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Style Statman and country Famous klezmer star found inspiration in Wheeling Jamboree

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE thejewishchronicle.net ocTober 13, 2011 tishri 15, 5772

Vol. 55, No. 22

Pittsburgh, PA

You shall dwell in booths

$1.50

Project Harmony offering discreet assistance to abused women BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

Chronicle photo by Ilana Yergin

Tzipora Sachs helps her son, Eliezer Henteleff, 4, decorate Eliezer’s paternal grandparents’ sukka, Sunday, in Squirrel Hill. Sukkot, the Festival of Booths, began at sundown, Wednesday. Jews all over western Pennsylvania and West Virginia were busy this past weekend erecting their booths for the holiday.

South Hills man’s heart attack spured him to start, finish Torah BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

On June 12, 2010, Jay Feuer, then age 59, was running on a treadmill at Bally Total Fitness in Bethel Park when he collapsed. He woke up three days later at St. Clair Hospital. Feuer, who had always taken good care of himself, and thought he was in good health, had suffered a sudden cardiac arrest. He would have died had it not been for a quick-acting paramedic who just happened to be exercising near him when his heart stopped beating.

“He did CPR on me,” Feuer said, “and he yelled at the employees to get an AED [automated external defibrillator]. When they finally found it, he said he had to use it three times on me until my heart started beating again. When I got to St. Clair, they had to use defibrillators three more times.” Four months later, after having additional problems with scar tissue and arrhythmia, Feuer had open-heart surgery. He has since had a complete recovery. But his terrifying ordeal left him motivated to finish a project he had been working on for years: commissioning a new Torah for his synagogue, Beth El

Congregation of the South Hills, and paying for it with tip money collected at the synagogue’s weekly bingo games. Feuer has been running Beth El’s bingo games, along with fellow congregant Fern Schwartz, for about 10 years. Bingo is a large source of revenue for the congregation, and attracts regular players from throughout the South Hills community. Often, when players win a game, they will tip the volunteers who bring them their cash prizes. The volunteers do not keep the tips, but turn them over to Feuer and Schwartz. “Before Fern and I took over bingo, Please see Torah project, page 21.

A Pittsburgh program is working to raise awareness of the presence of domestic abuse in the Jewish community in the hope of reducing the stigma of women who are victims and encouraging them to seek help. Project Harmony has joined forces with the Shalom Task Force, based in Brooklyn, N.Y., to provide a hotline that women can call to get help and referrals to professional services. Local therapists have undergone training regarding domestic abuse in general, and specifically from a Jewish perspective, in order to help those calling the hotline in need, said Dr. Jordan Golin, the director of clinical and elder care services at Squirrel Hill Psychological Services. “If a woman from Pittsburgh calls the [national] hotline, a trained volunteer will speak with her on the phone, and direct her to resources,” Golin said. “A Jewish woman would get directed to our agency.” Domestic abuse is an issue that affects women of all walks of life, including Jewish women from all streams of observance. According to Deborah Rosenbloom, director of programs for Jewish Women International, outreach organizations that serve Jewish women from the secular to the Orthodox “all are very busy.” In fact, Rosenbloom noted that the feedback from JWI’s Misheberach for victims of domestic violence, which was read over the High Holy Days in synagogues of all four streams of Judaism, inspired many women to come forward. “Slowly people have been writing in that women came forward,” said RosenPlease see Project Harmony, page 23.

B USINES S 18/C L AS SIFIED 21/O BITUARIES 22/C OMMUNITY 12 O PINION 6/R EAL E STATE 20/S IMCHAS 16/S TYLE 10

Times To Remember

KINDLE SABBATH CANDLES: 6:24 p.m. DST. SABBATH ENDS: 7:21 p.m. DST.


2 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE

OCTOBER 13, 2011

Metro Mideast analyst speaks here

Avishai: Settlements, right of return must be addressed to reach peace BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

While the Palestinian Authority seeks to gain United Nations recognition as an independent state, nobody — not even its president, Mahmoud Abbas — believes such a state can come to fruition in the absence of direct negotiations with Israel. And Abbas also knows that negotiations with Israel are futile as long as Israelis keep building settlements in the West Bank, according to noted Middle East author and reporter Bernard Avishai. Avishai, an adjunct professor of business at Hebrew University who has written widely on the Middle East conflict, spoke at the Jewish Community Center in Squirrel Hill, Tuesday, Oct. 11, to discuss “Israel and the emergence of Palestine.” J Street Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh Area Jewish Committee sponsored his presentation. He spoke to the Chronicle prior to his arrival in Pittsburgh. By going to the United Nations at this

point in time, Avishai said, Abbas is “trying to strengthen his hand.” Although Israel may control most of the land the Palestinians wish to call their own state, the Palestinians will be in control of “two-thirds of the world’s hearts and minds,” he said. And Palestinian control of the world’s hearts and minds will ultimately result in wreaking havoc on Israel’s economy. “Israel has become a globalized economy,” Avishai said. “Even without a formalized boycott, if the Palestinians become more of a subject of the world’s sympathy, and Israelis become more of a subject of the world’s exasperation, a lot of the world’s companies will say, ‘I don’t want to work with Israel.’ ” The decision not to work with Israel does not have to come from a company’s board of directors, Avishai said, but can come from individual engineers and managers. “The Israeli economy is dependent on startups and building relationships with European companies,” Avishai said. “The little global startups have to prove up their products. If Israelis are selling

Bernard Avishai: “Israel’s political isolation will ultimately lead to its economic implosion.”

solutions, they have to know what the products are. That means having relationships with managers in big corporations. If those companies’ engineers say, ‘I don’t want to deal with the Israelis,’ that’s when the ‘startup nation’ (Israel) runs down. That’s when you have a kind of vicious circle where lots of talented young people leave the country. It’s not a

good thing. Israel’s political isolation will ultimately lead to its economic implosion.” The solution to the threat to Israel’s “economic implosion” is obvious, according to Avishai. “This is not rocket science,” he said. “Israel should be doing what it should Please see Avishai, page 19.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011 — 3

METRO Briefly The Zionist Organization of America, Pittsburgh District, will honor former Pittsburgh Mayor Sophie Masloff, former Allegheny County Executive James C. Roddey, attorney Lawrence N. Paper and volunteer Janice Greenwald, at its 2011 Awards Dinner, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 6 p.m. at Congregation Beth Shalom. Sophie Masloff A native of the Hill District and a longtime City Council member, Masloff became Pittsburgh’s first Jewish and woman mayor in 1988 upon the death of Richard Caliguiri. She was 70 at the time. The following year, she defeated five men in the Democratic James C. Roddey primary, in which she was not the endorsed candidate, and went on to win the general election. She chose not to run again in 1993. A successful communications industry executive, Roddey served on more than 40 nonprofit boards, then Lawrence N. Paper chaired the Port Authority of Allegheny County and the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority before becoming the county’s first chief executive in 2000.

Paper is a longtime ZOA member and currently serves as vice president of the Pittsburgh District. He has also been active in B’nai B’rith, Hadassah Auxiliary and Jewish War Veterans. Greenwald has represented Hadas- Janice Greenwald sah, a nongovernmental organization, at the United Nations and the Jewish NGO Caucus. A registered nurse, she has also chaired the National Nurses Council. She has visited Israel more than 20 times, three of which she led Hadassah missions for nurses. Contact the ZOA at (412) 665-4630 or Pittsburgh@ zoa.org for more information. The Career Development Center will host a fall mixer, Tuesday, Oct. 18, from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at the Allegheny HYP Club, 619 William Penn Place, Downtown. More than 20 employers from various industries will be present, including financial services, health care, manufacturing, non-profit, education and the energy sector. No resumes will be circulated, but business cards are allowed. Professional attire is recommended. Food and beverages will be provided. Limited slots are available to non-CDC clients who qualify. Resumes should be e-mailed to patrickferraro@jfcspgh.org. Confirmation is required for admittance. NA’AMAT USA, Pittsburgh Council, will honor Patricia L. Siger, senior vice president and chief development officer of the YMCA of Greater Pittsburgh, at its annual Spiritual Adoption/ Scholarship Dinner Monday, Oct. 17, 6:30 p.m. at Congregation Beth Shalom. Siger is the co-founder of The Jewish Women’s Foundation of Pittsburgh, which supports genderPlease see Briefly, page 5.


