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Style A journey back Survivor returns to Polish hometown in ‘Memory’

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february 16, 2012 SHEVAT 23, 5772

Vol. 55, No. 40

Pittsburgh, PA

$1.50

Gotta dance … and help House Bill would mandate Holocaust education in Pennsylvania schools BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

State Rep. Brendan Boyle is planning to introduce legislation requiring Pennsylvania public and nonpublic schools to provide Holocaust and genocide education in their curricula. “I think it is, frankly, critical that all of our young people learn about the Holocaust specifically, and generally about genocide, the dangers of unstopped hatred, and what that can lead to,” the Philadelphia Democrat told the Chronicle. “We would like to say, ‘Never again,’ but it still happens.” Under the bill, the Pennsylvania Department of Education would develop a model Holocaust/genocide curriculum to be used by schools. “It’s important to learn about the 12 million that were exterminated, and the 6 million who were Jewish, and what led to that, ” Boyle said. “It’s been said that the road to the Holocaust was paved with indifference. When we see hatred and indifference, we have to stand up.”

California, Florida, Illinois, New Jersey and New York already have laws requiring the teaching of the Holocaust in schools, according to the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance, and Research. Pennsylvania has been without state funding for Holocaust education since 2009, when about $60,000 was cut from the budget by the office of Gov. Edward Rendell. That cut left no state funds designated for Holocaust education in the commonwealth. Those Holocaust education funds were part of a broader ethnic heritage line item in the Department of Education’s budget. The department had been distributing the $60,000 to the Pennsylvania Holocaust Education Council, a volunteer organization that is made up of both active and retired teachers. The organization provided grants to teachers for educational materials, to bring survivors to their schools and to help fund field trips. Boyle is gaining support for his Please see Holocaust Bill, page 15.

JFilm releases 2012 festival lineup: horror film, sitcom among offerings BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

Chronicle photo by Ohad Cadji

Lizzie Shackney (left) and Hannah Busis, two of the Diller Teen Fellows and organizers of the Feb. 11 Project Build — a community teen fundraising dance to support school construction in Haiti — address the other dancers at the Jewish Community Center in Squirrel Hill. They explained why the Diller teens chose this year’s cause and presented a slide show and short video. Nearly 200 teens, grades nine to 12, from across Greater Pittsburgh, attended the open dance, which raised $2,000 to build schools in Haiti. More photos from the dance can be seen at thejewishchronicle.net.

Movie-loving Pittsburghers may want to clear their calendars for the last two weeks of March, as the big screen lineup rolled out by the JFilm Festival promises to deliver a smorgasbord of films that probably should not be missed. From the first-ever Israeli horror film, to episodes of the acclaimed Israeli version of the sitcom “Friends,” to a documentary exposing sexual abuse in the modern Orthodox community of Baltimore, this year’s 20 offerings look to be eclectic, moving and, above all, entertaining. “This year’s films blew us out of the wa-

ter,” said Kathryn Spitz Cohan, executive director of JFilm Pittsburgh. “They are all significant.” The festival will open Saturday, March 17, at the SouthSide Works Cinema, with “Prima Primavera,” a road-trip movie with Hungarian subtitles, exploring the relationship between an unlikely pair of traveling companions, fleeing bank robbers through the Bulgarian and Serbian countryside. “I think it will have a wide appeal,” Spitz Cohan said of the film, which her committee of 50 enthusiastically chose to open the festival. “It’s a little quirky, it’s charming, it’s tongue-in-cheek. And it has Please see JFilm, page 15.

B USINES S 12/C L AS SIFIED 11/C OMMUNITY 8/O BITUARIES 14 O PINION 6/R EAL E STATE 13/S IMCHAS 10

Times To Remember

KINDLE SABBATH CANDLES: 5:39 p.m. EST. SABBATH ENDS: 6:39 p.m. EST.


2 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE

FEBRUARY 16, 2012

This week’s issue: March 28, 1979

Historic peace treaty signing met with measured hope by Chronicle (Editor’s Note: Retro News is a column that will appear every week this year as part of the celebration of the Chronicle’s 50th anniversary.)

Front Page The front page of this week’s Chronicle carried just one story dealing with just one issue — the only issue:

Treaty of Peace Between Egypt and Israel Signed on the White House Lawn The simple headline modestly ran two columns long. It wasn’t a screamer, like when war is declared (or won) or when a man walks on the moon. In fact, each successive line was printed in a smaller point size than the last one, mindful of the historic moment when a Jewish and Arab state declared peace, but realizing that much work lay ahead. The story accompanied a photo of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, U.S. President Jimmy Carter and Israeli Prime Minster Menachem Begin. Below that, a map of Israel showing the armistice lines of 1949 with its neighbors and the buffer zone carved out after the Yom Kippur War. As for the story, it wasn’t really a story at all, but a complete text of the treaty the three leaders had signed on the

White House lawn just days earlier. Chronicle Executive Editor Albert W. Bloom apparently chose not to publish a front-page analysis as he had on previous landmark occasions. This time, he just let his subscribers read for themselves and make up their own minds. According to the preamble of the Egyptian-Israeli Peace treaty, which would return to Egypt all of the Sinai Peninsula in return for diplomatic recognition of Israel, the parties were “convinced of the urgent necessity of the establishment of a just, comprehensive and lasting peace in the Middle East in accordance with [United Nations] Security Council Resolutions 242 and 338.” The inside pages carried the local reaction to the treaty. In a page 2 story, Dr. Sidney N. Busis, then president of the United Jewish Federation, lauded the treaty in a lengthy statement. He commended Begin and Sadat for “courage and statesmanship in pursuing their quest for peace.” He expressed hope that other leaders would emulate Sadat — something that would happen years later when Jordan’s King Hussein also made peace with Israel — and he underscored “the risks that Israel is taking for peace.” Busis also noted that several Jewish Pittsburgh dignitaries were on hand for the signing, including himself, Donald Robinson, Ivan Novick, Philip Baskin and their wives.

“That is the oil-loaded question,” he added — a reference to how the price of oil would likely dictate U.S. policy in the region. “America, and the rest of the shrinking free world, has got to look at these ugly Middle East realities in the eye — and move energy conservation to the front burner of their national policy agendas. Time is running out.”

Community

The March 28, 1979, front page.

Opinion In his weekly “People & Issues” column, Bloom, the executive editor, took aim at those intractable foes of Israel that remained as such even after the treaty signing. Titled “A new Axis to grind,” Bloom reported that Syria and Iraq were trying to draw Jordan into a new “triangle of trouble” or a new super state consistent with the Arab nationalism philosophy of the time. “Some experts believe they may succeed,” Bloom wrote. “But they add, how long will it last?

Correction In “Jewish women react as Komen defunds, funds Planned Parenthood,” published Feb. 9, we incorrectly stated that, due to a common gene mutation, women of Ashkenazi descent are 10 times more likely than the general population to develop breast cancer. This is not true.

Also this week, Rodef Shalom Congregation announced it would host its First Family Health Day, sponsored by the Ladies Hospital Aid Society Auxiliary. Many well-known physicians and health care specialists were expected to speak. Pittsburgh artist Lila Hirsch was holding an adult class for acrylic painting at the Jewish Community Center in Oakland. In addition, Tessie Binstock was presenting a series of art history classes at the JCC while Sandi Koi was teaching a class in calligraphy. A group of teens were pictured before they left on a bus trip to Washington to be on hand for the signing of the historic Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty. They were rewarded for making the trip by meeting Israel’s Prime Minister Begin and Vice President Walter Mondale. — COMPILED BY LEE CHOTTINER (For a more comprehensive look at the March 28, 1979, Chronicle, visit the jewishchronicle.net and click on “archives” at the top of the page. Back issues of the Chronicle are archived by the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.)

