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Style Jews on the Silk Road As Myanmar opens to the West, its Jewish Life awaits discovery

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february 2, 2012 SHEVAT 9, 5772

Vol. 55, No. 38

Pittsburgh, PA

Look out, mopeds!

Jewish movements ‘cross-pollinating’ on learning initiatives for its educators

Jewish engineering student to make durable EVs in ’Burgh

BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

BY LEE CHOTTINER Executive Editor

A University of Pittsburgh senior, who plans to make aliya this summer, is starting his own electric bike company, which he hopes will be a hit here and in the Jewish state. Micah Toll, 22, was the subject of a recent USA Today story. His company, Pulse Motors, is a Pittsburgh-based startup that will provide two-wheeled electric vehicles to the students and the public. The PEV0, which is federally classified as a bicycle and not a motor-powered vehicle (no special license or registration is needed to own or ride one) comes with fully functional pedals, and can be ridden as a regular bike. The bike is fully electric; it can reach speeds of 20 miles per hour, can go up to 30 miles on a charge and takes three hours to be recharged. After he makes aliya, Toll said the headquarters for Pulse will stay in Pittsburgh, though he hopes to open a branch office in Israel within the year. Toll, a mechanical engineering major who also heads up the aliya group at the Hillel Jewish University Center, got the idea for Pulse two years ago as a way to get college students out of their cars and into more sustainable transportation modes for getting around town. “We’ve produced five [prototypes] of them so far, but they’re not available commercially,” he told the Chronicle. “We’re doing beta-testing; we’re giving them to college students in Pittsburgh, asking them to replace their standard forms of transportation with one of our PEV0s. “We’re getting a lot of good responses from students who have replaced them,” he added. Please see Toll, page 16.

$1.50

Chronicle photo by Ohad Cadji

Micah Toll thinks his PEV0 electric bike (pictured here) is durable enough for the hills of Pittsburgh and Israel.

When it comes to educating educators, Yeshiva University, the Jewish Theological Seminary and Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion are finding that collaboration has its benefits. “The three schools are cross-pollinating,” said Rabbi Scott Aaron, community scholar for the Agency for Jewish Learning. “They’re saying education should not be siloed.” Aaron himself is a case in point. Ordained at HUC-JIR, he will be teaching Jewish experiential education courses next year for both the JTS and his alma mater. Beginning next fall, Aaron will teach a yearlong course for the master’s of arts degree in Jewish education with a focus in Jewish experiential education at JTS’ Davidson School in New York. Aaron is currently teaching a distance-learning course for HUC-JIR’s certificate program in Jewish education for adolescents and emerging adults. The Jim Joseph Foundation is funding both of these programs, which train rabbis, educators and other youth professionals in Jewish experiential education. The foundation, established in 2006, is devoted exclusively to supporting the education of Jewish youth, and is now two and a half years into the implementation of its education initiative, which has awarded $45 million in grants to HUC-JIR, JTS and YU. Part of the grant money was designated specifically for collaborative efforts between the denominations. The program coordinators for the various experiential Jewish education programs of YU, HUC-JIR and JTS have been meeting regularly over the last 18 months to “share ideas, and provide feedback and support to each other. We are complementing each other,” said Mark Young, program coordinator for the Experiential Learning Please see Cross-pollinating, page 12.

B USINES S 15/C L AS SIFIED 17/C OMMUNITY 14/O BITUARIES 18 O PINION 6/R EAL E STATE 16/S IMCHAS 13/S TYLE 10

Times To Remember

KINDLE SABBATH CANDLES: 5:22 p.m. EST. SABBATH ENDS: 6:23 p.m. EST.


2 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE

FEBRUARY 2, 2012

This week’s issue: November 24, 1977

Sadat’s ’77 visit garnered hopeful but guarded review in the Chronicle (Editor’s Note: Retro News is a column that will appear every week this year as part of the celebration of the Chronicle’s 50th anniversary.)

Front Page Four days after Egyptian President Anwar Sadat’s historic flight to Tel Aviv — Nov. 20, 1977 — the Chronicle came out with what essentially was a review of the visit and its prospects for success. Writing in a front-page analysis of the trip — one titled “The shadow and substance!” and illustrated by a cartoon of a shrewd-looking Sadat holding a poker hand — Chronicle Executive Editor Albert W. Bloom noted that most of the visit’s substance came in the mere fact that a jetliner touched down at Ben Gurion Airport with Sadat aboard. In other words, that the visit took place at all, not what was said during the visit. He even paraphrased a verse from Exodus to suggest that Sadat was reaching out to Israel, not because he wanted to, but because he had to. “After seven (and 22) lean years of hostility, Sadat and [then-Israeli Prime Minister Menachem] Begin might be interpreting the future dream of seven (and an eternity) fat and peaceful years for the region,” Bloom wrote. “Egypt’s Sadat is in his seventh year of power!” Nevertheless, Bloom fairly quoted Sadat at length in this analysis and even

conveyed one of the Egyptian president’s main themes: There can be no peace without resolution of the Palestinians’ issues. Today, we believe that is still true. We also believe the Palestinian Authority must prepare its people for peace and not send mix messages, including efforts to ignore Jewish history in the region.

Opinion This week, the Chronicle weighed in on the debate over the case of Allan Bakke, a white student who applied for admission to the medical school at the University of California-Davis. After being turned down in favor of minority students with lower academic qualifications, Bakke sued citing reverse discrimination. The U.S. Supreme Court ultimately ruled in his favor. In its editorial, the Chronicle stopped short of an all-out endorsement of Bakke’s position, but the paper did brand quota systems as “morally repugnant,” stated that affirmative action need not be set back by the court’s ruling — whatever it would be — and lamented that Jews were no longer granted minority status “once it became a good thing in the vocabulary of the times.” Also that week, the Chronicle carried a front-page wire story about New York Sens. Daniel Patrick Moynihan and Ja-

The November 24, 1977, front page.

cob Javits, who warned that the United States would cancel a grain sale to the Soviet Union if refusenik Anatoly Sharansky were put on trial for treason.

Community Also this week, the Chronicle reported that the Kollel announced that its

learning center would open in January 1978. In reflecting on the discussion over consolidation going on in today’s Jewish Pittsburgh, Charles Rice, thenpresident of Kether Torah Congregation, which housed the Kollel, cited in a statement his belief that “existing buildings need to be utilized rather than expending funds to establish new edifice.” Rabbi Sion David of Temple Israel in Uniontown was named to the Fayette County Mental Health/Mental Retardation Program board. Members of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged were preparing for their Winter Galaxy ball. In a sign of the times, none of the four women pictured were referred to by their first names, but were instead listed as “Mesdames Abe Foster, Meyer Mallinger, Abe Borovetz, and Samuel Maysels.” In addition, Karen Joy Ravits, the Chronicle’s campus correspondent, was writing about some of the reasons why college students may defer making aliya. — COMPILED BY LEE CHOTTINER

(For a more comprehensive look at the Nov. 20, 1977, Chronicle, visit the jewishchronicle.net and click on “archives” at the top of the page. Back issues of the Chronicle are archived by the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.)

Buy, Sell, Trade in the Classifieds, Call Donna 412-687-1000


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012 — 3

METRO Briefly Area teens will hold a community teen fundraising dance, Saturday, Feb. 11, from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. at the Jewish Community Center in Squirrel Hill. The Diller Teen Fellows will sponsor “Project Build,” as the event is called, to raise money for improvements to the educational system in Haiti. All proceeds from the dance will go to the Joint Distribution Committee’s Fund for Haiti, which was created in the wake of the devastating earthquake that struck Haiti Jan. 12, 2010. JDC has collected, and continues to collect, money to aid relief and reconstruction efforts for the victims. In coordination with its network of Israeli, American and other local Haitian partners on the ground, JDC is providing food, water, shelter, medical aid and education to Haitians. “Education is important to the Jewish community and to us. Change can only happen in a society where children can be educated and productive,” Diller Fellow Lizzie Shackney said in a prepared statement. “We want to help make this change in Haiti by building schools.” Some 800,000 people were displaced by the earthquake, with many of them still living in temporary housing. The Haitian government does not provide basic education for all. However, the

Haitian people value education for their children so highly they will often sacrifice everything else to send their children to school. The Diller teens have cited the need to raise awareness of Haiti’s dire situation in the Pittsburgh area. “Moses is our role model. We help when we see a need for help. We do not stand by and witness hardship, tikkun olam does not only apply to our own people, but to the entire world,” Diller Fellow Hannah Busis said in a prepared statement. The Diller Teen Fellows Program is a project of Partnership2Gether (formerly Partnership 2000), linking the communities of Pittsburgh with Karmiel/Misgav, Israel. During the 15-month program, 20 teens from Pittsburgh join with 20 from Israel to focus on leadership development, Jewish identity, Israel and the Diaspora, and the value of tikkun olam (repair of the world). The program is a partnership of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, Agency for Jewish Learning and Jewish Community Center, and is funded through a grant from the Helen Diller Family Foundation, Fine Foundation and Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Contact diller@ajlpittsburgh.org for more information. Local Jewish agencies will compete for a $1,000 prize when the Please see Briefly, page 5.


