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Metro Preservation Central PA center to house memories of Jewish life there

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JANUARY 26, 2012 SHEVAT 2, 5772

Vol. 55, No. 37

Pittsburgh, PA

Giffords resigns from Congress

$1.50

Byman: Israeli counterterrorism a series of adjustments BY LEE CHOTTINER Executive Editor

we do,” he said. “We have a unique opportunity to do something creative and courageous.” Recently, Rodef Shalom has reached out to Temple Sinai and Congregation Beth Shalom in Squirrel Hill to consider partnerships in education. Bisno hopes to present a proposal for such initiatives to the board of trustees by March, at the latest. These initiatives must not undermine the congregation’s identity and turn it into “a one-stop behemoth,” he cautioned. “We need to figure out what we need to accomplish.”

Daniel Byman believes Israel must defend itself from terrorism, but it must also learn from its mistakes. And there have been mistakes. “I believe terrorism is horrible — not just wrong, but horrible. And I believe Israel has not only a right but an obligation to fight back,” Byman, an expert in counterterrorism, said in a Chronicle interview. “But that doesn’t mean Israel always does the right thing. “Israel is a government. Like any other government, it is subject to political pressure; it is human beings making mistakes. Israeli intelligence is superb … but it’s fallible as well,” he continued. “Israel, I think, is actually often not so good on the strategic level. It’s very good in making day-to-day decisions but often some of its long-term decisions have backfired.” A professor in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and a senior fellow at the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution, Byman is out with his new book, “A High Price: The Triumphs & Failures of Israeli Counterterrorism.” In it, he tracks the evolution of terrorism in the Arab-Israeli conflict since the British mandate, with an emphasis on the 1990s to the present. He analyzes what has worked and what hasn’t. He spoke here last week as a guest of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh. In his book, Byman prefers to address day-to-day acts of terrorism, such as bombings and rocket attacks, and the counter-measures employed by Israel. These types of terrorism are harder for Israel to deal with than the high-profile hijackings and hostage takings of the

Please see Rodef Shalom, page 15.

Please see Byman, page 15.

Photo Courtesy of U.S. Army

U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.), seen here on the campaign trail with her husband, U.S. Navy Capt. Mark E. Kelly, resigned from Congress this week after a final appearance on the floor of the House of Representatives Tuesday for President Obama’s State of the Union Address. Giffords was shot in the head Jan. 8, 2011, at a public appearance in Tucson. She says she needs to resign to focus on her recovery.

Rodef Shalom ponders tough issues at town meeting BY RON KAPLAN Chronicle Correspondent

A fixture in Jewish Pittsburgh for more than 150 years, Rodef Shalom Congregation has a storied past. But, according to its clerical and lay leadership, it must make serious changes to secure its future. At a Jan. 19 town meeting, Rodef Shalom’s senior rabbi, Aaron Bisno, and its president, Don Simon, laid out the challenges facing the largest congregation in western Pennsylvania, and their strategies for addressing them. Bisno said that Rodef Shalom must con-

sider changes to nearly every aspect of its operation. This must be done, he said, by pooling resources with neighboring congregations for youth education, religious services and administrative functions. “We can’t go it alone. We have an obligation to pursue [collaboration],” Bisno said. Bisno, who traveled across the country last winter while on sabbatical, visited many congregations and learned firsthand that Rodef Shalom’s problems aren’t unique. His sabbatical also exposed him to many creative approaches to deal with these vexing challenges. “We need to re-examine everything

B USINES S 12/C L AS SIFIED 11/C OMMUNITY 10 O BITUARIES 14/O PINION 6/R EAL E STATE 13/S IMCHAS 8

Times To Remember

KINDLE SABBATH CANDLES: 5:13 p.m. EST. SABBATH ENDS: 6:15 p.m. EST.


2 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE

JANUARY 26, 2012

This week’s issue: July 8, 1976

Rabin addressed readers following Entebbe rescue (Editor’s Note: Retro News is a column that will appear every week as part of the celebration of the Chronicle’s 50th anniversary. Each week, Retro News will look at a past issue of the Chronicle, encapsulating the news reported that week.)

Front page It’s not every week that the front page of the Chronicle has a story under the byline of the prime minister of Israel. But that’s what happened on July 8, 1976, just four days after Israeli commandos swept down on the international airport in Entebbe, Uganda, to rescue 102 hostages from Air France Flight 139, which terrorists hijacked over Greece on June 27. The price of the operation was high. In addition to the seven hijackers and three hostages and 45 Ugandan soldiers who were killed, the operation claimed the life of commando leader Yoni Netanyahu, brother of current Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, and today an iconic figure in Israel. In his front-page statement, then-Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin called the rescue mission “a bold, resourceful and sophisticated effort,” but he did not overlook the loss of life to Is-

rael and the hostages’ families. “Together with the families who have lost their dear ones, we mourn our dead,” Rabin wrote, “uniformed and civilian, victims of the vile Arab terrorism.” He used the forum to trumpet another example of Israel’s refusal to deal with terrorists, saying the mission was “worthy of Jewish and Israeli pride and of worldwide acclaim.” Operation UMI (Uganda, Mission Incredible) is how the Chronicle labeled the mission, but its real code name was Operation Thunderbolt. The rescue effort was dubbed, dominated the front page of the Chronicle, which had a map showing the 5,000-mile route the commandos’ plane took to Entebbe, and how they refueled in Kenya before returning to Israel. Also published on page 1 was a grisly wire story about Dora Bloch, a 75-yearold Jewish hostage who was in an Entebbe hospital when the rescue took place. According to the story, she was dragged from her hospital shortly after the rescue. She was never seen or heard from again; U.S. State Department sources said the Ugandans killed her. At the upper left-hand corner of the page was a federation appeal on the heels of the successful rescue effort.

Opinion In his weekly “People & Issues” column, which took up almost an entire page that week, the Chronicle’s executive editor, Albert W. Bloom, used the rescue at Entebbe to note the seventh bracha of the morning Shacharit service, which gives thanks to the Guardian of Israel “who settest the captives free.” “The words seemed to reflect some primitive bygone century when men and nations were less ‘civilized,’ ” Bloom wrote. “No more!” He noted that the Entebbe rescue occurred in the same country that Theodore Herzl once considered for a new homeland for the Jews. “History repeats itself,” he wrote, “but never in the same way.”

Community

The July 8, 1976, front page.

Oddly, there also was wire story about a Presbyterian minister who warned of a new effort that summer by Christian missionaries to convert Jews.

Also this week, the Chronicle reported that Ivan Novick was elected president of the Tri-State Zionist Organization at its annual conference … Louis Zeiden of Beaver Falls was named to the board of the Tri-State Israel Bonds Cabinet … Irene Smolover became the fundraising Please see Retro News, page 15.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 26, 2012 — 3

METRO Briefly The Johnstown Area Heritage Association and Beth Sholom Congregation are cooperating on the Jewish Community Heritage Project, a series of three museum exhibits and other programming for 2012-2013 to mark 125 years of organized Jewish life in Johnstown. The University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown is cooperating with the project, which will coincide with a campus lecture by Michael Walzer, a Princeton University professor emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Studies — and a Johnstown native —Thursday, Sept. 27. The first exhibit will open at the Discovery Center Friday, Sept. 28. Among the other exhibits are: • The Jonah Drawings, by David Wander, which explore the Book of Jonah and the writings of the prophets. The Jonah Drawings consist of 13 paper panels in dark shades of grey, blue and black. They follow the text exactly, but visually interpret the scenes for a modern audience. The 50-foot-long frieze is accompanied by additional paintings interpreting the written word. • Cinema Judaica: The War Years, an exhibition of iconic Hollywood film posters from 1939 to 1949 that illustrates how the motion picture industry countered America’s isolationism, advocated going to war against the Nazis, influenced post-war perceptions of the Jewish people and the founding of the State of Israel, and shaped the face of contemporary Jewish life.

