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Advice on Supported Internships For schools, colleges, supported employment providers, employers, young disabled people and their families June 2013


Contents Summary

3

About this departmental advice

3

Expiry or review date

3

Who is this advice for?

3

Key points

3

Introduction

4

What is a Supported Internship?

5

What are the benefits of Supported Internships?

6

For learners:

6

For employers

7

For Further Education and supported employment providers

8

Partnership approach

10

Roles of partners and skills across the partnership

12

Employers’ role

12

Supported employment (Job Coaches) role

12

Education role

14

Skills to fulfil supported employment and education roles

14

What a course looks like

16

Learner recruitment

16

Work placements or rotations

16

Underpinning qualifications and accreditation of work-placed learning

17

English and Maths

17

Support on completion of programme of study

18

How to prepare learners for Supported Internships

19

How to fund Supported Internships

20

Glossary of terms

22

Further sources for information

23

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Summary About this departmental advice This is advice from the Department for Education. This advice is non-statutory, and has been produced to help recipients understand Supported Internships to support the rollout of this study programme from September 2013.

Expiry or review date This advice will next be reviewed after the evaluation of the Supported Internship trials is published in the Autumn 2013.

Who is this advice for? This advice is for: 

Schools

Colleges

Supported employment providers

Young disabled people and their families

Key points This advice outlines: 

What is a Supported Internship

What the benefits of Supported Internships are for learners, employers, and education and supported employment providers

The partnership approach of Supported Internships

The roles of partners and skills across the partnership

What a course looks like

How to prepare learners for Supported Internships

How to fund Supported Internships

3


Introduction Government policy is that disabled young people should be helped to develop the skills, qualifications and experience they need to succeed in their careers. At the heart of this is access to better quality vocational and work-related learning options to ensure that ALL young people can make a positive contribution to our society and economy. 1 Professor Wolf’s Review of Vocational Education published in 20112 found that too many young people are taking low level qualifications that provide little prospect for progression, limiting their potential. To address this, the Government has already announced reforms to the funding system, moving to an approach built around study programmes that will allow colleges to tailor packages of education for students that are more clearly focused on outcomes. The new system will be in place from September 2013. To support this, the Government is also introducing destination measures showing how many young people progress into education, training or employment from schools and colleges. Ofsted have already included monitoring of destinations in their inspections for schools and are doing the same for college inspections from September 2013. Further information on destination measures can be found on the Department for Education website.3 These changes to funding and the introduction of study programmes will enable all colleges and training providers to consider offering Supported Internships to disabled young people from September 2013. The Government is testing a variety of different models and innovative approaches across 15 colleges. Building on progress that has already been made in this area, the Supported Internship trials will be evaluated and the evidence of what works made available to all colleges in the Autumn 2013, including how best to use the role of the Job Coach. Job Coaches are a key part of any Supported Internship and it is anticipated that the National Occupational Standards for Supported Employment4 will prove helpful to colleges and training providers wanting to use, develop and get the best from this role.

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Support and aspiration: A new approach to special educational needs and disability. Progress and next steps. Department for Education (2012) 2 https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/180504/DFE-000312011.pdf 3 http://www.education.gov.uk/childrenandyoungpeople/youngpeople/participation/a00208218/ks-4-5-destmeas 4 http www e cellence ateway or u node 1 or http://base-uk.org/knowledge/national-occupationalstandards

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What is a Supported Internship? A Supported Internship is a study programme based primarily at an employer’s premises based on the ‘place and train’ model They are desi ned to better enable disabled youn people to achieve sustainable paid employment by equipping them with the skills they need for employment through learning in the workplace. For the young person, the internship should contribute to their long-term career goals and fit with their working capabilities. For the employer, the internship must meet a real business need; with the potential of a paid job at the end of the study programme should the intern meet the required standard. The overall goal of Supported Internships is for disabled young people to move into paid employment. The structured study programme includes on-the-job training provided by experienced job coaches, and the chance to study for relevant qualifications, where appropriate. The job coaches also provide support to employers, increasing their confidence in working with disabled young people and helping them to understand the business case for employing a diverse workforce. Job coaches also provide support after the structured study programme for those young people who are not offered a paid job at the end of the programme. Supported Internships reflect the following principles:    

The majority of the youn person’s time is spent at the employer’s premises Young people are expected to comply with real job conditions, such as timekeeping and dress code. Systematic instruction, a method specifically designed to help people with complex learning difficulties learn new tasks, is used where appropriate. Stretching learning goals are set, including achievement at Level 2 in English and Maths, preferably GCSE, or where this is not appropriate, another qualification or stretching level of learning. Both the young person and the employer have support through a tutor and a formally trained job coach in line with the National Occupational Standards for Supported Employment. Young people continue to be supported after the course of study, with a trained job coach to ensure that they get paid employment as part of a sustainable career.

