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Wedding Styles | Becoming Abe | Food for Thought

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018

Wedding Issue

P I N E H U R S T

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S O U T H E R N

P I N E S

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A B E R D E E N


the perfect day


the

FAIR BARN TRADITION & EXCELLENCE IN A VENUE LIKE NO OTHER 910.295.0166 • thefairbarn.org

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Features JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2o18

10 Becoming Abe

Local writer Paul Dunn isn’t merely writing history books on Abraham Lincoln. He’s delving into the mind of one of our greatest past presidents.

17 A Moment to Celebrate

Our local wedding photographers share some of their work over the past year.

30 Food for Thought

After the ceremony, is there anything more important than the food? We think not. That’s why we asked a local caterer to share his thoughts on all things edible.

32 Flower Power

Who knew flowers had so many meanings? Well, probably a lot of people, but it’s always good to have a quick reference guide. By the way, poenies (right) represent devotion.

35 Wedding Styles

To each her own, and that’s particularly true when talking styles. We offer a few ideas to get those creative wedding juices flowing.

56 A Look Back

John T. Patrick had a vision, and even though it was named “Patrick’s Folly,” many of us wouldn’t be here today without him.


Knickers F R O M

D A Y

T O

N I G H T

LIVE, LOV E , S PA R K L E . . .

L I N G E R I E S L E E P W E A R L O U N G E W E A R M E N S

W E A R

B R A S B R E A S T

F O R M S

www.knickers-lingerie.com 910-725-2346 Open Tuesday - Friday 11-5:00 Saturday 11-4. Sunday and Monday closed. 165 E. New Hampshire Avenue Southern Pines, NC 28387


Departments

46 10

8

From the Editor

28 In Vino, Veritas 46 Pick of the Pines 52 Life Under Pines 54 The Garden 62 Book Review ON THE COVER

17 64 On the Buckle 66 Healthy Choices 68 Puzzle 70 Golf 74 Calendar 83 Sightings

- Maya Angelou

88 Last Impression

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018

Wedding Issue |

S O U T H E R N

P I N E S

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in life is not merely to survive, “ Mybutmission to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.

Wedding Styles | Becoming Abe | Food for Thought

P I N E H U R S T

70

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2o18

A B E R D E E N

HAPPILY EVER AFTER

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Lucy’s

Bridal & Formal 131 Main Street Commons Vass, NC

For appointments, please call 870.897.0203

c u s t o m - c r e at e d couture gowns


From the Editor

T

he last and only time I’ve been on a horse was during a riding tour in Hawaii. My wife, Heather, and I were on our honeymoon and the tour advertisement lauded a peaceful horse ride through the unique forests of Kauai to a cascading waterfall and, after a nice swim and lunch, an equally tranquil ride back to the ranch at the end of the day. Pure, relaxing bliss. What they failed to mention in that glossy brochure, however, was a horse named Tiger. When we arrived at the ranch, the guides lined us up across a picketed row of horses, and depending on the person’s weight and size, began matching each person with a horse. My very new and very beautiful wife was one of the first picked, and she was matched with a calm, peaceful mare named Koa. As the others in our group were being matched with their horses, I noticed a rather disgruntled, portly looking horse that kept getting passed over by the guides. My internal “uh, oh” alarm did ring but not too loudly. What are the odds, I thought? Well, in fact, really good, because sure enough, Tiger and I were the last to be paired, and let’s just say it was a match made somewhere besides heaven. I should have known something was up when the guide described Tiger with a little too perky “fun” while everyone else’s horse had descriptions like “sweetheart” and “a gentle soul.” Now, I consider myself pretty good with animals—even cats tend to like me, although the feeling is far from mutual—so I was confident I could commune with Tiger even after the pretty snooty snort he gave me as I was climbing on. I figured he’d sense I was a pretty good guy, I’d whisper a few encouraging things in his ear and we’d gallop off into the sunset. It turns out, though, that horses can be as stubborn as mules or a particular teenager that doesn’t want to get up in the morning. When Tiger wanted a little breakfast of fresh grass along the trail, he stopped. When he wanted a second breakfast, he stopped. When he wanted an early morning snack, a mid-morning snack, a late … well, you get the idea. Once we finally did catch up to the rest of the group, Tiger, belly full, decided it was playtime and took it upon himself to try to bite the back end of every other horse we came near. A lot of bucking, panicked riders and unsympathetic glares were pointed my way. Even my new bride pretended she was with another group. I enjoyed the waterfall, but in the back of my mind I knew there was a ride back. When it was time to climb onto our trusty steeds (did the sarcasm seep through there?), Tiger and I were asked politely to ride away from the rest of the pack, shunned like on the tundra to fend for ourselves. I relate this found memory of my honeymoon—a time that is suddenly feeling very far away—for two reasons. First, we’re very happy to add our horse column On the Buckle to the magazine. Our columnist Toby Raymond is “horse people” through and through, and her writing reflects a passion I envy (I’m also confident she could have managed Tiger better than I did). And second, this is our annual wedding issue, which can only bring to mind my own wedding and the start of a very significant chapter in anyone’s life. To all the brides and grooms new and old, congratulations!