• Letters to Sala, a traveling exhibition based on the Sala Garncarz Kirschner Collection in the Dorot Jewish Division of the New York Public Library, a new collection of letters, photographs and documents that were mailed or smuggled into Nazi labor camps. Jews have been in Johnstown since at least the 1850s. The earliest Jews in Johnstown were German, followed by many more from Russia, Poland and other parts of Eastern Europe during the great wave of immigration from about 1880-1920. The area’s first Jewish burial ground was established at Grandview Cemetery in 1888. The temporary exhibit on Johnstown’s Jewish history will be displayed at Beth Sholom Congregation after the project concludes in 2013. The exhibit’s themes will include the early settlement of German and Eastern European Jews in the Johnstown area, how Jews developed an economic niche, establishment of a mature community, and discrimination and integration. The project is funded by the Abe and Janet Beerman Fund at the Community Foundation for the Alleghenies, the William L. Glosser Family Fund, the Saul and Eva Glosser Memorial Fund and the United Johnstown Jewish Federation. Call Beth Sholom at (814) 536-6440 or Barry Rudel at (412) 215-9157 for more information. Rudel can also be reached at bhrudel@comcast.net. Every Body Day, a program of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh’s annual Youth and Please see Briefly, page 5.


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METRO Huntingdon Co. center to preserve central PA Jewish history

Agudath Achim synagogue in Huntingdon was struggling to survive in the 1980s. Today, it has 100 members and drew 40 to 60 worshippers for the most recent High Holy Days. BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

The Jewish population of central Pennsylvania may be dwindling, but its stories and records will be kept alive, thanks to the stewardship of Jewish leaders in Huntingdon, as well as a group of non-Jewish Northern Cambria high school students and a dedicated history teacher. “There was the realization that there was a lot of Jewish life in central Pennsylvania, and that nobody knew that much about it,” said Stanford Lembeck, president of Agudath Achim in Huntingdon. “It all came to mind last year that time is passing quickly, and we are losing these stories (of the local Jewish families). We are trying to intervene to make this important history continue to live.” To that end, Lembeck, along with Holly Mollo, spiritual leader of Agudath Achim, have established the Center for the Study of Jewish Life in central Pennsylvania, a cooperative effort among Agudath Achim, Juniata College, Juniata College Hillel and the Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives in Cincinnati. The Center in Huntingdon will collect artifacts and oral histories to provide resources for scholarship and families seeking to learn about their forbears from Sunbury to Lock Haven, from Lewistown to Punxsutawney. “We had been aware for some time of the attrition of these communities,” said Mollo. “There were congregations that were going away, and they needed hospice care. What happens to the artifacts,

the books, the yahrtzeit boards, the Torahs — all the trappings of a synagogue? There was no place where people could preserve this stuff.” The archives will be housed at Juniata College, which also served as the location of the Center’s first annual Shabbaton last October. Parts of the Shabbaton were also held at Agudath Achim. The planning for the Shabbaton was well under way when Lembeck and Mollo read an article in The Jewish Chronicle published last July about the students in Northern Cambria, and their work to preserve their own town’s Jewish history, as well as the 85-yearold Barnesboro synagogue building. Barnesboro merged with the nearby town of Spangler several years ago to form Northern Cambria. “We had already developed our prospectus for the Center when we came across the article [in the Chronicle],” Lembeck recalled. “That was in the works. The Barnesboro story came as a kind of special treat and surprise.” At the invitation of Lembeck, about 10 students from Northern Cambria High School, and their teacher, Karen Bowman, attended the Shabbaton. The group did a presentation about their own work in chronicling Jewish history, and listened to the information presented by others throughout the day. Hearing various presentations about the Jewish families of central Pennsylvania, as well as touring Agudath Achim, helped bring history to life for her students, Bowman said. “It was a wonderful day, chock full of information about what everyone wanted to know about the Jews of central Please see Synagogue, page 13.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 26, 2012 — 5

METRO Briefly Continued from page 3. Family Wellness Fair, will be held Sunday, Jan. 29, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the JCC in Squirrel Hill. The program will include: group exercise classes, new cardio equipment, family gym, youth and family wellness fair, boys hip-hop, adult hip-hop, children’s hip-hop, and special camp discounts Visit JCCPGH.org or call 412-5218010 for more information. The Pittsburgh Area Jewish Committee’s Christian-Jewish Dialogue will meet Thursday, Feb. 2, at noon at Congregation Beth Shalom, 5915 Beacon St. The topic will be “Immigration,” presented by Rabbi Paul Tuchman and Father Dan Valentine. Jewish and Christian texts (Leviticus 19:33-34; Hebrews 13:2) will be studied. The monthly conveners are Rabbi James Gibson, Rev. Cynthia BronsonSweigert, Valentine and Rabbi Michael Werbow. The program is free to the public. Contact the PAJC office at 412605-0816 or at pajc@pajc.net for more information. Jewish Family & Children’s Service’s Career Development Center will offer job seekers 15 workshops in February. Some of the workshops include: Job Search Strategies, Feb. 1; Marcellus Shale Presentation and Q&A,

Feb. 7; The Art of Networking, Feb. 13; and Transitioning to Success, Feb. 28. Monthly LinkedIn for Beginners, LinkedIn Advanced, AARP WorkSearch 40+, Networking Club and Job Seeker Support group workshops will be held also. Visit careerdevelopmentcenter.org to register. Call the Career Development Center at 412-422-5627 for more information. Pittsburgh Conference of Jewish Women’s Organizations and Beth Shalom Sisterhood will hold an afternoon game party at Congregation Beth Shalom, 5915 Beacon St., Monday, Feb. 6, at 12:30 p.m. Women from any Jewish organization or Sisterhood are invited for an afternoon of fun and friendship. Bring your friends and your favorite games. There is a charge. R.S.V.P. to Lynne Jacobson at 412-521-8288 or lynnej43@verizon.net; or Ruth Garfinkel at 412-687-3077, ruthgarfinkel@aol.com. Contact Dena Chottiner at chottiner102@comcast.net or call 412-672-3979. Congregation Beth Shalom and Rodef Shalom Sisterhood are holding a winter film festival open to the community. Sunday, Jan. 29, the comedy film “Nora’s Will” will be screened at 7 p.m. in Congregation Beth Shalom’s Samuel and Minnie Hyman Ballroom, 5915 Beacon St. There is no charge but there is a suggested fee. Light refreshments will be served. Call 412-421-2288 for more information.