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What are the benefits of Supported Internships? For learners: As often cited, disabled people may want to wor but can’t because they don’t have the right support at the right time. The employment rates for people with some impairments remain consistently low. For example, people with learning disabilities or mental health conditions have employment rates of under 15 percent5. Although young people with more complex needs can face additional challenges finding and securing work, Supported Internships are one way which can ensure with the right support young disabled people can make a valuable contribution to the labour market. Ofsted found that high quality employment support can have a considerable impact on youn people’s aspirations and careers 6 For some young people, the experience of work and on-the-job training through a Supported Internship is more likely to help them secure employment than qualifications or classroom-based learning. The pilots through Valuing Employment Now for Project SEARCH and the 2012/13 Supported Internship trials testing new approaches have cited numerous benefits for learners which include:        

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Ensuring young disabled people received evidence-based support which helps them to get both a job and career, and achieve their life goals and aspirations Building confidence and motivation Improving their decision making skills Improving their communication skills Widening their social networks Improving family relationships Improving health and well-being Developing independent travel skills

http://odi.dwp.gov.uk/docs/fulfilling-potential/building-understanding-main-slide-deck.pdf Ofsted (2010)

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Aaron started on his Supported Internship in 2010 at East Kent Hospital University Foundation Trust, with support from East Kent College and Kent Supported Employment, where he did three 10-week work placements over the course of an academic year. After graduation, Aaron was successful in obtaining a 6-month contract in Recruitment, and following this obtained a permanent contract as a Case Notes Collection Clerk with Clinical Coding. Aaron says, “I really enjoyed the practical wor of the Supported Internship, achieving the trust of my mentors. The learning has been a two-way process, that the Hospital Trust have learnt that disability does not just mean people who have a physical impairment, but people who have autistic spectrum conditions like me. I learned so many things that I wouldn’t have done bein in a classroom I am really enjoyin my current role and determined to improve my skills, and am looking forward to a long career in the NHS ” Aaron’s mother says, “Aaron stru led all his life to fit in and was never given a chance in the workplace. Since joining the Trust, his confidence and sense of belonging has sky rocketed. Aaron is now a happy, confident young man who enjoys coming to work and being part of a team. The impact on our family has been hu e ” Aaron’s line mana er says, “Aaron’s presence has made us enerally think about the way we communicate with colleagues. By having him in our department he has helped us to eliminate misunderstandings and ensure the department operates as a team ”

For employers Healthy, competitive businesses can flourish where the needs of people, communities and businesses are interrelated. To remain competitive, organisations need everyone who works for them to make their best contribution. Increasingly, employers are recognising the importance of diversity in recruiting and retaining the skills and talent they need to be successful. By offering Supported Internships, employers can be supported to create open and inclusive workplace cultures in which everyone feels valued and respected. There is a strong business case for employers in employing a diverse workforce. A diverse workforce can help to inform the development of new or enhanced products or services, open up new market opportunities, improve market share and broaden an or anisation’s customer base 7 It will also enhance their public image as a leader in employing people with disabilities. 7

http://www.cipd.co.uk/hr-resources/factsheets/diversity-workplace-overview.aspx

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The pilots through Valuing Employment Now for Project SEARCH and the 2012/13 Supported Internship trials testing new approaches have cited numerous benefits for employers which include:      

Support to employ a diverse workforce Savings in recruitment costs with the ability to try out the talent of young disabled people Efficiencies in business processes which benefitted all staff and brought time and cost savings Increased capacity in departments Recognition of the contribution young disabled people can make to enhance their businesses On-site training and support to the business and their employees

A Supported Internship programme was established in Blackpool as a partnership between Blackpool and Fylde College, Progress and Blackpool Council from September 2012. A young woman with a learning disability, Caroline, is undertaking an internship at the Town Hall of Blackpool. Carmel McKeogh, Deputy Chief Executive at Blackpool Council said, “Caroline’s job is just about as hi h profile as you can et It involves wor in in the Leader’s office as Caroline wor s for a team who provide excellent administrative support to the Council Leader as well as all the Cabinet Members. Every day is exciting and different with many visitors coming in to see the Leader and Deputy Leader. Caroline and the team are constantly busy and they are always welcoming and helpful. We are really e cited to have our intern wor in the Leader’s office, and we thin Caroline is an excellent ambassador for the programme. I wonder how many people leave the Leader’s office thin in differently about the fantastic potential talent that people with learning disabilities can bring to a wor place ”