4 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012

METRO North Hills twins on autism spectrum to mark b’nai mitzva at Ohav Shalom BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

Like any Jewish mother, Jillian Zacks just always assumed that when the time came, her twins, Max and Paige Duhl, would celebrate their b’nai mitzva by leading services for their congregation. While both children are on the autism spectrum, which has presented some challenges, they are now ready and able to ascend the bima this April to lead Saturday evening services, as well as havdala, as b’nai mitzva at Temple Ohav Shalom in the North Hills. “It was always a given that they would have a b’nai mitzva,” said Zacks, who worked with Rabbi Art Donsky, spiritual leader of Ohav Shalom, and the Agency for Jewish Learning, to find appropriate accommodations to help her children prepare for this important day in their lives. “I think it is really good for kids with all different needs and at all different levels to participate in Jewish life,” Zacks said. “With the help of the AJL, they can work to get to this significant milestone.” The Duhl children attend religious school on Sundays at Ohav Shalom, but because of their learning abilities, they have not studied Hebrew. They will be leading the services using transliteration. “That was the major accommodation,” Zacks said. The Duhl twins are tutored by teacher Katie Lang, who Zacks refers to as “a true angel,” and have benefited from the special needs services of the AJL, which provides a consultant to help the chil-

Max and Paige Duhl with Rabbi Art Donsky of Temple Ohav Shalom in Allison Park.

dren navigate the religious school. “AJL has always played an instrumental role with assistance, at Sunday school,” Zacks said. “AJL has just been amazing and supportive and has tied together what is such an important part of their lives.” Any child in the Jewish community wishing to celebrate a bar or bat mitzva should be able to do so, regardless of his or her abilities, said Terry Feinberg Steinberg, director of special education services at the AJL. “We have the resources in the Jewish community to support anyone in their life cycle events if they want to, even those who are not affiliated with a synagogue,” Steinberg said. Ohav Shalom, which is located in Alli-

son Park, has celebrated at least one special needs bar or bat mitzva a year since Donsky joined the congregation as its rabbi almost 15 years ago. “We’ve done a whole variety, depending on the student’s exceptionalities,” he said. “We adjust the service to meet their needs, but also keep it relevant for the congregation. We’re a small enough congregation — and we’re very family oriented —and we understand that one size doesn’t fit all. We play to the student’s strengths.” Ohav Shalom draws a significant number of families with special needs children to its congregation due to its inclusive reputation, as well as the reputation of its surrounding public schools, according to Donsky.

The North Allegheny, Pine-Richland, and Hampton Township school districts all tend to draw families that are seeking quality services for children on the autism spectrum because they offer strong support for those students. Jewish families drawn to those schools often join nearby Ohav Shalom, which for many years has had a faculty member trained in working with kids with exceptionalities, Donsky said. The Duhl twins have already begun work on their b’nai mitzva projects. Paige is collecting allergen-free food for the North Hills Community Outreach, and Max will help prepare allergen-free food for the Oneg Shabbat that will follow the b’nai mitzva service. Additionally, Max is helping to coordinate Ohav Shalom’s Jewish Disability Awareness Shabbat service, which will be held Feb. 24, in honor of Jewish Disability Awareness Month (JDAM). Begun as a national project in 2008, JDAM marks February as a time for Jewish institutions — particularly congregations — to recognize and commit to including individuals with disabilities. The Agency for Jewish Learning works to promote JDAM in Pittsburgh. Several area congregations have designated a date to celebrate JDAM, and AJL consultants will be visiting religious school classrooms with interactive puppet shows and children’s books focusing on disability awareness, according to Steinberg. (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012 — 5

METRO Briefly Continued from page 3. Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh holds its Federation February Fonings (F3), a phone-a-thon set for three Sundays in February. F3, which will benefit the federation’s Centennial Year Annual Campaign, is an update of the campaign’s weeklong Fundfest held in past years. All F3 participants will be invited to choose an agency that has impacted them or their family, or with which they have an affinity. Individuals who attend multiple sessions may note a different agency each time or boost a particular agency by designating it repeatedly. At the close of F3 the agency designated most will receive the $1,000 prize. F3 will take place Feb. 12, 19 and 26, with sessions lasting from 9:30 a.m. to noon and 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. All sessions are open to the community, but some sessions will provide an opportunity for specific groups to gather. Feb. 12 will be a Community MegaFoning celebrating the 100th day of the Centennial Year Annual Campaign. Feb. 19, Jewish agency professionals and volunteers will gather in the morning, and teens will gather in the evening. Feb. 26, Women’s Philanthropy will gather in the morning and the Young Adult Division will gather in the evening. Register at bit.ly/Fonings or contact Becca Ackner at backner@jfedpgh.org or by calling 412-992-5253.

Chabad of the South Hills will hold its Tu B’Shevat winter seniors luncheon Wednesday, Feb. 8, at noon at 1701 McFarland Road, Mt. Lebanon. The luncheon will include hot soup, hand massages and a fruit platter demonstration. There is a suggested donation. The building is wheelchair accessible. Contact Barb at 412-278-2658 or barb@chabadsh.com for more information and to register. Congregation B’nai Abraham in Butler aill hold a Tu B’Shevat seder, Sunday, Feb. 5, 11 a.m., at the synagogue, (519 N. Main St.) In addition to the traditional customs of the seder, the event will showcase two firsts for B’nai Abraham: a new Haggada booklet illustrated by member Laurie Bloomberg, and the first performance of the congregation’s new music ensemble. The seder is free to the community. Contact Cantor Michelle Gray-Schaffer at 724-287-5806 or at congbnaiabraham@zoominternet.net for reservations. The Squirrel Hill Historical Society will hold its next program with speaker Eric Osth, principal at Urban Design Associates, on “A sustainable community future: What type of projects should Squirrel Hill favor?” Tuesday, Feb. 14, at 7:30 p.m. at the Church of the Redeemer, 5700 Forbes Ave. Contact Mike at 412-417-3707 or visit squirrelhillhistory.org for more information.


6 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012

Opinion

The Jewish Chronicle David M. Caoin, CEO EDITORIAL STAFF Lee Chottiner, Executive Editor Angela Leibowicz, Community/ Web Editor Toby Tabachnick, Staff Writer SALES STAFF Susie Mangel, Senior Sales Associate Roberta Letwin, Sales Associate Donna Mink, Classified Sales PRODUCTION STAFF Dawn Wanninger, Production Manager Nancy Bishop Production Artist BUSINESS STAFF Joe Soloski, Comptroller Josh Reisner, Office Manager Marcy Kronzek, Subscriptions BOARD OF TRUSTEES Richard Kitay, President Cindy Goodman-Leib, Vice President Larry Honig, Secretary Andy Schaer, Treasurer Davida Fromm, Past President Carolyn Hess Abraham Brian Balk Daniel Berkowitz Lynn Cullen Milton Eisner Stephen Fienberg Malke Steinfeld Frank David Grubman Thomas Hollander Evan Indianer David Levine Ari Lightman Mitchell Pakler Amy Platt Benjamin Rosenthal Charles Saul Adam Shear Jonathan Wander Lou Weiss Published every Thursday by the Pittsburgh Jewish Publication and Education Foundation 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Phone: 412-687-1000 FAX: 412-521-0154 E-Mail: newsdesk@thejewishchronicle.net SUBSCRIPTION: $45 in Pennsylvania $47 East of the Mississippi $49 West of the Mississippi and FL NEWSSTAND PRICE $1.50 PER COPY POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE JEWISH CHRONICLE, 5915 BEACON ST., 3rd Floor PITTSBURGH, PA 15217 (PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA) USPS 582-740 Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to the Jewish Chronicle become the property of this publication, which is not responsible for the return or loss of such items. The Chronicle does not endorse the goods or services advertised in its pages and makes no representation to the kashrut of food products and services in said advertising. The publisher is not liable for damages if, for any reason whatsoever, he fails to publish an advertisement or for any error in an advertisement. Acceptance of advertisers and of ad copy is subject to the publisher’s approval. The Chronicle is not responsible if ads violate applicable laws and the advertiser will indemnify, hold harmless and defend the Chronicle from all claims made by governmental agencies and consumers for any reason based on ads appearing in the Chronicle.

Lesson from Atlanta ast week’s announcement that the owner and publisher of the Atlanta Jewish Times, Andrew Adler, has resigned and is seeking a buyer following a Jan. 13 column he wrote speculating that Israel would consider assassinating President Obama, should be a lesson to the Jewish media, the Jewish community and to all America: Political rhetoric in this country is out of control. In describing a hypothetical “no-win” war scenario that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu might face, Adler suggested three options the PM might consider, one of which being to have Mossad agents “take out a president deemed unfriendly to Israel” so the vice president could step up and dictate a forceful proIsrael policy. “If I have thought of this Tom Clancytype scenario,” Adler wrote in his column, “don’t you think that this almost unfathomable idea has been discussed in Israel’s most inner circles?” He added, “You have got to believe, like I do, that all options are on the table.” As the editor of a reputable Jewish newspaper, Adler should have known better than to make such a reckless and

L

provocative suggestion. And that’s what is so scary about this incident. He apparently thought nothing wrong with it. But there was something very wrong. People are influenced by what they hear and read in the media, by what their religious leaders or any figures of authority in their eyes might say. Think no one will take a shot at President Obama because of a newspaper editorial? Well, we hope not, anyway, but we can’t help but remember what happened to the late Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin — gunned down in Tel Aviv by a Jewish assassin who believed he was religiously justified to take his life — something some far-right rabbis have even said. Certainly, it was Adler’s right to print whatever he pleased in a democracy as great as ours; it was also the obligation of responsible Americans to immediately shout him down for his incitement, which, thankfully, is what Atlanta’s Jewish leaders, and the readers of his paper, did. Unfortunately, what Adler did is not unique. Campaign rhetoric this season has frequently gone over a cliff. Last week, at a Florida campaign rally for Newt Gingrich, supporters of the

candidate chanted “Kenya,” referencing the place where they want to send the president. In so doing, they attempted to keep alive the malicious lie that the president is not an American citizen. The right thing for the former Speaker of the House to have done was to scold those few extremists, which would have been an act of leadership. But he didn’t. Thankfully, Adler is doing the right thing — the only thing — by resigning and putting his paper up for sale. But he needs to do more. As the Atlanta Jewish Federation said in a statement, “While we acknowledge his public apology and remorse, the damage done to the people of Israel, the global Jewish people, and especially the Jewish Community of Atlanta is irreparable.” Maybe, but Adler could — and should — at least offer himself as a spokesman against the toxic climate, much like a reformed alcoholic speaking at an AA meeting about his dark past. Don’t like President Obama? Don’t vote for him. Do like him? Do vote for him. But there are 10 more months to go in this campaign. If the rhetoric only deteriorates from here, it could be a volatile 10 months, indeed.