One in every 40 Ashkenazi Jews has a BRCA gene mutation — which can be a predictor for breast cancer — compared to only one out of every 500 to 800 people in the general population. The risk of developing breast cancer for a woman with a BRCA gene mutation is 10 times higher than for those without the gene mutation.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 16, 2012 — 3

METRO Briefly Shaare Torah Congregation will screen Carl Kurlander’s film about Pittsburgh, “My Tale of Two Cities: A Comeback Story,” Sunday, Feb. 19, 7:30 p.m., at the synagogue, 2319 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. A discussion with the filmmaker will follow. Kurlander, a Hollywood screenwriter who wrote the movie “St. Elmo’s Fire,” and was the writer/producer on NBC’s “Saved by the Bell” sitcom, returned to Pittsburgh in 2001. This unlikely decision became the topic of the first-person documentary, “My Tale of Two Cities,” which explores whether one can go home again, and whether Pittsburgh, which built America with its steel, conquered polio, and invented everything from aluminum to the Big Mac, could reinvent itself for a new age. Shaare Torah was one of the first places to show an extended trailer for “My Tale of Two Cities” while the film was being made. The final version has since played in more than 26 cities across North America, including a special screening on Capitol Hill. There is no cost to attend, and copies of the DVD will be available for purchase. Erwin Joos, a writer and art historian, will make a presentation about artist Eugeen Van Mieghem and the

Red Star Line titled “One Foot in America: The Jewish Emigrants of the Red Star Line and Eugeen Van Mieghem,” Tuesday, Feb. 28, 7 p.m., at the American Jewish Museum of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh, Squirrel Hill. Joos is the founder and president of the Eugeen Van Mieghem Foundation, curator of the Eugeen Van Mieghem Museum and author of Van Mieghem Publications. Van Miegem (1875-1930) was an artist whose works depicting emigrants bears artistic witness to the greatest mass migration in the history of Antwerp, Belgium. His paintings and drawings that depict Jewish emigrants provide a sensitive visual record of Jewish emigration from Europe on Red Star Line ships. Antwerp was the New York of the 16th century. Along with Venice, it was the most important world port of that period. When Antwerp fell in 1585 to the Spanish army, its community of Sephardic Jews left, mostly for Holland and Italy. Nearly 300 years later the port of Antwerp once again became a center of Jewish migration. Between 1873 and 1934, the Red Star Line transported approximately 2.5 million emigrants from Antwerp to the United States. Some of those who departed include Golda Meir, Irving Berlin and Albert Einstein. Call 412-521-8010 for more information. Please see Briefly, page 5.


4 - THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 16, 2012

STYLE

A trip back... ‘Memory’ a distilling look at one survivor’s experience BY LEE CHOTTINER Executive Editor

Dennis Woytek (red shirt) filming in the Jewish Cemetery in Warsaw

Howard Chandler (center) visiting the Jewish Cemetery in Wierzbnik, Poland. Chandler was instrumental in restoring the cemetery.

Electric fences at Majdanek

Photos courtesy Dennis S. Woytek

Howard Chandler remembers well the day his family was expelled from his hometown of Wierzbnik, Poland. He remembers the exact date — Oct. 27, 1942 (it was a Tuesday). He remembers it was “a beautiful fall day.” And he remembers how the family tried to hide his younger brother — the smartest of his siblings, he said — with a Catholic family, and how that family apparently betrayed the boy. Chandler, now 84 and living in Toronto, displayed his remarkable recollection of his Holocaust experience in a new documentary, “Memory: A Holocaust Survivor’s Story.” The 51-minute film, produced by Dennis S. Woytek, assistant professor of journalism and multimedia arts at Duquesne University, will be the last of six films screened at the 2012 Human Rights Film Series (subtitled “Dignity & Disgrace”) at Duquesne, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 7 p.m., at 105 College Hall. The film was made with the support of Classrooms Without Borders, a nonprofit that connects teachers to multicultural experiences, and several other funders. Woytek will speak at the screening, as will Alan Rosen, an author and lecturer from Yad Vashem’s International Institute for Holocaust Research. “Memory” is a six-chapter film juxtaposed with an on-camera interview with Chandler, family photos of his early days and death camps, and scenes from a recent trip he made with members of Classrooms Without Borders to Wierzbnik — today known as Starachowice — and the camps where he was imprisoned. Chandler acted as docent on that trip. The aging survivor vividly recalls details of his early days and his relations with his Christian neighbors, the ghettoization of his community, including the eroding living conditions in Wierzbnik as Jews from other parts of Poland were sent there, then eventually deported to Treblinka, where they were killed. That

fate also befell his mother and sister and younger brother following their expulsion, while Chandler, his father and brother were spared to work in a nearby munitions plant. Chandler actually escaped at one point, but he returned because he knew 10 Jews, including his father and brother, would be shot if he didn’t. He also knew Poles might turn him in for a reward of a bag of sugar and a bottle of vodka. “This was the worth of a Jew,” Howard Chandler he said. After the war, Chandler feared returning to Poland and reclaiming family property after hearing that other Jews who had done so were shot. Woytek made the film with the assistance of Jessica Blank a Jewish student and senior digital media arts major at Duquesne. “Our goal as a documentary film crew was to record the events, the experiences of the group and to record Howard Chandler as he again walked in his footsteps that brought so much sadness more than 67 years ago,” Woytek said in an online statement. While not the first film about a Holocaust survivor returning to Europe, “Memory” candidly distills the Holocaust experience through the eyes of one man, whose recollection is hardly dimmed by the passage of time. Perhaps because of his young age — he was 14 when the Nazis sent him to slave labor — Chandler is able describe his experiences as if they were recent occurrences. Whatever the reason, this short documentary is worth viewing. (Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.)

Visit us on the web: thejewishchronicle.net


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 16, 2012 — 5

METRO Briefly Continued from page 3. The Jewish Chronicle has added two new writers to its blogosphere. “The BeetEating Heeb” is a blog for Jewish vegetarians, Jewish vegans and all Jews whose concerns about food are not limited to how it tastes. Written by Jeffrey Cohan of Forest Hills, a member of the Advisory Committee of Jewish Vegetarians of North America, the blog will also examine what the Torah has to say about food. “Connie’s College Chat,” by Connie Pollack, is a forum about college admisConnie Pollack sions that will provide insight and advice for parents and for students as they explore post-secondary educa-

tional options. Multiple topics, including how to plan for college, the college selection and application process, affording college, and more will be covered. Both blogs can be found on the homepage of thejewishchronicle.net. A photography exhibit by Ira Rubin, entitled “Statues and Street Scenes: Exploring Historic Prague and its Environs,” is on display for the month of February at the Squirrel Hill Branch of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. The photographs in this exhibit, taken in June 2010, juxtapose ordinary people going about daily tasks with the grandeur of monuments from the 16th to 20th centuries. Among the photos is a picture of the Old Jewish Cemetery of Prague and the courtyard at Terezin Concentration Camp. The Jewish Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh and Amazing Journeys are offering cruises of the West Coast or Alaska this spring and summer. The West Coast cruise, which runs from May 27 to June 1, is for Jewish singles in their 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s, and is a one-time only, five-night North American journey from San Diego, Calif., to Vancouver, British Columbia. The JCC travel program, in partnership with Amazing Journeys, provides Jewish adults from all over North America with unique travel opportunities, planned and escorted by expert travel professionals. Contact Bill Cartiff at 412-278-1975, ext. 242 or bcartiff@jccpgh.org for


6 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 16, 2012

Opinion

The Jewish Chronicle David M. Caoin, CEO EDITORIAL STAFF Lee Chottiner, Executive Editor Angela Leibowicz, Community/ Web Editor Toby Tabachnick, Staff Writer SALES STAFF Susie Mangel, Senior Sales Associate Roberta Letwin, Sales Associate Donna Mink, Classified Sales PRODUCTION STAFF Dawn Wanninger, Production Manager Nancy Bishop Production Artist BUSINESS STAFF Joe Soloski, Comptroller Josh Reisner, Office Manager Marcy Kronzek, Subscriptions BOARD OF TRUSTEES Richard Kitay, President Cindy Goodman-Leib, Vice President Larry Honig, Secretary Andy Schaer, Treasurer Davida Fromm, Past President Carolyn Hess Abraham Brian Balk Daniel Berkowitz Lynn Cullen Milton Eisner Stephen Fienberg Malke Steinfeld Frank David Grubman Thomas Hollander Evan Indianer David Levine Ari Lightman Mitchell Pakler Amy Platt Benjamin Rosenthal Charles Saul Adam Shear Jonathan Wander Lou Weiss Published every Thursday by the Pittsburgh Jewish Publication and Education Foundation 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Phone: 412-687-1000 FAX: 412-521-0154 E-Mail: newsdesk@thejewishchronicle.net SUBSCRIPTION: $45 in Pennsylvania $47 East of the Mississippi $49 West of the Mississippi and FL NEWSSTAND PRICE $1.50 PER COPY POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE JEWISH CHRONICLE, 5915 BEACON ST., 3rd Floor PITTSBURGH, PA 15217 (PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA) USPS 582-740 Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to the Jewish Chronicle become the property of this publication, which is not responsible for the return or loss of such items. The Chronicle does not endorse the goods or services advertised in its pages and makes no representation to the kashrut of food products and services in said advertising. The publisher is not liable for damages if, for any reason whatsoever, he fails to publish an advertisement or for any error in an advertisement. Acceptance of advertisers and of ad copy is subject to the publisher’s approval. The Chronicle is not responsible if ads violate applicable laws and the advertiser will indemnify, hold harmless and defend the Chronicle from all claims made by governmental agencies and consumers for any reason based on ads appearing in the Chronicle.