4 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011

METRO Where gem meets treasure

Squirrel Hill corner, residents honored at SHUC function BY JESSICA SVEC Chronicle Correspondent

A popular city intersection has earned the title of Squirrel Hill Treasure. The corner of Forbes and Murray avenues was honored this past Thursday, Oct. 6, as a neighborhood gem, marking the beginning of a new tradition. In a twist to the usual “Squirrel Hill Person of the Year” format, the Squirrel Hill Urban Coalition chose to include a specific location to honor as well as three individuals as “unique treasures” to the Squirrel Hill community. It’s the first time the coalition has made such a designation for a location. Representatives from all sides of the Forbes-Murray corner, including the Carnegie Library, the Sixth Presbyterian Church, the Jewish Community Center and the Zukin Development (Rite Aid building), were there to join in the plaque dedication. The unveiling ceremony, held on the lawn of the church, included Rev. Mary Louise McCullough, its pastor; Holly McCullough, manager of the library; Rocco Didimencio, owner of the Coldstone building; Wayne Zukin,

Chronicle photo by Lee Chottiner

The Squirrel Hill Urban Coalition just designated the Forbes-Murray intersection as a Squirrel Hill Gem.

owner of the Rite-Aid building; and Mayda Roth, representing the JCC. City Councilman Bill Peduto; Elsie Hilliman, honorary chair of the treasure events; Ceci Sommers, event chair; Lori Fitzgerald, co-chair; and Steve Hawkins, former chair of the

SHUC board, were also in attendance. The plaque will eventually find its permanent home near the Rite Aid building and will forever be a testimony to the importance of this specific corner of Squirrel Hill. With a beautiful day for a celebration,

the street fair also included a farmers market, Squirrel Hill’s first plant swap and a live musical performance by the Squirrel Hillbillies. Ceci Sommers, the event chair, called the Forbes-Murray intersection, “A real gem,” saying all types of people cross that corner to enjoy the wide array of shops, restaurants and coffeehouses that occupy the streets surrounding the bustling intersection in the heart of it all. The three individuals being honored were Deb Acklin, president and CEO of WQED; Robert Levin, president and CEO of Levin Furniture; and former Pittsburgh Mayor Sophie Masloff. A dinner at the Pittsburgh Golf Course will be held Thursday, Oct. 13, 6 p.m., to officially dedicate the honorees as 2011 Squirrel Hill Treasures. The dinner will include a film of the three as well as the Forbes-Murray intersection . This is the first of the new venture for the Squirrel Hill Urban Coalition. Another location and three people will be named next year as Squirrel Hill Treasures. (Jesssica Svec can be reached at Jessica.svec@gmail.com.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011 — 5

METRO Briefly Continued from page 3. specific programs in the Jewish and non-Jewish communities. The foundation has 125 trustees and awards approximately $50,000 per year to programs that promote social change. In addition, Siger chairs The Jewish Healthcare Foundation, which has more than $125 million dollars in assets, and she serves on the boards of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Magee-Womens Hospital Research Foundation and The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. Siger is a longtime member of NA’AMAT and has been involved with the Spiritual Adoption campaign for almost 20 years. Contact Executive Director Dee Selekman at (412) 521-5253 for information or reservations. The Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh has announced new staff and staff assignments. The federation has realigned its Financial Resource Development Department. It also has redefined the responsibilities of four of its team members and added two new employees. Brian S. Eglash has been promoted to senior vice president and chief development officer and currently oversees all development operations including the annual campaign, the Jewish Community Foundation, supplemental giving, corporate giving, special campaigns and the marketing department. Jessica Brown Smith is the new director of campaign and financial resource development, supervising the day-to-day administration of the development team. Along with those changes, the federation has announced that two of its

former campaign associates have been designated senior development associates. Becca Tobe and Roi Mezare will engage donors in philanthropy, community involvement and leadership positions within the federation community. Also, joining the campaign staff are three new professionals: Young Adult Director Evan Durst, Campaign/Marketing Associate Becca Ackner and Shalom Pittsburgh Associate Rachael Altoff. All three have been active personally and/or professionally in the local Jewish community. Contact Jessica Smith at (412) 9925248 or jsmith@jfedpgh.org for more information. Roi Mezare will be the guest speaker at the United Jewish Federation of the Ohio Valley program Monday, Oct. 24, 7 p.m. at Temple Shalom, 23 Bethany Pike, Wheeling, W.Va. A dessert reception will precede the program. Mezare is a senior development associate of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Call (304) 232-5274 or (304) 2334870 for reservations.

Kindergarten Information Night will be held Tuesday, Oct. 18, from 7 to 9 p.m., in Levinson Auditorium at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh, 5738 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. The program, organized by the JCC’s Early Childhood Development Center, is free and open to the community. Refreshments will be served. David May-Stein, assistant superintendent of the Pittsburgh Public Schools, will speak. Contact Kelly Gable-LaBelle, division director of early childhood services, at (412) 521-8011 Ext. 209, for more information. Kindergarten Information Night is supported in part by the Marilyn Kramer Memorial Fund.

Buy, Sell, Trade in the Classifieds Call Donna 412-687-1000


6 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011

The Jewish Chronicle

Opinion

David M. Caoin, CEO EDITORIAL STAFF Lee Chottiner, Executive Editor Angela Leibowicz, Community/ Web Editor Toby Tabachnick, Staff Writer SALES STAFF Susie Mangel, Senior Sales Associate Roberta Letwin, Sales Associate Donna Mink, Classified Sales PRODUCTION STAFF Dawn Wanninger, Production Manager Nancy Bishop Production Artist BUSINESS STAFF Joe Soloski, Comptroller Josh Reisner, Office Manager Marcy Kronzek, Subscriptions BOARD OF TRUSTEES Richard Kitay, President Cindy Goldman-Leib, Vice President Larry Honig, Secretary Andy Schaer, Treasurer Davida Fromm, Past President Carolyn Hess Abraham Brian Balk Daniel Berkowitz Milt Eisner Stephen Fienberg Malke Steinfeld Frank David Grubman Thomas Hollander Larry Honig Evan Indianer David Levine Ari Lightman Mitchell Pakler Amy W. Platt Benjamin Rosenthal Charles Saul Andrew Schaer Ilana Schwarcz Adam Shear Jonathan Wander Published every Thursday by the Pittsburgh Jewish Publication and Education Foundation 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Phone: 412-687-1000 FAX: 412-521-0154 E-Mail: newsdesk@thejewishchronicle.net SUBSCRIPTION: $45 in Pennsylvania $47 East of the Mississippi $49 West of the Mississippi and FL NEWSSTAND PRICE $1.50 PER COPY POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE JEWISH CHRONICLE, 5915 BEACON ST., 3rd Floor PITTSBURGH, PA 15217 (PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS TO JEWISH TELEGRAPHIC AGENCY AND FEATURE SERVICE) USPS 582-740 Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to the Jewish Chronicle become the property of this publication, which is not responsible for the return or loss of such items. The Chronicle does not endorse the goods or services advertised in its pages and makes no representation to the kashrut of food products and services in said advertising. The publisher is not liable for damages if, for any reason whatsoever, he fails to publish an advertisement or for any error in an advertisement. Acceptance of advertisers and of ad copy is subject to the publisher’s approval. The Chronicle is not responsible if ads violate applicable laws and the advertiser will indemnify, hold harmless and defend the Chronicle from all claims made by governmental agencies and consumers for any reason based on ads appearing in the Chronicle.

Mosque attack ews in Israel and worldwide can be proud of the community’s quick and active condemnation of last week’s attack on a mosque in the Galilean city of Tuba-Zangariyye. But it’s not enough. As you know, vandals launched an arson attack on the mosque, Sunday, Oct. 2, destroying holy books and prayer rugs. Graffiti was spray-painted on the mosque walls. Police later arrested an 18-year-old Jewish male in connection with the arson. Some of the graffiti made references to Asher Palmer, a 25-year old Jew whose car was struck by rocks on the West Bank on Sept. 25. One rock hit him in the face, causing him to lose control of the car. Both he and his 1-year-old son died as a result of the attack. The Jewish response to the mosque attack was immediate and powerful. Both Israeli President Shimon Peres and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu forcefully condemned the attack. Peres, as well as Israel’s chief rabbis and clergy leaders from other faiths, visited

J

Tuba-Zangariyye in a show of solidarity. The response didn’t end there. Nearly 1,000 rabbis in Israel and America signed a petition condemning the burning of a mosque, according to the New Israel Fund, which circulated the petition within 24 hours of the attack. Fund representatives presented the petition to the imam of the TubaZangariya. Ameinu, a progressive U.S.-based Zionist organization, designated funds to buy holy books to replace those destroyed by arsonists. As Ameinu President Kenneth Bob said of the attack, “This is not Zionism, this is not Judaism and there is no place for this in a civilized society.” Rest assured, Muslims are watching the Jewish response, and many are responding to it in a positive fashion. The Islamic Society of North America praised a statement released by major American-Jewish rabbis representing the Orthodox, Conservative, Reform and Reconstructionist movements that called attacking a mosque or any reli-

gious building “antithetical to the most basic values of Judaism, and cannot be justified for any reason.” But, as we said above, more could be done. Some Zionist and pro-Israel organizations did not issue statements condemning the attack. This is a moral issue, not a political one, and Zionist leaders ought to speak with one voice in attacking such criminal acts. And one need only surf the social networks to find Jewish responses along the lines that, these things rarely happen in Israel, and we should be proud of that. Granted, such attacks are rare in Israel, but they have happened. Our first response must not be to reaffirm their rarity, but redouble efforts to make sure they don’t happen at all. For the most part, the Jewish world got it right in reacting to this heinous act, but it wasn’t perfect. Fortunately, it’s not too late to do something. Jews and Muslims can take this tragic incident and turn it into something positive for all. Let’s hope we do.