Shelley’s words apply to today’s ‘Arab Spring’ Jay Bushinsky

JERUSALEM — The English poet Percy Bysshe Shelley surely did not have the Arab world in mind when he penned the concluding verse of his “Ode to the West,” which reads: “If winter comes, can spring be far behind.” Those words could apply to the abortive efforts to bring democracy to Central Europe in 1848, and to liberalize the Communist regime in Czechoslovakia in 1968, but not to the upheavals that began raging in the Arab world a year ago. Carried away by misguided expectations harbored by naive or misinformed foreign correspondents that the North African rim and part of the Fertile Crescent had opted for genuine democracy, they invented the term “Arab Spring,” which is a totally different story. It supposedly started when a young fruit and vegetable vendor committed suicide in Tunis due to political despair and the mass demonstrations that ensued caused the resignation and flight of the country’s corrupt president, Zine Abedine ben Ali. But the violence that deposed his Libyan and Egyptian counterparts, Presidents Muammar Qaddhafi and Hosni Mubarak (in the former case it included military intervention by the United States and European Union), has not spawned genuine democracy in either country. Libya still is ruled (barely) by a weak transitional government. Egypt is

dominated by a caretaker regime headed by the Muslim Brotherhood, which owes its existence and survival to the Egyptian army’s concurrent seizure of power. The Brotherhood won an overwhelming majority in Egypt’s first free election and with its more extremist ally, the a-Nour party, controls 75 percent of the country’s new parliament. Syria’s case is much more tragic. The popular revolt that erupted in Damascus and spread throughout the country has pitted the Syrian armed forces against citizens who want the regime of President B’shar Assad replaced by a government committed to political freedom. The daily clashes there have cost the lives of an estimated 5,000 people. Despite this carnage, much of it caused by reckless and indiscriminate tank and artillery fire at unarmed demonstrators, the international community has failed to stop the bloodshed. Russian, Chinese and Iranian support of Assad has kept the enlightened nations at bay. In short, the so-called Arab Spring has little to show for itself. It resulted in free elections in Tunisia, Libya and Egypt, but the Tunisians were the only ones in all of the affected countries to elect an alternative government based on secular democratic principles. Even the voters’ preference in Tunis was for a relatively moderate Islamic political party. One lesson to learn from all this is that there is an inherent and inexplicable fascination with the Arab world among Western journalists and commentators. It contrasts sharply and transparently with the skepticism bordering on outright enmity they harbor for Israel. It is as if their contact that with the Arab side of the Middle East dispute convinced them that the Arabs are the good guys who have an authentic right to rule their respective

countries while the Israelis are illegitimate outsiders. The fact that the Hebrew Bible, which was composed nearly 4,000 years ago and which describes in great detail the Israelis’ presence in the Holy Land is totally ignored. Nor are these journalistic Arabists impressed by the political geography of Palestine-cum-Israel, i.e. the survival of hundreds of Hebrew-language place names despite the passage of more than three millennia or their easily identifiable Arabic-language derivatives. Actually, some Israeli historians credit the country’s Arab population with having preserved the biblical names of cities, towns and villages that existed during that era. A genuine Arab Spring may come about in the years to come, but this will depend on the extent to which democratic principles penetrate their various Arab populations’ mindset and replace the persistent, but essentially stagnant, sloganeering that persists today. This could prompt many if not all of the current Middle Eastern regimes to guarantee freedom of speech, press and assembly and do away with covert control by secret police or intelligence agencies known as the ominous mukhabarat — the Arabic term for intelligence. Such regimes undoubtedly would reconcile themselves to the fact that Israel exists in the region whether they like it or not and will continue to do so, and this realization would militate for true and stable peace. It might even make the journalistic and analytical Arabists admit that contemporary Israel indeed does have some unique attributes that they could emulate. How apt are the closing words of Shelley’s poem: Please see Bushinsky, page 8.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012 — 7

OPINION Join fellow members of the

GREATER PITTSBURGH AIPAC DELEGATION for the three most important days affecting

ISRAEL’S FUTURE!

Letters to the editor We invite you to submit letters for publication. Letters must include name, address and daytime phone number; addresses and phone numbers will not be published. Letters may not exceed 400 words and may be edited for length and clarity; they cannot be returned. Mail, fax or e-mail letters to: letters@thejewishchronicle.net via e-mail : via fax:

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No laments, please I am writing in response to the “Slings and arrows” column in the Jan. 26 edition. Rather than lament Mr. Lieberfeld’s essay, the paper could have published an

open letter providing the information that he is apparently unable to obtain from the politically correct portion of the Jewish community within which he lives and that he is apparently too lazy to find on the Internet. For starters, Jews aren’t a race. I thought that nonsense went out with the Nazis. Second, so-called “Palestinians” aren’t a people. They are indistinguishable from other Arabs. Palestinians are nothing more than south Syrian Arabs living in Judea, Samaria or Gaza. Third, the two major “Palestinian” political organizations are Hamas and the Please see Letters, page 9.

THE 2012 AIPAC POLICY CONFERENCE March 4-6, 2012

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To register go to WWW.AIPAC.ORG/PC or contact The AIPAC Mid-Atlantic Regional Office at 410-223-4190.

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8 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012

OPINION Campaign against campus antiSemitism is making gains Guest Columnist KENNETH L. MARCUS Just over a year ago, the Jewish community won an important victory against campus anti-Semitism. The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) agreed, for only the second time, to extend civil rights protection to Jewish college students. This landmark ruling resulted from a unified stand by over a dozen Jewish organizations. A year later, after adverse decisions in three cases, some wonder whether this victory has lost its luster. It has not. In fact, civil rights advocates are making slow, steady progress, and even the unsuccessful cases have yielded positive results. The community achieved unity last year because the major players agree that there is a problem for students on many college campuses. Last month, the Institute for Jewish & Community Research announced that over 40 percent of Jewish college students have experienced or witnessed anti-Semitism on their campuses. Moreover, this figure may understate the problem, since more students respond affirmatively when questioned more specifically. Admittedly, many incidents are minor. However, on some campuses serious antiJewish harassment has been reported. Frequently, this harassment relates to animosity against Israel but impacts individual Jewish students. Advocates have filed complaints against the University of California at Berkeley, Irvine and Santa Cruz; Rutgers; and Columbia universities. In general, the complainants ask the universities to take firm action in response to anti-Semitic harassment. They ask administrators not to censor anyone

Bushinsky: Continued from page 6. “Scatter, as from an unextinguished hearth Ashes and sparks, my words among mankind!

but rather to denounce anti-Semitism with firmness and specificity. Lawsuits arise when administrators refuse. Advocates are making progress, but they also face setbacks. While all five cases remain pending, or subject to appeal, three have had unfavorable rulings: • Last month, a San Francisco judge dismissed a University of CaliforniaBerkeley students’ complaint. The judge, however, granted the students leave to re-file their complaints, and they have already done so, adding additional claims. • This month, OCR found insufficient evidence to proceed on this author’s complaint that Columbia University offered a course that was so biased against Jewish students that a Barnard department chair had to steer Jewish students away from it. OCR pulled back, after having previously decided to commence a full investigation, because the department chair denied student allegations, and OCR was unable to verify student testimony. • OCR had previously dismissed the Zionist Organization of America’s complaint alleging a hostile environment for Jewish students at the University of California-Irvine. The net effect of even these cases has been positive, although the initial legal decisions were negative. The litigationrelated publicity at Irvine was undoubtedly a factor in last year’s successful prosecution of 11 Irvine students who infamously disrupted Ambassador Michael Oren’s speech. Most observers agree that Irvine’s administration has been more responsive since ZOA filed its case. Similarly, since the Berkeley case was filed, University of California’s president, Mark Yudoff, has issued stronger statements against anti-Semitism (needed for its defense in this litigation) than he had previously made. The Barnard case set a helpful precedent, by which Jewish students have Please see Marcus, page 16.

Be through my lips to unawakened Earth The trumpet of a prophecy O Wind, If Winter comes can spring be far behind.” (Jay Bushinsky, an Israel-based political columnist, can be reached at jay@actcom.co.il.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012 — 9

OPINION LETTERS

TO THE

EDITOR

Continued from page 7. PLO. Hamas is part of the Muslim Brotherhood, which wants to re-establish the caliphate. The PLO has spent decades telling its members (in Arabic) to kill Jews or drive them into the sea. The “Palestinians” aren’t fighting for freedom or democracy. They are fighting to establish sharia, under which Mr. Lieberfeld would be given the choices of converting to Islam, becoming a dhimmi, or being executed. Perhaps he should be asked if he feels sorry for the KKK in its unequal struggle against the FBI. Something to think about is whether Mr. Lieberfeld’s understandings of Israel and Islam are very close to the understandings of President Obama. If they are very close, wouldn’t President Obama also think that supporting the “Palestinians” is the moral thing to do? James D. Silverman Squirrel Hill

Join the conversation The courageous conversation we took up at Rodef Shalom’s Town Hall Meeting Jan. 19, which was described on the front page of last week’s Chronicle (“Rodef Shalom ponders tough issues at town meeting,” Jan. 26) has been long overdue. The challenges each of our congregations and agencies must confront are not unique to any of us; we are all in this together and no one of us can solve for the enormity of these challenges alone. Obviously, this means we must collaborate, which is more than inviting others to sign on to what any one of us is already doing. After all, collaboration means to co-labor, to work together, and working together in this way will require our doing things differently than we have before. Admittedly, change can be read as a synonym for loss, but so is change a necessary catalyst for realizing the promise we simply cannot achieve alone. Only those too enamored of their own accomplishments (what Freud referred to as the “narcissism of our small differences”) to focus on what is in the best interests of our community-at-large fail to appreciate this truth. This is why it is especially important that our community’s senior leadership actively focus on those we are here to serve rather than on who gets the credit for what any of us seeks to accomplish. If this notion resonates with you, but you are not sure where to begin, permit me to suggest that readers take up this conversation with their rabbi, lay congregational and agency leadership. After all, for our local courageous conversations to gain purchase, we will need as many clear-eyed, community-minded folks around the table as possible. Won’t you join us? Rabbi Aaron B. Bisno Point Breeze (The author is the senior rabbi of Rodef Shalom Congregation.)