For Further Education and supported employment providers Through working in partnership, Further Education and supported employment providers can offer better quality vocational and work-related learning options to ensure that young disabled people can make a positive contribution to our society and economy. The experience of work and on-the-job training through a Supported Internship is more likely to help some young disabled people secure employment than qualifications or classroom-based learning. Offering Supported Internships is one way of improving destination measures into employment which the Government is introducing for Further Education, which also now forms part of Ofsted inspections. 8


Offering Supported Internships will also strengthen their relationships with employers to better understand the skills and qualifications they will need from young people to inform future curriculum development. It is also known that there are increasing numbers of young disabled aspiring to have jobs and careers, and there will only be increased market demand for this type of study programme. The pilots through Valuing Employment Now for Project SEARCH and the 2012/13 Supported Internship trials testing new approaches have cited numerous benefits for providers which include: 

Gathering clear and positive evidence that can challenge assumptions and raise aspirations for the future of young disabled people after they leave full time education Breaking the cycle of young disabled people repeating college courses and training with limited opportunities for employment

During the development of the SEN Green paper, Deborah Parker, Chief Executive at Progress, a supported employment provider, was inspired by the development of a valued and accessible alternative to Apprenticeships for those learners who would not be able to achieve a level 2 qualification. She was delighted that Supported Internships were going to be piloted but disappointed that her local college was not selected. This did not deter her, and she developed a partnership between Blackpool and Fylde College, Progress and Blackpool Council to pilot the study programme locally from September 2012 for six young disabled people. All the interns have a year on the programme, with 4 days a week in a work placement with an employer, and one day per week continuing their learning, studying a course relevant to their placement. The partnership was formed with natural allies, who were all equally inspired by the initiative. As a supported employment provider, Progress knew it was important to create something of value that would result in valued paid employment throu h a ‘place and train’ approach to study pro rammes, which has already resulted in one job outcome. The college are totally committed to the best possible outcomes for learners, and were keen to work in partnership with Progress to be one step ahead in developing this study programme. The partnership has a number of private sector employers who are lining up ready to come on board, and has equally inspired young people and their families.

9


Partnership approach The first step in establishing Supported Internships is to establish an effective partnership between an education and supported employment provider, and employer(s) as it will require input from all three to deliver an effective programme. The evaluation of previous pilots from Valuing Employment Now have highlighted that this is a key success factor in setting up a successful programme. This will involve identifying the partner or anisations, establishin senior ‘buy-in’ was well as identifyin operational leads across the partners. Decisions will also need to be made which best fit local conditions as to who leads the partnership. This could be the education or supported employment provider, or an employer. It could also be a role which is taken on by the Local Authority to co-ordinate the input from each partner. In order for strategic partners to steer the programme both internally and as a partnership, it is important for partners to agree their roles at an early stage and create effective communication channels. Establishing a partnership Steering Group is one way of doing this which will ensure that each partner organisation takes on both individual and shared responsibilities. The importance and challenges of partnership working cannot be under-estimated. It requires each partner to recognise that they are at different stages of understanding Supported Internships, and the skills and abilities that young disabled people can bring to the labour market. It will also require partners to compromise as the programme and partnership develops. Establishing terms of reference for the partnership and agreeing roles of each partner early in the development of a Supported Internship programme will help to overcome some of the challenges of partnership working. Decisions will also need to be made as to whether the education provider also takes on the role of supplying Job Coaches for the supported employment role. This will be dependent upon both the availability of local supported employment providers and whether Job Coaches can be supplied through the education provider. It must be noted that when decisions are made to engage with a supported employment provider, this input will need to be funded, which is covered in the section on how to fund Supported Internships. It is recommended that Supported Internship partnerships carry out a skills audit from the outset of developing their study programme to ensure that staff, which may include Tutors, Learning Support Assistants, and Job Coaches have the skills needed to effectively deliver all aspects of the programme. Staff training may be needed to ensure that staff have the appropriate skills and qualifications. It needs to be recognised that the skills of Job Coaches are much different than that of Learning Support Staff, and if these staff are to be used to fulfil the Job Coach role, they will need to be appropriately trained.