Evoking my father’s defiant Zionist spirit on his yahrzeit Menachem Z. Rosensaft

NEW YORK — Addressing the United Nations General Assembly last month, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas declared that he had come “from the Holy Land, the land of Palestine, the land of divine messages, ascension of the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) and the birthplace of Jesus Christ (peace be upon him).” No mention of Kings David and Solomon, nor of the prophets Isaiah, Ezekiel, Jeremiah and Amos, or of the great Jewish sage Rabbi Akiva, or of Hillel and Shammai, the most prominent members of Jerusalem’s Sanhedrin around the very time of Jesus Christ’s birth. Abbas failed to recall Yokhanan ben Zakkai, who established his yeshiva at Yavneh only decades later, or, for that matter, Yehuda Ha-Nasi, who compiled and edited the Mishna, the compilation of the oral tradition that forms the first section of the Talmud, in the second century of the Common Era. All these men lived in Abbas’s “Holy Land, the land of Palestine” long before the birth of Muhammad. Indeed, the very words “Jews” and “Jewish” are conspicuously absent from Abbas’ speech. Abbas’ deliberate refusal to acknowledge that before either Christianity or Islam ever appeared on the historical or theological scene, Judaism had been firmly ensconced in what is today the

State of Israel speaks volumes. And when Reuters reports that “The issue of whether and how to suggest that Israel should be a Jewish state ultimately sank” the Quartet’s recent diplomatic efforts to revive Israeli-Palestinian peace talks,” it is time for all of us, in particular those of us who have long supported a legitimate peace process, to draw our line in the sand. “My people,” Abbas declared, “desire to exercise their right to enjoy a normal life like the rest of humanity. They believe what the great poet Mahmoud Darwish said: Standing here, staying here, permanent here, eternal here, and we have one goal, one, one: to be.” Our unambiguous response must be that we insist on precisely the same rights Darwish demands for the Palestinians. For us, a permanent, eternal Jewish sovereignty in the State of Israel is not only non-negotiable but must be, especially in the aftermath of the Holocaust, one of the cornerstones of any authentic and hopefully lasting peace. When the remnant of European Jewry emerged from the death camps, forests and hiding places throughout Europe in the winter and spring of 1945, they looked for their families and, overwhelmingly, discovered that their fathers and mothers, their husbands, wives and children, their brothers and sisters, aunts, uncles, and cousins, had all been murdered by the Germans and their accomplices. And yet, they did not give in to despair. On the contrary, almost from the moment of their liberation, the Holocaust survivors’ defiant affirmation of their Jewish national identity in the Displaced Persons camps of Germany, Austria and Italy took the form of a political and spiritually redemptive Zionism. The creation of a Jewish state in what was then called Palestine was far more

than a practical goal. It was the one ideal that had not been destroyed, and that allowed them to retain the hope that an affirmative future, beyond gas chambers, mass graves and ashes, was still possible for them. At Bergen-Belsen, the largest of the D.P. camps, a popularly elected Jewish leadership headed by my father, Josef Rosensaft, made Zionism the order of the day. At the first Congress of Liberated Jews in the British Zone of Germany, convened in September 1945 in Belsen by my father and his colleagues, without permission from the British military authorities, the survivors formally adopted a resolution calling for the establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine, and expressing their “Sorrow and indignation that almost six months after liberation, we still find ourselves in guarded camps on British soil soaked with the blood of our people.” Two months later, my father denounced the British government’s stifling of “Jewish nationalists and Zionist activities” at Belsen in the pages of The New York Times. He further charged “that the British exerted censorship over the inmates’ news sheets in that the Jews are not allowed to proclaim in print their desire to emigrate to Palestine.” In December 1945, my father told representatives of American Jewry assembled at the first post-war conference of the United Jewish Appeal in Atlantic City, according to a report in The New York Herald Tribune, that the survivors’ sole hope was emigration to Palestine, the only place in the world “willing, able, and ready to open its doors to the broken and shattered Jews of war-ravaged Europe.” The following week, The New York Journal American quoted him as declaring at an emergency conferPlease see Rosensaft, page 9.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011 — 7

OPINION

Letters to the editor We invite you to submit letters for publication. Letters must include name, address and daytime phone number; addresses and phone numbers will not be published. Letters may not exceed 400 words and may be edited for length and clarity; they cannot be returned. Mail, fax or e-mail letters to: letters@thejewishchronicle.net via e-mail : via fax:

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Albanian-Jewish ties Thank you for your article about Albanians (“Photo exhibit pays tribute to Albanian Muslims who saved Jews,” Sept. 29). I have somewhat closely followed for many years the development, or, I should say, the re-connection between the two peoples. It is always a pleasure to read in the Israeli newspapers, and just meeting random Jews from time to time, on their perception toward us as a people. When the kind words for our culture come from a people who have suffered immense hardships during the course of history, the remarks are not only honest, but amplified in power regarding the message that they are ultimately conveying. Albanians have saved even neighboring forces at times that they came to occupy them (this is strange but true), so one might say, there’s nothing special about it; they do this all the time. But when it comes to the Jews, few people are aware of the connections that we share. During World War II, King Zog [of Albania], when in Britain, asked for more than 50,000 Jews to be allowed to settle in Albania. Years ago Haaretz reported on a plan to make Albania home of the Jews as well, as its resources could house easily 7 million people if properly managed. Another thing worth noting here is that not only King Zog, but even [Albanian] communists, who hanged Catholic priests and pretty much abolished all religions, never touched any Jewish person who remained in Albania. Some rose to very prominent positions; some, like Mr. Robert Schwartz, have been forever placed in the “hall of fame” of Albania for their immense contribution to our culture. And let’s not forget that Albanians hold themselves very proud to the fact that they are among the few allowed without visas to enter the Holy Land. I don’t think this is a recompense or token of any kind, but more like a bond that has endured all the brutal wars that have put brothers against each other, let alone people and nations. This year, the first synagogue opened in Albania (I should say the first of modern times). In the past, the two peoples have made contact because of their unparalleled

mobility due to wars and because Jews were being persecuted by various forces. This time, we are coming into contact to not just survive, but hopefully build upon this long tradition of mutual respect. Valentine Dhima New York City (The author is an advisory board member to the Albanian Professionals and Entrepreneur Network.)

A positive thing for whom? I would like to correct a couple points in your article on the transfer of B’nai Emunoh to Chabad (“B’nai Emunoh to become Chabad-owned synagogue,” Sept. 29). The transfer was not decided by congregational vote, contrary to what the article claims. The congregation twice voted down such a transfer. In the last congregational meeting before the transfer, the vote was 53 percent to 47 percent to open negotiations with Chabad. Some of those who voted in favor clearly did so with the understanding that it would come back to the congregation for a vote once terms were worked out. No such final vote ever took place. Of those who were most involved in the synagogue, coming to its daily morning minyan, the majority were opposed to giving the synagogue, nine or 10 Torahs, hundreds of siddurim and several cemeteries to Chabad. Most of those involved members voted against even entering discussions with Chabad. The article quotes someone as saying, “This is a positive thing for B’nai Emunoh.” I can see that it is positive for several parties. It is a positive thing for Chabad, which expands into a growing Jewish neighborhood in Greenfield. It is a positive thing for Poale Zedeck, Young Israel, Kollel, Charles Morris and the other minyanim, which have been bolstered by people who have left B’nai Emunoh. It is a positive thing for those of us Greenfield Jews who will now get more exercise walking to congregations further from our homes. It is not a positive thing for B’nai Emunoh, most of whose most dedicated members have now left for other pastures. Mischa Gelman Greenfield (Editor’s note: Following receipt of this letter the Chronicle again contacted B’nai Emunoh President Joel Pirchesky, who again maintained that the transfer of the synagogue to Chabad was decided by a congregational vote.)


8 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011

OPINION

Bridging the Israel-Diaspora gap is more vital than ever Guest Columnist AVI DICHTER ASHKELON, Israel — Turkey, long one of Israel’s more stable and supportive partners in the region, expelled Israel’s ambassador. In Egypt, a peaceful partner to Israel since the two nations signed a treaty in 1978, the Israeli embassy was attacked by an angry mob whose members spoke of being willing to die just to have the chance to remove the Israeli flag. And in Jordan, staffers at the Israeli embassy were evacuated recently for fear of a similar attack. Israel’s ties with other Middle Eastern nations may never have been as fragile as they are today, which is a bold statement when one considers the history of violence and war in the region. It is that very fragility that lends new urgency to the effort to strengthen Israel’s ties to Jews around the world. As a people, Jewish unity has been a primary value of our community. But in the 21st century, we find the connection between Israel and the Diaspora slipping away. Those bonds, critical to Israel’s standing and resiliency, must be reinforced so that we are able to contend with the myriad challenges confronting

us today. My parents were born in Poland, survived Nazi concentration camps and managed to immigrate to Israel. From a young age they taught me to appreciate the Jewish state and never take it for granted. I witnessed the rebirth of my nation, and I have served my country for the past 40 years through various roles in security and public life. But the post-Holocaust Jewish narrative is, in fact, nothing less than a continuum of the historic Diaspora — a distancing that now, more than ever, raises troubling questions about support for Israel from Jews across the world, but especially in the United States. My cousin Sammy and I, for example, share a common past and values, but totally different upbringings. Oceans away from my hometown of Ashkelon, Sammy was raised in Detroit, where his father and uncle immigrated after surviving the Nazis. Sammy grew up as a committed Jew and Zionist, and remains so to this day. We have been close since childhood, devoted to keeping our families intact with regular visits and communication.