Dialogue with Lieberfeld Regarding the Jan. 26 editorial, “Slings and arrows,” your editorial reaction to Jesse Lieberfeld’s essay “Fighting a Forbidden Battle: How I Stopped Covering Up for a Hidden Wrong,”

(Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Jan. 15) was disappointing. A young man said to his rabbi “I want to support Israel. But how can I when it lets its army commit so many killings?” He received an unsatisfactory response from his rabbi, to wit, “It is a terrible thing, isn’t it?” he (his rabbi) said, “but there’s nothing we can do. It’s just a fact of life.” This young man wants to understand why a country and people he is a part of and was raised to love and admire is doing these things. As you very well know, he is not alone. There are many good and patriotic Israelis and Jews who support Israel and ask the same questions every day. Reach out and talk to him. Establish the dialogue that he is seeking. He is part of the future of the Jewish people, whether you accept or reject him. He has not “turned on the Jewish state” as you put it. He has asked those who authoritatively represent the Jewish faith and Jewish political establishment to help him understand what he is seeing. Do not dismiss him, saying “he is not the first, and he won’t be the last” to “turn on the Jewish state.” The clear and present danger we see in both the United States and Israel is that groups that disagree with each other only listen to themselves (find a Democrat watching Fox News or find a Likud member reading materials from Rabbis for Human Rights). When a young man like Jesse asks the other side (a role you cast yourself into, not him) to speak with him, and the other side turns him away with caustic, dismissive comments, how can Jesse and many others like him help but be disappointed? He deserves our attention, not the back of our hand. Invite him in for a discussion of his and your views, now. Mark Fichman Pittsburgh

Too late for balance I read Jesse Lieberfeld’s essay the day it appeared in the Pittsburgh PostGazette. It was honest and courageous. The Jewish Chronicle’s response was neither. I have spent a great deal of time in Israel; indeed, I am there now visiting our daughter and family on the kibbutz where they are members. And I can tell you that after more than 60 years of treating Israeli Arabs as second-class citizens and oppressing Palestinian Arabs, it is too late to tell your readers about Arabs in the Knesset or on soccer teams or the treatment of Jews in Arab lands. It is too late to extol the Jewish values that are taught in our synagogues. And it is way too late to write about the need for balance. Balance would require this paper to editorialize for an end to the reduced appropriations for Israeli Arab towns and schools as compared to their Jewish counterparts, an end to Israeli laws that explicitly discriminate against non-Jews, and an end to the ongoing demolition of homes of Palestinians and Bedouins. Jesse’s essay calls attention to a side of the equation that desperately needs attention. Your paper should do the same. Michael Zigmond Squirrel Hill


10 - THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012

Style On the road to Burma A Jewish presence continues in this jungle land BY BEN G. FRANK For the Chronicle

You don’t have to take the “Road to Mandalay, Where the flyin’ fishes play,” to find the Jews of Burma, a country where little has changed since British colonial times over a half century ago. Fly into Yangon (Rangoon) and take a taxi to the heart of the city, and you will discover the 100-year-old majestic, blue and white painted synagogue, Musmeah Yeshua, located at No. 85, 26th St. It was at this historic house of worship that I saw a phenomenon that I had seen many times in the vast Jewish Diaspora: A Jewish man or woman opens the synagogue in a community where most of the Jews have long disappeared. There are only eight Jewish families in Burma, but Musmeah Yeshua remains open thanks to one man, Than Lwin. Jews know him as Moses Samuels, the man who carries the load of Jewish history on his shoulders. Each morning, he walks a few blocks from his house to unlock the doors of the synagogue and keep a Jewish presence in Burma, now known as Myanmar. Usually no one shows up for a minyan, though a prayer service does occasionally take place — the result of someone having to recite a Kaddish, or, on occasion, when a group of Israeli, American or Australian Jews arrives during the tourist season. When that happens Moses frantically calls the few Burmese Jews as well as the Israelis at the embassy in the city to come quickly to the synagogue and meet the guests in this building, one of 188 sites on the list of Yangon Heritage Buildings. Like the recent influx of tourism to Burma, Jewish groups have been touring this land of the golden pagodas. Today, Myanmar is transitioning from a half century of repressive military rule, which shut off the country from the outside world. Myanmar is opening itself to the West and introducing economic and political reforms, including the release of prominent political prisoners. All this prompted the historic visit to Myanmar last December of Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. Her trip resulted in the United States restoring diplomatic relations with Myanmar. And for the first time in at least several decades, the small Burmese Jewish community, joined by government officials, members of the diplomatic corps, and former ambassadors to Israel, held a communitywide Chanuka celebration in the Park Royal Hotel. Prior to the festivities, Samuels and his family visited the home of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the Nobel Prize winner and symbol of Burmese freedom, who emerged from house arrest in 2010. The Jewish group had invited Suu Kyi to the Chanuka program, but “the Lady,”

Ben Frank photo

Inside view of Musmeah Yeshua Synagogue, Yangon.

as she is known, told the delegation she could not attend because she was holding a prayer ceremony at her home for her late mother, who was the wife of General Aung San, Burma’s independence hero. The group invited her to visit the historic Musmeah Yeshua again, since she was last there 15 years ago. The interior of the synagogue is similar in style to the grand Magen David synagogue in Kolkata (Calcutta), India, with its soaring ceiling, memorial lamps suspended in mid air and pale beams over a central carved bima located in the center of the prayer hall, surrounded by benches for the worshippers. Above them is a women’s gallery. I moved about Yangon, visiting pagodas, spotting saffron-robed monks, all the time hearing the tinkling bells of Burma. I saw stores, which were once occupied by Jewish tailors, wine and liquor traders, coffee and fruit vendors, and antique dealers. Today, gold and diamond shops have replaced those former shops. The Jews are long gone. Not far away, in the middle of this sprawling city of 5 million, sits the Shwedagon Pagoda, the chief place of pilgrimage in the Buddhist world and a tourist’s delight. This enormous golden structure, close to 400 feet high, with a magnificent stupa, is adorned with 5,448 diamonds and 2,317 rubies. At the tip of the structure is a 76-carat diamond. The platform covers 12 acres. Rudyard Kipling described it as a “golden mystery.” For the visitor, this is a land of colorful bazaars and joyous festivals. For tourists, Myanmar of today is similar to

Thailand 40 years ago. As Kipling said, “This is Burma, and it will be quite unlike any land you know about.” Once, several thousand Jews called Burma their home. The first Jew in Burma was Solomon Gabirol, who served as a commissar to the army of King Alaungpaya (1752-1760). Over the years, Jews arrived in Burma and in the mid-19th century, David Sassoon and his co-religionists,

Ben Frank photo

The Shwedagon Pagoda, Yangon.

known as Baghdadis, settled in India and Burma and other Far East lands. Within decades of British arrival in the 1880s, life for the Jews of Burma became pleasant. After the 1941 Japanese invasion, however, many Burmese Jews fled to India. When a military junta seized control of the country in 1962, installing an authoritarian regime and nationalizing business, most Jews departed. Both Israel and Burma were born in 1948. Until 1962, the year when the military took over, relations between the two nations were strong and promising. U Nu became the first foreign prime minister to visit the Jewish state, and David BenGurion, Israel’s first prime minister, spent one of the longest official trips abroad for an Israeli prime minister with a two-week sojourn in 1961. Israel aided Myanmar after Cyclone Nargis in 2008, and Israeli Ambassador Yaron Mayer said in an interview for the Chronicle that the Jewish state and Myanmar have maintained good relations over the years. Samuels is not alone in keeping a Jewish presence in this city. He is aided by his son, Sammy Samuels, 31, who lives most of the year in New York City, but is a driving force as he raises funds for the synagogue, and with his father, established Myanmar Shalom Travels and Tours, an entity designed to “keep the Jewish spirit alive in Burma.” (Ben G. Frank is a journalist and travel writer. His latest book is titled, “The Scattered Tribe: Traveling the Diaspora from Cuba to India to Tahiti & Beyond.”)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012 — 11

SPORTS

JCC empties bench in victory over NUP BY ZACHARY WEISS Chronicle Correspondent

The JCC Boys’ Varsity Team routed conference foe Northside Urban Pathways (NUP) 58-29 in Greater Pittsburgh Independent Basketball League play. The JCC’s Jesse Goleman led all scorers with 18 points. The JCC started fast, running up the score to 8-0 on NUP.

The team took advantage of all their open shots and regularly drilled them into the net. Its defense frustrated NUP, registering three of its four blocks in the game. The JCC led 16-4 by the end of the first quarter. With a lead in the second quarter, JCC head coach Andy Pakler started to empty his bench and midway through the quarter, all of the players had seen some playing time. “That was our goal from the beginning of the game,” Pakler said. “Our goal as a team was for every person in the locker room to do one thing that everyone applauded. Whether it was taking a charge,

get a defensive stop or whatever it was, everybody did one thing that got a round of applause from us.” The JCC’s aggressive play paid off with a 35-8 lead at the half. NUP attempted a comeback in the third quarter, but Goleman managed a couple of baskets toward the end of the period and the JCC still outscored 11-8 its opponent to lead 41-21 going into the final period. At the beginning of the fourth quarter, Pakler emptied the bench. Meanwhile, NUP couldn’t get going in the quarter, failing to pressure the JCC on the floor, and falling far short at the buzzer.

But the JCC had little time to savor the victory. It visited Project Destiny the next night, eeking out a 65-62 win on the road and boosting its record to 9-1 on the season. Next on the schedule were to be matchups Monday, Jan. 30, and Tuesday, Jan. 31, against St. Basil and St. Bede, but those games were cancelled because neither team belongs to the GPIBL. The JCC’s next contest is a rematch against Pittsburgh Project, Thursday, Feb. 2.