10


Pluss is a social enterprise that supports thousands of people with disabilities and other disadvantages into employment each year. They do this through a range of specialist, local employment services and through direct employment within their own commercial enterprises. Bicton College is one of the colleges who trialled different approaches to delivering Supported Internships and made the decision to work with Pluss and formalised the arrangement early on in the trial. The agreement has provided Bicton College with a full-time Employment Advisor who can also provide 1:1 support in the workplace as required. The Employment Advisor’s main remit is to find wor placements and to be there to offer advice when employment contracts are being negotiated. Both organisations are committed to improving employment outcomes for people with learning disabilities and felt that working together has strengthened their positions. Bicton Colle e says, “Part of our motivation to wor with Pluss was the desire to et the best outcomes for our interns, and it was felt that Pluss’ established reputation would enable us to reach a much wider range of employers. It was also seen as a good opportunity to link educational and local supported employment provision because as they move on, this is the route that the young people are likely to take. As we move away from the trial and continue the delivery of Supported Internships within study programme changes, we are exploring opportunities which will enable us to wor in partnership ”

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Roles of partners and skills across the partnership Employers’ role Employers have a vital role in Supported Internships as this programme of study will primarily be delivered at their premises, with young people undertaking work placements or rotations that meet a real business need with the potential of a paid job at the end of the programme. Employers will need to understand the business case in being involved as a partner and what will be required from them. They will also need to understand how to make reasonable adjustments for young disabled people to fully participate and make a real contribution in their workplaces. Employers will need to be involved in decision-making on all aspects of the delivery of Supported Internships. This should include learner recruitment, course and curriculum design and policies on this programme of study. This is important to ensure effective matching of young disabled people to work placements or rotations, and the course curriculum delivers the skills they require from their workforce. Course design will also need to take into account how they operate their business including hours/days at work and term times. The policies for the programme such as absence management and disciplinary procedures will also need to take into account the employer perspective. Employers will need to provide meaningful work placements or rotations, which can be made more difficult and evolve over time to ensure stretching learning goals can be set throughout the programme for young disabled people. They will need to provide effective line management and supervision of interns. They will also need to provide opportunities for interns to apply for positions within their business throughout the duration of the programme of study.

Supported employment (Job Coaches) role Supported employment as defined in the National Occupational Standards is high quality, personalised support for people with disabilities and/or other disadvantages which enables them to seek, access and retain employment in the open labour market.8 The key stages of supported employment will need to be embedded into Supported Internships, which are:    

Engagement with young disabled people and their families Employer engagement Vocational profiling and job matching In-work support and career progression.

It has been long recognised that there are low expectations about what young disabled people can achieve in terms of jobs and careers. Supported employment recognises the 8

http www e cellence ateway or u node 1

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importance of raising these expectations for individuals and their families across education, health and social care services. Young disabled people and their families will need clear information about what to expect from a Supported Internship at the recruitment stage, and continued support through regular reviews throughout the duration of the programme of study. Supported employment recognises employers as an equal customer in the process, and that they may need support in order to fulfil their full role as a full partner in the delivery of Supported Internships. Employers may need support to understand the business case for their involvement; and to have the skills to welcome, supervise and fully integrate a young disabled person into their workplace. They may also need support to adjust their recruitment processes to allow for working interviews. Vocational profiling provides the mechanism for identification of the experience, skills, abilities, interests, wishes and needs of young disabled people. The vocational profile is then used to ensure a high quality job match is obtained, which best suits the young disabled person’s s ills and preferences It is also used to do better-off in work calculations, so that young people can make informed choices about moving into paid employment Once an employer’s commitment to offerin a wor placement or rotation is secured, a job analysis is undertaken to check assumptions made in the job description and thoroughly investigate the job so that all of its aspects and those of the workplace are understood. The job analysis might point towards ways of job carving together parts of job descriptions that suit the youn disabled person’s talents, or creatin new job descriptions that suit the young disabled person and are cost effective for the employer. The process of vocational profiling and job analysis should ensure that the support requirements of a young disabled person are properly considered, which will allow inwork support to be individually tailored and targeted through the identification of a skills gap. In-work support to the young disabled person and their employer may include systematic instruction, and the development of natural supports within the workplace. Supported employment should ensure that induction and on-going training takes place and may offer out of work support as appropriate. Supported employment should also ensure that goals are agreed with the participant and employer to ensure that stretching learning goals are set throughout the duration of the programme of study. Supported employment will also need to be involved in engagement of employers external to the Supported Internship partnership. Not all young people will be successful in securing paid employment with their host employer at the end of the study programme, and engagement with other employers will be needed to ensure that all young people have the opportunities to move into paid jobs. Consideration will be needed as to ongoing support for young disabled people whether they gain a job at the end of the study programme or not. This is important to the success of Supported Internships so that young disabled people continue to be supported after the programme of study to ensure that they get and maintain paid employment as part of a sustainable career.