Knowing Rabbi Plaut e didn’t know W. Gunther Plaut, the renown Reform rabbi who died Wednesday, Feb. 8, in Toronto, at age 99. But we certainly knew of him. We knew the German-born Plaut, who never intended to become a rabbi, came to America in 1935 to accept a scholarship to study for the rabbinate at Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati — a decision that probably saved his life. We knew he became an Army chaplain in World War II, attached to the 104th Infantry, an assignment that fatefully brought him back to his native Germany where he was among the first U.S. soldiers to liberate a concentration camp — Dora-Nordhausen. And we knew he wrote or edited more than 20 books throughout his long rabbinate, including the Torah commentary that has become the standard chumash at hundreds of Reform congregations — “The Torah: A Modern Commentary,” or, as generations of Reform Jews have come to know it, “The Plaut Chumash.” All this we know, but so would anyone

W

else who has read one of the many news obituaries written about Plaut since his death. This much we know in our kishkes: No matter what kind of Reform Jew you are — a regular temple goer, an occasional attendee at Saturday morning Torah study, a once-a-year-Jew or a Jew who left organized religion behind shortly after your confirmation — W. Gunther Plaut touched your life, even if you didn’t know it. If you’re a regular at services or Torah study, you’ve read the Plaut Chumash and are intimately familiar with the rabbi’s take on the weekly parasha. If you’re a once-a-year Jew, you may have robotically picked up a copy of the chumash to follow along during a Torah service at some bar mitzva. Your eyes might have caught a passage here, an interpretation there, and you were impressed by it. And even if you didn’t do that much, the rabbi’s sermon you listened to was more than likely influenced by the chumash you didn’t read. Finally, if your Judaism ended with

your confirmation, more likely than not, the parting gift you received from your temple was the Plaut Chumash. And you kept it. You may have even thumbed through it once or twice over the years, glancing at the rabbi’s commentaries and interpretations. The Plaut Chumash became one of those few links to your faith that you just didn’t break. Plaut didn’t pretend his opus, which included commentaries by Rabbi Bernard J. Bamberger and essays by William W. Hallo, was for all Jews. “Our work reflects a liberal point of view,” he wrote in his preface. He nevertheless hoped that such a viewpoint, like others in Jewish scholarship, would “reflect the search after the living God.” We hope so, too, but we know the Plaut Chumash is omnipresent in a vast portion of the Jewish world. It has influenced holy discussions for generations — an achievement few humans ever reach. We didn’t know W. Gunther Plaut. Then again, maybe we did.

A Russian Jewish leader with grand plans gary rosenblatt

NEW YORK — Alexander Levin, a ragsto-riches Ukrainian businessman who announced a new international forum for Russian-speaking Jews recently at the United Nations, says he knows how to deal with world leaders such as Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin. “The way the West does business with the government of Russia and Ukraine is not the right way,” the 43-year-old Levin explained in an interview at his hotel here. “Our group won’t bring big pressure. That would be a big mistake; you can’t pressure Russia, which has billions of dollars, weapons and oil. But we understand Putin and other leaders; we have the same mentality. Our approach is to be very pragmatic and open new channels” of partnership in seeking to unify international opposition to a nuclear Iran. Levin’s agenda is to improve conditions for peace through his new organization, The World Forum of RussianSpeaking Jewry, which he will serve as president, unifying Jews of the former Soviet Union and ultimately establishing “the right conditions for the arrival of moshiach — that is my goal.” Heady plans for a man little known in the West and far from a seasoned diplomat in international relations. But as president of the Greater Kiev Jewish Community, he is a force to be reckoned with, as indicated by his becoming the centerpiece of the recent U.N. ceremony commemorating International Holo-

caust Remembrance Day and the 70th anniversary of the Babi Yar massacres. More than 500 Russian-speaking Jews, most of them elderly Holocaust survivors, attended the solemn U.N. program, where Levin announced the new organization in his keynote address and pledged: “We, the Russian-speaking Jews from the far-flung corners of the Earth, stand ready to unite against the nuclear program of Iran. We will not let another Holocaust engulf us.” Malcolm Hoenlein, executive vice chairman of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations, and a participant at the commemoration, told The Jewish Week the Russian-speaking Jewish community around the world is “a human reservoir of talent and potential,” and that any effort to bring them together “can be valuable.” He also noted that leaders like Levin have “built Jewish communities and underwritten institutions in Eastern Europe, which are realities unmatched in Western Europe.” Raised in his native Kiev, Levin lived with his family — and three other families — his first 20 years in a small apartment with little privacy and no bath or shower. When he came to the United States in 1988, he remembers being greeted by HIAS officials and crying on being placed in quarters for the homeless in Manhattan. Levin spent several years in the United States, where he is a citizen (as he is in Israel), before returning to Ukraine and becoming one of the country’s wealthiest businessmen, primarily through real estate. Along the way he discovered an inner sense of Jewish belief. When he was young, he said, he never saw a synagogue, but would go to a church, light candles and face a statue of Saint Nicholas. “I prayed to God but looked at him,” he said with a shrug and a smile. It was on his return to Ukraine from the United States, in his 20s, that he felt “a

need to learn more about Judaism.” He went to the synagogue in Kiev for the first time on Yom Kippur, but was unmoved by the service. Nonetheless, he was impressed with a leading Chabad rabbi there, Moshe Reuven Azman. “He had clear eyes and a good heart, I could see that,” Levin recalls. He began to study Jewish texts and now prays three times a day, wears a kipa and follows the Chabad rituals. At first reluctant to become a local Jewish leader in Kiev — “I’m a businessman, I didn’t think I could do the social work” — he took on the presidency of the community. He also co-chairs the Babi Yar Foundation, and found to his surprise that despite the major challenges of seeking unity among a disparate community, “I feel like I understand this work, and I like it. “In my heart, I felt the need to do something for my God, for my Jewish people, more than give tzedaka.” His address at the U.N. event focused on the influence of the Russian-speaking Jewish community in effecting world peace. “We have a political and electoral clout,” he said. “We can be a bridge between East and West, an intermediary between the United States and Russia or between the United States and Ukraine. “We have a possibility to save the people of this planet from an impending danger of a new genocide.” But his talk was thin on details, and in our interview prior to the U.N. event, he said his strategy was private, for now. “I have a global mentality,” he said. Countries like Russia and Ukraine only care about Iran because of money and oil, he maintained. “But world peace is priceless, and we know how” to make the case. (Gary Rosenblatt, editor and publisher of The New York Jewish Week, can be reached at gary@jewishweek.org. This column previously appeared in the Week.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 16, 2012 — 7

OPINION

Letters to the editor We invite you to submit letters for publication. Letters must include name, address and daytime phone number; addresses and phone numbers will not be published. Letters may not exceed 400 words and may be edited for length and clarity; they cannot be returned. Mail, fax or e-mail letters to: letters@thejewishchronicle.net via e-mail : via fax:

(412) 521-0154

Mailing address:

The Jewish Chronicle 5915 3rd Flr.,Beacon St. Pittsburgh, PA 15217

Bible resolution was controversial I want to thank Oren Spiegler for his letter on H.R. 535, the “Year of the Bible” resolution (“Bible resolution hypocritical,” Feb. 9). While I can’t explain the position of the legislators who penned it, I would like to take the opportunity to

provide context on the process of drafting, and voting for, resolutions. House resolutions provide a symbolic statement from the legislature — most often on behalf of worthy causes and organizations. I myself sponsored resolutions this session honoring the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh and Magee-Womens Hospital. More often than not, the content of these resolutions is universally supported and passed unanimously; as such, they are listed as “non-controversial” resolutions. The implication is that all House members can agree and, most often, that is the case. On the same day that H.R. 535 was adopted, so were resolutions declaring Please see Letters, page 13.


8 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRRUARY 16, 2012

Community A C

Building for the future

Playing to full house

L O S Temple Emanuel photo

E

The Diskin Music Fund of Temple Emanuel of South Hills presented a recital performance by Noah Bendix-Balgley, new concertmaster of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Jan 29. Bendix-Balgley, accompanied on piano by PSO principal keyboard Rodrigo Ojeda, performed works by Stravinsky, Brahms, Franck, Achron and Kreisler for a capacity audience. Pictured are Betty Diskin with Noah Bendix-Balgley after the recital.

