Hospital, University of Pittsburgh, Rodef Shalom Brotherhood, and Rodef Shalom Sisterhood.

(Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

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In MeMory of

PENNY & DAVID ABRAMS ............ABE GOLDSTEIN HEDY M. CAPLAN...................BENJAMIN MITCHEL ANNA F. CARLTON...........................DR. FREDERICK CARLTON PAUL & MARGARET CLOVSKY ..................FRANCES MEYERS CLOVSKY SUSAN COHEN......................DONALD SCHWARTZ SUSAN COHEN ....................JOSEPH BRAUNSTEIN SUSAN COHEN ....................HOWARD SCHWARTZ ELLEN & MARK DIAMOND ..........MOLLIE PRETTER DENA ELLIS................................MILTON ISKOWICH EVELYN R. ENGELBERG....................................MAX ENGELBERG BERNARD L. FREEMAN ............JACK J. FRIEDMAN DR. GLORIA Y. GOLDEN..........................MORRIS D. GOLDEN NANCY HARRIS ................BERNICE RICHTER FINEGOLD MARVIN KAMIN ..............................CELIA KADDELL CELE A. KANSELBAUM ............................CHARLES KANSELBAUM SUZANNE KESSLER...........MANIEE GOLDENBERG JAN & EDWARD KORENMAN ...........MARTIN REBB PHYLLIS & HERBERT KRAMER ...................................SARAH E. KRAMER IRV LEVY ..........................................REBECCA LEVY BARRY P. MARKOVITZ ................CARL MARKOVITZ MAURICE & CLAIRE MERVIS ............RUTH MERVIS RONA F. MUSTIN.........................DOROTHY SACHS MUSTIN RONA F. MUSTIN ...............................MARY SACHS RAE PAPERNICK...............................ANNIE SEGALL

Donor

In MeMory of

EVELYN K. REBB................................MARTIN REBB MARION & ALAN REZNIK..................................ELEANOR BERGSTEIN ANONYMOUS ......................................FANNIE RICE FERNE & NATHAN ROGOW ..................................ESTHER V. MORROW LENORE ROSEN ..................................PHILIP STEIN SHEILA ROTHMAN.........................MORRIS BRAUN TRUDY B. SCHUROWITZ............................SAMUEL KURFEERST DORIS S. SCHWARTZ..........EDWARD E. STRAUSS DORIS S. SCHWARTZ ..........................NORMAN M. SCHWARTZ JEAN D. SIEGAL ..............................LEON ABRAMS MR. & MRS. RICHARD M. SILK.....................................................WILLIAM SILK LEE SILVERMAN....................SAMUEL SILVERMAN OWEN A. SILVERMAN ..........SAMUEL SILVERMAN AUDREY & RALPH SILVERMAN...............................MORRIS J. SEMINS LEONARD SKIRBOLL ..................FANNIE SKIRBOLL RAE SOLOMON ................................JACOB BRAUN YETTA SPEISER.....................................MAX BLATT EVERNE B. SPIEGEL ...............ARTHUR FIRESTONE RICHARD S. STUART ...................CELIA LIBERMAN NANETTE V. TUCKER...........JACOB, LEAH & IRWIN FIRESTONE BARBARA E. VOGEL ...........SYDNEY BERTENTHAL ARNOLD WECHTER ...............LAWRENCE LIFSHEY MARCIA J. WEISS.......................DR. LOUIS WEISS