(Zachary Weiss can be reached at yngzc@yahoo.com.)


12 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012

METRO Cross-pollinating: Continued from page 1. Initiative at the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education, JTS. The program coordinators from all three seminaries also have done joint presentations on experiential learning in Jewish contexts at educational conferences, and hope that the alumni and students of the three programs will be able to network in the future, Young said. Other areas of study ripe for interdenominational collaboration include early childhood education, Israel study and leadership training — subjects that are mostly nontheological in nature. For example, the Jewish Early Childhood

Leadership Institute, which will be launched this spring, is a joint collaborative between HUC-JIR and JTS. The program, also funded by the Jim Joseph Foundation, will provide advanced training for educators working in early childhood education, and its faculty will teach at both HUC-JIR and JTS, as well as online. “I find it an exciting way for people to get to know each other [coming from different denominations],” said Lyndall Miller, the director of the Jewish Early Childhood Leadership Institute. “I anticipate lively discussions. I look forward to lively discussions. It is good to have, across the board, people with different perspectives.” Interdenominational educational training began in 2004 in New York City, with the Leadership Institute for Congregational

Leaders and Learners, a collaborative between HUC-JIR and JTS, and funded by the UJA Federation of New York. Helping train religious school directors and congregational educators in the Reform and Conservative movements, the Leadership Institute also has provided training to educators of Reconstructionist congregations, as well as at least one independent Orthodox program. “We have worked really hard to create a community of learners that respect one another and are willing to learn from one another,” said Dr. Evie Levy Rotstein, project director of the Leadership Institute. “We share more similarities than differences,” she added. “We are building on the strengths that people bring as individuals to build a community that sup-

ports one another.” Other interdenominational collaborations include a joint Israel program where students from HUC-JIR and JTS study and tour the country together. And, for the last several years, HUC-JIR and JTS have had a joint faculty appointment — the Schusterman Visiting Professor in Israel Studies. While this “cross-pollination” among the movements is becoming more common, Aaron does not see it as a step toward a future post-denominational Judaism. “I don’t think it has anything to do with a merger,” Aaron said. “Instead, it is two schools of education seeing an opportunity to partner.” (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012 — 13

Simchas Weddings

were Alex Speck, brother of the bride; Rick Caso; Michael Farkas; Ryan Kanzleiter; Steven Pistor; and Matthew Recupito. Max Mracek was the ring bearer and Lucia Perrine was the flower girl. Erin graduated from Hofstra University and is the weekend producer for WABC Radio in Manhattan. Michael, a graduate of Indiana University and Flight Safety International, is a pilot with ExpressJet Airlines. Erin and Michael reside in Hoboken, N.J.

Speck/Berkowitz: Erin Brooke Speck and Michael Steven Berkowitz were married Oct. 29, 2011, at the Omni William Penn Hotel. Rabbi Charles Diamond officiated. Parents are Cindy and Eric Speck of Squirrel Hill and BJ and Gary Berkowitz of West Bloomfield, Mich. Maid of honor was Beth Kaiserman. Bridemaids were Robyn Berkowitz, sister of the groom; Hillary Miller, cousin of the bride; Rebecca Kalla; Eva Marcus; Carolyn Slayton; and Alison Stang. Corey Berkowitz, brother of the groom, served as best man. Groomsmen

B’nai Mitzva Sydney Silvana Brown, daughter of Audrey and John Brown, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Feb. 4, at 10:30 a.m. at Temple Sinai. Grandparents are Silvana and Michael Kelly and Rose Ann and Robert Brown, all of Pittsburgh.


14 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRRUARY 2, 2012

Community A C L O S E R L O O K

Welcome reception

Birthday celebration

Deborah Winn-Horvitz, the new president and CEO of the Jewish Association on Aging, was welcomed at a reception Jan. 17. Pictured from left are Steve Halpern, JAA board; Winn-Horvitz; David Gritzer, COO; and Mitchell Pakler, JAA board.

Residents at UPMC Heritage Place participated in an educational presentation about the 100th anniversary of Hadassah, Jan. 24. The residents learned about the history of Hadassah and the new addition being built on the Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem. The Hadassah women pictured, from left, are Shirley Zionts, Sondra Glasser and Judy Palkovitz.

UPMC photo Jewish Association on Aging photo

Jew’colades COMPILED BY ANGELA LEIBOWICZ Community/Web Editor

Beverly A. Block is a recently elected new shareholder at the Pittsburgh law firm of Sherrard, German & Kelly, P.C. Block, a member of the firm’s litigaBeverly A. Block tion services group, is a member of the Allegheny County Bar Association and is on their executive council of the Women in the Law Division and a member of the ACBA’s Gender Equality Committee. Block was selected as a 2012 Pennsylvania Rising Star by Super Lawyers magazine. Block graduated from the University of Michigan with a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and Juris Doctor from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. She is a resident of Squirrel Hill. Eric Daniel of Fox Point was recently awarded the Joseph L. Arnold Prize for Outstanding Writing on Baltimore History for his paper “Northwest Real Estate Company v. Serio: The ‘Invasion’ of a Northwest Baltimore Suburb.” Daniel will be speaking about the paper and issues addressed at an event

sponsored by the Baltimore City Historical Society in March. Daniel is a master of community planning student at the University of Maryland and an intern in the Office of General Eric Daniel Counsel for the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission. He graduated from the University of Maryland Carey School of Law in May 2011.

Meyer “Skip” Grinberg has been elected president of the board of directors of the Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Three Rivers Marathon. The marathon, which will be held Meyer “Skip” May 6, will attract Grinberg an international field of 25,000 participants. This community event uses 3,500 volunteers and last year helped raise over $1.5 million for 40 local charities. In addition to many civic and communal activities, Grinberg is the co-chair of Partnership2Gether of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh.

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16— THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012

METRO/OPINION Toll: Continued from page 1. No matter how good the results are, though, Toll said another generation of the PEV0 — not this model — will eventually go into commercial production. “We’ve started research and development on our next vehicle,” he said. “We’re aiming for release in the summer of 2013.” Electric bikes are nothing new, but the

Marcus: Continued from page 8. protections against “racial steering,” i.e., being ghettoized into certain courses or majors because they are Jewish. Moreover, all three cases focus attention on campus problems, prompting students elsewhere to come forward and assert their rights. There is no substitute for victory. Nev-

models, which mostly come from Asia, are typically underpowered and not suited for hilly, rugged terrain. Pulse’s goal is to make a durable electric bike at an affordable price. “In Pittsburgh that’s a real problem,” Toll said. “We have so many hills, so we designed a vehicle for Pittsburgh that’s strong and robust.” The situation is the same in Israel, he added, where electric bikes have carved out a niche in Tel Aviv, but not in hillier parts of the country.

Toll thinks the Israeli market is ripe for Pulse. “Israel is a country of early adopters,” he said. “It has always been at the forefront of new technology.” He formed the company with two friends who had backgrounds in electric vehicles and bicycles. Last year, they developed their first vehicle — the PEV0. Pulse recently took first place in the Randall Family Big Idea Competition, a contest hosted by Pitt’s Katz School of Business, which attracted almost 200 entries.

Toll co-founded Pulse with Thorin Tobiassen (chief technology officer), who brings firsthand experience with electric vehicles for the West Coast; and Max Pless (chief operating officer), another graduating Pitt senior who has a background in bike frame construction and repair.

ertheless, these cases have already yielded favorable results, regardless of their outcome on appeal. Now, three things are needed: First, all parties must work harder to avert the need for litigation. This means working to articulate more clearly the university values of civil discourse and equal opportunity, while vigilantly protecting freedom of speech. Second, when litigation is unavoidable, the strongest cases must be identified and

pursued. Since favorable precedents have been achieved, the priority now is to find cases that are factually strong. Too often students come forward too late, and the strongest cases are sometimes barred by the statute of limitations. Most importantly, the Jewish community must continue to stand together as it did a year ago. Only when the community is united can it provide students the support they need.

(Kenneth L. Marcus is a former staff director of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. He is forming a new organization to combat campus anti-Semitism, the Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law, and is a senior research associate at the Institute for Jewish & Community Research.)

(Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012 — 17

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COLLEGE/GRAD. Student to assist an 85 year old woman with health problems in home with maintance & personal issues. Computer literacy required. References required good composition. 412-251-5467. ••• EDUCATION DIRECTOR Dynamic, conservative congregation seeks a creative, full-time Director of Education for our formal/informal experiential education program form early childhood through 12th grade, including family education programs and programming for day school students. Our ideal Director of Education is a committed, Conservative Jew who is charismatic and relates well with children of all ages as well as their parents. S/he is Jewishly knowledgeable and has developed strong administrative, supervisory, communication, budgetary and especially people skills, and enjoys working in a team environment. Our ideal candidate will keep our school innovative and growing. Masters in Jewish education and educational administration background preferred. Competitive salary and benefits. Send resume by February 1 to B’nai Jeshurun Congregation, 27501 Fairmount Blvd., Pepper Pike Ohio 44124. Attn. Education Director Search Committee or email to: president@bnaijeshurun.org. ••• ADMIN. ASSISTANT/RECEPTIONIST Full Time- 12months. Community Day School seeks administrative. Primary responsibilities include greeting visitors, answering phones, coordination substitute teachers, handling student transportation issues, assisting with communications and providing administrative support. Candidate must have excellent organizational and communication skills, work well as a member of a team, be able to multi-task and maintain confidentiality. Proficiency in Microsoft Office and ability to learn database management required. Send cover letter and resume to hr@comday.org. EOE ••• THE CARE Registry, INC. is in immediate need of caregivers for our elderly clients. We offer $12.00/hour pay! We also have Live-in-care positions. Please call for more info. 412-421-5202 or www.TheCareRegistry.com.