R

L

Annual Sports Luncheon this Sunday

O O K

Adat Shalom photo

Parker Haberman, back, Caden Goodworth and Dylan Rice — all pre-K students at Adat Shalom Preschool near Fox Chapel — love to build huge cooperative structures.

More than 400 special needs guests will have the chance to get up close to local sports celebrities, including a Pittsburgh Steeler, professional wrestlers, former professional baseball players and collegiate athletes at the Congregation Beth Shalom Men’s Club Annual Sports Luncheon Sunday, Feb. 19, at 12:15 p.m. WTAE-TV’s sports and news anchor Andrew Stockey will emcee the event for the 15th time. Scott Seabol, a former third baseman for the New York Yankees and St. Louis Cardinals and a McKeesport native, and Dennis Bair, a former pitcher for minor league affiliates of the Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Reds and Arizona Diamondbacks and an Allderdice High School graduate will attend. All activities will be held in Beth Shalom’s Samuel and Minnie Hyman Ballroom, located at 5915 Beacon St. in Squirrel Hill. The entire community is welcome. Contact Congregation Beth Shalom at 412-421-2288 to make a reservation.

Sales Opportunity

The More You Sell — The More You Make E-mail davidc@thejewishchronicle.net for more information

Melton for seniors

Melton 55 — an abbreviated program modeled on the Florence Melton Adult MiniSchool — has come to Riverview Towers. Open to senior citizens, the class meets once a week for one hour. Taught by Rabbi Aaron Herman, pictured above, the students learn “Rhythms of Jewish Living,” including life cycle events and holidays. The 30week course is open to both residents and nonresidents of Riverview. The program is sponsored by the Agency for Jewish Learning and is funded by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Contact Amy Karp at the AJL at 412-521-1101 for more information and to enroll.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 16, 2012 — 9


10 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 16, 2012

Simchas B’nai Mitzvahs Suzanna Libi Goodman, daughter of Debbie and Jim DeLong and Lisa and Rob Goodman, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Feb. 18, at Temple Emanuel. Grandparents are Naomi and Gabriel Frankel and Gail and George Goodman.

Julia Lauren Izenson, daughter of Dana and Marty Izenson, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Feb. 18, at Peninsula Sinai Congregation in Foster City, Calif. Grandparents are Marilyn Hausman, Nancy and Joel Hausman, Sondra and Richard Glasser and the late Edward Izenson.

Check out the blogs at www.thejewishchroncle.net

Alexandra Papernick, daughter of Marla Meyer and Stephen Papernick, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Feb. 18, at 10:30 a.m. at Temple Sinai. Grandparents are Gloria Cadwallader and Frank DeLuca and the late Wayne Meyer and Judy and Alan Papernick.

Zoe Papernick, daughter of Marla Meyer and Stephen Papernick, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Feb. 18, at 10:30 a.m. at Temple Sinai. Grandparents are Gloria Cadwallader and Frank DeLuca and the late Wayne Meyer and Judy and Alan Papernick.

Jordan Maya Rabner, daughter of Brittany Green and Monte and Lisa Rabner, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Feb. 18, at Tree of Life*Or L’Simcha.

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE 5915 BeaCon ST., 3rd Flr., PiTTSBurgh, Pa 15217 HELP WANTED

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REGISTERED SALES Representative. The development corporation for Israel/Israel Bonds (DCI) is currently seeking an experienced Professional Registered Sales Representative for its Pittsburgh office who will have responsibility for soliciting sales of Israel Bonds with new & established customers. The ideal candidate will be a high energy, sales oriented individual with a documented record of success, ideally in selling financial products, knowledge of the local Jewish Community & Israel history & current social political environment is a strong plus. Duties will include proactively managing DCIA & its current customer base, prospecting for new sales opportunities, working with lay leaders working to establish & implement campaign activities resulting is the sales of Israel Bonds & coordinating existing & new sales events in the Western PA & West Virginia region. Must be a self-starter & have ability to work in a team environment. Travel is required. Qualifications include: Bachelor’s degree with 5-7 years of sales experience required. Series 7 or 62 & 63 licenses are required but will train. Strong verbal & written communication skills & track record of closing sales is a must. To apply for position please send resume with salary requirements to: jobs@israelbonds.com. Applications without salary requirements will not be considered. ••• THE CARE Registry, INC. is in immediate need of caregivers for our elderly clients. We offer $12.00/hour pay! We also have Live-in-care positions. Please call for more info. 412-421-5202 or www.TheCareRegistry.com. ••• HOME INSTEAD SENIOR Care needing weekend caregivers. Rewarding work with seniors, make a difference in the life of an elderly person by joining our #1 nonmedical team of caregivers. Car is required, training is provided, Flexible schedule, all shifts EOE. 412-731-0733. ••• CREATIVE & EXPERIENCED communication manager with knowledge of print and electronic media a must and demonstrated ability to strategize. Send resume to: Herzog@rodefshalom.com.

VOLUNTEER CENTER COORDINATOR, The Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh a non-profit fundraising and community planning organization is dedicated to promoting service volunteering as a means to give community members a way to engage with Federation, engage in Jewish life, make a difference, and learn about key issues facing the community. To this end, Federation has launched a new Volunteer Center that focuses on linking volunteers from the Jewish community to existing, high-quality, relationship-based volunteer opportunities in Jewish organizations, and the community at large. Federation is looking for an individual with strong programmatic and entrepreneurial skills to grow this Center. The skills and attributes needed for this position include, but are not limited to: High energy professional, able to work in a fast –paced environment. Deep commitment to the Jewish community. Good communication skills, both written and oral. Well organized, timely and responsive. Ability to establish and maintain relationships with organization, and staff. Knowledge of community issues and organizations. Ability to adapt to changing priorities and needs in the community. Supervisory skills for managing a junior associate, 3-5 years’ experience working with volunteers or in related activities. Minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree in relevant or related field. Compensation is commensurate with experience, education and previous related achievements. Position is full time and offers a competitive package. Qualified individuals may apply by sending cover letter, resume and compensation requirements to the attention of Pat Calabro at pcalabro@jfedpgh.org.

POSITION WANTED THE CARE REGISTRY, INC provides nurse aides and companions to offer one on one care for you in your home. The workers are screened and bonded. All shifts and live in care available. The Care Registry is licensed by the PA Dept. of Health. Low rates! Care management also available. 412-421-5202.

POSITION WANTED CAREGIVER CONNECTION A PA. Licensed home-care registry, Jewish Family & Children’s Service refers screened, JF&CS trained caregivers providing short/long-term personal care services to seniors at affordable rates. Available 24/7, call 412-422-0400 or 877243-1530 (toll free). ••• HOME HEALTH CARE specialist in hospice, dialysis & direct care. Will work any shift. Call Patricia Spencer 412-229-8760. ••• BOYD COMMUNITY Service proving personal care, transportation, light housekeeping, meal preparation & shopping. Reasonable rates and hourly services. Contact Sonya Boyd 412-731-0279. ••• CAREGIVER/ Caring Hands, Personal Touch Elder Care. Experienced with references & reasonable rates. Call 412-841-0146. ••• CERTIFIED NURSING Assistant available to help care for your loved one. References, experience, will do light housekeeping.412-723-2693. ••• CAREGIVER AVAILABLE to take care of your loved one. Reliable with references. 412-418-8511. ••• MALE CAREGIVER looking to take care of your male loved one. References, Act 33/34 clearance & years of experience working with Stroke, Dementia & Parkinson’s, call 412-805-5375. ••• LAUNDRY & IRONING also available to do home or office cleaning, clean out basement, garage or yard. References 412-330-9871. ••• PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZING & Painting. Are you stressed out, living in disharmony & clutter? Do you need to freshen up your bedroom, office or kitchen but don’t have the time? I help busy professional & families in Pittsburgh. I can make your home more liveable, too. Call Jody at 412-759-0778 or email: collegeconcierge.jdiperna@ gmail.com. Find me online at http://collegeconcierge.squ arespace.com. ••• HEAVENLY HOUSEKEEPING our house cleaning is a blessing. Experienced, reliable & reasonable. 412-277-2565. ••• CAREGIVER WILL TAKE Loving care of your loved one, have all references & clearances. 412-215-1801. ••• PERSONAL ASSISTIANT to the Elderly/Handicapped. Excellent driver for shopping & errands, appointments & outings. Available for companionship correspondence, light cooking, light cleaning. Act 33/34, reasonable rates. 412-422-2849. ••• CERTIFIED AID seeking position as caregiver, available 24/7, year’s experience, good references & have clearances. 412-513-7840. ••• SEEKING PRIVATE Duty caregiving, available 24/7. Certified, experienced, reliable with references. 412-969-6863.