But will our children and grandchildren be committed to maintaining that connection and its underlying devotion to Israel? This has always been of great concern to me, but it became even more important on a study trip I took to North America several months ago. Organized by the Ruderman Family Foundation, the trip showed me that my deep personal concerns for my family ties are but a microcosm of the dangers facing the continuity of the Jewish people. I am not the first, of course, to grasp this threat to national Jewish unity and security. Pundits and researchers have examined the Israel-Diaspora relationship for years, with debates raging over the ability to sustain this unique bond in the 21st century. As politicians, this was a new experience for all of us. Rather than coming to speak, we came to listen. Instead of espousing our own ideas, we learned from others. And some of what we learned was alarming. We found out that 12 percent of the population — more than 30 million Americans — hold anti-Semitic views,

according to a 2009 Anti-Defamation League survey. We were astonished to learn of such bigotry in America, the beacon of freedom around the world, where Jews have thrived for well over a century. Further, we learned that 35 percent of American citizens view American Jews as more loyal to Israel than the United States. Just as disturbing were inconsistent statistics about the number of Jews living in the United States. Various studies estimate the number of American Jews from 5.2 million to 6.5 million. The vast 25 percent difference in the sum suggests a serious crisis of identity as to the definition of “Jewish” or, as we in Israel frame the question, “Who is a Jew?” In Israel, we tend to define Jewishness with clear either-or classifications. But by doing so, we risk alienating our friends in the diverse Jewish communities around the world and most importantly in America, which finds unity through diversity. As Israeli political leaders, this journey into the American Jewish community has left us deeply concerned about this divide — and its potential for widening even further at a time when Israel must depend on friends from abroad. (Avi Dichter is a member of the Israeli Knesset for the Kadima Party. He is a former director of the Shin Bet security service and minister of public security.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011 — 9

OPINION Where’s the traditional food of Sukkot? Guest Columnist RABBI ELI SEIDMAN Every Jewish holiday has a food that is identified with it, apart from Sukkot. Rosh Hashana has apples and honey. Chanuka has latkes. There’s hamantaschen for Purim; we eat matza for Pesach and blintzes for Shavuot. (Yom Kippur doesn’t have a food — but it’s a fast.) But when it comes to the joyous fall holiday of Sukkot, there is no one specific food that reminds us of the history of the holiday, or is aligned with its message. You could say (as some do) that we eat foods that are harvested at this “time of ingathering.” You might point out that we like to eat warm, hearty soups because Sukkot is usually a cold, damp time. Or you may say “all of the foods we eat have a special flavor due to the fact that we are eating them outside, in the Sukkah” (chabad.org). Nevertheless, the fact remains that there is no one food that is eaten by all

Rosensaft: Continued from page 6. ence on Palestine at the Manhattan Center in New York City, that, “We know that the English are prepared to stop us with machine guns. But machine guns cannot stop us.” In early 1946, he told the Anglo-American Committee of Inquiry on Palestine that if the survivors would not be allowed to go to Palestine, “We shall go back to Belsen, Dachau, Buchenwald and Auschwitz, and you will bear the moral responsibility for it.” Small wonder, then, that according to British Foreign Office documents, my father was considered an “extreme Zionist” and a “dangerous troublemaker.” My father, who taught me that a love of the Jewish people and of the

on Sukkot. Some say we should eat foods that are stuffed, to symbolize an abundant harvest and an abundance of blessings. Like stuffed cabbage (aka holishkes), stuffed peppers, turkey stuffing or strudel. Some have a custom to eat kreplach on Hoshana Rabba. Kreplach are small squares of rolled pasta dough filled with ground beef or chicken and folded into triangles. Hoshana Rabba is considered the very last phase of the Divine judgment. Kreplach symbolize the hiddenness of G-d’s verdict. Others eat cabbage soup due to a play on words: On Hoshana Rabba, one of the prayers is “kohl mevasser, mevasser v’omer” (the voice of the messenger cries out). Kohl, in Yiddish, is cabbage, and vasser is water. Hence cabbage soup. Sephardic Jews eat couscous on Sukkot. They make it into a stew with many vegetables, as a way to symbolize an abundant harvest. Whatever your custom, I wish you a very happy and healthy Sukkot and a good, sweet and peaceful new year 5772. (Rabbi Eli Seidman is the director of pastoral care at the Jewish Association on Aging.)

State of Israel is the most important element of Jewish leadership, understood that the goal of a Jewish state was a spiritual lifeline that gave the survivors of Auschwitz, Treblinka, Belsen, and all the other centers of horror a sense of purpose and a basis for hope. He died 36 years ago, on the fifth day of the Hebrew month of Tishrei, midway between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur. I cannot think of a worthier way to honor his memory than by evoking his spirit and his uncompromising dedication to the creation of a new Jewish commonwealth to refute each and every refusal to recognize Israel as a Jewish state. (Menachem Z. Rosensaft is adjunct professor of law at Cornell Law School, lecturer in law at Columbia Law School and distinguished visiting lecturer at Syracuse University College of Law.)


10 - THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011

Style ‘Old Brooklyn’ Andy Statman credits Wheeling music show for inspiration BY LEE CHOTTINER Executive Editor

Andy Statman, considered by many to be the dean of American klezmer musicians, was born and raised in Brooklyn and pays homage to his home through many of his tunes — “East Flatbush Blues, “Flatbush Waltz” and “Ocean Parkway After Dark.” So it may surprise some of his fans to know that the quintessential nice, Jewish klezmer-loving guy from “across the bridge” owes much of his music inspiration to — Wheeling, W.Va.? Nu? Go figure. In an interview with the Chronicle just weeks ahead of the release of his latest, perhaps most eclectic album to date, “Old Brooklyn,” Statman, now 61, credits the “Wheeling Jamboree,” a longrunning country/bluegrass radio program for whetting his taste for his life’s work. “Wheeling played a great part in my musical development,” Statman said, recalling how he used to sit up into the night listening to the “Jamboree” on WWVA — a 50,000-watt radio station strong enough to be heard in New York. There, he was introduced to legendary performers such as Doc Williams and the Border Riders and many other acts he admits many of his traditional Jewish fans probably never heard of. “I just remember I was up to 3 in the morning listening to these guys,” Statman recalled. “That station played a major role in me getting into bluegrass and becoming a musician.” Did the master of klezmer who grew up in a secular household, but has since become an observant Jew, say (“bluegrass?”) Yep, Statman played bluegrass early in his career. He also moved on to jazz, and then klezmer, studying under David Tarras, whom many klezmer aficionados would label as the genre’s finest clarinetist of the 20th century. For himself, though, Statman doesn’t necessarily describe himself as a klezmer performer — not anymore. “I stopped playing traditional klezmer back in the early ’80s, and already had a band that’s been very innovative,” Statman said. “I haven’t really played klezmer as a folk music in many years.” “At this point, I don’t worry so much about names [of music styles],” he added. “I’ve studied a number of differ-

ent styles and can play in them, but now I just play music and play whatever seems right at the time.” Nowhere is that more evident than his latest two-CD set, “Old Brooklyn.” Unshackled by the labels of music genres, Statman has teamed up with some of the hottest singers and musicians today, including Ricky Skaggs, Bela Fleck and Paul Shaffer, to create a music package with roots far beyond the Brooklyn Bridge. The listeners will detect hints of Beal Street, Bourbon Street, the Mississippi Delta, Motown, Appalachia, and yes, Eastern Europe, though the klezmer influence is no more or no less important to this album than any other music style. “All the music on this record may fit a few genres, but I’m doing it my own way,” Statman said. “It’s really my own music at this point.” That is, with the influence of his collaborators on the album, he added. Take “The Lord Will Provide,” a wellworn English hymn from the 18th century. Sung by Skaggs, with Statman on clarinet (he also plays a lot of mandolin on this album), it was Skaggs who suggested it be included, and the country music star sings it with slow, deliberate passion. “He sang it for me once and I loved it and he suggested we do it so we came up with a quick arrangement. So to me its sounds like an ancient field recording,” said Statman. And while the song has an Appalachian gospel hint, Statman took issue with that suggestion. “It’s just a song about Abraham and Hashem and that’s what people are davening and that’s what this song is about,” he said. “It’s really a song about faith in God.” Statman hasn’t forgotten his klezmer fans on “Old Brooklyn.” The style is evident on the title track as well as “Shabbos Nigun” (a duet he played with Fleck) and “Totally Steaming.” Klezmer, according to Statman, has joined the American music landscape — played in its purest form, yet also rearranged and reinterpreted by the musicians who have mastered it. “To me, klezmer music is from a [different] time and place, but I think klezmer’s last flourishing was in America. Then it picked up a lot of different See “Old Brooklyn” next page


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011 — 11

STYLE ‘Old Brooklyn’ Continued from page 10 influences here, it sort of became several styles removed from the community it originally represented. Just bluegrass, Dixieland jazz and several other styles are now described as American. “Musicians can synthesize different styles and bring in other influences,” Statman said. “You preserve the past, then you find your own voice in it, which leads to innovations in the music.” (Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.)


12 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011

Community A C L O S E R L O O K

Jew’colades

Time for sukka decorating

COMPILED BY ANGELA LEIBOWICZ Community/Web Editor

The Pittsburgh Area Jewish Committee will be awarded the YWCA’s 2011 Racial Justice Award at a celebration dinner Wednesday, Nov. 16, at the Westin Hotel and Convention Center. The annual Racial Justice Awards recognize community leaders and organizations that work to eliminate racism and promote equity in Pittsburgh. “Our policies and positions reflect our profound respect for the dignity of every individual, as preached by the ancient Hebrew prophets, and our abiding love of liberty, as taught by this nation’s founding fathers. Being recognized for our intergroup work by an organization as highly regarded as the YWCA is a tremendous honor,” said Executive Director Deborah Fidel. Abe Salem, minyan leader and Torah reader, is retiring after serving Congregation Beth Shalom for 22 years. Congregation President Stefi Kirschner announced that, “After 22 years of dedicated service and loyalty, Abe Salem is retiring from Congregation Beth Shalom. Abe has been the minyan leader, Torah reader and the ultimate storyteller at Beth Shalom. He has inspired congregants of all ages with his stories and tales, complete with Jewish Abe Salem content and a message for all.” Salem has touched the lives of all who meet him and leaves an indelible mark, said Kirschner. While he is retiring, he is not leaving the congregation. He will continue to daven the congregation and bring his spirit to the community, she added. Robert Zaremberg, a graduate student in the GSPIA program at the University of Pittsburgh, is now the Torah reader for Congregation Beth Shalom. He has assumed Torah reading responsibilities for all Shabbat and holiday services and chants Torah in the daily minyan services.