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Education role As young disabled people will be enrolled as learners on their Supported Internship programmes, education should lead on engagement with young disabled people and their families. They should guide learner recruitment with support from other partners. Education should also work with partners to determine the best place to deliver aspects of the curriculum which cannot be accommodated at employers’ premises The majority of learnin will be at the employers’ premises based on the place and train or supported employment model. However, parts of the curriculum may require a classroom. This can be provided either on the employers’ premises, the colle e or other community settin Education should also lead on course design and curriculum delivery with support from partners. The study programme will need to deliver the skills employers require from their workforce and take into account how they operate their businesses including hours/days at work and term times. It also needs to consider the skills gap identified in matching young disabled people to internships. Education will also have lead responsibility to ensure all documentation is completed to fulfil their statutory responsibilities and satisfy Ofsted inspections.

Skills to fulfil supported employment and education roles Education providers will need the skills as set out in the overarching professional standards for teachers, tutors and trainers in the lifelong learning sector9 to:    

engage the learner in the learning process including in the design and development of provision work with the learner and others to develop individual learning priorities, to realise goals and aspirations promote an environment of mutual respect that empowers the learner to learn and encourages every learner to express views about the learning promote inclusion and participation

The provider fulfilling the supported employment role supplying Job Coaches will need the skills as set out in the National Occupational Standards for Supported Employment10 to:

9

Effectively engage with young disabled people and their families

Engage with employers as an equal customer in the supported employment process

Carry out vocational profiling and development planning

http://www.collegenet.co.uk/tools/download/lifelong%20learning%20teaching%20standards_17_doc.pdf http www e cellence ateway or u node 1

10

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 

Job match and secure sustainable employment for young disabled people Deliver in-work support using Training in Systematic Instruction and support career development.

It is recommended that Supported Internship partnerships carry out a skills audit from the outset of developing their programme of study to ensure that staff, which may include Tutors, Learning Support Assistants, and Job Coaches have the skills needed to effectively deliver all aspects of the programme. Staff training may be needed to ensure that staff have the appropriate skills and qualifications. The British Association for Supported Employment (BASE) can advise on training.

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What a course looks like Learner recruitment Unlike Traineeships11, Supported Internships are a programme of further education study based primarily at an employer’s premises and as such, it is not intended young people will be paid as employees. They should be available for young disabled people aged 1624 in further education with a Learning Difficulty Assessment or Education, Health and Care Plan (ECHP)12 who want to move into employment and need extra support to do so. These young disabled people should be those that would best benefit from the place and train or supported employment model of provision. Supported Internship partnerships will need to agree on a set of criteria for successful entry to the programme of study. It is important to remember that these criteria should not be about selecting those young people with the highest levels of attainment, but those young disabled people who would most benefit from this personalised and intensive study programme. Eligibility criteria should include a motivation to move into paid work of at least 16 hours per week. It should also include whether they want to explore work within the sectors provided in the Supported Internship partnership. All partners should be involved in the recruitment process. How young disabled people are judged against the eligibility criteria will need to be agreed across the Supported Internship partnership. Application forms and activities/interviews will need to be planned for any selection exercise. Adequate time should be allowed for effective recruitment onto the programme. Those that have piloted different approaches to Supported Internships have found information sessions for young disabled people and their families helpful prior to the recruitment process starting. The time needed for any further checks from the employers will also need to be factored in.

Work placements or rotations Supported Internships should last for a substantive amount of time. The expectation is that this would be a minimum of six months, but the exact time required would be up to the Supported Internship partnership to decide based on both learner and employer needs The majority of the youn disabled person’s time should be spent at the employer’s premises Whilst at the employer the youn person will be e pected to comply with real job conditions, such as time keeping, dress code, following instructions, and task management. 11

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/197566/Traineeships__Framework_for_Delivery.pdf 12 For colleges in the SEN Green Paper Pathfinder areas, young people may be referred to them using an Education, Health and Care Plan rather than a Learning Difficulty Assessment.