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11: ELEANOR BERGSTEIN, THOMAS BERLINSKY, MAURICE A. BERMAN, SYBIL YOUNG CHERINGTON, HENRIETTA CHOTINER, BESSIE C. COHEN, HYMAN COHEN, GERTRUDE DUGAN, REBECCA A. F. FINKELHOR, JOSEPH O. GOLEMAN, HELEN GUSKY, ROSE KAUFMAN, MEYER LEFF, ABRAHAM LEVITIN, DORA LEWIS, LEONA MANDEL, SAMUEL MERVIS, WILLIAM NATHAN, HYMAN PARKER, DR. IRVING PEARLMAN, CATHERINE POLLACK, DR. DANIEL E. SABLE, NELLY SCHARMAN, EDAS SCHLANG, WILLIAM SCHWARTZ, SAMUEL SILVERMAN, ESTHER GOLOMB SLONE, MAX SNYDER, MAX SOLOMON, JACOB SPERLING, RUTH STEINBERG, SAUL PHILLIP STEINSAPIR, ABRAHAM L. STORMWIND, FREDA SLATEY WATMAN, ANNA R. WEIL, SAMUEL WEINER, SARAH WEISZ, ARMAND WHITMAN. MONDAY, DECEMBER 12: DOROTHY ABRAMS, JACOB BREAKSTONE, FLORA BREVERMAN, HARRY A. COHEN, LILLIAN COHEN, RACHEL COHEN, SOL M. COHEN, DAVID GLICK, MORRIS D. GOLDEN, MYRON (BUNNY) KLEIN, A. EMANUEL KLINE, EDWARD LAMDEN, PVT. IRVING H. LERNER, ANNA LEVINE, DORA LIEBMAN, ISIDOR LINDER, ABRAHAM LITOW, GUSSIE MALLINGER, JOSEPH MALLINGER, PVT. JOSEPH MANDEL, EMANUEL M. MARKS, DENA MIRKIN, PAULINE PEARLMAN, BERNARD RAUH, LOUIS J. RUBENSTEIN, FANNIE SOLOMON, JUDGE JOSEPH STADFELD, ISADORE STRAUS, EDWARD E. STRAUSS, MOSHE HIRSH TUFSHINSKY, ANNA WEINBERGER, JACOB WEINBERGER, BLANCHE STRAUSS ZIONTS. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13: SIDNEY EPSTEIN, EVELYN R. FELDMAN, WILLIAM FELDSTEIN, ANNA GOLD, HENRY GOLDSTEIN, HARRY HADAS, PERLE HEIMAN, ROSE F. JACOBSON, ELLA KAZAN, HYMAN KUNTZ, JENNIE LEVY, LOUIS LIPSITZ, MARK MACE, MAX MALLINGER, HYMAN MATES, LOUIS MENDEL, ISAAC MIKULITSKY, ANNA MOSS, NELLIE RADEN NAYHOUSE, IDA NOSSOKOFF, JANE FLORENCE PIANIN, S. WALTER PLATT, LENA RANDALL, JOSEPH REISZ, LAWRENCE ROSENTHAL, FREDA ROSENWASSER, EVA R. SACHS, CHARLES SAXEN, IDA L. SILVERMAN, GERALDINE GLICK SIMON, SARAH SIMON, SARAH SIMON, HARRY STERN, HERMOINE COHEN STOLWEIN, ANNA SUFRIN, YETTA VINOCUR, DAVID H(JUDGE) WEISS, JUDGE DAVID H. WEISS, HARRY L. WITT. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14: BESSIE M. BLEIBERG, ROSE Y. COHEN, SAMUEL B. COHEN, SAMUEL L. COHEN, LOUIS DEBROFF, JACOB GILBERD, MARCELLA SHAPIRO GOLD, BELLA GOODMAN, EVERETT GREEN, EILEEN G. HERMAN, ISRAEL L. KOBACKER, MINNIE LANGE, FRIEDA K. LAWRENCE, RUTH M. LAZEAR, MORRIS W. LEDERMAN, SADYE LINCOFF, JACOB LIPPS, WILLIAM MARCUS, CARL MARKOVITZ, ANNA MARKOWITZ, JACOB MENDELBLATT, ABRAHAM MINTZ, LEWIS MORRIS, MARCUS ROSENTHAL, ANNA SANES, BERTHA B. SCHWARTZ, GOLDIE MALLINGER SCHWARTZ, CHARLES B. SHAPIRO, LEONARD SHECHTER, JULIUS SHEPS, RUTH ESTHER SHEPS, MORRIS SOLOMON, BELLA STEIN, IDA SUPOWITZ, EDNA TEPLITZ, CELIA VERK, JOSEPH WIMMER. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15: MEYER W. COHEN, BERNICE FINEGOLD, BERTHA FINGERET, LEO FREIBERG, RENA F. KLETZ, HARRY KOBACKER, MARGARET K. LEBOVITZ, ISRAEL MOSES LEVINE, ABRAHAM LITMAN, MINNIE LITTMAN, LOUIS MYERS, WILLIAM NUMER, CHARLES PEARLSTEIN, LOUIS POLLOCK, DR. SAMUEL RAFAEL, YETTA RAKUSIN, MARTIN REBB, EDWARD F. REESE, M.D., ESTHER RICE, BESSIE ROSENBLUM, MORRIS ROTH, ROBERT RUBIN, FANNIE SANES, LOUIS SCHULTZ, DOROTHY SCHUSTERMAN, JACOB W. SINGER, ELLA SMITH, ALBERT H. SNYDER, SUMER SOMERMAN, JULIUS SPATZ, REBECCA SPEVOCK, HEINCHA STARK, JACOB STEIN, MORRIS STEIN, WILLIAM STERN, CORNELIA STERN THALKHEIMER, SCHEINDEL WANDER, JACOB ZEIGER. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16: BERNICE BEA" BAROFSKY", RACHEL DEBORAH COHEN, ESTHER DANZINGER, GERTRUDE P. ELIAS, LEONARD ENELOW, SADIE FEIGENBAUM, ARTHUR FORMAN, JACK J. FRIEDMAN, JACOB GOLD, NORMA HARRIS, HARRY HAYNES, WILLIAM HERSH, GOLDIE LINTON HORNE, MAX L. HORNE, MILTON ISKOWICH, MAX JANOWITZ, SYLVIA KALMENSON, NANNIE KLATER, NORA A. KOCH, MORRIS LAVINTHAL, MARY LEVINE, MORRIS H. LEVINE, REBECCA LEVINE, JOSEPH LEVITT, ALLAN LIPPOCK, MAURICE MALKIN, ANNA MALLINGER, REBECCA K. MALT, REUBEN MARCUS, FAN MERVIS, MIKEL B. MERVIS, HARRIS NATHAN MILLER, SYLVIA PORTNOY MORETSKY, ADOLPH MOSKOWITZ, RUTH MURMAN, HARRY ROSENFIELD, ANNA ROSENTHAL, HAROLD J. RUBENSTEIN, SAM RYAVE, SGT. ARTHUR SCHWARTZ, ZENIA SEDERSKY, GENIA SIDRANSKY, BENJAMIN SINGER, LOUIS C. SLOTSKY, FRANK SMITH, ZELIG SOLOMON, ABE TOPAZ, ANNE C. WEISS, KITTIE WIENER, MAX ZWANG. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17: MAURICE P. ASHINSKY, ESTHER L. BIALER, J. GEORGE BLOOM, JACOB COON, HARRY FIRST, DAVID FRANK, LOUIS FRANK, ROSE GERAN, ROSE GOLDSTEIN, MARTIN W. HEPPS, SARAH JACOBSON, JENNIE RHEIMHEIMER LEHMAN, IDA L. LEVEN, ALVIN LICHTENSTUL, ABE LIPPARD, ANNIE LITSKY, CHARLES LUNTZ, JENNIE MARKOVITZ, DOROTHY MILLER, JULIA MONHEIM, MYER PALKOVITZ, MARY PEETLER, GRACE PERELSTINE, MORRIS ROMAN, REBECCA ROSENBERG, JENNIE ROSENBLOOM, CHAVA ROSENSON, HARRY ROSENTHAL, DAVID RUBIN, MORRIS RUDICK, FANNIE J. SACK, HARRY A. SAPIRA, M.D., MORRIS J. SEMINS, AARON SIFF, MYER SIMON, BERTHA SIMS, DR. JACOB SLONE, SHIRLEY STARR, MORRIS WEISS, REGINA WEISS.

Call DeeAnna Cavinee at 412.521.1975 or e-mail donations@jaapgh.org for more information or to make a contribution to the Jewish Association on Aging.


24 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 8, 2011

The Jewish Chronicle December 8, 2011  

The Jewish Chronicle December 8, 2011

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