LONG TERM Substitute Teacher- Third Grade. Community Day School has an opening for a 3rd grade teacher starting March 1st through mid-June. This position requires third grade certification, background in differentiate instruction, current clearances and a minimum of two years of experience. Everyday math experience preferred. Please email letter and resume to hr@comday.org. EOE ••• HOME INSTEAD SENIOR Care needing week-end caregivers. Rewarding work with seniors, make a difference in the life of an elderly person by joining our #1 non. Medical team of caregivers. Car is required, training is provided, Flexible schedule, all shifts EOE. 412-731-0733.

POSITION WANTED THE CARE REGISTRY, INC provides nurse aides and companions to offer one on one care for you in your home. The workers are screened and bonded. All shifts and live in care available. The Care Registry is licensed by the PA Dept. of Health. Low rates! Care management also available. 412-421-5202 or www.TheCareRegistry.com ••• CAREGIVER CONNECTION A PA. Licensed home-care registry, Jewish Family & Children’s Service refers screened, JF&CS trained caregivers providing short/long-term personal care services to seniors at affordable rates. Available 24/7, call 412-422-0400 or 877-243-1530 (toll free). ••• HOME HEALTH CARE specialist in hospice, dialysis & direct care. Will work any shift. Call Patricia Spencer 412-229-8760. ••• BOYD COMMUNITY Service proving personal care, transportation, light housekeeping, meal preparation & shopping. Reasonable rates and hourly services. Contact Sonya Boyd 412-731-0279. ••• CAREGIVER/ Caring Hands, Personal Touch Elder Care. Experienced with references & reasonable rates. Call 412-841-0146.

POSITION WANTED CERTIFIED NURSING Assisant available to help care for your loved one. References, experience, will do light housekeeping. 412723-2693. ••• CAREGIVER AVAILABLE to take care of your loved one. Reliable with references. 412-418-8511. ••• MALE CAREGIVER looking to take care of your male love one. References, Act 33/34 clearance & years of experience working with Stroke, Dementia & Parkinson’s, call 412-805-5375. ••• LAUNDRY & IRONING also available to do home or office cleaning, clean out basement, garage or yard. References 412-330-9871. ••• PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZING & Painting. Are you stressed out, living in disharmony & clutter? Do you need to freshen up your bedroom, office or kitchen but don’t have the time? I help busy professional & families in Pittsburgh. I can make your home more liveable, too. Call Jody at 412759-0778 or email : collegeconcierge.jdiperna@ gmail.com. Find me online at http://collegeconcierge.squ arespace.com. ••• HEVENLY HOUSEKEEPING our house cleaning is a blessing. Experienced, reliable & reasonable. 412-2772565. ••• CAREGIVER WILL TAKE Loving care of your loved one, have all references & clearances. 412-215-1801. ••• OFFICE CLEANING Available. Excellent references, reliable and reasonable. Call 412-980-2002. ••• PERSONAL ASSISTIANT to the Elderly/Handicapped. Excellent driver for shopping & errands, appointments & outings. Available for companionship correspondence, light cooking, light cleaning. Act 33/34, reasonable rates. 412-422-2849. ••• WHY PAY for a nursing agency when you can have me! 32 years’ experience with excellent references. 412-969-5364. ••• CLEANING LADY seeks work, reliable, experienced with references. Call 412390-1914. ••• CERTIFIED AID seeking position as caregiver, available 24/7, year’s experience, good references & have clearances. 412-513-7840. ••• SEEKING PRIVATE Duty caregiving, available 24/7. Certified, experienced, reliable with references. 412969-6863. ••• PERSONAL CAREGIVER available to care for you or your loved one. Experienced, references 412-628-4381.

TORAH

A map for faith Portion of the Week RABBI RON SYMONS TEMPLE SINAI Beshalach, Exodus 13:17-17:16

Recently, while preparing for the 92nd Street Y Satellite Broadcast of Walter Issaacson speaking about his relationship with Steve Jobs, I was touched by Steve Jobs’ words: “Again, you can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.” While each of us might enjoy the promise of a well-mapped future, Jobs reminds us that we can look back to history for guidance, but we cannot expect to forecast the future. He reminds us that we need to take educated steps forward into the future with a bit of faith. This week’s Torah portion, Beshalach, brings us back to the shore of the sea just after we passed from slavery to freedom. The Torah teaches us, “And Moses made Israel move on from the Reed Sea” (Exodus 15:22). We can read this verse and wonder why would Moses make us move forward. Wouldn’t we have moved forward on our own? Rabbi

Tanhuma helps us understand the circumstances: “Moses had them move against their will, for they were not ready to leave the shore. Why not? Because when Israel left Egypt, Pharaoh, together with all those hosts, set out to pursue them. What else did he do? As he set out in pursuit of Israel with his chariots and horsemen, he adorned all the horses with precious stones and pearls. When they reached the sea and the Holy One drowned them, all these precious stones and pearls floated on the surface and were cast on shore, so that every day Israelites would come down and gather them. That is why they did not wish to move from there. Moses, perceiving this, said, ‘Do you think that the sea will continue to bring up precious stones and pearls for you every day?’ So, against their will, Moses had them move on.” (Tanhuma Buber, Beshalach, #16, fifth century C.E.) After passing through the waters of the Sea of Reeds, we thought that we could live in the past, reaping the rewards of yesterday into tomorrow. According to this midrash, Moses teaches us that life requires us to move on with faith. Our sacred studies teach us how to connect the dots of history with the hope that we can draw lines that connect the dots of yesterday with the dots of tomorrow. I call that faith.

(This column is a service of the Greater Pittsburgh Rabbinic Association.)

BUYING AUTO/TRUCKS/ JUNK REMOVAL

DRIVER

PLASTER/PAINTING

SELLING & BUYING Auto’s & JUNK Removal. Cars, Trucks, Vans, SUVs, Quit Driving, Death, Wrecks, Antiques, Classics & Junkers. FREE Legal Title Transfer! Vehicle Removal from Your Property. Denny Offstein Auto Sales 724-287-7771. Paying Cash, Honest Fair Prices!

NEED A RIDE? Call Norm, he will drive you. Doctors, shopping, anything that needs to be done. Experienced, insured, great references and reasonable rates. Available le for airport pickup or departure. Norm 412-521-6999.

PLASTER/PAINTING Marbleized painting & drywall, free estimates, excellent references. Call Herzel 412422-5486.

FOR SALE

IN-HOME TUTORING & Learning Support K-12. 412760-9560, e-mail:debbiechottiner@yahoo.com, visit my web-site: www.debbiechottiner.com.

CHAIR CANING CANE & ABLE Chair caning, hand pre-woven cane rush reed & wicker repaired. Reasonable rates pick up & deliver. Charyl Hays 412-655-0224.

COMPUTER NICE JEWISH Boy, offering the full range of computer services, from advising and teaching to repair and support. I will come to your house or apartment, fix any problem you’re having & teach you what you need to know to use it. I have 14 years’ experience working with people of all ages. . No job is too large or small, and nobody is too computer illiterate. (Really) CALL JASON 412-401-1204, or visit my web www.computerwizard.us. References available.

ADATH JESHURIN Cemetery Plot. Prime location on isle, section- B, Plot- 41, row- 7. $850.00 call Elaine at 412-561-1224.

TUTOR/ EDUCATIONAL SPECIALIST

HOME IMPROVEMENTS SOUTH HILLS Glass Block Company. Glass Block & Replacement Windows. Free Estimates, fully insured, PA#041031. 412-466-7097, email: shgwindows@verizon.net.

For all your Real Estate needs

Call Donna 412-687-1000

MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT THE HOT MATZOHS, Pittsburgh’s #1 Klezmer Band, is available for your Wedding, Bar/Bat Mitzvah, Corporate or other special event! The dynamic band, featuring violinist Barbara Lowenstein (founder), offers many styles of music in addition to Klezmer, e,g, classical, jazz, swing and folk. Call 412-3443338 or 412-303-0746. e-mail: barbsviolin@gmail.com.

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18 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012

OBITUARY FELDMAN: On Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012, Morton B. Feldman; beloved husband of the late Racelle (Lazar) Feldman; beloved father of Helene (Dr. Jeffrey) Stein of Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., Carol (Richard) Nathenson of O’Hara Township and Dr. Harold (Dr. Annie Steinberg) Feldman of Philadelphia; father-in-law of the late Dr. Lee J. Goldblum; brother of Emil (late Ruth) Feldman; grandfather of Daniel Stein, Laura (Dr. Gary) Benjamin, Andrea (Jason) Blau, Emily (Fiancé Aaron Marks) Goldblum, Emilia Feldman and Joshua Feldman and dear companion of Irene Gutnick; also survived by nieces and nephews. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment West View Cemetery of Rodef Shalom Congregation. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com FINEBERG: On Wednesday Jan. 25, 2012, Helen Fineberg, 93, of Murrysville; beloved wife of the late Joseph Fineberg; loving mother of Sybil (Bill) Porter; proud grandmother of Kym Porter, Holly (Patrick) Wright, and Brian Porter; great-grandmother of Casey, Ryan, Jessica, Savanna, Cydney, and the late Payton; sister of Raymond Gross, and the late Henry Gross, Ruth Ossar, Lenord Gross, and Shirley Anstanding. Services were officiated by Rabbi Werbow at Congregation Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Payton Wright Foundation, P.O. Box 110067, Bradenton, FL 34211. Arrangements by Jobe Funeral Home Inc., Corner of Beatty Road & 48 North, Monroeville, PA, 15146. www.jobefuneralhome.com