TORAH Do it to them first, or turn the other cheek? Portion of the Week RABBI ALEX GREENBAUM BETH EL CONGREGATION OF THE SOUTH HILLS Mishpatim, Exodus 21:1-24:18

“Let’s do it to them before they do it to us.” — Sgt. Stan Jablonski (“Hill Street Blues,” 1981 TV series) Sounds terrible, does it not? I remember when Sgt. Jablonski took over for Sgt. Phil Esterhaus and “Hey, let’s be careful out there” became “Let’s do it to them before they do it to us.” Each and every show began with these words (the end of each of their daily morning announcements). Now, that is not very politically correct, is it? Would not “turn the other cheek” be better? According to the book of Matthew 5:38, Jesus said, “If someone strikes you on the right cheek, turn to him the other also.” But, that is them and this is us. In Exodus 22:1 of Parashat Mishpatim we read, “If a thief is caught while breaking in and he is beaten to death, there is no blood-

guilt.” This is the source for justifying selfdefense under Jewish law. What is the reason one may kill a burglar? Because the thief must be thinking, “If I go in there, the owner may try to stop me, and if he does, I’ll kill him.” So this is how the Torah reasons, “If the thief has come to kill you, you must act first and kill him.” (Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedrin 72a) We are not a religion of conscientious objectors. Life is sacred, our lives as well. Self-defense is not murder, even the defense of another. “The following must be prevented from committing their crime, even if they must be killed to do so: A person who pursues another to kill him or her.” (Sanhedrin 8:7) I recently saw a bumper sticker that read “What Part of ‘Thou Shalt Not Kill’ Didn’t You Understand?” Understand this — the Ten Commandments never say, “Thou shalt not kill,” they say “Thou shalt not murder.” Some killing is commanded. You may even say that it is a mitzva (commandment) to kill, if it is in self-defense or in the defense of another. We are much more the religion of “Let’s do it to them before they do it to us” than “Turn the other cheek.” (This column is a service of the Greater Pittsburgh Rabbinic Association.)

POSITION WANTED

CERTIFIED APPLE TECHNICIAN

MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT

PERSONAL CAREGIVER available to care for you or your loved one. Experienced, references 412-628-4381. ••• EXPERIENCED CNA seeking part-time work. Available various days & evenings. Call me 412-918-9886. ••• CAREGIVER AVAILABLE any shift, reasonable rates, references. Call Concha 412-641-0058. ••• CAREGIVER N/S, Excellent references, reliable transportation, cooking & light housekeeping. 412-480-0843. ••• LICENSED CAREGIVER with excellent references & experience. 412-781-3706. ••• THERSA’S HOME Cleaning Service. Good personal references, 10 year’s experience, light cooking. I clean floors the old fashion way (on hands & knees), available Monday-Thursday. 412-4525518 or 412-867-6672.

HELPER-CERTIFIED APPLE Technician. iPad, iPhone, Apple Computer or any Apple product personal training. On-site assistance. Call Michael 412-913-4226.

THE HOT MATZOHS, Pittsburgh’s #1 Klezmer Band, is available for your Wedding, Bar/Bat Mitzvah, Corporate or other special event! The dynamic band, featuring violinist Barbara Lowenstein (founder), offers many styles of music in addition to Klezmer, e,g, classical, jazz, swing and folk. Call 412-344-3338 or 412-303-0746. e-mail: barbsviolin@gmail.com.

BUYING AUTO/TRUCKS/ JUNK REMOVAL SELLING & BUYING Auto’s & JUNK Removal. Cars, Trucks, Vans, SUVs, Quit Driving, Death, Wrecks, Antiques, Classics & Junkers. FREE Legal Title Transfer! Vehicle Removal from Your Property. Denny Offstein Auto Sales 724-287-7771. Paying Cash, Honest Fair Prices!

COMPUTER NICE JEWISH Boy, offering the full range of computer services, from advising and teaching to repair and support. I will come to your house or apartment, fix any problem you’re having & teach you what you need to know to use it. I have 14 years’ experience working with people of all ages. . No job is too large or small, and nobody is too computer illiterate. (Really) CALL JASON 412-401-1204, or visit my web www.computerwizard.us. References available.

DRIVER NEED A RIDE? Call Norm, he will drive you. Doctors, shopping, anything that needs to be done. Experienced, insured, great references and reasonable rates. Available le for airport pickup or departure. Norm 412-521-6999.

FOR SALE ADATH JESHURIN Cemetery Plot. Prime location on isle, section- B, Plot- 41, row- 7. $850.00 call Elaine. 412-561-1224.

HOME IMPROVEMENT

CHAIR CANING

SOUTH HILLS Glass Block Company. Glass Block & Replacement Windows. Free Estimates, fully insured, PA#041031. 412-466-7097, email: shgwindows@verizon.net.

CANE & ABLE Chair caning, hand pre-woven cane rush reed & wicker repaired. Reasonable rates pick up & deliver. Charyl Hays 412-655-0224.

PLASTER/PAINTING Marbleized painting & drywall, free estimates, excellent references. Call Herzel 412-422-5486.

PLASTERING

TUTOR/ EDUCATIONAL SPECIALIST IN-HOME TUTORING & Learning Support K-12. 412760-9560, e-mail:debbiechottiner@yahoo.com, visit my web-site: www.debbiechottiner.com. ••• TUTORING OFFERED in French & Spanish. Certified, experienced Teacher. Call 412-583-4359.

LEGAL NOTICE

ESTATE NOTICES Letters have been granted on the estate of the following decedent to the personal representative named, who requests all persons having claims against the estate of the decedent to make known the same in writing to him or his attorney, and all persons indebted to the decedent to make payment to him without delay. Jacqueline C. Heckmen, deceased, of Pittsburgh, PA, No. 826 of 2012, Debra McMaster, Extrx., c/o David J. Slesnick, Esq., 310 Grant Street, Suite #1220, Pittsburgh, PA 15219. 3Th 319, 312, 305


12 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 16, 2012

BUSINESS &

PROFESSIONAL

$

SELLING • BUYING AUTO$ & TRUCK$ CAR$ • TRUCK$ • VAN$ • $UV$

$

QUIT DRIVING - DEATH - WRECKS ANTIQUE$ • CLA$$IC$ • JUNKERS

FREE LEGAL TITLE TRANSFER VEHICLE REMOVAL FROM YOUR LOCATION

DENNY OFFSTEIN AUTO SALES 724-287-7771 Paying Cash • Honest, Fair Prices AWNINGS

AUTO/TRUCK

ROTHMAN

LOOKING FOR USED & NEW AUTO & TRUCK PARTS?

AWSince N 1921 I NG Custom canvas awnings & sukkot Storage and service.

www.rothmanawningco.com 5% discount with this ad

ELDER CARE SERVICES Experienced with References Call Sam Benkovitz

412-841-0146 sb.chpt@gmail.com CONSTRUCTION

HANDYMAN

KRAMER

HANDY MAN AVAILABLE

CONSTRUCTION

412-247-9467 • 412-243-3788

(We Find Everything...Almost)

GONELLA’S AUTO 412-548-2125

ENTERTAINMENT

MON-FRI: 9-5•SAT 9-1 CANING

412-421-1133

CARING HANDS PERSONAL TOUCH

ROOFING • SIDING • GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS CONCRETE • KITCHENS & BATHROOMS WINDOWS & DOORS • DECKS • FLOORING

Free in-home estimates.

CANE & ABLE CHAIR CANING

HAND & PRE-WOVEN CANE RUSH, REED & WICKER REPAIRED REASONABLE RATES PICK-UP & DELIVER

kramerconstruct@aol.com

CLEANING

412.824.3540

Call Now For A Free Estimate

Donna Perrin

Who Has Time?

1st cleaning

General house cleaning, wall washing, windows. Other services available.

724-797-1891 • 412-422-1100 Major credit cards accepted

Licensed, Bonded, Insured

MARIANNE Quality Cleaning Services SINCE 1975 House Cleaning, Janitorial Wall Washing, Rug Scrubbing

724-861-9595 ~ 412-823-4797 Fully Insured/Bonded mairean@comcast.net HOME IMPROVEMENT

SAM BALES, INC.