Adat Shalom photo

Preparing for Adat Shalom’s annual Family Sukka Decorating Day are second-graders, from left, Jessica Balk, Izabella Stern and Ethan Hunt with help from their teaching assistant, Michele Wolff.

Cooking with friends Friendship Circle photo

Barbara and Jerry Rosenberg sponsored the fall session of The Friendship Circle’s Cooking Club. Pictured with the Rosenbergs is Friendship Circle’s director, Rabbi Mordy Rudolph.

The Chronicle Cooks Cooks

Will Return Next Week ✂


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011 — 13

SPORTS

‘Bear Jew’ Carimi chose observance on YK at Wisconsin JONATHAN MAYO

The Chosen 1s

A few years ago, Gabe Carimi had a dilemma. Yom Kippur was falling on a Saturday and his University of Wisconsin Badgers were playing that evening. It was 2007 and Carimi was a freshman offensive lineman for Wisconsin, a local kid making it in his home state. Carimi, who went on to win the 2010 Outland Trophy as the nation’s best collegiate interior lineman (he’s a tackle), wasn’t just one more of these athletes who happened to be Jewish. Jews in Wisconsin (and elsewhere), after all, had embraced Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun, but Braun admittedly isn’t observant, even if he hasn’t shrunk from that embrace. No, Carimi had been — and continues to be — active in the Jewish community. He grew up at Temple Beth El, a Reform congregation in Madison. He had a bar mitzva, a confirmation, the whole works. “He was a shofar blower and had been up until last year,” said Rabbi Jonathan Biatch, who has watched Carimi grow up at Beth El. “Even during his college playing days, he blew the shofar when he was here. He’s very knowledgeable about Judaism — a good neshama about his Judaism. “ That’s why it wasn’t surprising when Carimi said at the time of his Yom Kippur decision: “Religion is a part of me, and I don’t want to just say I’m Jewish. I actually do make sacrifices that I know are hard choices.” Carimi didn’t sit out that game back in 2007. Using his liberal, progressive Jewish upbringing, he thought creatively. He decided to fast according to the Israeli clock, allowing him to do so for 24 hours and be done by the afternoon. That gave him enough time to recover and play. “He was dedicated enough to Judaism to want to observe the holiday somehow,” Biatch said. “He understood there

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was a way to do it.” Four years later, Carimi was Wisconsin’s co-captain, a four-time academic All-American who led Wisconsin to a Rose Bowl appearance and a bona fide NFL prospect. The Chicago Bears drafted him in the first round and now Carimi is in the NFL, starting at right tackle. (Fans of “The Blind Side” should know that’s the same position Michael Oher currently plays for the Baltimore Ravens, having moved from left tackle.) Carimi is already being called “The Bear Jew,” a nod to his background, his team and his size: He’s listed as being 6 feet 7 inches and 316 pounds. One has to think that he made for one outstanding Tekiah G’dola blower as a result. He’s already been welcomed by the Jewish community in Chicago and vice versa, perhaps one of the few times folks from Wisconsin and Chicago have ever agreed on anything football related (see rivalries, football: Packers vs. Bears). It’s not surprising to those who know him that Carimi could so quickly bring people together. “He has a gentle spirit and soul,” Biatch said. “His physical prowess, he does his job. He performs his task. It’s important for

Gabe Carimi

his team and yet, whenever you see him, he’s a very sweet and loving man.” This makes it very easy for Carimi to be a role model in a time when athletes are thrust into such positions without actually deserving it. His dedication to his

community and his excellence on the gridiron make him worth admiring both in and out of the Jewish community. “Children look up to him and enjoy the fact Gabe is part of our community and now a professional player,” Biatch said. “For adults, it’s a further sign that American Jews have made it. Still, whenever someone comes — Braun, Shawn Green — these people continue to remind us that we can do anything. “I think the stereotype of the small, scrawny Jew is broken wide open. It breaks down those stereotypes. It definitely is a positive for us. I have a sense in Chicago there’s a lot of pride even though he’s a new resident.” And what if Carimi is forced with another play vs. fast dilemma in his pro career? Something tells me he’d choose the right path, though he is helped by how the Jewish calendar is devised. “Yom Kippur never falls on a Sunday,” Biatch said. “It can only fall on a Monday, Wednesday, Thursday or Saturday, for a myriad of reasons.” (Jonathan Mayo, the Chronicle’s sports columnist, can be reached at jonathanm@thejewishchronicle.net.)


14 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011 —

BOOKS

Book describes how John Lennon ‘imagined’ it wrong Book Review

BY MASHA RIFKIN JointMedia News Service

He kills John Lennon again, and frankly it’s a relief. In his newest book, “John Lennon and The Jews: A Philosophical Rampage,” Ze’ev Maghen delineates exactly why the music legend’s most dearly espoused dream — captured poignantly in his song “Imagine” — is anything but that. He then weaves this thesis into the answer to the question that has plagued Jewry in recent decades: What is really so important about being Jewish? Maghen, who is chairman of the Department of Middle East Studies at BarIlan University as well as a senior fellow at the Shalem Center in Jerusalem, writes in surprisingly casual prose. With statements that drop your jaw to the floor and cause you to frequently erupt in laughter, he snatches you from wherever you had plopped down to read his book and drops you right down by his side. At a bar, debating life’s biggest questions over a cold beer.

Book Review “John Lennon & the Jews: A Philosophical Rampage,” by Ze’ev Maghen, CreateSpace, 296 pages.

This is the kind of environment his writing style creates, and it draws you in. If you read Maghen’s book, you are forced to think — hard. Using bits of philosophy, history and logical deduction, Maghen argues that Lennon’s dream, universalism — the desire for the world to live “as one” with no differentiating characteristics — actually spells out the destruction of what is at the core of being human. To illustrate this point, Maghen speaks directly to you, a tone consistent throughout the book, and asks what you value most in life. Pre-empting the excuses and circumventions most of us would take to get around the question, Maghen focuses us, asks the question again, and delivers the answer we may have already known subconsciously: love. Not just any love though, but preferential love, Maghen clarifies. “Preferential love” is the term Maghen applies to the kind of love that identifies some people (lover, mother, child) as special and others (strangers) as not. This kind of love stands in stark contrast to the universal love advocated by Lennon and others: that one is applied to everyone equally. The kind of love that “distinguishes and prefers,” Maghen writes, is the only kind of love that’s really worth living for, and is at the core of how we humans work. “We all love preferentially, and that’s the only kind of love we value, the only kind of love we want back from the people we love.” He continues that it is, and always will be, in human nature to prefer certain people over others, to create groups and communities that they relate to better than others, love more than others. Most of all, Maghen advocates that this is a good way to live, in fact, the best way to live.

These kinds of preferences, Maghen explains, lead to multiculturalism, to a world of “dazzling diversity, of indeand pendent self-respecting and societies communities that value, retain, and revel in their own uniqueness,” and the only thing that can actually lead to peace. Peace, while unattainable through Lennon’s method, actually becomes a possibility when different people and cultures find a commonality in what matters most to them, Maghen argues. “Prefer your family, and you will have something genuinely in common with all decent … loving human beings the world over, an experience to share with almost everyone,” he writes, “and there’s the real common ground for you: we all love preferentially. There’s the real basis for cross-cultural understanding. There’s the only potential for peace.” But what about fascism and other past and present murderous regimes, you ask? Good question, and one that Maghen diffuses easily. To find out how, you’ll have to read the book. So, where does Jewishness fit into all of this? Maghen explains that in order to create multiculturalism, we have to cultivate multiple cultures all over the world. Simple enough, but what we often forget is that Jewishness is one of those cultures. Still, what does that even mean? What is it, really, to be Jewish? This is when Maghen really spells it out, and in so doing, provides us the tools to explain what we have instinctively felt since we each realized the fact that we were Jewish. We’ve all been there, questioned by our gentile friends or significant others, “Why is being Jewish so important to you — you don’t even go to temple!” or “How can you care so much about Israel — you’ve never even been there!” Maghen’s answer: doesn’t matter. The term “Judaism,” the religious component of being Jewish, is a modern invention,

not even mentioned in the Torah once. The word, “Jew” then, or “Yehudim,” as it is written in the biblical text, is a geographical or national term, describing a people who are from the land of Judea. “The house of Jacob … has always deemed itself one vast extended family, glued together over four adventurous millennia by a whole slew of factors, only one of which consists of belief in and obedience to that timeless national constitution known as the Torah,” Maghen writes. Being Jewish is a form of kinship, being a part of the same family, with the same history, and the same destiny. “The future of the Jewish peoples is as much up to you as it is up to the current Israeli prime minister,” Maghen writes. It is this tribal bond that connects Jews across the world, almost as if one electrical current runs through us all. It is a bond, Maghen explains, that has dissipated for many other tribes over the generations, and thus is a foreign concept to most, which leads the world to label it as “Jewish exclusivism.” Maghen’s book is not the run of the mill philosophy “fluff” thrown at you in college. It’s gritty, it’s down to earth, it’s real, and it’s challenging to do justice to it here. Peppered with fun facts (did you know Israel may be currently owned by a nun?), humor, personal stories and history come to life, the book makes you take a look at everything society and institutions of higher learning have taught you to take for granted and simply ask, “why?” Maghen allows the reader to feel — relief. Relief that it is okay to judge, to choose, to identify and to think that maybe John Lennon got it wrong.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011 — 15

BOOKS ‘Worldly Goods’ a chilling love story that strikes an eerie note Book Review

BY NEAL GENDLER For the Chronicle

“All Our Worldly Goods,” Irene Nemirovsky’s slender novel, is a model of economy, capturing an enormous range of emotion and relationships in spare, simple language. The story follows a prosperous small-town French family from happy times at the beginning of the 20th century, through the slaughter and destruction of the needless war of 1914 to the despair of the next one, as a panic-stricken, incompetent France col-

lapses in 1940. Nemirovsky, a Jew born to a wealthy Kiev banking family in 1903, moved to France during the Russian revolution, attended the Sorbonne, and became a highly successful writer for newspapers and journals and of other books. She was killed in Auschwitz in 1942. Her acclaimed “Suite Francaise,” set in Paris as the Nazis take over, lay unknown and unpublished until 2006. “All Our Worldly Goods” was pub-

lished in France in 1947 and in England in 2008. In her “translator’s note,” Sandra Smith provides a worthy description, saying that the book “is about love: forbidden love, married love, unrequited love, the love of parents for their children, of people for their homes, of citizens for their country.” True, but don’t misinterpret that as sort of a chick-flick on paper. “Worldly Goods” is much Please see Wordly Goods, page 20.


