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The Glass Minstrel Hayden Thorne ebooks | Download PDF | *ePub | DOC | audiobook

Ingramcontent 2014-07-30Original language:EnglishPDF # 1 8.00 x .49 x 5.25l, .50 #File Name: 1500404764216 pagesThe Glass Minstrel | File size: 64.Mb Hayden Thorne : The Glass Minstrel before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised The Glass Minstrel: 2 of 2 people found the following review helpful. Exquisite gemBy SiriusI have purchased this book couple of months ago, but delayed reading it since I had known that it deals with grief and I knew I would cry, and for that I have to be in the mood. Very recently however I have read a review elsewhere which prompted me to read this one. I am very glad I did. It is a quiet psychological Christmas themed story, where two fathers are trying to move on from the grief


that almost consumed them and one boy is trying to make sense of what his future will be. And of course since this is Christmas story there is love, healing and forgiveness as well. But beware, this story is more sad than your usual Christmas fare is despite an uplifting ending of the sorts. These two fathers are trying to cope with the worst nightmare that parent can expect after all and never wants to think that it may ever come. And my goodness I loved the settings, I really wanted to visit this town. I also love how subtly the changes in three main characters are portrayed throughout the story.Absolutely lovely and highly recommended. Oh. Beware this story is NOT romance.2 of 2 people found the following review helpful. The Glass Minstrel by Hayden ThorneBy ElisaI have no trouble at all to admit that at the end of this novel I was in tears, but it was not a desperate crying, it was more like a lonely tear or two down your cheek, thinking, wondering of the things that could have been and will not and the hope that in any case is born from a tragic event.This is the story of two lost souls, Heinrich and Stefan, barely eighteen years old kid who died together since together they wanted to live; their happiness was short and it was not easy, and so the tears are for them, thinking that if life was more clement, they would have an option. But in a way Heinrich and Stefan are together now, in their dreams, and they will be also in another way at the end of this story, in the eyes of their parents, Abelard Bauer, the toy maker, and Herr Schiffer.This is also the story of Jakob, 15 years old and in love with his best friend, and then in love with a stranger, and then in love of an imaginary prince he sees in the guise of a minstrel glass toy Herr Bauer did with the face of his own dead son. Jakob needs love and he doesn't know where to find it in the small town where he is living, and probably he will not be able to find it.This is the story of two men, Abelard Bauer and Herr Schiffer who need to find a way to come to term with what happened and will happen, and the only way to do that is to accept that Heinrich and Stefan were in love. This tragic love is told to the reader through small passages of Heinrich's journal, and in the few things Stefan told to his father before his death. At the beginning I thought the two boys committed suicide, but that was not the case and for me it was an odd relief: through they are dead, but at least it was not an act they committed since there was no hope for them; they at least tried to live their love and that is the only hope they can leave to Jakob, unknown to them, but they are so dear to Jakob.I like both Herr Bauer and Herr Schiffer's characters, these men are in great pain but this pain is not so huge to prevent them to find the love for who is around them and still alive. Herr Bauer in particular is still able to be kind and generous, and, even if in silence and alone, he is trying to understand his son's reasons. Not Herr Bauer or Herr Schiffer are idolatrising their sons, both of them are well aware that Heinrich and Stefan were no angel, but their faults were not to love each other. Even Herr Schiffer that is more embittered than Herr Bauer will at the end arrive to that conclusion and he will be the one that will allow to the glass minstrel to find his right companion to eternity.I strongly recommend this novel, trust me, it's not tragic as you can think, also since, well, all the tragedy already happened, and now it's time for the aftermath, dealing with the pain and healing the hearts, and be ready to help who comes next.2 of 2 people found the following review helpful. Excellent historicalBy octobercountryI really enjoyed this book, which features three separate plot-lines running concurrently; the stories intersect on occasion and intertwine at the end.I felt badly for poor Jakob, who is trying to figure things out as he experiences his first crush on a slightly older fellow. As I was reading I found myself wanting to take him aside, letting him talk things out to a sympathetic ear, and helping him by giving out a little friendly advice.The plot definitely has some sad and melancholy themes, but is hopeful and uplifting overall. And this one did put me in a holiday mood as well; I'd say it's easily the best of my Christmas reads so far this season. Recommended.I can't say that the manga-style cover does the book any favours. Oh, it isn't horrible, but I think different artwork would give the book a wider readership. (Edited to add---the new edition has a different cover, which I think fits the mood of the story better than the original did.) It is the Christmas season in mid-19th century Bavaria. Two fathers, Abelard Bauer and Andreas Schifffer, are brought together through the tragic deaths of their sons. Bauer, a brilliant toymaker, fashions glass Christmas ornaments, and his latest creation is a minstrel with a secret molded into its features.When Schiffer sees Bauers minstrel ornament in the toy shop, he realizes that Bauer is struggling to keep his sons memory alive through his craft. At first he tries to fault him for this, but then recognizes that he, too, is seeking solace and healing by reading his sons diary, a journal that reveals, in both painful as well as beautiful detail, the true nature of Heinrichs relationship with Stefan.Fifteenyear-old Jakob Diederich is the son of a poor widow. The boy is burdened with his own secret, and he develops an obsession with a traveling Englishman who stays at the inn where Jakob works. The lives of Bauer, Schiffer, and Diederich intersect during the holiday as Schiffer tries to focus on his family in the present, Bauer struggles to reconcile his past, and Jakob copes with an uncertain future.Echoing the sensibilities of melancholy 19th Century folktales, lyrical prose and rich period detail quietly weave a moving tale of redemption, hope, and haunting, but timeless, themes.

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