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The Supported Internship partnership will need to decide how many work placements or rotations will be provided for each Supported Internship. For some young disabled people, they may have had limited previous exposure to work, and more than one placement or rotation may be needed. This will also be dependent upon how many placements or rotations can be provided by the employers within the partnership. Consideration also is needed as to what happens when placements or rotations break down. It is suggested that the Supported Internship partnership agree a policy on how such incidences will be managed. Where appropriate, learning at the employer should use systematic instruction, a method specifically designed to help people with complex learning difficulties learn new tasks. It is important to ensure adequate access to skilled Job Coaches for young disabled people and employers. This resource needs to be considered to ensure that it is timely and responsive to the needs of both learners and employers. As previously stated, the partners involved in delivering the Supported Internship programme will be at different stages of understanding Supported Internships, and the skills and abilities that young disabled people can bring to the labour market. It is likely that work placements or rotations will need to develop over time which allows for young disabled people to continue gaining new skills ensuring stretching learning goals. If a learner fulfils all aspects of the job role within a short period of time, Job Coaches should negotiate with employers as to how the work placements or rotations can be made more challenging, so the young disabled person continues to gain new skills throughout the programme of study.

Underpinning qualifications and accreditation of work-placed learning Learners should undertake some form of associated learning alongside their time at the employer. This should build on any previous learning they have done at school or college and it must progress them, stretching them to achieve new goals. Learning should be useful, fit with the wor they’re doin at the employer, meet the identified s ills ap and be agreed with the employer. As Supported Internships are funded through the new study programme arrangements, they need to be compliant with the requirements of this funding. For some learners, the majority of their learning will be through their work placements or rotations, and accreditation of work-based learning should be considered. For these learners, classroom time can help to complete any portfolios of evidence needed for these qualifications. It is important to be aspirational about what qualifications young people with learning difficulties and/or disabilities can achieve with the right support.

English and Maths Some form of English and maths training at the appropriate level should form part of the course curriculum. For some, this may be progress towards achieving English and maths 17


GCSE A*-C For others it will be about improvin a youn disabled person’s functional skills in areas such as communication and understanding of time and money. For some learners, it will be appropriate for this learning to happen in a classroom. For others, this could be offered as part of their work-based learning.

Support on completion of programme of study It is important to remember that young people will need to have continued support after the course of study, with a formally trained job coach to ensure that they get and maintain paid employment as part of a sustainable career. This will need to be arranged with either the education or supported employment provider, or a provider external to the Supported Internship partnership. How this can potentially be funded is covered in the section on funding. Some young disabled people will move straight into paid employment, and on-going support to them and their employer will need to be considered. For others, they will be seeking paid employment, and how this will be provided will need to be considered. Bright Futures is a 1-year Supported Internship programme. All learning takes place within the local hospital in Margate. Students are taught by East Kent College staff and supported by Kent Supported Employment (KSE) who provide on the job coaching. The study programme is aimed at learners aged 18-24 who have learning disabilities/difficulties and would like to gain work related experience. The programme is an award winning course which supports young people to gain skills within a care environment, with a view to gaining paid employment at the end of the programme. The Bright Futures partnership agreed a timeline of the activity that needs to happen across all partners throughout the year. They also use a traffic light system for the timeline which is reviewed at regular Steering Group meetings. The example timeline can be found in Appendix 1.

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How to prepare learners for Supported Internships Special educational needs co-ordinators (SENCOs), Careers Advisors, Information, Advice and Guidance (IAG) and Further Education practitioners will all have a role to play in ensuring young disabled people and their families have information on Supported Internships, and that young disabled people are prepared to enter onto this programme of study. As previously stated, it has been long recognised that there are low expectations about what young disabled people can achieve in terms of jobs and careers. SENCOs, Careers Advisors, IAG and Further Education practitioners will all have a role in raising expectations on what is both possible and positive, ensuring that school curriculum is preparing young disabled people for successful employment outcomes. Please see appendix 2 for information to help lesson planning to prepare young disabled people for Supported Internships and other study programmes. The detaching of funding from qualifications and the freedom to design study programmes that support the individual progression needs of learners together provide an excellent opportunity to explore new approaches to curriculum design and delivery. Providers are able to design coherent study programmes that provide learners with an appropriately challenging learning experience which supports their progression onto Supported Internships. Study programmes can include:      

Travel training Social skills for the workplace Communication skills Money and time skills Vocational profiling Work tasters and work experience

Study programmes which contain these elements would provide young disabled people with the skills and aptitudes they need to progress to a Supported Internship.