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6 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 26, 2012

Opinion

The Jewish Chronicle David M. Caoin, CEO EDITORIAL STAFF Lee Chottiner, Executive Editor Angela Leibowicz, Community/ Web Editor Toby Tabachnick, Staff Writer SALES STAFF Susie Mangel, Senior Sales Associate Roberta Letwin, Sales Associate Donna Mink, Classified Sales PRODUCTION STAFF Dawn Wanninger, Production Manager Nancy Bishop Production Artist BUSINESS STAFF Joe Soloski, Comptroller Josh Reisner, Office Manager Marcy Kronzek, Subscriptions BOARD OF TRUSTEES Richard Kitay, President Cindy Goodman-Leib, Vice President Larry Honig, Secretary Andy Schaer, Treasurer Davida Fromm, Past President Carolyn Hess Abraham Brian Balk Daniel Berkowitz Lynn Cullen Milton Eisner Stephen Fienberg Malke Steinfeld Frank David Grubman Thomas Hollander Evan Indianer David Levine Ari Lightman Mitchell Pakler Amy Platt Benjamin Rosenthal Charles Saul Adam Shear Jonathan Wander Lou Weiss Published every Thursday by the Pittsburgh Jewish Publication and Education Foundation 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Phone: 412-687-1000 FAX: 412-521-0154 E-Mail: newsdesk@thejewishchronicle.net SUBSCRIPTION: $45 in Pennsylvania $47 East of the Mississippi $49 West of the Mississippi and FL NEWSSTAND PRICE $1.50 PER COPY POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE JEWISH CHRONICLE, 5915 BEACON ST., 3rd Floor PITTSBURGH, PA 15217 (PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA) USPS 582-740 Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to the Jewish Chronicle become the property of this publication, which is not responsible for the return or loss of such items. The Chronicle does not endorse the goods or services advertised in its pages and makes no representation to the kashrut of food products and services in said advertising. The publisher is not liable for damages if, for any reason whatsoever, he fails to publish an advertisement or for any error in an advertisement. Acceptance of advertisers and of ad copy is subject to the publisher’s approval. The Chronicle is not responsible if ads violate applicable laws and the advertiser will indemnify, hold harmless and defend the Chronicle from all claims made by governmental agencies and consumers for any reason based on ads appearing in the Chronicle.

Slings and arrows he essay by Winchester Thurston junior Jesse Lieberfeld, which decries Judaism as a once-wonderful religion while lopsidedly trashing Israel as the oppressor in its standoff with the Palestinians, has regrettably gone viral since its Jan. 15 publication in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Since appearing in the P-G, Jesse’s essay, “Fighting a Forbidden Battle: How I Stopped Covering Up for a Hidden Wrong,” which tied for first place in Carnegie Mellon University’s 2012 Martin Luther King Jr. Day Writing Awards, has been referenced, critiqued or reprinted in more than 7,000 blogs and websites. It has been held up as a profile of courage by pro-Palestinian forums and attacked for its shocking lack of depth and understanding by pro-Israel forums. Whatever this young man’s reasons for walking away from his faith and turning on the Jewish state, he’s not the first, and he won’t be the last. But that doesn’t mean he’s right. As any Jew who has been to Israel knows, it’s an eclectic land — a place

T

where Arabs live alongside Jews in the Galilee and have representation in the Knesset. It’s a place that sent an Arab football team to represent it in the European Cup, a place where an Arab statesman joined the Cabinet of former Prime Minister Ehud Olmert. Compare that to the Arab world where 800,000 Jews were driven from their homes before and after Israel’s independence. It’s a place where Israeli cemeteries are filled with the victims of Palestinian terrorism — including women and children. Don’t they deserve at least a mention in this essay? As any Jew who is active in congregational life knows, Jewish teachings and values — the very foundation of Western civilization — are taught every week in synagogues of all Jewish denominations — through Torah and Talmud classes, rabbis’ sermons, religious school lessons and many other modes. Synagogues are places where Jews volunteer for any number of social action and community service projects,

from supporting food banks to visiting the sick and elderly, to planting their own community gardens. That sounds like a still-great religion to us. And as any Jew who reads this newspaper knows, we print opinions from across the political spectrum — from those who laud Israel to those who criticize it. No one knows better than we do that Israel isn’t a perfect land (no nation is), and we don’t use these pages to pretend that it is. But it is a great land nevertheless, and the debate our columns foster make Israeli and Diaspora Jews a stronger, more understanding people — not a race. In the 21st century, it’s easy to make a written piece go viral, but the truth will always be the truth. What a shame this controversy arose; its fallout will likely be felt for some time. But long after it is forgotten, Jews will continue to practice their faith, and Israel will continue to be a successful democracy. Such are the hallmarks of a great religion and state: They can endure the slings and arrows.

In defense of 15-year-olds shooting M-16s Guest Columnist RENEE GHERT-ZAND More and more frequently, I am confronted with alarming examples of the growing chasm between Israeli Jews and American Jews. Sometimes it is the Israeli misperception of American Jewish life that rankles me. On other occasions, I am dumbfounded by the lack of understanding of Israeli realities and sensibilities on the part of American Jews. I would put an opinion piece by Joshua Bloom, director of Israel Programs for Rabbis for Human Rights North America published recently in the Huffington Post into the latter category. In his article, Blum criticizes Gadna experiences for North American teens visiting Israel. Gadna (an acronym for g’dudei noar ivri) is the Israel Defense Forces pre-military program for prearmy age teens. Gadna is staffed by IDF soldiers, and a minimum weeklong Gadna stint has, in recent years, become a typical component (sometimes optional, sometimes mandatory) of many youth group Israel adventures. Bloom seems to think that there is no justifiable reason for a week of Gadna on these trips. For him, American Jewish youth learning about life in the army, visiting different kinds of military bases, engaging in physical challenges, learning orienteering and survival skills, getting briefed on IDF history and training to shoot a weapon amount to “the promotion of violent institutions.” I beg to differ. I personally did Gadna

for three summers in a row when I was a teenager back in the mid 1980s, well before it was a common thing to do. And I didn’t just do one-week stints — I toughed it out for six weeks at a time. Those 18 weeks were probably the most formative ones of my life. Looking back nearly 30 years later, I can say unequivocally that I emerged from those summers not only more physically fit, but also a different, more aware person. And let me assure you, I did not turn out to be a promoter of violent institutions. I gained a clearer understanding of the importance of the IDF. By getting to know the army through Gadna, I developed a deep respect and admiration for it as an institution. At that same time, I managed not to get brainwashed in the way Blum seems to fear, in that, while I support the IDF, I can still take peaceful stands and take issue with certain questionable military policies or deplorable acts by individual soldiers. Equally important, Gadna gave me insights into Israeli society that I would never have gained otherwise. Being 24/7 with Israeli teens — both as my fellow chanichim (course participants) and as my madrichim (soldier counselors) — gave me a better idea of what it is like to grow up Israeli (which includes knowing that you will one day have to serve in the army) than could any other experience. Not to mention that having orders barked at me at 5 in the morning really improved my Hebrew language abilities. I learned about the Israeli (Jewish) society and psyche not from lectures, but by spending time with my fellow Gadna-niks. I observed how Aviva, a tough and proud officer and the only girl in a large, poor Moroccan immigrant family living in Dimona, approached her army service as a ticket out of the working class. I got to know Eitan, who was