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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 PUBLISHER/EDITOR Greg Girard greg@pinehurstlivingmagazine.com PUBLISHER/CREATIVE DIRECTOR Amanda Jakl amanda@pinehurstlivingmagazine.com ADVERTISING SALES Vince Girard vince@pinehurstlivingmagazine.com GRAPHIC DESIGN Steven Jordan, Tim Myers, Kira Schoenfelder COPY EDITOR Rachel Dorrell OUR GIRL FRIDAY Iris Voelker iris@pinehurstlivingmagazine.com INTERN Haley Ledford CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Ellen Cooper, Robert Gable, Giff Fisher, Sundi McLaughlin, Dolores Muller, Robert Nason, Sassy Pellizzari, Toby Raymond, Helen Ross, Jean Barron Walker PHOTOGRAPHY Jennifer B. Photography, Kat Cloutier Photography, Amanda Jakl, McKenzie Photography, Moore County Historical Association, Pinehurst Photography, Mollie Tobias Photography, Tufts Archives For advertising or subscription inquiries call 910.420.0185 © Copyright 2018. Pinehurst Living is published six times annually by Sand & Pine LLC. Any reproduction in part or in whole of any part of this publication is prohibited without the express written consent of the publisher. Mailing address: PO Box 5202 Pinehurst, NC 28374 Phone 910.420.0185 www.PinehurstLivingMagazine.com Pinehurst Living will not knowingly accept any real estate advertising in violation of U.S. equal opportunity law.


star

STRUCK Discover celestial additions to the PATH OF SYMBOLS Collection.

AVA I L A B L E AT

F RA M E R’S C O T TAG E 1 6 2 N W B R O A D S T R E E T, S O U T H E R N P I N E S , N C PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM 9


Becoming

Abe By Ellen Cooper Photography by Kat CLoutier

I

met author Paul R. Dunn on a cold, snowy Saturday afternoon. Two people from two totally different worlds sitting down together to have a cup of hot coffee and discuss the one thing that brought us together—writing. Within the first few minutes with Dunn, I was mesmerized, and found that our worlds weren’t so different after all. Laughing over my reaction to the snow—me, a true North Carolinian, thinking we needed to head home (because there’s a blizzard alert!) and him, a true New Yorker, saying it was nothing to worry about (which, in fact it was not), we began to get to know one another. Originally from New York, Dunn began his writing career working at a family ad agency during the day while in school full time at St. John’s University in the evenings. One of his most memorable accounts? Radio City Music Hall, where Dunn not only created ads, but was given the opportunity to work with major movie studios. Dunn then transitioned to the publishing world as the food marketing expert for Good Housekeeping Magazine, a job that introduced him to the game of golf. Throughout his life, Dunn continued to write, mostly political columns, and even entered the world of local politics while living in New Jersey. And then, 20 years after first being introduced to Pinehurst, Dunn and his family moved to the Village—a decision he says was one of the best in his life. We met on this day to discuss the two books he has written: Great Donald Ross Golf Courses Everyone Can Play and The Secret War Diaries of Abraham Lincoln. I became curious. How did one man write two books about two topics that have nothing to do with one another? But, I came to find out that Dunn is an incredibly interesting man with varied tastes. Without him having to tell me, it became obvious; Dunn loves his family, loves the game of golf and loves history. Abraham Lincoln was thought to have said, “Whatever you are, be a good one.” Here’s what I learned about Dunn, he is a good (major emphasis on good) storyteller, and a good one to tell the stories of Lincoln.