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How to fund Supported Internships Education and training providers that currently deliver provision for 16-19 year olds and young people with Learning Difficulty Assessments up to academic age 25, and hold a contract with the Education Funding Agency (EFA) will be able to deliver Supported Internships within the new study programme arrangements from September 2013. This will be on the basis of funding per student13. It is envisaged that this will include both Element 1 and Element 2 funding. It is recognised that the target group for this study programme is those young disabled people who are identified as having Learning Difficulty Assessment14 and some of these will be identified as having high needs. Therefore, it is expected that Local Authorities will be entering into discussions with institutions offering Supported Internships on additional top-up funding through Element 3 to meet the additional needs of high needs students. There is also the 16-19 Bursary fund which can also be used for travel, meal and equipment costs for young people to participate in Supported Internships.15 Some of the young people who would best benefit from Supported Internships may also be eligible for Health and Social Care services. Dependent upon the assessed needs for Health and Social Care, this funding could also be used to meet specific needs of young disabled people on the study programme. Some young disabled people will need continued support at the end of the programme of study, whether they have moved into paid employment or are still job searching. The funding available locally to individuals will vary according to the availability of services and eligibility criteria for funding. Access to Work funding may be used once a young person is in a paid job or selfemployed, or about to start a job or work trial.16 Access to Work is a grant from DWP which helps pay for practical support so that disabled people can do their jobs. It can pay for support at job interviews and help with additional support costs in paid employment of more than 16 hours per week. There is no set amount for an Access to Work grant, and how much an individual can get depends upon their circumstances. It can pay for things such as: 

Specialist equipment



Adaptations to equipment

13

Further information is available at: http://www.education.gov.uk/aboutdfe/executiveagencies/efa/a00210682/funding-formula-review 14 For colleges in the SEN Green Paper Pathfinder areas, young people may be referred to them using an Education, Health and Care Plan rather than a Learning Difficulty Assessment. 15 http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/1/16-19%20bursary%20fund%20%20yourquestions%20answered%202013%2014%20final.PDF 16 https://www.gov.uk/access-to-work/overview

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A support worker or job coach

Communication support

Fares to work if someone is unable to use public transport

Disability awareness training for employers.

Work Choice is a DWP-funded programme which supports disabled people with the most significant barriers in getting and keeping a job. For some young disabled people who enter paid employment, Access to Work may not be able to meet the full cost of their support needs, and Work Choice could be a possibility. For some young disabled people who are still job searching when they finish their Supported Internship, Work Choice may be the most appropriate programme for them to progress to. Referral routes onto the programme vary, and Disability Employment Advisers at local Jobcentre Plus should be able to provide this. Some Local Authorities commission supported employment through Health and Social Care. Eligibility for these services varies, and Local Authorities should be able to provide this information. In addition, some Local Authorities provide Direct Payments for employment support for those eligible for Health and Social Care. These routes may be available and most appropriate for some young people who meet eligibility thresholds. There are also other supported employment services which are funded through either European Social Funding or charitable funding. This may be the most appropriate route for some young people depending upon local availability. Employers are also another source of potential funding. They can provide support inkind by providing a classroom or time from Human Resources staff in identifying work placements or rotations. They may also choose to train some of their staff to provide Job Coaches. They may also choose to provide a level of funding into the partnership. The Supported Internship pilot in Blackpool is a partnership between Blackpool and Fylde College, Progress and Blackpool Council, which was outside of the pilots funded through the Department for Education. The partnership looked at the cost of delivery, and pooled resources to pay for the Job Coach and other costs relating to the study programme. Progress used funding raised for them by the Hilton Community Foundation (Blackpool). The College sourced some funding which was matched by Blackpool Council. As their pilot has progressed, they have recognised that the funding formula changes using funding through Element 1, 2 and 3 should be sufficient for them and will provide a sustainable source of funding to rollout the provision from September 2013. Once young people progress into paid employment, they are making applications to use Access to Work to ensure continuity of support by the same Job Coach. 21


Glossary of terms Access to Work is a grant from the Department of Work and Pensions which helps pay for practical support so that disabled people can do their jobs. It can pay for support at job interviews and help with additional support costs in paid employment of more than 16 hours per week. Better-off in work calculations is a calculation that aims to show people whether they will be better off in work than when living on welfare benefits. It will take into accout details of the amount of welfare benefit income they receive, including housing and council tax benefit. It will also take into account the money they can earn in paid work, along with any any welfare benefits or tax credits they can recive when and in work, and shows if they be better off going into paid work. Job analysis is an in-depth way of analysing jobs to ensure an effective job match. A job analysis includes looking at the job summary, core and episodic routines, work demainds, worksite considerations, and workplace culture. Job carving involves creating, modifying or customising a community-based job so it is suitable for a particular work while simultaneously meeting the needs of an employer. Natural supports emphasise the participation of supervisors and co-workers in training and supervising disabled workers. The concept of natural supports highlights the need to understand the worksite culture and what is natural or typical. Skills gap is the comparison of the requirements of a job role as defined by the employer against the skills and abilities of an employee which will need to be bridged by some sort of training. Study programmes do not have a prescribed content. They offer a flexible and personalised programme of study that provide learners with an appropriately challenging learning experience which supports their progression. Systematic instruction is a coaching method specifically designed to help people with complex learning difficulties learn new tasks. Vocational profile is the process of ‘ ettin to now’ the person to identify their aspirations, learning needs, skills, former experiences and job preferences. The profile informs practical job findin and helps to achieve a ood job match which suit individual’s skills and preferences. Work Choice is a programme funded by the Department for Work and Pensions which supports disabled people with the most significant barriers in getting and keeping a job. Working interviews are a reasonable adjustment in the recruitment and selection process where individuals can demonstrate their skills as opposed to talking about them in a formal interview. 22