assigned to the noncombat Gadna corps for his military service because he was an only child, his father having died in the Six Day War while Eitan’s mother was pregnant. I became best buddies with Rachel, a slightly wacky firebrand. She taught me the fine points of relieving oneself in the field, and I saved her more than once from getting dangerously lost in the desert by reading topographical maps for her. We are still close today. Finally, Blum suggests that “putting M-16s in the hands of 15-year-olds, glorifying violence, and playing war games minimizes the real consequences and suffering associated with combat.” I can tell you from firsthand experience that nothing will teach you to have a true appreciation for the destruction that can be done with an M-16 better than being made to handle one. I had to practice performing safety checks on my gun so many times that I could probably still do one in my sleep. Feeling the painful kickback as you shoot a real semiautomatic weapon is nothing like pressing a button on a video game controller. Seeing your bullet rip through a practice target is a real wakeup call you can’t get from playing “Call of Duty,” which I would argue is far more of a glorifier of violence. I agree with Bloom that we should expose our youth to “Israel’s heroic peacemakers and pursuers of justice,” and that we could be doing a better job of encouraging critical thinking and explaining the difficult moral complexities of war. I just think that Gadna can and should be an essential piece of that effort. (Renee Ghert-Zand is a regular contributor to The Forward, which previously published this column.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 26, 2012 — 7

OPINION Letters to the editor We invite you to submit letters for publication. Letters must include name, address and daytime phone number; addresses and phone numbers will not be published. Letters may not exceed 400 words and may be edited for length and clarity; they cannot be returned. Mail, fax or e-mail letters to: via e-mail : letters@thejewishchronicle.net via fax:

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Presidential politics rapped Let me see: Republican candidate for president, Rick Santorum, is proposing that if he is elected president he will push to give tax credits to parents to have more babies. At the same time, Republican Gov. Tom Corbett is pursuing massive tax cuts on state aid to schools because, he says, the state cannot afford such aid. While Santorum is heralding a baby boom to increase the population, most congressional Republicans are determined to send 12 million immigrants back to their home countries. Then, while Corbett is against most taxes having to do with energy production from the Marsellus Shale fields in Pennsylvania, Santorum wants to end all taxes on manufacturing, which he argues has nothing to do with energy production. Republican congressional legislators want to solve tax and debt problems by doing what they see as right: Not increasing taxes on anybody. Gov. Rick Perry says if he were president and Iran closed the Strait of Hormuz, the United States would attack Iran. Republican congressman Ron Paul would reduce foreign aid to zero. His new slogan is: What me worry! I can hardly wait to see what the Democrats are proposing to re-elect their candidate. Richard M. Carpe Squirrel Hill

It takes all of us An essay written by a Jewish high school student, which was recently published by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, described the student’s alienation from Israel, Jews and Judaism. This demonstrates a serious issue relating to the future of our Jewish community. How do we educate and inspire our children to instill Jewish values and a positive Jewish identity? Our community offers many opportunities for our teens to learn about their heritage, such as post bar/bat mitzva, synagogue study programs, day schools, youth groups, summer camps and AJL’s J-SITE program. We all seek to instill pride and love for Israel, Jews and Judaism.

We cannot, however, accomplish this goal on our own. It takes all of us — community, educational institutions, synagogues, family — to raise a Jewish child with such values. This task and duty are especially difficult as we face the challenges of mass media, peer pressure and other cultural influences. For its part, the community must continue to provide quality Jewish educational and experiential opportunities for children and adults. Parents must ensure that their children, as well as they, are engaged in meaningful Jewish learning and living. Synagogues must provide the spiritual inspiration for our children and a warm, welcoming home away from home. Let’s all learn more, do more and encourage others to do the same. Working together, we can change the culture of our community to place greater value on Jewish learning and living. This is the type of environment that is necessary to instill in our children a positive Jewish identity, to create meaningful life experiences, and to ensure our children’s future participation in a thriving Jewish community. Ed Frim and Charles H. Saul Squirrel Hill (The authors are respectively the executive director and president of the Agency for Jewish Learning.)

Repression in Gaza condemned As chairperson of the International Council of Jewish Parliamentarians (ICJP), I would like to express the solidarity of our organization with Mahmoud Abu Rahma, a human and civil rights activist, who was recently stabbed in Gaza, as reported by AlMezan, a Gaza-based nongovernmental organization that employs Mr. Abu Rahma. The attack was connected to the release of an article written by Abu Rahma in December, in which he sharply criticized the Palestinian armed groups in Gaza, as well as Gazan and West Bank leadership, for repeated human and civil rights violations, banning the freedoms of expression and peaceful assembly, and the use of torture and illegal detentions, which resulted in the death of several individuals. In his article, Abu Rahma also condemned the unfortunate common practice by terrorist groups to act in “densely-populated areas,” displaying a “continuous negligence of the resistance groups who show little or no care for people’s life and well being.”

The abuse of human rights in Gaza has steadily increased since Hamas’ coup in 2007. Political opponents, women, homosexuals, religious minorities are reported to be under a growing threat. There has also been mounting intolerance toward Gaza’s small Shiite minority, which has lately experienced harassment and mass arrests while celebrating a Shiite holiday. The ICJP, an organization committed to uphold the principles of democracy, further the cause of human rights and promote the rule of law, firmly condemns the ongoing repression in Gaza. We praise the courage

of Mahmoud Abu Rahma and we call on the international community to open its eyes and act to shine a light on Gaza’s human rights situation, first and foremost by supporting political objectors, so that their exposure will not be in vain. Fiamma Nirenstein Rome, Italy (In addition to chairing the ICJP, the author is a member of the Italian Chamber of Deputies.)


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Simchas Births Weiner: Amanda and Jared Weiner of Boca Raton, Fla., announce the birth of their daughter, Zoe Madison, Jan. 12. Grandparents are Roberta and Jeff Letwin of Pittsburgh and Carla and Bruce Weiner of Boca Raton. Greatgrandparents are Buddy and Phyllis Letwin of Pittsburgh, Eleanor and Paul Weiner and Helen Krane of Del Ray Beach, Fla. Big brother is Jonah. Zoe is named in loving memory of her paternal great-uncle, Mark Unatin.

Hanna Rose Stolzer, daughter of Julie and Dan Stolzer, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Jan. 28, at Temple Emanuel. Grandparents are Shirley Stolzer and Dr. Bertrand Stolzer and Carol and Charles Krueger.

B’nai Mitzva Jeremy Andrew Farbman, son of Louise and Steven Farbman, will become a bar mitzva Saturday, Jan. 28, at 10:30 a.m. at Temple Sinai. Grandparents are Rose and Thomas Guerrieri and Gerald Farbman, all of Pittsburgh, and the late Shirley Farbman.