GRAFF: On Friday, Jan. 13, 2012, David Graff; beloved husband of the late Doris (Friedlander) Graff and Mildred Stangel; beloved father of Ellen (Marc) Erenstein of Boynton Beach, Fla., Joanne (Jonathan) Haskel of Boca Raton, Fla., and Martin (Janice) Graff of Dresher, Pa.; brother of Annette (Edward) Resnick of McMurray, Pa., and the late Julia Bobes and I. Jerome Graff; grandfather of Erica Erenstein, Heather Cobb, Jeffrey Haskel, Wendy Graff and Joshua Graff. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment at Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Congregation Beth Shalom, 5915 Beacon Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com LEWINE: On Friday, Jan. 26, 2012, Dr. Robert A. Lewine, 85, formerly of Wheeling, W.Va., and Brownsville, Pa., passed away peacefully at home in Scottsdale, Ariz., surrounded by his loving family; beloved husband of Seena; cherished father of Barbara, Alan, Barry (Janet), and Michael Dr. Robert A. Lewine (Rachel); dear grandfather of eight grandchildren; son of the late Maurice Lewine and Mary Kaufman Lewine of blessed memory. Lewine personified a life well lived. He served in WWII and was a graduate of the Uni-

versity Of Pittsburgh School Of Medicine. Lewine was a dedicated pediatrician who practiced for 44 years in Wheeling and was a clinical professor of pediatrics at West Virginia University. He served three years as president of the West Virginia Academy of Pediatrics. Lewine worked in “retirement” as a mentor to medical students and residents, as a volunteer at the Phoenix Indian Medical Center, in medical research and as part of an international medical relief team in Honduras. He cared for thousands of children and touched many lives in his long career. He was a devoted husband, father, and grandfather. Bob and wife, Seena, were inseparable in their 60-plus-year marriage. He also loved to fish, golf, travel and cheer for the Steelers. He will be missed. Services and interment will be held in Wheeling at a later date. MARCUSON: On Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012, Jack Marcuson and on Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012, Vivian “Goldie” Marcuson; beloved parents of Randy Marcuson and the late Phillip Marcuson; father and mother-in-law of Debbie Marcuson; Jack was the son of the late Phillip and the late Mary Marcuson; Vivian was the daughter of the late Sidney and Gloria Spero; loving grandparents of Beth (Bryan) Schlussel, Amanda Marcuson, Hunter Marcuson and the late Benjamin Marcuson; proud greatgrandparents of Brennan Parker Schlussel; Jack was the brother of Esther (the late Rabbi Eugene) Lipman, the late William Marcuson and the late Charlotte Levy and brother-in-law of Gertrude Marcuson; Vivian was the sister of Claire (the late Dr. Saul) Bergad, Charlotte Spero-Sukolsky and Alexander (Irene) Spero; also survived by Cally Marcuson, their caregivers at Angela Hospice, Martha and Angie and they were forever grateful to Kim and Mile at the Veterans Administration. Jack and his beloved wife Vivian “Goldie” were married for 66 years; they were in hospice care together at their home in Michigan, when they died within days of each other. Jack and Vivian’s years together were celebrated and eulogized at a duel funeral service. Arrangements by The Ira Kaufman Chapel, 18325 W. 9 Mile Road, Southfield, Michigan 48075. www.irakaufman.com PECK: On Monday, Jan. 23, 2012, Annabelle (Cohen) Peck, 73, of Pittsburgh; beloved mother of Benita (Marc) Hamovilz; daughter of the late Fay Seiner and Hyman Cohen; dear sister of Leah (Kenneth) Lipman of Framingham, Mass., Joyce Slotnick of Irwin, Pa., and Marcia Miller of Pittsburgh; also survived by many nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews. Contributions may be made to Forward Shady Apartments, 5841 Forward Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 or Jewish Family and Children’s Service 5743 Bartlett St., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by D’Alessandro Funeral Home, Ltd., 4522 Butler St., Pittsburgh, PA 15201. www.dalessandroltd.com ROSEN: Chuck Rosen, 71, of Boynton Beach, Fla. and formerly of Pittsburgh; husband of Diane Partony; father of Alan and Jill Rosen; grandfather of Jonathan and Sarah Rosen; brother of Francie Hausman and Bobee “Elliott” Slotsky Kramer . Services were held in Boynton Beach, Fla. Contributions may be made to Temple Torah of Boynton Beach, Fla., or Family House

Pittsburgh, 5301 Fifth Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232-2195. RUTTENBERG WEISS: On Saturday, Jan. 7, 2012, in Boynton Beach, Fla. with her family at her side, JoAnne Ruttenberg Weiss passed away. She was born September 25, 1941, in Washington, daughter of Frances Cohen Ruttenberg and granddaughter of Sam and Pearl Cohen. Mrs. Weiss was the JoAnne Ruttenberg wife of Sidney Weiss “Sid” H. Weiss of Carnegie for 48 years; the mother of William (Dana) Weiss of Marlboro, N.J.; and mother of twin daughters Sharon (Sean) Lalloway of Brookfield, Conn., and Sandra (Stuart) Sharpe of Atlanta, Ga. Also surviving are six grandchildren, Eden and Logan Weiss, Katie and Jake Lalloway and Francine and Hannah Sharpe; sister Harriet (Dennis) Gould of Washington; and many relatives and friends. She graduated from Washington High School in 1959. She then went on to graduate from nursing school and worked at Montefiore Hospital in Pittsburgh before moving to Queens, N.Y., with her husband, Sidney, and son Billy. Her twin daughters, Sharon and Sandra, were born in New York. There, she continued her nursing career at UpJohn Health Care in New York and enjoyed volunteer work in that field. In 1999, she and her husband started spending their winters in Boynton Beach, Fla., and made this their permanent residence in 2010. Mrs. Weiss had a passion for life and enjoyed her family and friends. She also enjoyed traveling, vacationing on cruise ships, shopping, meeting people, planning parties, ceramics, playing canasta and especially her yearly trip to Ocean City, Md., with her family. Family request any contributions be made to Hospice of Palm Beach County, 5300 East Ave., West Palm Beach, FL 33409. www.hpbcf.org SABLE: On Thursday, Jan. 26, 2012, Jack “Jake” Sable; beloved husband for 35 years of Saralee (Zama) Sable; Dear father of Shanie Lininger (Jesse) and Charles (Michelle); loving grandfather of James Lininger and Kaitlin Sable; devoted son of the late Charles R. and Mollie (Marcus) Sable; cherished brother of Marlene Harris, twin sister Sandi Sable (Ed) Forstenzer, Morry (Eunice) Sable, the late Karen Sable and Edwin Sable. Jake was born July 17, 1946 and raised in Squirrel Hill, where he was a legendary baseball pitcher at Taylor Allderdice High School. As a junior in 1965, he was the team captain and M.V.P. Jake went on to play in the Federation League, and then at Point Park College on a baseball scholarship. His accomplishments from the mound were many, most notably on October 8, 1965 when he pitched the first no hitter in the history of Point Park College, leading his team to a 6-0 victory. Jake pitched with what Coach Frank Gustine called a blazing fastball, snapping curve and effective change up. In 1969 and 1970, he played in the Tri-State College Baseball Coaches Association All Star team games at Forbes Field. After leavPlease see Obituaries, next page.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012— 19

METRO Obituaries: Continued from previous page. ing Point Park, Jake played for the Monroeville Maulers from 1969-1976 and for the Salem Warlocks from 19982009. He was inducted in the Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in May 2011. He worked at the family business, Sable Chevrolet located in Carrick for over 40 years, until its closing in the fall of 2008. Jake was deeply devoted to his family and friends, and his legacy of kindness to all will be remembered always. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc. Interment Mount Lebanon Cemetery/Temple Emanuel Section. Contributions may be made the Jewish Sports Hall of Fame, 74 Hauppauge Road, Commack, NY 11725. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com SCHWARTZ: On Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012, Morris “Morrie” Schwartz, 88, of Oakland and Braddock, Pa.; beloved husband of Ann Plotkins Schwartz and the late Amalia Golden Schwartz; loving father of Barbara (Herb) Shear, James (Judith) Schwartz, Eileen (Rick) Smith, Suzanne (Richard) Wagner, Marilyn Plotkins (Glenn Litton) and Bob (Beth) Plotkins; loving and devoted grandfather of Gerry Shear, John (Judith) Shear, Harrison Smith, Andrew Smith, Alexander Smith, Allyson (Coby) Sonenshine, Reid Wagner, Nina Plotkins Litton and Leah Plotkins; loving and devoted great-grandfather of Ori Shear, Max and Solomon Sonenshine, and Lexie and Andrew Wagner. Morrie dedicated his life to his family and friends, and served as an inspiration to everyone he ever encountered. He received two bronze stars during his service to his country in WWII; always loved a good

bridge game, the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Pittsburgh Steelers. Schwartz recently retired as an accountant with over 60 years of service. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank, 1 North Linden St., Duquesne, PA 15110; Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, 4401 Penn Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15224 or Friendship Circle, 5872 Northumberland St., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com ZEICHNER: On Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012, Dr. Barry J. Zeichner, 76, of Mt. Lebanon; beloved husband of Marion Zeichner; loving father of Gwen and Marcy (Bob); loving grandfather of Benjamin, Aviel, Shoshana and Barry; brother of Joan (Larry), Terri (Jerry) and Marshall (Joyce). Dr. Zeichner practiced Dentistry in Brookline, Pa., for 46 years. For many of those years Patti Savage was at his side as his assistant. When he retired four years ago he missed the personal contact with his faithful patients. Services were held at Temple Emanuel of South Hills in Mt. Lebanon; interment at Mt. Lebanon cemetery. Contributions may be made to Operation Smile, 1-888-OPSMILE or Family Hospice, Center for Compassionate Care, 50 Moffett St., Mt. Lebanon, PA 15243. Arrangements by William Slater II Funeral Service, 1650 Greentree Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15220. www.slaterfuneral.com

UNVEILING MENDLOWITZ: A monument in memory of Edith Mendlowitz, will be unveiled Sunday, Feb. 12, at 11 a.m. at Gemilas Chesed Cemetery (Elrod). Relatives and friends are invited.