Further sources for information Associated resources (external links) Preparing for Adulthood http://www.preparingforadulthood.org.uk/ British Association for Supported Employment (BASE) http://base-uk.org/ National Institute for Adult Continuing Education (NIACE) http://www.niace.org.uk/ Association of Colleges (AoC) http://www.aoc.co.uk/ The Association of National Specialist Colleges (Natspec) http://www.natspec.org.uk/ OCN – Eastern Region http://www.ocner.org.uk/ Project SEARCH http://www.projectsearch.us/ Mental Health Individual Placement and Support model http://www.centreformentalhealth.org.uk/employment/ips.aspx Supported Employment (mental health) Fidelity Scale: http://www.centreformentalhealth.org.uk/employment/ips_fidelity.aspx National Occupational Standards http://base-uk.org/knowledge/national-occupational-standards http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/node/61 Business case for employers for a diverse workforce http://www.cipd.co.uk/hr-resources/factsheets/diversity-workplace-overview.aspx Professional standards for tutors and trainers in the lifelong learning sector http://www.collegenet.co.uk/tools/download/lifelong%20learning%20teaching%20standar ds_17_doc.pdf

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Other departmental advice and guidance you may be interested in Support and aspiration: A new approach to special educational needs and disability. Progress and next steps. Department for Education (2012) https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/support-and-aspiration-a-new-approach-tospecial-educational-needs-and-disability-progress-and-next-steps Destination measures http://www.education.gov.uk/childrenandyoungpeople/youngpeople/participation/a002082 18/ks-4-5-dest-meas EFA funding formula http://www.education.gov.uk/aboutdfe/executiveagencies/efa/a00210682/fundingformula-review Bursaries http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/1/16-19%20bursary%20fund%20%20yourquestions%20answered%202013%2014%20final.PDF

Other departmental resources Benefit information https://www.gov.uk/browse/benefits/disability Access to Work https://www.gov.uk/access-to-work/overview Work Choice https://www.gov.uk/work-choice/overview Fulfilling Potential http://odi.dwp.gov.uk/fulfilling-potential/index.php

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Appendix 1 – Bright Futures timeline

Activity Project Boards Operational meetings Recruit mentors Identify and develop rotations Managers/mentor events Second term Identify rotations for 3rd term Agree agenda for open day Flyer for open day Publicity for course and open day Agree application pack Market open day Open day Match interns to 3rd rotations Third term New cohort applications due from open day attendees Decide whether need 2nd open day and plan Final date for applications due New cohort interviews Plan selection day New cohort selection day Offer letters Plan graduation

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Lead role


Graduation Hospital clearance for new cohort ID cards for new cohort Operational Planning Meeting for Yr 3 Arrange inductions for new cohort First term Identify 1st rotations Match interns to 1st rotations Identify 2nd rotations Match interns to 2nd rotations Book dates/venues for open day and graduation

Project / Key Task experiencing significant problems – urgent action required Project / Key Task has potential for significant problems – action required Project / Key Task on target and no significant problems anticipated

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Appendix 2 – information to inform lesson planning This could be used for lessons across 5 – 10 sessions. The career mind maps created can follow young disabled people to continue to support their transition from education to employment. The views of learners about what they will need from study programmes can be used to plan and develop post-16 options. Overview Learners will gain a better understanding of what it means to work, and have a paid job and career, and begin to think about what types of jobs they could do. This will help prepare them for a Supported Internship or other study programme. Learning outcomes 

Understand what it means to work

Understand the different jobs and careers available in the labour market

Create a career mind map, which includes: what having a job and career means to learners; learners’ interests; what they are ood at; what plans they have; and who can help them

Express views about what learners will need from a personalised study programme to help them achieve their career aspirations.

Delivery methods A range of teaching methods should be used which includes co-operative learning, learning through classroom talk, active learning and experiential learning.


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Supported internship guidance