Check out the blogs at www.thejewishchroncle.net


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 26, 2012 — 9


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Community A C L O S E R L O O K

CDS celebrates Winter Gala Roaring ’20s style

David Bachman photo

Pictured from left are Head of School Avi Baran Munro, Winter Gala chairs Stefani Pashman and Jeremy Feinstein and Leadership Award recipient Karen Feinstein. BY BRANDT GELMAN “Most importantly, they become people who are said. “My dream is to see a line of families outcompelled to make a difference in the world.” side our door waiting to enroll their children. Chronicle Correspondent She cited various projects CDS students have That line would represent a secure Jewish future The roaring ’20s were a time of economic prosrecently undertaken, including b’nai mitzva age for our city and for our people.” perity for Americans who believed the sky was the pupils who are taking trips to local synagogues to Another shining moment of the night was the limit when discussing the future of the country. help make morning minyans. One synagogue that recognition of Stuart Kaplan as the Volunteer As the Jewish Healthcare Foundation enters its has received these CDS students is Tree of of the Year honoree. Kaplan, a CDS parent and 20th year of existence, and Community Day Life*Or L’Simcha. Munro said students who trustee, was given the prestigious award for his School continues to thrive, the theme for this made minyans there were treated to French toast tireless work with the school and within the year’s Community Day School Winter Gala breakfasts and returned to school promptly becommunity. seemed obvious — a trip back to those heady fore first period. “Stu is committed to our school, to our stutimes. One initiative that Munro is most proud of is dents, and to our future, and we thank him for Influential figures in Jewish Pittsburgh gaththe tuition assistance program CDS has. everything he does,” Munro said. ered for this year’s event at the Omni William “Finances should not be a barrier for someone As Kaplan stepped off the podium upon receivPenn Hotel, Downtown, donning fedoras and flap- to apply to CDS,” she said. ing his award, the rest of the night’s festivities per attire to celebrate CDS and its role in the In fact, fundraising initiatives such as the Winwere under way. Tim Richart, who Munro credits Pittsburgh Jewish community. ter Gala dinner are one of the main reasons the with the vision to create great events such as the “It is great to share this event with the Jewish tuition assistance program has been able to grow. Winter Gala, said the event, in a word, was outHealthcare Foundation,” said Head of School Avi Munro said currently more than 40 percent of standing. Between the dancing, the food and the Baran Munro. “It’s wonderful to have them see families enrolled at CDS receive tuition assisambiance, the 2012 Winter Gala was the perfect what we do at CDS, and to see the role the school tance. Just recently, CDS (along with Pittsburgh’s way to recognize the achievements of the Jewish plays in our neighborhood.” other Jewish day schools) initiated a new proHealthcare Foundation, and CDS. Despite the dancing and festive atmosphere gram in which students starting school in the “Our partnership is deep and it goes back a within the grand ballroom of the William Penn, third grade and up can be granted their first year long time,” Munro said. “We are honored to share Munro took the time to praise the strides CDS tuition free. Munro hopes this initiative will conthe celebration with you.” has made to make the school more visible within tinue to bring in families that normally would not the community. turn to CDS as a first choice in schooling. “Our students become leaders, valedictorians, “People who did not see themselves as day (Brandt Gelman can be reached at bgelnational merit finalists, it is true,” Munro said. school families are turning toward us,” Munro man55@gmail.com.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 26, 2012 — 11

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TORAH Did God really harden Pharaoh’s heart? Portion of the Week RABBI MARTIN WILLIAM SHORR Hadar Israel, New Castle Bo, Exodus 10:1-13:16

There are two points to be shared in this week’s portion, Bo: First is in the very beginning of the passage, “Come to Pharaoh for I have made his heart, and the heart of his servants hard, so my signs can be made known to him.” This raises an obvious question — Judaism teaches that G-d does not interfere with the personal actions of individuals. Here, as can clearly be interpreted, G-d is doing exactly that with Pharaoh. While the wording indeed seems to indicate G-d is interfering with Pharaoh’s actions, it certainly is not the case. Every time Pharaoh refused the command of G-d to let the Jewish people go and serve him, Pharaoh’s heart hardened to the point making it less possible for Pharaoh to agree. All together, Pharaoh’s heart being hardened is mentioned 19 times here. But Pharaoh would not allow himself to be swayed; each time his stance would be stronger and more stubborn. Even the idea of G-d in Pharaoh’s thinking would harden his heart. Pharaoh could not conceive that there was any force more powerful than himself. In that respect, G-d hardened Pharaoh’s heart — or rather the idea of G-d. The second point is in verse 10 of Chapter 10, where there is a passage in

which Pharaoh says to Moses, “The evil intent is opposite your faces.” The Hebrew word rawahw, (evil) is interpreted by certain midrashim (Jewish folklore) as the name of a star. And this star is referred to as “the star of blood.” Some believe it is the planet Mars. Mars is red. Pharaoh, being into magic and astrology, believed that this star was to meet the Jewish people in the desert and take them away from further service to him and wipe out Egypt. Moses always asked Pharaoh before each plague, “Let my people go, so that they may serve their G-d in the wilderness.” but conveyed to Pharaoh they would return to serve him as slaves. Of course Moses never intended for the people to return, and in this particular case Pharaoh lets him know that he is certainly aware of this and declines Moses’ request. This demonstrates how lost and sick Pharaoh was. Moses’ request was very simple, and yet Pharaoh became enamored with all kinds of concepts and imaginings. Both of these points together really explain what is meant by the passages “Pharaoh’s heart was hardened,” and G-d mentioning, “I have hardened his heart.” When someone is so caught up with notions beyond even their own control, there is no room or open space for negotiation or reasoning of any kind. All Moses asked for was the exit of the people — nothing more, nothing less. It was Pharaoh who took the concept to wild extremes. (This column is a service of the Greater Pittsburgh Rabbinic Association.)

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 26, 2012 — 13

METRO JCC improves to 7-1 with win over Propel

Synagogue:

BY ZACHARY WEISS

Continued from page 4.

Chronicle Correspondent

In a rematch of the first game of the Greater Pittsburgh Independent Basketball League (GPIBL) season, the JCC Boys’ Basketball Team routed Propel by a 68-36 score. Jesse Goleman and Ben Katz once again led the JCC, scoring 23 and 22 points respectively. In a pregame team meeting, JCC head coach Andy Pakler made sure his players knew what he wanted them to accomplish. “I said that we wanted to come out and play four quarters of complete JCC basketball,” Pakler said. His squad outrebounded Propel 40-17 — a key factor in the game. The JCC set the tempo for the game in the first quarter as Katz skied for numerous offensive rebounds, setting up multiple chances for the JCC to score. The team also recorded four blocks and led 20-8 in the quarter. Propel tried checking the JCC’s momentum in the second quarter by substituting the five players they had on the floor two separate times, but Pakler recognized Propel’s uncharacteristic strategy and his team continued open a wide lead going into halftime. “Different coaches do different things to motivate their team,” Pakler said. “I know I’ve been on the losing end before and I know what it’s like to be down a lot

of points and try to have the team dig deep and pull out some sort of energy.” With the JCC up 31-16 going into the third quarter, the team picked up the pace and netted some easy baskets. This set up the exclamation point in the game when Justin Cicco came off of the bench and scored a layup on the run and drew a foul, firing up the JCC bench. Cicco failed to convert the free throw, but the JCC clearly had the lead for good. “That was great,” Pakler said. “We know Cicco can finish and that he put himself in the right situation to do things.” With the JCC totally in control 52-25 going into the fourth quarter, Pakler wanted to be sure that his team would finish up strong. “It’s a very important part of the game,” he said. “When you are up double figures and are able to keep that lead, it allows you to keep working and not to become complacent. Every quarter starts out with a 0-0 score and I tell the guys to go win each quarter.” The team was to visit Urban Impact, a team that the JCC lost to when they encountered them on the road last season, however the game was postponed due to snow and a makeup date has not been announced. Up next for the JCC was a home game Tuesday, Jan. 24, against NUP and a road game Wednesday, Jan. 25, against Project Destiny. (Zachary Weiss can be reached at zmweiss@pointpark.edu.)