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ANNA CARLTON .............RAYMOND FRIEDMAN ALLAN COHEN .......................ESTHER PHILLIPS SUSAN COHEN...............BLANCHE SCHWARTZ BARRY P. & EILEEN (SHARE) FAIR ............................................IRA KAY SHARE JOAN FINKEL....................BENJAMIN & MIRIAM SILBERMAN BERNARD FREEMAN .HERMAN FRIEDMAN MORTON & SUSAN FRIEDMAN ..............................ABE I. FRIEDMAN JEFF GLASSER....................JEANNETTE KURTZ RUTH K. GOLDMAN......................DR. IRVING S. GOLDMAN MOLLIE GUTKIND .......................SAM OSGOOD RUTH HABER .....................DR. YALE S. LEWINE MARIAN, LARRY, JOE, MARK & BILL HERSHMAN .......................BESS M. LEVENSON MARY JATLOW ..................JANE MARGOWSKY SHIRLEY KURTZ .............................SAUL KURTZ ALAN & SELMA KRUPP..............MILTON KRUPP SHIRLEY LAYTON ...................ESTELLE MARTIN

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In MeMory of

SANDRA LOEVNER................MAX A. LOEVNER LOVING FAMILY......................BEATRICE RUBEN LOVING FAMILY .............................CLIFF RUBEN MYLES MARKS ................JOSEPH ROSENTHAL JEAN METZGER .....ERNA & ERNEST METZGER SHARON MOSS..................LILLIAN BERNSTEIN DIANA MYER....................OSCAR ZEIDENSTEIN ROSE ORR ................................WILLIAM D. ORR JOHN & ELEANOR PHILLIPS..................ESTHER & FRANK PHILLIPS LESLIE RIPP.....................................MILTON RIPP RHODA ROFEY .......................LEONARD ROFEY RHODA ROFEY ..............................CELIA ROFEY RHODA ROFEY ....................MARVIN KAUFMAN KIM & HOWARD ROSENBERG ....................................AL W. WOLF MYRON ROSENBERG ....PEARL R. ROSENBERG ZELDA SCHREIBER ......................IRVIN SCHATZ MAX SMOLAR .................JOSEPH ROSENTHAL ALAN & JUDITH TAPPER .........IRVIN H. TAPPER

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5: ETHEL GRAFF BRAUN, MOSES BROWN, ROSE CHUSSETT, ANNA C. FEIGUS, RUBIN FEINBERG, MINNIE FELDMAN, JULIUS FELLMAN, IDA FLEISHMAN, MAX GREEN, MEYER GROSSMAN, WILLIAM GUSKY, EVA HINKES, JESSE L. KANN, SAMUEL KARP, IDA A. LEFF, FANNIE LONDON, MINNIE B MANDELSTEIN, ANNA MELET, FANNIE MENDELBAUM, FANNIE ODLE, MOLLY OPTER, SAMUEL ROBINS, BANI ROGALSKY, ETHEL RUBEN, BENJAMIN SADOWSKY, LOUIS SAMUELS, OSCAR SHECHTER, JENNIE SILBERMAN, BELLE SOKOLOW, LOUIS B. STEIN, JULIUS STERNFIELD, IRVIN H. TAPPER, PHYLLIS WEINER UNGER, BERTHA F. WALKOW, HENRY WEINSTEIN, IDA WINER, MORRIS WOLK. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6: JACOB BAHM, ABRAHAM M. COHEN, GOLDIE GLICK, JACK HART, HELEN BETTY K ISRAEL, EDWARD JOSEPHS, PEARL KARP, DAVID KART, DIANE L. KATZ, ETI KUPENBERG, ERNEST S. LAMPL, DEBORAH LANDAU, ANNA LAZIER, MARIAN LEVINE, BELLE WISE LEVY, JOSEPH G. LUPTAK, PAUL MARIANS, LOUIS MARKOWITZ, SADIE MARKOWITZ, LOU F. MARKS, ERNA METZGER, ALEXANDER NEWMAN, LOUIS ORTENBERG, KATIE RAND, LOUIS ROBIN, SAMUEL ROSENBERG, ESTHER D. ROTH, MORRIS ROTH, HARRY SEDER, HENRY SEGAL, MYER SHULAN, ETHEL BRODIE SIMON, MOLLIE SIMON, SAMUEL SLOAN, MORRIS C. SOLOF, LENA ECKERT SPEEVACK, MAX SPODEK, HERMAN SPOLAN, IDA JANE WEIN, SAMUEL A. WEISS, HANNAH WORMSER. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7: ESTHER BERKMAN, HERMAN A. BLOOM, MARTIN CLEBAN, FANNY FARBSTEIN, CLARA FRIEDMAN, IRVING GLICKEN, MORRIS GOODMAN, MOLLIE GREENFIELD, HARRY GRUSKIN, MORRIS HALPERN, CLARA IDA HARRIS, HELENE HEPPENHEIMER, ROSE HYTOWITZ, EDWARD ILKUVITZ, SARAH PEPPER KRAUS, ALVIN LAIBMAN, JULIUS LEBOWITZ, JACOB E. LEFTON, SAMUEL LIEBER, ESTHER MANKOVITZ, ANNA ROFEY, MARTHA ROGAL, NATHAN ROSENBERG, JOSEPH RUBENSTEIN, MOLLIE PERILMAN RUBIN, FLORA HIRSCH SACHS, HARRY B. SALZ, EDGAR SCHAFFEL, FANNIE SCHLOSSER, JOSEPH SCHWEBEL, ROSE SPANDAU, SARAH STAMAN, ANNA R. STUCKELMAN, FANNY THOMPSON, HARRY D. WALD, LENA WEILL, FANNIE WIMMER, LILLIAN B. ZIFF. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8: FRED BAROVSKY, SADIE SUGAR BELZER, HARRY A. COHAN, JAMES H. DARLING, REUBEN DOBKIN, IDA S. GOLDBERG, JACOB J. GORDON, MOLLIE HELFER, SIDNEY HYDE, WALTER E. KATZ, ALFRED J. KOBACKER, CARL LABOVITZ, LUDWIG LANDMAN, MARY LAPIDUS, ANNA LEVENSON, JACOB LEVY, ELLIS LICHTENSTEIN, SHELDON G. LINDNER, FANNIE MARKOWITZ, SOLOMON NEUGASS, MOLLIE PLOTKIN, PHILIP ROSENTHAL, JENNIE RUDNER, NETTIE SAMUELS, HARRY SHAPIRO, ISAAC SHORR, JENNIE SHRAGER, DAVID SILVERBLATT, MINNIE RHEA SILVERBLATT, JENNIE SOBEL, ABRAM SOCKEL, SADIE SPIEGEL, SADYE SPIEGEL, DOROTHY SPOLAN, ANNIE STEARNS, EMANUEL STEIN, MENDEL WATKINS, JULIUS WOLF. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9: JACOB ADLER, IDA ALPERT, GUSSYE BERNSTEIN, SIMON BOSTOCKY, FROOMIE BROWN, EVA COHEN, LENA GORDON, EDITH M. GUSKY, MOLLIE HILSENRATH, MICHAEL HOFFRICHTER, SAUL I. HYDE, ROSE KLINE, GRACE M. LEVINE, DANIEL LEVINSON, ABRAHAM M. LEWINE, REBECCA LUICK, GOLDIE W. MARCUS, RAE MARCUS, WILLIAM MARK, SANDOR MARKUS, REBECCA MILLER, HENDEL MUNTER, MYER MYERS, CLARA M. NEIMAN, LOUIS H. NEVINS, BELLA PITTLER, DOROTHY POLLOCK, LEON PRINZ, LOIS ELLEN RABINOWITZ, ISRAEL C. RAMBACH, LOUIS ROSEN, ISAAC ROTHBERG, MOLLIE RYAVE, DAVID SAMUELS, SYBIL R. SCHERMER, MORRIS SCHLEIFER, MAX SCHOENBERGER, FRANCES SHELL, NORMAN SPEER, BENJAMIN W. STEINER, SAMUEL STONE, DAVID STRAUSS, SAMUEL WALDMAN, BRUCHA WEISSMAN, MORRIS S. WERTHEIMER. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10: SARAH ABRAMS, CHIA SORA BRODY, HYMAN BROWARSKY, MAURICE I. BROWN, ETHEL GOLANTY, ABRAHAM GOLDFARB, MORRIS D. HERWITT, HYMAN KLAHR, NAOMI LEVENSON, REBECCA LEWIS, DAVID LUNDY, ISADORE LUPOVITZ, NATHAN MAGIDSON, JOSEPH MARKOVITZ, LEW J. MILLER, ISADORE PACHTMAN, MILTON RIPP, ROBERT J. ROSENTHAL, EUNICE ROTH, ISADORE SCOTT, JUDITH SHUPAK, LENA G. SKIRBLE, JACOB OWEN SPECTER, MD, SAUL SPIEGEL, SIDNEY STARK, GEORGE J STEIN, SARA STEINER, HENRIETTA STRENG, EVA TRACHTENBERG, A. LEONARD WINER, IVAN LEE WOLINSKY, GARBIEL RABBI ZAKUTO. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11: MYER BOROVETZ, CHARLES I. BRISKIN, EVELYN R. COHEN, LOUIS J. COHEN, SAUL FRANK, DAVID I. GLANTZ, MARCUS GROPPER, MAX HALLE, REUBEN HELFANT, IRVING HOCHHAUSER, LILLIAN Y. HORWITZ, SAMUEL M. KRAUSE, SIMON KROUSE, WALLACE A. LAUTMAN, EVE LITTMAN, ELI LIVINSTON, BESSIE MARCUS, SAMUEL MEHLMAN, ERNEST METZGER, BESSIE NYDES, MILDRED PECHERSKY, ABRAHAM PEREIRA, RACHEL PICHEL, JENNIE PINK, ELSIE L. PLESSET, LILLIAN S. ROMANOFF, FREDA ROSEN, ROSE ROSENFELD, IRVING ROSS, ALEXANDER ROTH, MARGARET SCHAFFRAN, MARK J. SERBIN, MARY SHANKER, DR. NINON A SHAW, DAVID SOLOF, PHILIP SOLOMON, DORA STADTFELD, LEON STEIN, MABEL Z. SWARTZ, SAM WEISS, FLORENCE EVA WEIZER, LOUIS BENNETT WHEELER, ADOLPH WINKLER.


20 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE FEBRUARY 2, 2012

The Jewish Chronicle February 2, 2012  

The Jewish Chronicle February 2, 2012

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