HANDYMAN

NO JOB TOO SMALL

Reasonable

412-825-0822

412-824-3540

CALL 412-303-6883

Free Estimates Gary Ruben

Plumbing, Heating &

General Contracting

412-421-4053 412-963-1198

Registered Licensed Insured

LIEBEL PAINTING

412-421-1575 or 412-884-7272

MASONRY

T&H PAVING HOME REPAIRS INTERIOR - EXTERIOR CARPENTERY WORK PAINTING • DRY WALL WALL REPAIR REPAIR KITCHEN KITCHEN • BATH BATH • FLOORING FLOORING REPAIR REPAIR • TIE WALLS WALLS CONCRETE WORK VERSLOC VERSLOC WALLS WALLS CLEAN UP DEBRIS REMOVAL REMOVAL

412-951-3437

Blacktop • Paving Concrete Work Landscaping Restoration Patching & Sealing

Professional

Interior/Exterior Painting Wallpaper Removal Plaster Repair

Quality Workmanship, Fully Insured References. PA 013425

Residential/Commercial Free Estimates

412-672-5237 412-951-0013

412-281-9860 1-800-641-9055

Steve Tierno

HOME HEALTHCARE

TINDELL CARE LLC Tender Care Private Duty IN JEWISH

ELDER CARE

• Bathing • Dressing • Feeding • Medication • Vital Signs • Ambulate • Errands • Light Housekeeping • Cook Great References Bonded and Licensed Caregivers Private Duty & Most Insurance Accepted Now serving Squirrel Hill & the Jewish Community

Cheri - 412-478-0176 tindellcare@comcast.net www.yellowbook.com

Painting & Wallpapering Residential & Commercial Interior/Exterior Fully Insured 412-351-3443

Vince Marino PLUMBINGLLC Basement Waterproofing French Drains Reg. Master Plumber Sewer Cleaning Fall Furnace Cleaning Special Call for free quote SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING $80.00 •••

EMERGENCY SERVICE

412-225-0017 412-682-6733

PLUMBING

JIMMY COHEN PLUMBING & HEATING 24 HR. Emergency Service A Full Service Company • Water Heaters Installed

412-421-2208 ROOFING

HAUSLER ROOFING

PAINTING

Residential - Commercial

Since 1952

CALL DONNA 412-687-1000

PAINTING BY VINCENT

Competitive Prices Free Estimates

TO PLACE YOUR AD

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING & POWERWASHING

412-461-6800

GUTTER • MOSS • MILDEW CLEANING • DECK STAINING

CLASSIFIED BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL REAL ESTATE

412-773-2487 OR 412-537-4405 INSURED • PA 073408

POINTING

R & R MASONRY

AND ELECTRICAL SERVICES WHOLE HOUSE PLUGS TO PANEL BOX

30 YEARS EXPERIENCE • SR. DISCOUNTS

412-963-6933 www.amshelpetsit.com

Interior/Exterior

HOME IMPROVEMENT

PLUMBING • WINDOWS • DECKS KITCHENS & BATHS • PAINTING

Gail Amshel, 205 Ridge Rd., Pgh, PA 15238

G&E PAINTING

or A “Honey, TO DO” List Call Dave at Maids & more

SPECIALIZING

10% OFF

Individual Care In Your Home or Ours

412-480-0743

HOME IMPROVEMENT

• House Cleaning • Carpet Cleaning • Wall Washing • Party Service • Windows • Move In/Move Out • Interior Painting • Spring Cleaning • Holiday Cleaning

Est. 1993 • Bonded and Insured

PLUMBING

“The King of Trickery” Magic/Ventriloquism • Birthdays/Gatherings

Home Pet Sitting Service, LLC

PAINTING

FREE ESTIMATES ENNIO

CHUCK CAPUTO Blends professional

AMSHEL’S

Proficiency: electric, plumbing, painting, minor indoor/outdoor construction, stonework FLEXIBLE, CONVENIENT SERVICE

CHARYL HAYS 412-655-0224

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

PET CARE

CAREGIVER

AUTO/TRUCK

TOP QUALITY INTERIOR & EXTERIOR • Skilled Professional Painters • Thorough Preparation • Victorian Restoration PGH 412-362-2555 C A L L East 412-856-5474

• Top Quality Materials • Neat Work • Fully Insured North 412-967-9198 South 412-343-4567

• • • • • •

Whole house/Partial pointing Chimney rebuilds/Pointing Brick replacement/Mortar matching Steel 1-beam/Lentil replacement High pressure cleaning stone/brick Local references/Insured

412.831.7074 w w w. r e b e r r e s t o r a t i o n . c o m


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 16, 2012 — 13

OPINION/SPORTS LETTERS

TO THE

EDITOR

Continued from page 7. “Cervical Cancer Awareness Month” and “Wear Red for Women Day,” among others. It’s appropriate that no time is spent in debate or conversation about truly non-controversial resolutions, which can be helpful to groups seeking to raise awareness about issues or programs. In hindsight, H.R. 535 simply should not have been brought up on the floor with a “non-controversial” designation. Had there been any discussion on the floor about the bill, I would not have voted for it, and I regret my oversight in voting for a resolution that does not reflect my long-standing belief in the separation of church and state. That said, I can’t regret that I try to keep my time and attention focused on what I believe to be the most substantive matters of policy — legislation designed to keep our buses running, our water clean and our children educated.

During my time in the legislature, I’ve relentlessly fought for the expansion of civil rights for the LGBT community in Pennsylvania, combated proposals to limit reproductive rights, opposed attempts to defund our public schools and worked for better health care access and quality, at reduced cost. Over the last several months, I have advocated tirelessly to maintain access to Pittsburgh’s worldclass — and publicly funded — hospitals for everyone. Currently, I’m the prime sponsor of House Bill 2112, which would adequately fund public transit in Allegheny County and in all of Pennsylvania. I can assure you that when those votes that are not symbolic, but change real laws in Pennsylvania, come up, there is no oversight or confusion about where I stand. State Rep. Dan Frankel Squirrel Hill (The author represents the 23rd Legislative District.)

JCC falls to rival Career Connections BY ZACHARY WEISS Chronicle Correspondent

In a physical rematch, Thursday, Feb. 9, Career Connections topped the Jewish Community Center for the second time this season — this time, on the JCC’s home floor — by a score of 49-43. Grayson Woods of Career Connections led all scorers with a game high 22 points while Austin Kulikowski made baskets when he needed to most en route to a 12 point performance. Ben Katz led the JCC with 20 points on the night. The second quarter told a very similar story to the first, as both teams tried to cause separation from each other without success. JCC center Jake Berntsen went down hard with an injury. After a minute, he got up, toughened out the injury and elected to stay in the game. Suddenly, a whistle was blown and Berntsen was issued a technical foul.

“They started to get in our heads a little bit,” Pakler said. “It was really physical and there was a lot of trash talking going on and it kind of got to us a little bit.” This was the beginning of an unraveling for the JCC, which affected everyone, including Pakler. “I felt like the same kid was giving us cheap shots, hitting guys in the mouth, hitting them low and hitting them beneath their waist,” Pakler said. “I was just tired of the cheapness, so I just wanted to get the referees’ attention.” In the fourth quarter Kulikowski put his team up 9 points — a lead it would not relinquish. Although the JCC staged another comeback effort in the final minute, it was too late and the team dropped its record to 10-3 and 1-1 on the week after defeating Auberle Tuesday, Feb. 7. (Zachary Weiss can be reached at yngzc@yahoo.com.)