Pennsylvania,” Bowman said. “We were able to see from the Juniata synagogue what ours might have been like when it was in operation. We have a shell, but they have an active worship life. It totally turned the tables for us, and made us realize they have what we don’t in our story, and what we’ve been searching for. They have pre-empted circumstances.” In fact, despite the flight of Jews from central Pennsylvania, Agudath Achim’s congregation is actually growing, mostly through the absorption of members of congregations in surrounding areas that have closed. Although it was barely surviving throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Agudath Achim now boasts about 100 members, and drew between 40 and 60 people for the High Holy Days this past year. While it is true that the resurgence of Agudath Achim is unusual in the region, it is not alone. “One of the most interesting developments, in Sunbury, is they just built a new synagogue in the last two to four years,” Lembeck said. “They replaced the previous synagogue, which had fallen into disrepair. And the new synagogue was designed by Robert Venturi, a world-class architect. It’s extraordinary.” But despite the relative success of Agudath Achim, and the re-birth of Congregation Beth El in Sunbury, most

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congregations in central Pennsylvania are struggling. Lembeck believes that by combining, and sharing resources, the congregations of central Pennsylvania may be able to better survive. He hopes the establishment of the Center may help to unite the various small communities scattered throughout the region. “We would like to see synagogues work with each other,” Lembeck said. “They are now all independent, and we think that through the Center, we might be able to provide an initiative for them to work together.” The Center has already begun to collect historical objects from area synagogues that have closed, like Ohev Shalom in Lewistown, from which the Center is preserving personalized metal plaques that adorned the seats of some of its members. Because he anticipates collecting a vast array of artifacts and oral histories, Lembeck hopes to recruit additional volunteers to help archive the information gathered, as well as develop a coherent system of archiving. He also hopes to involve Juniata students in the work, and to locate memorabilia from synagogues that no longer exist. “There was a synagogue in Punxatawney that no longer exists,” Lembeck said. “We are looking for its remnants. So far, we have only found a small black and white woodcut.”

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14 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 26, 2012

OBITUARY ALEXANDER: On Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012, Edward Nathan Alexander; beloved husband of the late Jeanne Alexander; beloved father of Lee Alexander of Potomac, Md., and the late Lynn Alexander; beloved grandfather of Jodi and Jeremy Alexander. Services and interment were held at Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, to the attention of Lauren Cooler, The Rosanne L. Alexander Ovarian Cancer Research Fund, MSKCC Development Office, 633 Third Ave., 28th Floor, New York, NY 10017. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com BRICKENSTEIN: On Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012, Yael Brickenstein; beloved daughter of the late Zeev and Molly Brickenstein; step daughter of Sarah Cohen Brickenstein; sister of Hadar (Yonatan) Bechor and David Brickenstein; aunt of Dana and Eric Brickenstein, Elan Bechor and the late Amir Bechor. Services and interment were held at Mt. Lebanon Cemetery/Beth El Section. Contributions may be made to Animal Friends, 562 Camp Horne Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15237. Arrangements by

Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com COFFEY: On Tuesday Jan. 17, 2012, Dr. David Alan Coffey of Los Angeles; beloved father of Olivia Iris Coffey from his marriage to Zara Gerber; son of Dr. Charles and Barbara Coffey; brother of Sybil and Jennifer Coffey; and brotherin-law of the late Roger Cox; also survived by a large extended family and many friends. David was born in Pittsburgh on April 8, 1959. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Pittsburgh Medical School, the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute, and the New Center for Psychoanalysis. He lived life with passion and conviction, was loved and respected, and will be greatly missed. Contributions can be made to New Center for Psychoanalysis, 2014 Sawtelle Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90025, Psychiatric Clinical Faculty Association; UCLA Semel Institute, 760 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024; or National Alliance on Mental Illness, 3803 N. Fairfax Drive, Ste. 100, Arlington, VA 22203. Services were held Sunday, Jan. 22, at Eden Memorial Park, 11500 Sepulveda Blvd., Mission Hills, CA 91345. www.edenmempark.com

KING: On Saturday, Jan. 21, 2012, Dorothy Pervin; beloved wife of the late Robert J. King; beloved mother of David J. King and his wife Judy Smith of Austin, Texas, and Richard P. King and his wife Susan Briskin of Scarsdale, N.Y.; sister of William J. Pervin; grandmother of Stephen Smith King; also survived by nieces and nephews. Services were held at Tree of Life/ Or L'Simcha Congregation; interment Tree of Life Memorial Park. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com MARKS: On Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012, Ethel Marks, 99, of Squirrel Hill; beloved wife of the late Robert Marks; loving mother of Andi Fischhoff; grandmother of Maya, Ilya and Noam; sister of Sybil and the late Sol, Leah, Rosie and Henry. Services were held at Homewood cemetery. Contributions may be made to Riverview Towers or Congregation Dor Hadash. Arrangements by D'Alessandro Funeral Home, Ltd., 4522 Butler St., Pittsburgh, PA 15201. www.dalessandroltd.com MILLIGRAM: On Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2012, Emerson “Neil” Milligram, 80, of Shadyside; son of the late Alvin and Margaret Milligram; beloved brother of Ruth Solomon; loving uncle of Jeffrey (Aileen) Solomon and Michele (Ken Fryncko) Solomon Fryncko; great-uncle of Olivia and Alexa Baer. Special thanks to his caregivers Concha and Tomeka. Neil was a U.S. Army veteran of the Ko-

rean War and a past concertmaster of the University of Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. He received his Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Pittsburgh, his master’s degree from Loyola University in Baltimore and his doctorate from the University of Pittsburgh in 1972. Milligram was the founder and chairman of the Business Department at Carlow University. Upon his retirement from Carlow University in 2002, the college established the Dr. Emerson Neil Milligram Exemplary Leadership Award, now given at commencement to a graduating senior. He was a former director of the Daughters and Sons of Abraham. Services were held at Homewood Cemetery Chapel. Contribution may be made to Young People’s Synagogue, 6404 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh PA 15217 or Adat Shalom Congregation, 368 Guys Run Road., Cheswick, PA 15024. Arrangements by D’Alessandro Funeral Home, Ltd., 4522 Butler St., Pittsburgh, PA 15201. www.dalessandroltd.com SIEGEL: On Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2012, Bernard Louis Siegel; beloved father of Jonathan Siegel and Sharon (Dr. Daniel) Sinder; brother of Dr. William (Marian) Siegel and Richard (Rabbi Laura Geller) Siegel; grandfather of Talia and Jillian Sinder. Services and interment were held at Beth Shalom Cemetery. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 26, 2012 — 15

METRO Byman: Continued from page 1. 1970s, he said. They also have a more profound effect on life in Israel. According to there Byman, have been few dramatic acts of terrorism since the Second Intifada. “It was a slow but steady grind Daniel Byman that in the end was exceptionally successful from the Israeli point of view,” he said. “By 2005, Israel had decimated various terrorist organizations. Israel had a superb intelligence gathering apparatus; the number of attacks was way down and Israel had done this without making political concessions. In 2005 the Palestinian groups largely called it quits because they had been overwhelmed. “But at the same time there were some heavy costs for Israel as well,” he continued, “and I felt most of the discussion about Israel, most of the discussion about counterterrorism, missed most of this.” The 2005 withdrawal from Gaza was one such cost. Done unilaterally by Israel, Byman said, it should have been done, at least ostensibly, in conjunction with the Palestinian Authority to give the P.A. government a way to claim