EC— Donald Ross to Abraham Lincoln ... what caused the switch? PD—I am a history buff and have been interested in Lincoln for a long time. I was

finishing up Great Donald Ross Golf Courses Everyone Can Play and thought what’s next? I didn’t want to write about golf—play it yes—but no more writing about it. I used to give talks about Lincoln. The way he interacted with women, how he was always willing to represent and stand up for women at that period of time resonated with me. He had a warm place in his heart for many. So I began to think, maybe I should write about Lincoln. But, I didn’t want to talk about what everyone else already knew about him—not the women, not his father, not even his presidency necessarily. There are more than 19,000 books about him. So, what could I write that others hadn’t already? How could I bring him to life? And then it clicked.

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EC—What was that? PD—I already knew much about Lincoln from previous studies. I have

read many stories about him, and we all know what he accomplished as president, and we all know how he died. But what I wanted to do was to get into his life, to assess his life. I began to read books that chronicled his daily life. And when I say daily life, I mean everything about his day-to-day activities from birth to death. After reading, I felt like I knew him. And that’s when I decided I would try to get into his head, become him so to speak, with his diary entries. With that, volume one of The Secret War Diaries of Abraham Lincoln was born. Volume one covers 1860 and 1861—from when he was elected to the end of his first year as president. Half of the book is pure fiction—it is what I think Lincoln would have written in his personal diary/journal each day based on events of that day. The other half is pure fact—the historical accounts of his life, which are referred to as “Author’s Notes.” Lincoln was an odd man, he was a poet, and he often wrote poems about dreams. He was an incredibly intelligent man as well, and was self-taught. But most of all, he was a melancholy president. His diaries—his dreams—reflect his moods.

EC—Besides your natural interest in Lincoln, why him? Why not another president?

PD—If you study Abraham Lincoln, and are willing to put other

presidents, especially Washington, aside, then you see what an outstanding president he was on so many levels. He took on unbelievable challenges with his job. The stories tell of his kindness, his patience and his tremendous wisdom. He was an incredibly hard worker, having to learn through trial and error during his time in office. Lincoln was also loyal to a fault, a very human president.

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EC—You sound like you know him, as if he’s a family member of yours, or a close friend. PD—This was a unique experience, and one that I was happy to write about. Anyone can

write history, but this was different than writing history. This was the opportunity to tell a story and to bring this very well known man to life. However, while we all know who he is, no one knows what he was thinking, what he felt, what he actually went through every day, and I enjoyed telling that part of him. You can only write that if you feel you know someone, and oddly enough, I feel like I do—probably better than anyone I have known in my life.

EC—So what is next? We all want to know what happened after his first year in office. PD—(chuckles) I am currently writing volume two, and am halfway through, but I have

two more to get started on. While I feel I already know him so well, I continue to learn more and more about him as time goes on. I am especially learning that he never took a day off—he always worked! Which means when he works, I work, because I have to write the diary for that day. However, even though there is no vacation, this is an extremely rewarding, fun and enlightening experience. You know, I love history, and the command of history is important for the future. I feel that I am making a contribution to history by telling history. PL

Author Paul R. Dunn is a historian living in Pinehurst. He is writing a four-volume diary, which recounts Abraham Lincoln's thoughts during the Civil War. It also includes Lincoln's recurring dreams. When not writing political columns or “becoming Abe,” Dunn can be found on the golf course. Both “The Secret War Diaries of Abraham Lincoln” and “Great Donald Ross Golf Courses Everyone Can Play” can be found locally at The Country Bookshop in downtown Southern Pines, or online on Amazon.