16 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011

Simchas B’nai Mitzva Claire Holthaus, daughter of Vicki and Daniel Holthaus, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Oct. 15, at 9:30 a.m. at Congregation Dor Hadash. Grandparents are Richard and Judy Roth of Cincinnati and the late William and Jean Holthaus. Julia Emily Robb, daughter of Marcy and James Jordan and Gerald Robb, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Oct. 15, at Temple Emanuel. Grandparent is Marian Nathenson

David Zaretsky, son of Gregory and Aline Zaretsky, will become a bar mitzva Saturday, Oct. 15, at Adat Shalom.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011 — 17

FREE SCREENING

Attend our free screening at the Maggie Dixon Heart Health Fair! Find out your risk and take it to heart. Early detection of a heart problem could save your life. If you have one or more of the following risk factors, consider attending this free screening: › › ›  ›

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› › › › ›

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Saturday, Oct. 22, 2:30 to 5 p.m. Maggie Dixon Heart Health Fair, Petersen Events Center, Pitt Campus Pre-registration is not necessary. Event admission and parking are free.

Heart screenings sponsored by UPMC Heart and Vascular Institute Join in the fun! The Health Fair offers a variety of screenings and activities in tandem with the University of Pittsburgh Fan Fest. Visit PittsburghPanthers.com for more information.

UPMC.com/HeartScreenings


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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011 — 19

METRO Avishai: Continued from page 2. have been doing 30 years ago: stop the damn settlements.” But the result of returning the land on which the settlements are built is a hard pill to swallow for many Israelis. “There are 600,000 Israelis living over the Green Line,” he said. “Even if Abbas offers what he offered to Olmert — that 62 percent of settlers can stay — that means that 200,000 Israelis will have to come back. A lot of people in Tel Aviv can’t envision how to do that.” While the settlement issue needs to be resolved in order to proceed with a lasting peace, Avishai believes the Palestinians’ right of return “is a more fundamental issue that needs to be addressed.”

“I think the time has come for both sides to get much more serious and specific about what they really want,” Avishai said. He believes what the Palestinians really want is something akin to the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which was set up by the Government of National Unity to help deal with what happened under apartheid. “The Palestinians want a common institution between Israel and Palestine that will provide redress for individual families that lost property and had their lives totally destructed,” he said. “People who were wounded by the 1948 war want redress and want their stories told. Avishai believes Israel should put the right of return at the forefront of peace negotiations. “There is no reason Israel should look at the law of return last,” he said. “I think that’s misguided. It has to start with the right of return, just as a

divorcing couple starts with custody of a child rather than who gets the rug in the living room.” Israel needs to set up ways for Palestinians to seek compensation for their losses, and ways for them to choose either monetary compensation or to return to the land. The number of Palestinians who would actually choose to return to Israel rather than stay in a new Palestinian state is relatively low, according to Avishai. “Polling was done in 2003,” he said. “If you look at all the Palestinians in the camps, you’ll never get more than 30,000 people who want to go back to Israel.” If those numbers are true, Israel should not be concerned with losing its Jewish majority. And if the Palestinians can define what kind of Jewish state is acceptable to them, another roadblock on the path to peace can be removed. “Abbas should say what kind of Jew-

ish state is consistent with universal democratic principles,” Avishai said. “He doesn’t have to say ‘I accept a Jewish state no matter what kind of a state you are.’ Abbas could even welcome a Jewish national home in Israel as long as he stipulates as to what that means.” “I think it’s crucial to understand that a two-state solution is in Israel’s interest, and that it’s not the end of the road. It’s a provisional thing,” Avishai said, noting that evolving cooperation will be needed on issues such as the administration of Jerusalem, water and security arrangements. “The two states will have to be cooperative,” he said. “But we won’t be able to get to it unless we can envision what cooperation can mean.”

(Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)


20 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011

BOOKS Worldly Goods: Continued from page 15. more: war, destruction, rebuilding, renewal and fear, all delivered with what Smith aptly calls “the astute psychological and social observation for which Nemirovsky is now known.” The story centers on Pierre, grandson of Saint-Elme’s leading citizen — a somewhat benevolent tyrant who owns a paper mill. Grandfather has arranged for Pierre to marry plump, orphaned heiress Simone. But Pierre secretly and chastely has been meeting Agnes, daughter of a brewer and thus lower in the town’s rigid social order. Soon after a lavish engagement dinner, he announces his desire to marry Agnes instead. His parents object, his enraged grandfather disinherits him. Agnes and Pierre marry quietly in Paris, and he begins work as an engineer, living happily with Agnes in Spain. But in July 1914, Pierre is called to join his regiment. Nemirovsky’s minimal words bring maximal effect in describing Agnes and Pierre’s agony of separation, the flattening of Saint-Elme and the suffering of its residents, and Pierre’s recognition of the futility of the Great War. He returns mostly recovered from wounds that will leave him with a painful hip. Grandfather relents a bit — although shunning Agnes — and takes Pierre into the paper mill, rebuilt partly with funds from Simone, who becomes co-owner. She has married a Parisian she met in a ditch while fleeing Ger-

mans and installed him at the mill. They have an attractive daughter, and, as a good novelist would contrive, she attracts the attention of Pierre’s son Guy. In the intertwined lives of these two families, Pierre and Agnes are pretty much the soul of goodness. Simone, unforgiving of Pierre, becomes fat, widowed and unhappy. The families live in quiet, tolerant dislike. Everyone’s mood deepens, and relationships change, in dread of a second German war. Pierre and Agnes have a new, greater fear when Guy is mobilized. Described, this might seem tame, but the plot’s twists, individual dramas and surprises pull you in and keep you glued. Nemirovsky captures the shock, fear and resignation of her adopted nation as it is outwitted and outfought in Hitler’s invasion. Smith says “Worldly Goods” shows no author premonition of impending doom, but instead “an underlying feeling of hope.” Yet, mid book, is what, with our knowledge, is an eerie note: At the grandfather’s 85th birthday celebration in 1924, he recalls that his grandfather lived to 103, but considers his failing health and concludes that he won’t live to that age — which would be in 1942. (Neal Gendler is a Minneapolis writer and editor.)

Book Review? “All Our Worldly Goods,” by Irene Nemirovsky, translated by Sandra Smith, Vintage Trade Paperback Original, 272 pages.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011 — 21

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METRO Torah project: Continued from page 1.

the chair people used the tip money for parties for the volunteers,” he said. But Feuer and Schwartz wanted to do something bigger and more meaningful for their volunteers, so they began saving the money. While different ideas were discussed, Feuer and Schwartz ultimately decided that the best way to honor their volunteers would be to purchase a Torah with their volunteers’ tip money. “I can’t think of a better way to honor the bingo workers for their hard work than to have them purchase a Torah,” he said. “And I’m not aware of any other Torah purchased by bingo tip money.” But while the new Torah will only honor the congregation’s bingo volunteers, it will also help the congregation, too, by seeding further fundraising and enthusiasm, according to Feuer. Feuer and Schwartz have collected over $37,000 in tip money over the last 10 years. Of that, about $35,000 will go to purchase a 10-pound Torah, light enough to be carried by the elderly and frail, and thus furthering Beth El’s “inclusion agenda,” said Miles Kirshner, president of the congregation.

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(Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

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“Our Torahs are currently no less than 25 pounds, and some are as heavy as 45 pounds,” Kirshner said. “The idea of the new Torah is that the physical size will be normal, but it will be made out of a lighter weight parchment. It will be fully kosher, but it will only weigh nine to 11 pounds.” And the scribe will be instructed to use a “font that is eminently readable to encourage more people to be included,” Kirshner added. The scribing of the Torah will be a “yearlong educational process,” Kirshner said. The scribe will leave about 500 letters in outline form to be filled in later. “When the sofer (scribe) comes to the shul, any individual or family can touch the feather of the quill, and will be deemed to have performed the mitzva of scribing a Torah,” Kirshner said. As for his part, Feuer sees the opportunity to participate in the scribing of the new Torah as a kind of second chance. “I was determined to get this project done after my cardiac arrest,” he said. “You’re supposed to write a Torah once in your lifetime. I blew it. This is my second chance.”