Rodef Shalom: Continued from page 1. Members of the congregation used the forum to suggest ways to retain young congregants, including merging with Temple Sinai and to moving Sunday school to Saturdays. Alan Ackerman advocated the merger idea, calling it a benefit to both congregations. Ackerman noted that operating two Reform temples only a mile apart is wasteful and “can’t go on forever.” Bisno, who opposes such a merger, warned that one congregation risks submerging its identity to the other in such cases. “Something will be lost,” he said. However, he acknowledged “an enormous amount of duplication in religious education” between the two congregations. Simon also opposes merging with Temple Sinai. “We’re not a business. … It’s very difficult to merge two different congregations,” he said. “We

Retro News: Continued from page 2. vice president of the Pittsburgh Council of Pioneer Women … and Gertrude Brog and Rabbi Benjamin Nadoff, members of the Hillel Academy staff and administration, were honored for more than 25 years of service at the school’s 15th annual senior high school commencement.

Misc. In a somber moment, the Chronicle also carried a full-page ad from the federation

credit for it. Instead, the government appeared weak and Hamas took control of the Strip in 2007. Another example was Lebanon, which Israel invaded in 1982 and successfully drove out the PLO. But the IDF got bogged down in a protracted guerilla war there, and the experience paved the way for the rise of Hezbollah. There have been some not-so-well known acts of cooperation as well. For instance, Israel gets Palestinian cooperation to stop terrorist attacks. “When I talk to Israeli security officials now they say on the West Bank Palestinian security forces are doing the overwhelming majority of the day-today [work] in stopping things like suicide bombings, but terrorist groups adapt and rockets are a great example.” He equated the rocket attacks from Gaza to the Fedayin border raids of the 1950s — not as deadly as suicide bombings, but a sign that terrorist groups are adapting to Israel’s ability to stop suicide bombers. And Israeli counterintelligence must adapt as well. “By some estimates Israel was arresting 90 percent of the suicide bombers at their doorstep as they were leaving the house — really truly pinpoint in intelligence.” In his book, Byman equates Israel to a laboratory, in which new types of counterterrorism measures are experimented with, and other countries — namely, the United States — can learn from them. (Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.) should view [Rodef Shalom] as a holy community.” Dan Freedman of Murrysville expressed concern that Rodef Shalom pays too much attention to social action. “There’s a great emphasis on social action,” Freedman said. “It waters down the brand. It’s something that members should seek elsewhere.” He also suggested that Rodef Shalom move Sunday school to Saturdays as a way of improving attendance at Shabbat services. Bisno thought Freedman had a valid point about overemphasizing politics and noted that a congregation shouldn’t stray from its core mission in teaching Torah and Jewish values. He also said that he would consider Freedman’s Saturday school suggestion. “I was very gratified and encouraged by the amount of enthusiasm,” Bisno said after the meeting. “There is a clear recognition of the challenges. … We have the wherewithal to address them.” (Ron Kaplan can be reached at ronkap205@yahoo.com.) recalling the victims of the massacre at the 1972 Munich Olympics. The ad showed a single memorial candle flickering in front of a black backdrop with the words, draped above and below the picture: “Olympic flame: 1972 Remembering is not enough” — COMPILED BY LEE CHOTTINER

(For a more comprehensive look at the July 8, 1976, Chronicle, visit the jewishchronicle.net and click on “archives” at the top of the page. Back issues of the Chronicle are archived by the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.)

We acknowledge with grateful appreciation contributions from the following: Donor

In MeMory of

CAROL G. BERK .....................NETTIE G. BARON MILTON CHARAPP ................MILTON CHARAPP ELAINE G. CHOTTINER........HARRY & REBECCA STEINER MORTON & SONIA COHEN .....LEAH KANELOIS E. COHEN ....................................ISRAEL FINEMAN LOIS E. COHEN...................SARAH R. FINEMAN FRANK & BARBARA DELUCE ....ALBERT SHAER ARNOLD GLANTZ.............BENNIE ROSENBERG CAROL & NORRIS GLANTZ .........JACK GLANTZ CAROL & NORRIS GLANTZ......IVAN WOLINSKY GLORIA Y. GOLDEN ......................TYBIE (TILLIE) KROCHMAL CORRINE DENMARK, LUCILLE GORDON & DOROTHY WOLOVITZ............IRVING E. COHEN DOROTHY A. GRINBERG ....SAMUEL J. AMDUR MARJORIE A. HALPERN .....................LEONARD CHASICK MAX HEFLAND ....................MENDAL HELFAND CAROLE F. KAUFMAN ...............ANN R. HENDEL ELAINE & CARL KRASIK ..........JULIUS A. BELLE EVELYN B. LEVIN.....................MORRIS BERGER SALLY & TIM LITMAN...................LEAH & LOUIS ROSENFIELD MICHAEL E. LOWENSTEIN..............WILLIAM M. LOWENSTEIN JANICE MILES ..........................WILLIAM D. ORR NESSA MINES.................................MAX GREEN

Donor

In MeMory of

NORMAN ORR..........................WILLIAM D. ORR PAUL & DIANE PECHERSKY ....................MILDRED PECHERSKY LOUISE PERLSTEIN ......HERMAN WEISBERGER MS. LISA POLLACK....................ALEX POLLACK SHIRLEY E. PRENY ...........ESTHER MALLINGER SHIRLEY E. PRENY .................MAX MALLINGER SHIRLEY E. PRENY .............JACK I. MALLINGER ANNE D. ROSENBERG.......JACOB ROSENBERG KARL SACHSBEN.........................JAMIN SACHS ALLEN J. SAMOWICH.......................FLORENCE SAMOWICH MIRIAM G. SCHAFFEL ..........EDGAR SCHAFFEL MURRAY & HARRIET SHAPIRO....................................CLARA DEUTCH JAY N. SILBERBLATT.............................PAULINE SILBERBLATT BERNICE SPOKANE .....................LOUIS COHEN PATRICIA STEINBERG ..........................HARRY L. STEINBERG ELAINE SUPOWITZ .....................MURRAY LOVE BETH TABOR LEV......................ELSIE LEBOVITZ PLESSET PHILLIP L. WEIN .........................IDA JANE WEIN DOROTHY WEINBERG .............CERNIE CAPLAN HAROLD C. WEISS .................MOLLIE B. WEISS ROBERT H. WOLF ........................GUSSIE WOLF