village

ARBORETUM

Rehearsal Dinners • Wedding Ceremonies & Receptions 910.295.1900 • arboretum@vopnc.org • vopnc.org

PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM 15


& FILLY & COLT

Photography courtesy of Heather Gunter Photography

Filly Colt’s &

AT LITTLE RIVER GOLF & RESORT

WEDDINGS • REHEARSAL DINNERS • BANQUET FACILITY • RECEPTIONS 500 LITTLE RIVER FARM BOULEVARD / CARTHAGE, NC 28327 / 910.692.4411 / FILLYANDCOLTS.COM

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BETH & CURTIS

MALOTT page 18

LOCAL WEDDINGS 2017

ALLIE & CHRIS

GODFREY page 20

STEPHANIE & DANIEL

MCAULEY page 22

KATE & BRANDON

MCDONALD page 24

ALECA

BLAISDELLBLACK & JOSEPH

STAMEY

page 26

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BETH & CURTIS MALOTT

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September 28

Ceremony: Lake Auman, West End Reception: Southern Prime Steakhouse Dress: Blush Bridal in Fayetteville Hair: Lavish in Southern Pines Makeup: Lavish in Southern Pines Rentals: Ward Productions Photography: Pinehurst Photography

PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM 19


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ALLIE & CHRIS GODFREY

November 11

Reception: VFW Post 5631 Florist: Hollyfield Design Tux: Michael Kors Hair: Allison Banks-Garcia, Stylist Cake: Designer Cakes by Brigitte Catering: Fred Styeres Planner: Tracy Armstrong Rentals: Capital Events Stationery: Whistle Stop Press Photography: Kat Cloutier Photography

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The Village Chapel The Village Chapel is an interdenominational church welcoming and embracing all Christians.

Sunday Worship Services 8:15 am - Communion Service 9:30 am - Family Service 11:00 am - Traditional Service

Sunday Radio Broadcasts WIOZ 550 AM - 8:00am WLHC 103.1 FM - 8:30 am

You’re Welcome Here! 10 Azalea Road • Pinehurst, NC tvcpinehurst.com • 910.295.6003 info@tvcpinehurst.com

Terry Anne Sams, DMD 200 Westgate Drive, Suite C • West End, NC 27376

910.687.4423

SandhillsWeekendDental.com Appointments available Wednesdays through Saturdays

PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM 21


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STEPHANIE & DANIEL MCAULEY

October 21

Planner: A Lovely Affair Weddings and Events Venue: 305 Trackside Flowers: Specialties Florals and Events Hair and Makeup: Brittany Campbell of Sunshine Artistry Catering: 39 West Catering DJ: All Around Raleigh DJ Cake: C Cups Cakery Harpist: Winifred Garrett Rentals: Ward Productions Photography: Jennifer B Photography

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Smiles & Happy Tears Are Our Style!

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KATE & BRANDON MCDONALD

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October 14

Venue/Reception: McDonald Artisan Farm Dress: New York Bride and Groom Hair/makeup: Alexis Nance Cake: Indigo Earth Events Catering: Thyme and Place Café Flowers: Folklore Flora Planner: Folie a Deux Events Rentals: Indigo Earth Events Ring: Kevin’s Creations DJ: DJ John Jay Photography: Pinehurst Photography

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ALECA BLAISDELL-BLACK & JOSEPH STAMEY July 1

Ceremony: Emmanuel Episcopal Churuch Reception: Pine Needles Country Club Dress: Oleg Cassini of David’s Bridal Hair/Makeup: Beautopia of Southern Pines Catering: Pine Needles Country Club Stationery: Wedding Paper Divas Planner: Wedding Day Rescue Entertainment: Cool Receptions Rings: Stewart Kupert Jewelers; Two Birch Photography: Jennifer B. Photography

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info@katcloutierphotography.com (910) 634-0053

Maggie’s Farm FLORAL AND EVENT DESIGN

by appointment only maggiesfarm4flowers.com maggiesfarm4flowers@gmail.com 910.295.1784

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PL

In Vino, Veritas

Is it Dry in Here?