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22 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011

OBITUARY FLAMBERG: On Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2011, Hannah Ruth Flamberg, 84, a longtime resident of Squirrel Hill and wife of the late Lawrence Flamberg, died at UMPC Shadyside from complications associated with lung cancer. Named one of Pittsburgh’s Leading 100 Community Activists by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, “Ruthie,” as she was widely known, was active in politics and countless community organizations from the time she moved to Pittsburgh in 1963 and became a U.S. citizen. At the time of her death, she was a member of the Allegheny County Republican Committee, judge of elections in the 14th Ward, an advisor to the Pittsburgh Job Corps, a volunteer at the Veterans Administration Hospital, volunteer at Family House and president of the Squirrel Hill branch of AARP. She was also active in the League of Women Voters and led several grassroots initiatives in the 1970s and 1980s to improve the Pittsburgh Public Schools. A committed Zionist, she met her future husband as a member of the Hagana, the pre-Israel Jewish underground. Active in the Pittsburgh Jewish community, Ruth held local, state and national lead-

ership roles with ORT, Jewish War Veterans Ladies Auxiliary, Hadassah and NA’AMAT (Pioneer Women). Ruth was a member and Sisterhood officer at Tree of Life Congregation and Temple Sinai. From 1970 until 1992, Ruth was the owner of Clothes Faire, a vintage clothing store in Braddock. Born March 27, 1927, in Toronto, the youngest of Abraham and Anne Gilman’s four children and the only daughter, she lived with her older brother, Sam, who was working at Westinghouse in the Manhattan Project during World War II, and graduated from Wilkinsburg High School in the class of 1944. Flamberg was the mother of Daniel Flamberg, Zachary Flamberg and Nancy Flamberg Baldwin and grandmother of Allison Flamberg and Matthew and Alexander Baldwin. A memorial service will be held at Temple Sinai in Squirrel Hill after the Jewish holidays. FIREMAN: On Friday, Oct. 7, 2011, Edith (Malvin) Fireman; beloved wife of Philip Fireman; beloved mother of Sharyn (Larry) Rubin and Stanley (Karen) Fireman; sister of Leonard Malvin; also survived by six grandchil-

dren and 12 great-grandchildren; aunt of Burt “Porky” Caplan and several other nieces and nephews. Services and interment were held at Shaare Torah Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Riverview Towers, 52 Garetta Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com ROSENFELD: On Sunday, Oct. 9, 2011, Rachelle (Chelle) Rosenfeld; beloved wife of the late Morris (Moe) Rosenfeld; beloved mother of Peter T. and Sabina Bilder Rosenfeld and the late Frank A. Rosenfeld; grandmother of Sophia Ann Rosenfeld; sister-in-law of Dora Lee Rosenfeld. Chelle was an active and dedicated member of Congregation Beth Shalom, where she was a life member of the board of trustees. She chaired many events for the congregation and sisterhood and was honored with the Nathan Snader Award for devoted service to Beth Shalom and the entire Jewish community in 1991. She served as chairperson of the community calendar for the Pittsburgh Conference of Jewish Women’s Organizations for over 30 years and was given special recognition for her service by the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh in 2005. She will be greatly missed by her family, friends and the Pittsburgh Jewish community. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Beth Shalom Congregation, 5915 Beacon St., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 or a charity of the donor’s choice. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com STERN: On Monday, Oct. 10, 2011, Harriet Katz Stern; beloved wife of the late James M. Stern; loving mother of Linda Stern (Dr. Robert) Lindner, Aaron Stern and the late Frederick Stern; sister of the late Cecile Katz Brown. Grandmother of Allison (Lind-

ner) Feldstein, Amy (Lindner) Dietrich, Julie (Lindner) Goldstein and Emily and Jessica Stern; Great-grandmother of Joshua Feldstein, Elizabeth Feldstein, Jonathan Dietrich, Kate Dietrich, Sarah Goldstein, Francesca Stern and Brittany and Joseph Stern Kish. Private interment was held in Florida at Lakeside Memorial Park. Contributions may be made to Sivitz Jewish Hospice, 200 JHF Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements entrusted to Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc. www.schugar.com TANNENBAUM: On Sunday, Oct. 2, 2011, Beatrice Tannenbaum, formerly of Pittsburgh; beloved wife of Sidney Tannenbaum and the late Hy Kurren; mother of the late Shelly Kellner, Elise (Tom) Hill and Carol (Ed Durda) Miller; sister of Eunice Freeman; grandmother of Hayden and Isabel Hill, Holly and Stacy Kellner, Elan, Tora and Ari Miller; mother-in-law of Joel Kellner; also survived by many nieces, nephews and numerous cousins. Services were held at Kether Torah Cemetery, 433 Irwin Lane, Pittsburgh, PA 15212. Contributions may be made to Neuro Challenge, 4411 Bee Ridge Road #246, Sarasota, FL 34231. WALDHOLTZ: On Monday, Oct. 10, 2011, Florence L. Waldholtz; beloved wife of the late Albert Waldholtz; beloved mother of Lance P. Waldholtz of Pittsburgh and the late Ann D. Sadler; mother-in-law of Linda Cordisco; sister of the late Jules LevKoy and Mildred Steiner; grandmother of Julie Lyons and Mandy Sadler Simons; great-grandmother of Emma and Benjamin Lyons; also survived by many nieces and nephews. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Rodef Shalom Congregation, 4905 Fifth Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011 — 23

METRO Project Harmony: Continued from page 1. bloom. “It is resonating with a lot of people, and that’s the Recontructionist, the Reform, the Consevervative and the Orthodox.” Many people are in denial that domestic violence is a problem in Jewish marriages, according to Golin. There are many misconceptions in the Jewish community about domestic abuse, Golin said. “It does happen in the Jewish community. It is a much larger problem than people would like to believe.” There are many reasons why the Jewish community is reluctant to acknowledge the breadth of the problem. “First, Jews are a minority, and they are not wanting to share their dirty laundry,” Golin said. “They feel shame.” Many Orthodox women who are vicitms of domestic abuse face more pronounced hurdles in coming forth, he noted. In the Orthodox community, they may be concerned about finding marriages for their children [if the family’s reputation is tarnished].” There is also the doctrine of “shalom bayit,” or “peace in the home,” Golin added. In the Orthodox community, he continued, there can be a stigma attached to divorce and separation. “There is pressure to preserve the marriage,” he said. “Sometimes women get the message that they need to preserve it no matter what is going on.” All calls to the Shalom Task Force hotline go directly to New York, and the calls come anonymously to the trained volunteers working the phone. The volunteers can only see from what city the calls have been made. They will then refer the calls coming from Pittsburgh to trained local counselors. Depending on the particular situation, referrals can also be made to other resources such as women’s centers and shelters. Shalom Task Force also takes measures to prevent domestic abuse by sending trainers to provide education about the problem to Jewish day schools, teaching young women the signs of a potentially abusive domestic partner. There are many different kinds of domestic abuse, Golin said, including emotional, physical, financial and sexual. “These are all different strategies for one individual to control the behavior of another individual, which can result in a woman feeling powerless and victimized,” he said.

“In other racial and ethnic communities there seems to be less of a stigma, and women are more likely to speak up,” Golin continued. “In the Jewish community, this seems to be more of a problem. There are not good statistics in the Jewish community. It is highly underreported, but we know it’s happening. Shalom Task Force is a witness to that.” Shalom Task Force has operated an anonymous domestic violence hotline for the Orthodox and immigrant Jewish community since 1993. Since January 2009, it has received over 2,800 calls. In the last 14 months, calls to the hotline increased over 10 percent. The severity of the calls has also increased, with 70 percent of all hotline callers requiring peer counseling and/or safety planning. The STF has “the seal of approval of the Orthodox community,” Golin said, “with rabbis sitting on its board. Its executive director, Daniel Schonbuch, is a rabbi.” “There is a need for this resource for women in Pittsburgh,” said Tzippy Rosenberg, a former teacher, who has been working with the task force to create Project Harmony. “The Shalom Task Force told me that women have been calling them from Pittsburgh even before we started this project.” Rosenberg, who is Orthodox, and a team of volunteers have been busy putting flyers in women’s restrooms in synagogues around town, and leaving business cards that women can discreetly take. “It takes an Orthodox woman many times longer to go for help than other [victimized] women,” Rosenberg said. “Maybe it is because they are in such a close-knit community, or maybe it is because of the shame involved. Maybe they think it is better for the children. It is not more prevalent in the Orthodox community, but whatever is out there, is in the Orthodox community as well.” “We are trying to educate people about what the red flags are,” she continued. “If there is a son who has real problems, we want them to know they have to get him help, and they can’t just marry him off.” The STF, through Project Harmony, has also been training local rabbis about the problem, Rosenberg said. “The presentation started out teaching the rabbis from classical Jewish sources about how to help Jewish women, and why it was imperative to do so,” she said. “It is a problem,” she said. “It is there and we have to address it. Even if we help one person, it is worth my effort and worth my time.”

Need help? Any woman who is the victim of domestic abuse can call either (718) 337-3700, or the toll-free number, (888) 883-2323.

(Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchroncile.net.)