SUNDAY, JANUARY 29: MARK ALEXANDER, JACOB AUERBACH, HARRY BEGLER, THOMAS CALIG, IRVING E. COHEN, BENJAMIN FELDSTEIN, NETTIE GALANTY, LEWIS GIRSON, RACHEL GOLDSTEIN, ESHIKA GOOTMACHER, PHILLIP HARRIS, ISAAC LANDIS, EDITH LAZEAR, MORRIS LEVENTON, ELIZABETH LEVINE, SAMUEL N. LEVINE, ADOLPH LOEWY, RHEBA MARKLEY, E.HARRY MAZERVO, ETHEL J. MENDLOWITZ, GERTRUDE MEYER, MEYER PERILMAN, MAX PINKUS, FAIGIE M RAPPORT, OSCAR ROBBINS, REBECCA ROSENFELD, DORA ROSENTHAL, ISADORE ROTH, GERTRUDE SCHUGAR, NETTIE SHER, PAULINE SILBERBLATT, NACHAME SMITH, FREDA SPATZ STEINBERG, ISAAC SURLOFF, ABRAHAM ULANOFF, SAMUEL WEINBERGER, MORRIS WEISS, SAMUEL WYNETT. MONDAY, JANUARY 30: ELI AGRENOVITZ, CELIA S ALEXANDER, WILLIAM M AXELROD, SAMUEL BELLMAN, HERMAN J BRODY, BELLA F. BROIDA, REBECCA BROUDY, RUBIN DAVIDSON, RUBEN EDELSTEIN, LOUIS EPSTEIN, LEONARD A FLEEGLER, RAYMOND GOLDSTEIN, JACOB GRAFF, ANNA GROSSMAN, SARAH HAIMOVITZ, TINA KAMINSKY, ANNA KART, ROSE KLEIN, SAMUEL B. KOIDANOV, SIDNEY LEFF, BESSIE LIPPARD, ANNA LIVINGTON, ANNE BILDER MALLINGER, BENJAMIN B. MARKOWITZ, DAVID S. OSGOOD, DAVID RASKIN, ADOLPH ROSEN, MEYER ROSEN, ALEX S. ROSENBERG, JOSEPH CLIFF RUBEN, ISAAC SAMUELS, JESS SCHWARTZ, IDA SEMINOFSKY, JACK C. SIEGEL, WILLIAM H. SIEGEL, MORRIS SUNDMAN, ISAAC SYMONS, HERMAN SZOBEL, SARAH TIZON, SIDNEY W. TOBIN, DORIS ROSENFELD WELTMAN, AL W. WOLF, JACOB WOLFE, ROSE BLATTNER ZIONTS. TUESDAY, JANUARY 31: ABE ABRAMSON, JOSEPH BALTER, BETTY BLOOM, THEODORE R. CRYSTAL, CLARA DEUTCH, THEODORE H. ENGELMAN, MYER FELDMAN, ISADORE F. FRANK, EVA GREENBERG, BENJAMIN HARRIS, STELIA P. HOLMAN, CELIA LANDO, EUNICE J. LANDO, BESS M. LEVENSON, TILLIE LEVINE, ALBERT DALE MALYN, EMIL MANDLER, EDITH W. METZ, FRANK MILLER, REBECCA MOSCOVITZ, SIMON A. MYERS, SOPHIE PARANSKY, ROBERT J. PARIS, ESTHER RABINOWITZ, EMMA AMY ROSEMAN RAPHAEL, MAX ROSENFELD, HARRY SCHLESINGER, MENDEL SILBERMAN, FALK SMITH, LEON STEIN, SAMUEL A. TISHERMAN, SARAH WEINTHAL, MAX ZIFF. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1: SIDNEY J. ALPERN, SAMUEL J. AMDUR, JULIUS BELLE, RAE BERNNARD, ANNA K. COHEN, LESTER L. COHEN, BEVERLY RENEE GERMAN, ESSIE GOLDBERG, BESSIE HURWITZ, HARRY KALSON, LOUIS KRAUSS, TILLIE KROCHMAL, MARY LANGER, RHEA LAUFE, CHARLOTTE MARCHBEIN LAZAR, JOSEPH H. LEVIN, MOLLIE B. LEVY, BENJAMIN LUBIN, JEREMY MARCUS, SAMUEL MILLER, DAVID NUMEROSKY, JANICE H. PRINTZ, ABRAHAM REICHBAUM, REBECCA ROSENBERG, MAX RUBEN, JAKE RUBIN, IDA SCHORIN, MAX SEIFER, IDA B. SHAFFER, SARAH SHAPIRO, JACOB SKIRBOLL, SIMON SOLOF, BESSIE STEINBERG, ESTHER SWARTZ, EDITH NAYHOUSE THORPE, NATHAN WANETICK, MINNIE WELLER. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2: ANNA COHEN, CELIA COHEN, MORRIS COHEN, EDYTHE B. DICKERMAN, ISADORE EISENSTEIN, JULIA P. FARBSTEIN, KATIE FIREMAN, JENNIE GOLD, ADELINE V. GOLDSTEIN, SARAH GOLDSTEIN, RUTH W. GUSKY, LOUIS HINKES, SAMUEL HORELICK, MAX JEREMIAS, HARRY KAPLAN, ANNE E. KATSEFF, LEWIS EDWARD KLINE, AARON H. LEVENSON, ESTHER LEVY, MARIAN PAPERNICK LINDENBAUM, MORRIS LIPKIND, ALICE LIPP, DAVID MEYER, HARRY MILLER, JENNIE ORRINGER, MAX M. RUTTENBERG, ANNA SCHWARTZ, ROSE SCHWARTZ, WILLIAM SCOTT, BARNEY B. SEGEL, JESSE SHY SHENSON, DAVID S. SHERMER, ALBERT SHERRY, LOUIS WILLIAM SIFF, CLARICE SILVERBERG, JACOB SILVERBERG, RUTH K. SLOTSKY, FANNIE SOLOF, SIMON SPARKS, KATIE WEISS, DAVID WETSTEIN, DAVID LOUIS WILKOFF. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3: HARRY M. ARONSON, JENNIE BLUESTONE, CHARLES FISHKIN, ISRAEL HAHN, GERTRUDE HURWITZ, GUSKY KAHN, ELLA P. KAMIN, IDA KARP, SAM LASSE, JACOB LEIBER, FREDA LENCHNER, ANNIE LEVENTON, JACOB LIBER, BENJAMIN MANN, KATIE MIDDLEMAN, JACOB MIMELESS, LOUIS MOIDEL, LILLIAN MYERS, ANNA ORRINGER, ALEX Z. OSGOOD, HERMAN PERLMAN, LOUIS ROSENFIELD, BELLA ROTSTEIN, IGNATZ SCHNEIDER, REBECCA SCHUTTE, MEYER HERBERT SIEGAL, GOLDIE SLOTOLOW, MAURICE SMITH, HARRY L. STEINBERG, MILTON S. STEINSAPIR, ABRAHAM TOPILOWSKY, JAMES D WALD, ROSLYN WEINBERG, ISAAC WORMSER. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4: JOSEPH BAKER, REBECCA BELKIN, ANNA BERNSTEIN, HELEN CITRON, MAX ELINOFF, LOUIS GOODSTEIN, JENNIE GREENBERGER, RACHEL GRINBERG, CLARA M. KAMINSKY, MINNIE S. KOPMAN, DAVID LEVY, SARAH R. MAGLIN, SAMUEL MALAMUD, SYLVAN A. MENDLOVITZ, CIRIL PERER, MILTON PERIL, MANUEL REGENSTIEN, JACOB ROSENBERG, JACOB ROSENZWEIG, LIBBIE ELKAH SAVILLE`, PEARL SHECKTER, MORRIS SINGER, JACOB SLONE, HERMAN SMITH, MAX SPIEGEL, DAVID H (JUDGE) WEINER, RACHEL WOLK, ESTHER WORMSER.


16 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 26, 2012

The Jewish Chronicle January 26, 2012  

The Jewish Chronicle January 26, 2012

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