By Sassy Pellizzari

O

h, January: You are the rising sun on a new day, a new page in our story, the promise of turning over a new leaf. You are a month that kicks off with a bang, running full force with earnest purpose, in which we vow sincerity and steadfastness in our resolve. We take this first day of the civil year to look at our indulgences in retrospect, to make changes and to promise a new start. We declare fortitude against our weaknesses from the previous year, and we are staunch and intent as the month begins. Ah, January: a month that undoubtedly ends in broken promises. So let’s take this year and learn from the past. Let’s not shoot for the moon. And admit it, you are not really going to give up your wine this month, and I’m here to tell you not to even try. Let’s just choose moderation and wines that are naturally produced, with no added sugar. I’m not talking about wines with some savvy marketing strategy that claim low sugar in order to jump on the healthy bandwagon most of the Western world seems to be traveling on these days. I’m talking about bubbles, the process in which Champagne and sparkling wines are

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produced and have been for decades. Here’s how it works … after all the harvesting, the grape selection, the fermentation and the aging, immediately before the bubbly is bottled, a tiny amount of “dosage” or sweet wine is added. Prior to dosage, all the sugar in the wine has been converted to alcohol, so the sparkling wine is extremely dry. And how much dosage is added obviously determines how sweet the champagne will be. Some producers choose not to add any dosage or sugar to the final product, and that is known as pas dosé or “dosage zero.” Determining dryness from a bottle’s label can seem deceiving. “Extra dry,” for example, sounds like it would be really dry, right? In actuality, it’s middle of the road on the dryness scale. On the next page is the official definition of the categories that you’ll find on the label, as described by the Comité Champagne, which is the official Champagne wine committee. Make healthy choices, do everything in moderation (except when you choose pas dosé), and let’s ring in 2018 with all the fun of the bubbles and none of the guilt. PL


Restaurant

Champagne Categories

Authentic Thai Cuisine

(courtesy of Comité Champagne) Pas dosé, Dosage Zero or Brut Nature:

contains zero dosage and 0-3 grams of sugar per liter (extremely dry)

Extra brut:

0-6 grams of sugar per liter (very dry)

Brut:

less than 12 grams of sugar per liter (dry)

Extra Dry:

12-17 grams of sugar per liter (medium dry)

Sec:

17-32 grams of sugar per liter (medium sweet)

The Oldest Thai Restaurant in Town --�-

-

Yf;(_,jw, G4�uiwy-

TUESDAY-fRJDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY

11:00am - '2:30pm Closed for Lunch 11:30am - '2:30pm

TUESDAY-SUNDAY SATURDAY

5:00pm - 9:30pm 4:00pm - 9:30pm

--P/J�- --

U.S. 1 South {£] 15-501 1404 Sandhills .Blvd. Aberdeen, NC 28315 www.thaiorchidnc.com

(910) 944-9299

Demi sec:

32-60 grams of sugar per liter (sweet)

Doux:

over 50 grams of sugar per liter (very sweet)

Sarah and her whippet Aja

Sassy Pellizzari lived in Italy for more than 13 years, where she developed a passion and knowledge of Italian wines. She and her husband, Paolo, are the owners of Bacco Selections, a Pinehurst-based company specializing in fine wine importing and distributing.

Cared for Canine & Cat offers only the highest quality food and treats for the ones you love.

1150 US 1 South, Southern Pines 910-693-7875 • caredforcanine.com

Follow us on Facebook to see our specials.

PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM 29


Food for

Thought By Giff Fisher, owner, White Rabbit Catering since 1977


Choosing a caterer

can be a daunting task, but a little advanced planning and thought can make your selection a bit easier. Checking references is always a good idea, but don’t forget to ask friends and others who use caterers on a regular basis. Remember too, that emotions are as important as economics, so listen to your gut. If you are getting a bad vibe, move on. You want to feel confident enough about your caterer so that there are no worries on your wedding day. We suggest listing the top 10 things you wish to see at your reception and allocate your budget accordingly. Is it more important that you have 10 different appetizers or three entrée choices? Are you inviting mostly vegans or is a nice steak a requirement for the bride’s father? Then be up front with your caterer about your priorities, so they can plan a menu to suit your budget. Also make sure to check with the venue for the reception, as that can often influence the menu and budget allocation. Some facilities have tables, chairs, linen, china and a full kitchen, where others are just a shell. When the caterer must bring in everything to make the event happen, preparation costs are much higher and will increase their fee. Rules of the venue can dictate your options as well. Find out what your venue provides and ask if your caterer is familiar with the facility you have chosen. Other questions to discuss: buffet versus plated, china versus disposables, alcohol or soft drinks. If serving alcohol, be sure to check legal and licensing requirements. And don’t forget insurance, which may be required. Your caterer should be informed in these areas so you will be covered should the need arise. As for the menu, take some time to think about what you want—perhaps your favorite entrée—and build from there. We usually build a menu from the main course and pair the hors d’oeuvres and sides to complement it. We’ve had some couples that have a “don’t want” list because they have seen it at other weddings and want theirs to be different. If you give your caterer some direction, they should be able to fill in the blanks to complete the menu in a style that you desire. Sometimes a tasting can be a good idea, not only for taste but also how the food will be presented. Ask your caterer if this is possible, and the cost. Sometimes it’s a good idea to see the set up of another event that the caterer is doing before your reception to gain confidence in their ability. Ask if that is a possibility. Having these questions in mind before you meet your caterer should be a big help. And remember, once you’ve selected a caterer, have fun! Enjoy the weeks before your wedding. Don’t spend countless hours worrying about details that may never come up. Let your caterer and their staff do the heavy lifting. That’s what you’re paying them for. Take full advantage of their knowledge and experience. Enjoy this next chapter in life and good luck! PL

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d l u o c t a h W

your bouquet say? Anemone

Protea

anticipation

change, transformation and courage

Ranunculus

radiant charm and attractiveness 32 PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM

Craspedia good health

Chrysanthemum fidelity, joy and long life


Rosemary

loyalty and fidelity

Peony devotion

Thyme

Sage

courage and bravery

wisdom and long life

A Rose by any other name

Roses are one of the most popular wedding flowers, and for good reason. They’re hardy, relatively affordable and come in almost every color imaginable, not to mention the different varieties within the species. If you’re looking at roses, consider the meaning of colors beyond red for your special day.

Red – passion, respect and courage Pale Pink – grace, admiration and elegance Deep Pink – gratitude, refinement and appreciation Orange – fascination, passion, desire and pride Coral – desire and fascination Peach – modesty and sweetness Yellow – joy, happiness, caring and true friendship White – innocence, purity and loyalty Burgundy – undying love and unconscious beauty Lavender – love at first sight and enchantment PL PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM 33


A small town venue

with an urban feel.

Photos courtesy of Jennifer B. Photography and Hillary Jaworski Photography

305 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines | 910.691.2739

305trackside.com


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D

esigning your perfect wedding is no small feat, but one thing that may help is designing your special day around a theme. Theme, in this instance, doesn’t have to mean campy or gimmicky. It simply means having a consistent thread throughout your event. To help spark your creative spirit, we put together three styled wedding shoots to show you that no matter what type of couple you are, you can have your perfect wedding here in the Sandhills. Personal style is yours and yours alone, so embrace the entire theme or take away a favorite detail or two to weave into your own special day.

STYLES ouveau N Romance For the traditional bride that wants a dash of elegance, we designed an Art Nouveauinspired reception.

American Rockabilly For the fun loving, patriotic couple, we fashioned an allAmerican shindig, complete with a convertible send off.

Bohemian Rhapsody And finally, for the laidback, earthy couple, we created a Bohemian-inspired wedding, with a natureinspired ceremony site and fun teepee photo booth.