14 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 16, 2012

OBITUARY GOLEMAN: On Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2012, Marian “Mickey” Goleman; beloved wife of the late Robert “Bob” Goleman; loving grandmother of Hayley Warner, Andrew Goleman, Brooke Warner and Jesse Goleman; daughter of the late Amelia Schiedel Friedman and George Friedman; sister of the late Richard Friedman of California. Preceded in death by her husband, Mickey and

Bob were married for 49 years. She will be dearly missed by her children. Mickey had the great fortune of being surrounded by a lifetime of dear friends, as well as her caregiver, Donika Cheeks in the last few years of her life. She has lived a full and good life. Services were held at Rodef Shalom Congregation. Contributions may be made to the Sivitz Jewish Hospice, 2000 JHF Drive, Pittsburgh,

PA 15217. Arrangements by Rapp Funeral Home, 10940 Frankstown Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15235-3043. therappfuneralhome.com NOVICE: On Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2012, Herbert S. Novice; beloved husband of Ruth Young Novice; beloved father of Kenneth (Kouy) Novice, Ronna (Mike) Zolinski, Stacey Legum, Marc (Deborah) Young and Jay (Monica) Young; grandpa/papa of Jessica, Megan, Lyra, Tyler, Mia, Eli, Benjamin and Bailey. Herb had a successful career in retail for many years as well as a passion for the stock market. He was a friend to all and will be sorely missed. Services were held at Temple Emanuel; interment Beth El Section/Mt. Lebanon Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Hillman Cancer Center, 5115 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232 or Temple Emanuel of South Hills, 1250 Bower Hill Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15243. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. schugar.com PLUTCHOK: On Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2012, Sylvia Dardik Plutchok, 84, of Atlanta; beloved wife (of 65 years) of George Plutchok; beloved mother of Randy (Linda) Plutchok, Ellen (Jared) Klein, Emily (Daniel) Mintz

and Jonathan (Louise) Plutchok; dear sister of Herbert Dardik, Irving Dardik and Ray Josell-Metz; also survived by nine grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Sylvia was raised at the seashore in Long Branch, N.J. Services were held at Riverside Cemetery in Saddle Brook, N.J. Contributions may be made to the National Museum of Women in the Arts, 1250 New York Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20005-3970 or YAD Sarah, 450 Park Ave., 7th Floor, New York, NY 10022-2605. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 3734 Chamblee Dunwoody Road, Atlanta, GA 30366. edressler.com SHAPIRO: On Friday, Feb. 3, 2012, Eleanor Zahm Shapiro, 72, originally of Squirrel Hill; beloved wife of Andy Eisman; beloved mother of Cindy Eisman of Framingham, Mass.; beloved bubbie of Emily and Glen Eisman; beloved daughter of the late Joseph and Vera Kaufman Zahm; beloved sister of the late Goldie (Leonard Polk) Zahm Polk and the late Nora Adella Zahm. Services and interment were held at Beth Abraham Cemetery. Arrangements by Elmer L. Herman Funeral Home, 5204 Second Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15207. elmerhermanfuneralhome.com

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 16, 2012 — 15

METRO Holocaust Bill: Continued from page 1. bill,which would mandate the Holocaust be taught in both public and nonpublic Pennsylvania schools. As of late last week, he already had 17 co-sponsors. While most lawmakers would support it ideologically, he believes that some may be reluctant to get behind it because of budgetary concerns. “Very few people would vote against it,” Boyle said. “The challenge is getting people to recognize it is enough of a priority.” The Pennsylvania Jewish Coalition

JFilm: Continued from page 1. a very nice message.” A reception will follow the film, with live music by Dennis Kurzawski on clarinet and Douglas Levine on keyboard. In partnership with the University of Pittsburgh, JFilm is bringing director and concert pianist Lincoln Mayorga to speak and play after the Pittsburgh premiere of “A Suitcase Full of Chocolate.” The documentary tells the story of Sofia Cosma, a child prodigy born in Latvia, who won renown in a Viennese piano competition in 1933. After witnessing Hitler’s invasion of Austria in 1938, she was forced to spend seven years in a Soviet prison. Remarkably, after the war, she went on to resume her career as a celebrated concert pianist. Also in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh, JFilm will continue its popular Film Schmooze events, at which experts lead small group discussions at a coffee shop following the screening of a film. The festival will also be present two episodes of “Srugim,” the popular Israeli television series that follows the lives of a group of 30-something modern Orthodox singles as they navigate their lives in contemporary Jerusalem. The groundbreaking show has been compared to the U.S. sitcom “Friends.” The series’ creator and director, Eliezer Shapiro, will speak following the screening. Also on the slate is the Pittsburgh premiere of “Rabies,” Israel’s first horror film, featuring a cast of Israel’s most popular actors. The film will be followed by “Can you Say Texas Chainsaw Massacre

(PJC) — a group that seeks to educate state government officials about the concerns of Jewish federations and their constituents — has had the reinstatement of Holocaust education funding on its radar since that funding was removed from the state budget, according to PJC Executive Director Hank Butler. “We are encouraged by this bill that he (Boyle) introduced,” Butler said. “The further time goes by from the Holocaust, the greater the need to have kids learn about it to make sure it doesn’t ever happen again.” (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

in Yiddish?: Thinking about Jewish Horror,” a discussion with Jeremy Dauber of Columbia University, and Adam Lowenstein of the University of Pittsburgh. JFilm’s selections this year are weighted toward dramas and documentaries, said Iris Samson, chair of JFilm. One of the more solemn topics examined in this year’s lineup is sexual abuse in an Orthodox community in Baltimore. “Standing Silent” follows Phil Jacobs, a longtime writer for the Baltimore Jewish Times, as he reports on sexual abuse in an observant community of which he is a member. Jacobs names the names of the accused perpetrators of sexual abuse, and they include some well-respected rabbis. “After the film,” Spitz Cohan said, a panel will talk about what we are doing in Pittsburgh to help survivors [of abuse], and discuss whether we are taking any steps to make sure it doesn’t happen.” The festival will conclude with “Circus Kids,” which will be free to the public, thanks to underwriting by the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh in celebration of its centennial anniversary. “Circus Kids” is a documentary following a youth circus troupe from St. Louis to Pittsburgh’s sister city of Karmiel/Misgav to work with the Galilee Circus, a group made up of Israeli and Arab youth from the region. The film shows the teens learning to embrace each other’s similarities and differences while working and performing together. “It’s just a great lineup,” Samson said. “I’m really excited about it. You don’t have to be Jewish to come to the Jewish Film Festival.” (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

We acknowledge with grateful appreciation contributions from the following: Donor

In MeMory of

GERTRUDE ADAMS ........................RUTH WEINBERGER SHIRLEY & MILTON BILDER.................................SOPHIA S. MEYERS JANET & GORDON CAMPBELL LOUIS LUTERMAN BERNARD & MARILYN CAPLAN ....................................PHILLIP CAPLAN MICHAEL & CHRISTINE CUSHNER ............................SAMUEL CUSHNER MIRIAM DICKMAN............................EMIL GLICK SHARON & MORRY FELDMAN NELLIE SWARTZ SONIA FREEDMAN ............................DA WINER MARY JATLOW............................MARY FARBER RHODA JUDD .............................JACOB MARKS RUTH KLEIN ..............................MAX PORTNOY EVAN KLEIN ............................SEYMOUR KLEIN EVAN KLEIN ............................DR. J.J HORWITZ

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In MeMory of

LOIS BUCK LEVIN .................HELEN MARGOLIS BUCK DR. JAY ORRINGER .....HARRY B. ORRINGER, M.D. RITA REESE ......................FRANCES BARNIKER ALAN & MARION REZNIK .............................ISADORE BERGSTEIN CORINNE ROZENSKY & FAMILY ..............BERNARD "HERKY" ROZENSKY JEAN SIMON.............................HARVEY SIMON ROY SIMON ................................GOLDIE SIMON STEPHANIE SNYDER .......................GERTRUDE SILBERMAN CHERYL SOBER .............RACHEL SHUKLANSKY VIOLET SOFFER ...................MARVIN L. GUSKY JACQLYN STEIN.......................ROSE & ALBERT SHERRY EUGENE WEINBERGER ............................HELEN WEINBERGER STEPHEN YOUNG ...................ISAAC C. YOUNG