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DR. HARRY S. BINAKONSKY ........JACK HIRSCH CAROL M. CROOK ..................RUTH N. MARTIN BARBARA FLESCH ...................ETHEL SIROCCA RUTH K. GOLDMAN .............JEANETTE GROSS KENNETH M. GOLDMAN .....HERMAN GOLDMAN RONA MUSTIN HART.........BESSIE RUTH ROTH MARIAN HOECHSTETTER .....JOSEPH & HELEN MOSKOVITZ MARIAN HOECHSTETTER ....................JEROME HOECHSTETTER FLORENCE D. HYMAN.........NICHOLAS HYMAN FLORENCE D. HYMAN .............SORLY GORDON FLORENCE IWLER .......................MOLLIE IWLER MR. AND MRS. CHARLES JACOBS........................RUTH KLEIN FISCHMAN HARVEY E. KLEIN .................EDWARD L. KLEIN SAUL KUPERSTOCK ....JACOB S. KUPERSTOCK HARRY L. LEVINSON.............JACOB LEVINSON BENNETT F. MARKEL ...........JACOB A. MARKEL NATALIE J. NELSON MELNICK ...................................DAVID MELNICK

TOBY N. PERILMAN...................TRACI MICHELE PERILMAN TOBY N. PERILMAN ......BERNARD M. BENNETT BERNICE Z. ROGERS .................JESSE ROGERS IRVING ROSENTHAL .........MEYER ROSENTHAL JEANNE F. SCHIMMEL ....................RUTH KLEIN FISCHMAN HARRIET L. SCHWARTZ .......MILDRED CAPLAN RHODA F. SIKOV ..............WILLIAM MYER ROSE RHODA F. SIKOV ..................RUDA BELLA ROSE JOANNE & MYROL SPECTOR ...............................MORRIS SPECTOR STERN FAMILY..............................SADIE STERN BEATRICE TAFT & PEARL KRIMSKY..............SHIRLEY WATCHMAN LOEFSKY RITA L. ZUKERMAN..................HARRY BRICKER

ISUNDAY, OCTOBER 16: DA M. BREMAN, SAM CHIZECK, DORA COHEN, JUDITH KOCHIN COHEN, SYDNEY FRANKENSTEIN, DAVID MAX GEFSKY, ELINOR SARAH GOLDMAN, ALEXANDER J. GOODWIN, MILTON GREENBERG, FANNIE GREENWALD, HARRY KANAREK, JANET LEVINE, LILLIE LEVY, MARY LIPTZ, SHIRLEY WATCHMAN LOEFSKY, SELMA LUTERMAN, SELMA LUTERMAN, ESTHER MALLINGER, ROSE L. MILLER, SARAH MORMANSTEIN, LENA NEWBERG, SADYE BREMAN NOVICK, ROSE RATTNER, MOLLIE ROBINS, JUSTIN PHILIP ROSENTHAL, BERTHA SCHWARTZ, JOSEPH SCOTT, ESTHER SEGALL, CLARA SEGELMAN, DAVID SELTMAN, HARRY SHEINBERG, ROSA SHRAGER, RUTH SOLOMON, BERNARD A. SPANEL, LOUIS STRAUSS, YETTA TYRNAUER, DOROTHY SCHWARTZ VAN SANTEN, DORA SRIGLITZ WECHSLER, MAX WEISMAN. MONDAY, OCTOBER 17: DR. ELLIOTT BRODIE, ALLEN A. BROUDY, FANNIE SULKES COHEN, SHACHNY GRINBERG, JEANETTE GROSS, REBECCA HERMAN, ANITA LOIS HIRSCH, PAULINE KLEIN, PAUL G. LAZEAR, CARL J. LEFKOWITZ, FREDA W. LEVINE, JOSEPH ROBERT LIPSICH, LIBBIE LUBIC, HARRY MELLON, CLARA M. OBERFIELD, TILLIE F. OSHRY, REBECCA OSOFSKY, HARRY PEARL, LOUIS RICE, JULIUS B. ROSENBERG, MELVIN N. ROSENFIELD, MORITZ ROSENZWEIG, MARCUS ROTH, ANNA ROTHBERG, BEN RUDNER, WILLIAM SABLE, TILLIE SCOTT, ISADORE SERBIN, IDA W. SHEELINE, HYMAN SHUSSETT, JACOB SOFFER, SAMUEL SUPOWITZ. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18: HARRY AMERICUS, MORRIS CHARLES ELOVITZ, JACOB FEIGUS, RUTH KLEIN FISCHMAN, HARRY GIRSON, SAMUEL W. GOULD, ALBERT HALLE, IDA FINKEL HIRSH, SAMUEL W. JUBELIRER, JACOB SAMUEL KUPERSTOCK, ROSE LEVINE, ELIZABETH GERTRUDE LEVY, JACK H. MAR, ANNA MILLER, HARRY MODELE, SAMUEL MOSKOWITZ, NATHAN OSGOOD, ANNA PARIS, ISABELLE RADIN, ELI J. ROSE, LOUIS ROSEMAN, IDA ROSEN, ANNA ROSENFELD, WILLIAM ROSENSTEIN, BERTRAM W. ROTH, PHILLIP SCHAFFER, IKE SHAPIRO, CANTOR HARRY P. SILVERSMITH, LIBBY SILVERSTEIN, FLORENCE S. SINGER, ROSE SPECTER, SADIE STERN, BESSIE STRENG, HERMAN STRUMINGER, HINDA THORPE, ESSAK WEINER, MARY COTLER WEINER, LILLIAN L. WEISBERGER, MINNIE WINER, LOUIS H. ZUCKER. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19: AARON BLOOM, ISMOR DAVIDSON, ALEX FRIEDLANDER, GOLDINE LAPIDUS, REBECCA LEDERMAN, KATIE DEBORAH LEFTON, SAM LEVIN, BELLE B. MAHARAM, ESTHER MANKIN, ISADORE NADLER, JOSEPH NEWMAN, JOSEPH PEARLSTEIN, REGINA PREVOST, ANNA RABINOVITZ, WILLIAM RAPHAEL, MINNIE RUBEN, HYMAN SCHLEIFER, ESTHER POMERANTZ SILVERMAN, HATTIE SIMON, ANNE S. SLESINGER, SIMON J. SOLOF, ESTHER ZACKS, EVELYN ZIFF, NATHAN ZWAIL, ISADORE ZWEIG. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20: JEANETTE BERKMAN, MEYER BERNSTEIN, BEN COHEN, BLANCHE S. COHEN, LEONA YORKIN DYM, WARREN G. FRIEDLANDER, CLARA GOLDSTEIN, MEYER HALTMAN, ALEXANDER LITTLE, DR. HARRY M. MARCUS, HARRY M DR. MARCUS, TOBA MARKOVITZ, EDITH MURSTEIN, SARAH NOVAK, EMANUEL ROTH, FANNIE SCHEINHOLTZ, LEAH SCHUTTE, HATTIE E. SCOTT, YETTA E. SEGAL, HANNAH SHARNOFF, CELIA SILVERMAN, BELLA WEINBERG, MOSES WEINERMAN, SAMUEL WIESENTHAL, CARRIE F. WOLF, LOUIS ZARENBOVITZ. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21: LUCY BALTER, SARA JEAN BINAKONSKY, HARRY BRICKER, ANNA LICHTENSTEIN BROWN, BEATRICE CHARAPP, NECHAMA COHEN, PEARL COHEN, TILLIE COHEN, SAMUEL JACOB ELIASHOF, DR. HOWARD H. FREEDMAN, RUEBEN GOLDSMITH, HYMAN GOLDSTEIN, PAUL HARRIS, HYMAN L. LEFF, WOLF LEVINE, ABRAHAM LEWIS, ESTHER MERVIS, SARAH MEYER, JACOB MEYERS, LUBE MILLER, SAMUEL MINSKY, SARAH LOEB NEIMAN, LEONARD NEWMAN, HARRY NM KAUFFMAN, HAZEL OSWOLD, BESSIE PECK, CARRIE POLLOCK, ROSE M. RABINOVITZ, PHILIP ROSENTHAL, DR. SAMUEL A. RUBEN, FLORENCE RUBEN, SAMUEL A (DR) RUBEN, ABRAHAM SCHRAGER, DELLA SCHNEIDER SCHWARTZ, REBECCA SCHWARTZ, FREYDA SENZAL, ABRAHAM SHRAGER, RIVKA SILVERMAN, ISRAEL SNIDERMAN, SARAH STROSKY, JENNIE WALD, LEOPOLD WEISS, ESTHER K. WEISSMAN, CHARLES WOLK, YETTA WYNETT. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22: JENNY BRAUN, ABE CAZEN, ISADORE CHARLAP, SAMUEL EVELOVITZ, DORA FRIEDMAN, FRANCES FROMME, MORRIS GORDON, LENA REBECCA HOROWITZ, ETHEL JOSEPHS, PHYLLIS K. KART, ABRAM HIRSH LEVINE, REVA LEVINE, ANNA MANDEL, BELLA MARCUS, JACOB MEYERS, LENA MOSKOWITZ, LAWRENCE A. PORT, HARRY REICHER, MEYER SAUL ROSENSON, DORA ROSENZWEIG, ABRAHAM J. ROTHSTEIN, BESSIE RUBINOFF, HARRY RUSKIN, ISAAC SCHWARTZ, LIBBY SCHWARTZ, ETTA SERBIN, MAX SHEPSE, JOSEPH SHIRE, SHIJEY SHUB, ANNA A. SILVERMAN, ABRAHAM SMITH, ABRAHAM MEYER SOLOMON, ROSE SPERLING, SAMUEL STONE, FLORENCE M. SUPOWITZ, SAUL H. TANUR, SAUL DAVID TAYLOR, ZELKA TISHERMAN, CELIA WAYNE, REBECCA WEINBERG,


24 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE OCTOBER 13, 2011

The Jewish Chronicle October 13, 2011  

October 13, 2011 edition

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