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19: ISAAC APPLE, SAMUEL I. BERMAN, FANNIE BINSTOCK, ALFRED DEVON, ABRAHAM D. ENGELBERG, JOSEPHINE FELDMAN, FRIEDA FOREMAN, REVA HANKIN, JOSEPH L. HARRIS, ALBERT F. KLEIN, ALBERT C. KRAMER, JOSEPH H. KRAMER, LOUIS LANDY, JOSEPH G. LAZEAR, RABBI JOSEPH LEVINE, CELIA LEVY, SOPHIE LEVY, SAMUEL LEYTON, LEAH SACHS MUSSOFF, ISRAEL NEVIN, DOROTHY NEWMAN, LABE NIDERBERG, MOISHE OFSHINSKI, WILMA OLBUM, SERRAE ROBERTS, MANDEL SAMBERG, HYMAN SAPEER, MAX F. SELEKMAN, JACOB H. SIEGEL, TILLIE SIEGEL, CHIRLE SILBERMAN, CELIA SILVERBERG, BEN SIMON, LOUISE S. SOBEL, RACHEL STRUMINGER, HARRY SUSSER, BENJAMIN WALKEN, MOSES WEIL, IDA J. WILNER, ANNA WINER, JOHN WIRTZMAN, FRIEDERIKE WOLFF, ANNETTE WOLK, NAT A. ZIMMER, NATHAN M. ZVIRMAN. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20: ESTHER MOLLY BOND, A. EDGAR COHEN, MAX COHEN, ANNA FRIEDMAN, LOUIS FRIEDMAN, O. HICKS FRIEDMAN, FANNY GITELMAN, JACK MORRIS GLANTZ, SAMUEL GOLDSTEIN, ANN R. HENDEL, CHARLES I. HOREWITZ, ROSE G. KARP, GEORGE KLEMPNER, HENRIETTA KLINE, LIBBIE KOPELMAN, MILTON B. KRUPP, JACOB K. LEVY, JOSEPH LEWINTER, CELIA LIPSITZ, EVA G. LITTLE, IDA S. MANDELL, WILLIAM MINTZ, RUTH BRILL MOLDOVAN, HARRY NOVICK, EZZIE C. PORTNO, CELIA ROFEY, DAVID M. ROSENBERG, FLORENCE SAMOWICH, MORRIS SAMPLINER, MORRIS SATTIEN, SAMUEL EARL SCHUGAR, ROSE SHERRY, BENNIE SILVERMAN, MORRIS SILVERMAN, HENRY SINGER, MAURICE SKIRBOLL, TILLIE STRENG, TILLIE TEX, CHARLES WANETICK, CHARLES WHITMAN, IDA WIDOM, ABRAHAM A. WOLK. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21: ABRAHAM B. AMPER, PHILIP ANOLIK, SOPHIE AUERBACH, MARY G. BAKER, LENA BOWYTZ, GERTRUDE BRODY, LEAH CANTER, WOLF COHEN, ESTHER COVEL, ANNE M. DARLING, HERMAN S. FELDMAN, HARRY FRIEDMAN, DR. LESTER GOLDSTEIN, MENDEL HELFAND, MORRIS HERR, JENNIE G. LASDAY, WILLIAM E. LEVY, BENJAMIN MALLINGER, ROSE MARKOVITZ, YENTA MENDLOWITZ, HASKELL D. MERVIS, HARRY NEIMAN, ANNA ROMANOFF, DORA B. ROSENBLATT, ETTA FAIGA ROSENBLUM, SOL ROTH, CECIL SHENSON, RABBI CECIL SHENSON, ZELDA SIEGEL, BENJAMIN SILKEN, ABRAHAM SIMON, JULIUS SKIGEN, LEONARD P. SNYDER, MARY DAVIS SOLOMON, ESTHER SPIRO, HYMEN STAPSKY, ISADORE ZEIDENSCHNEIDER, DAVID ZYTNICK. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22: ELIJAH BECKER, MEYER BOROFSKY, DAVID BROWN, REBECCA COHEN, MORRIS GOLDBERG, RAY M. GOLDMAN, BETTY G. GORDON, GERTRUDE GROSSMAN, EDWARD HAIMS, LEEBA HAUSMAN, ANNA HILL, LILLIAN HOFFMAN, ABRAM KATKISKY, HELEN KLEIN, HARRY LANDIS, SAM LAVINE, SAMUEL S. LEVIN, JACOB LEVINE, MARGARET LEWIS, MAX MALKIN, LILLIAN MALLINGER, MORRIS MALT, AMELIA L. MARCUS, LEONARD MERVIS, GEORGE MORRIS, HARRY PROTETCH, RACHEL RAPPORT, MINNIE ROSENBERG, MOSHE RUBENFELD, ANNA RUTTENBERG, ROSE SEIGLE, HYMAN SHANKER, BENJAMIN SHRUT, RACHEL SHEFFLER SHUKLANSKY, PAULINE SILBERBLATT, FANNIE SMOLOVITZ, ABE WEINER, LOUIS WEISS, GUSSIE WOLF. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23: BESSIE TABAK AMERICUS, SAMUEL BAILS, ISRAEL COHEN, LOUIS COHEN, LOUIS B. COHEN, ISADORE DEKTOR, RACHEL EISENBERG, DORA FELDMAN, SARAH R. FINEMAN, IDA GOLDBERG, ADOLPH GRAFF, JACOB HOREWITZ, JOSEPH R. KAUFMAN, GOLDIE KREIGER, BESSIE LEVIN, ISADORE LIBSON, MILTON EMANUEL LINDER, SARAH MANES, RALPH E. MANNHEIMER, DAVID ELI MARKS, MORRIS T. MASON, MORRIS MELNICK, BEN NEIMAN, ANNA GOLDIE PEARLMAN, BEN B. PERLOW, JOSEPH PHILLIPS, LOUIS RAPPORT, ROSE RECHT, HERMAN REITER, BERNIE ROSENBAUM, EDWARD MORRIS ROTH, MORRIS ROTHMAN, NATHAN ROUTMAN, ELEANOR SAUL, LILLY SAUL, JAKE SIEGLER, LENA SILVERBERG, SOPHIA SLESINGER, EVA TOPOLSKY, MARTHA TRACHTENBERG, MARY UDIN, MORTON WEINBERGER, ESTHER WEISS, ANNA H. WOLFE, ANN YECIES, ABRAHAM ZELIGSOHN, LOUIS A. ZIEVE, IRA ZIMMER. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24: MILTON ABES, MAX H. BARNETT, HARRY COHEN, JOSEPH COHEN, SARAH FINKELSTEIN, LEONARD M. FRIEDMAN, NORMAN B. GOLDFIELD, SADYE GOLDSTEIN, MINNA HOHENSTEIN, DAVID KAPLAN, DR. EDWARD KAPLAN, SARAH KAUFMAN, ROSE G. KLEIN, SHANA LEIBOWITZ, SADIE LONDON, LEAH LUTSKY, DR. JACOB MARTIN, DAVID MENDELSON, LOTTIE MEYERS, LOUIS MINES, MOLLIE MOSKOWITZ, BENNIE ROSENBERG, ISAAC ROSENBERG, BERTHA B. ROSENFELD, JOSEPH ROSENTHAL, REGINA ROTH, SELMA ROTHMAN, LENA RUBIN, BLANCHE SCHULTZ, SAM SINGER, HATTIE SMITH, CELIA SOLOMAN, BERNARD SPIEGEL, MOLLIE SPOKANE, SAMUAL SPOKANE, RUTH STEIGER, SAUL E TOBIAS, ETHEL WALTERS, WILLIAM WEIZER, EMMA WINTERS, JOSEPH WISE, BINA BEATRICE ZEIDMAN, JACOB ZEIDMAN, ISAAC ZUCKERMAN. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25: SAMUEL BARASCH, SAM BRENNER, HENRIETTA CAPLAN, IDA DANENBERG, MARY ELENBAUM, MORRIS FINKELSTEIN, MILTON I. FREEDMAN, CHARLES FRIEDBERG, ABE I. FRIEDMAN, ROSE GOLDENBERG, DOROTHY GOLDSTEIN, CARL GUSSIN, JOSEPH HOREWITZ, ISADOR JAEGER, SADYE JUDD, JACOB KRAMER, ALLAN KRAUSS, JACK LEFF, LENA LEFKOWITZ, DAVID LEVEN, THERESE H. LEVINO, LIBBIE LEVY, ABRAHAM A. LINDER, DORA MALLIN, AARON MALLINGER, BELLA W. MARKS, SAM MILLER, SAMUEL G. MILLER, LOUIS MORRISON, REGINA NEUGASS, SOLOMON NEUSTEIN, BETTY F. PAULL, EMANUEL PERLOW, LEE RADBORD, MAX RAND, BERTHA ROSENFELD, MINNIE ROTH, BENJAMIN SCHOENFELD, IDA SCHWARTZ, NATHAN SCHWARTZ, ALICE SHAPIRO, ISRAEL L. SHAPIRO, LILLIAN SIEGMAN, MIRIAM SILBERMAN, DORIS L. SILVERMAN, JULIUS SILVERMAN, RUTH SLOTEKEVICH, IDA C. SLOTSKY, IRVING LEWIS STUTZ, MD, CELIA WATERMAN, MYRON J. WILKOFF, JANINA WINKLER, RACHEL WOLK, PAULINE ZALEVSKY, THEODORE ZEUGSCHMIDT.


16 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 16, 2012

The Jewish Chronicle February 16, 2012  

The Jewish Chronicle February 16, 2012

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