Photography by MOLLIE TOBIAS PHOTOGRAPHY PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM 35


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ouveau N Romance

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ouveau N Romance

Florals: Botanicals Tableware and glassware: Richmond Rentals and Sandhills Woman’s Exchange Event Design: Patti Ranck of Indigo Earth Events Stationery: The Desktop Diva Dress: Lucy’s Bridal & Formal Tuxedo: Harley’s Tuxedo and Gifts Makeup: Brittany Page of Forever Young Med Spa Hair: Laura Rakvin-Almony of Forever Young Med Spa Venue: 305 Trackside Jewelry: The Jewelsmithe Bride: Jessica Campbell Groom: Tomas Stevens

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American Rockabilly

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American Rockabilly

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Florals: Jack Hadden Floral and Event Cake and event design: Patti Ranck of Indigo Earth Events Stationery: The Desktop Diva Whiskey bar: The Leadmine Dress and veil: Lucy’s Bridal & Formal Suit: Harley’s Tuxedo and Gifts Makeup: Caleb Marion of Lavish Salon Hair: Haven McRae of Lavish Salon Bride: Jessica Campbell Groom: Tomas Stevens Venue: The Fair Barn Car: Cav and Chuck Peterson

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Bohemian Rhapsody

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Bohemian Rhapsody

Florals: Margaret Smith of Maggie’s Farm Cake, Event Design: Patti Ranck of Indigo Earth Events Stationery: The Desktop Diva Dress: Lucy’s Bridal & Formal Makeup: Brittany Page of Forever Young Med Spa Hair: Laura Rakvin-Almony of Forever Young Med Spa Venue: McDonald Artisan Farm Bride: Jessica Campbell Groom: Tomas Stevens

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WEDDING DIRECTORY Accommodations Hampton Inn & Suites Homewood Suites The Magnolia Inn Springhill Suites

Health and Beauty The Cabana A Full Circle Massage Therapy Forever Young Med Spa Massage Envy - massageenvy.com

Attire Brides, Etc. - bridesetcnc.com Harley’s Tuxedos and Gifts Lucy’s Bridal and Formal - lucysbridal.org Knickers - knickers-lingerie.com

Jewelry Framer’s Cottage Gemma Gallery Hawkins & Hawkins Heavenly Pines Jewelry Jewels of Pinehurst The Jewelsmithe - jewelsmithe.com Paul Harkness Jewelry Design

Beer and Wine Bacco Selections Triangle Wine Company Southern Pines Brewing Company Cakes Duck Donuts The Bakehouse G. Charles Bakery Sweet Fi’s Catering and Dining Elliott’s Catering Co. The Leadmine Military Moms Food Truck - militarymomstruck.com Southern Prime Thyme and Place Café White Rabbit Catering - whiterabbitcateringnc.com Cruise and Honeymoon Be Our Guest Travel Company Dance Instruction Carolina DanceWorks Florists Botanicals - botanicalsweb.com Jack Hadden Florals and Events - aldenafrye.com Maggie’s Farm Flowers and Events maggiesfarm4flowers.com Second Act Floral & Events Specialties Events & Florals Hair and Makeup The Village Fox

Photographers/Videographers Jennifer B Photography - jenniferbphotographync.com Pinehurst Photography - pinehurstphotography.com Kat Cloutier Photography - katcloutierphotography.com Mollie Tobias Photography - mollietobiasphotography.com Rentals Gracefully Rustic Indigo Earth Events Richmond Rentals - richmondrentalsandsales.com Ward Productions Stationery The Desktop Diva - thedesktopdiva.com Transportation Kirk Tours - kirktours.com Red Tie Transit - redtietransit.com You2RDU Venues 305 Trackside - 305trackside.com The Fair Barn - thefairbarn.org Given Outpost - giventufts.org McDonald Artisan Farm -mcdonaldartisanfarm.com Pinehurst Resort and Country Club Rubicon Farm Village of Pinehurst Arboretum - vopnc.org Wedding Planners A Lovely Affair - alovelyaffairweddings.com Indigo Earth Events Vision Events

*Italicized businesses are contributors to our wedding issue. Advertisers have been highlighted in pink. For those businesses without a website, an icon indicates they can be found on Facebook.

PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM 45


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of

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018

PICK

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WEDDING GIFTS

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PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM 47


PICK

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THE PINES

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Style

EVE AVERY

LES , U R T U O B A IS NOT IT’S ABOUT

G N I K A E BR HE RULES. T

ES RN PIN E H T U / SO STREET Saturday 11-4 D A O // BR ay 10 -5 131 NE day-Frid Mon

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Life Under Pines

A Little Friendly Competition By Sundi McLaughlin

E

very February I am always reminded of love, friendship and gratitude. I know Valentine’s Day isn't for everybody. Some think it is a commercially driven nightmare. I, on the other hand, quite like putting aside one day a year to give a little token or note to those I love. And it brings back fond schoolgirl memories. I loved the class project in elementary school of decorating a personalized shoebox/mailbox for Valentine’s Day and filling out one of those little Disney or Looney Tunes valentine’s kits from the grocery store for every kid in my class, and hoping to get a few back from fellow classmates. It was one of my favorite days of the year. So, this year, I wanted to send out my own sort of grown-up version of a school valentine via this column, and send some love to all of the strong women in our community who have unknowingly mentored me on how to be competitive and generous at the same time. Here is what I adore and admire about so many of our local women. They are 100 percent-supportive and giving toward each other. Our community has so many hardworking women who are smallbusiness owners, which is quite remarkable with the national average of small business owners being 4 to 1 in favor of the male population.

In our area, it seems the opposite is true—Anthony at the Ice Cream Parlor is about the last man standing in downtown Southern Pines! With such a small town and where everyone is fighting for the same clientele, it’s naturally a competitive and at times stressful pursuit. So even with the support of so many, it’s easy to see how it can get a little cutthroat. In fact, I have experienced that very thing …. When I opened my shop eight years ago, I got an earful from a fellow female business owner (no longer in business) who stopped by the shop for a little inspection. She warned me I better not undercut her prices and I better not be some “bored housewife with too much money and not enough sense!” It was a warning, to be sure, and not really the welcome to the small-business community I was expecting from such a charming downtown. That is why all these years later, when I see this new group of women who are strong-minded, competitive business owners, as well as genuinely supportive of one another, I am left in awe. To be honest, and a little embarrassed to admit, it doesn't come naturally for me. I am highly and unattractively competitive. Hence the reason I won’t even attend a game night with friends (think Lord of the Rings where Uncle Bilbo grabs the ring and turns into a hideous monster). But I am learning and growing to be

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better. In a culture where women are often pit against each other for media fodder and young girls are often taught that other girls are competition rather than their friends, it’s remarkable to see these local women blaze a different path. Today, I see a divergent culture arising of women who still remain competitive and fierce but who also help contribute to one another’s success. It has been a great experience for me to be able to look around at my competitors and learn how to compete in the same market as them and feel happy for their success, even if that comes at a cost. I think maybe this progressive attitude arrives with maturity, but more importantly is taught by example. How different would my experience have been eight years ago when I opened my shop, had that same sage businesswoman walked in to say, “Welcome! I wish you much success. Please be respectful of what I sell, and I will do the same for you. Good luck.” It would’ve changed everything. It’s the boundary setting and business strength mixed with generosity and kindness that is the winning combination, even if it’s admittedly sometimes difficult to achieve. When I think of all the strong women in this town who support and encourage each other, dozens of beautiful faces come to mind, and it’s hard to name just one or two. Here are just a few strong women


who I think are leading by example with the winning combination listed above, and who I have learned so much from in this town: Jeannie - Mind Your Body Pilates Virginia - Hot Asana Jessica - Sunrise Theater Sarah and Toni Anne - Southern Pines Crossfit Ashley - Ashten’s Mary Ann - Chef Warren’s Lisa - Swank Janelle - C Cup Cupcakery Kimberly - Country Book Shop Patrica - Patricia’s Angela - Southern Whey Cameron - R Riveter Rachel - Rachel Garrison Photography Katie and Abi - Legacy Magazine Amanda (our very own) - Pinehurst Living and Sand & Pine Magazine The list could go on and on regarding the kind-hearted women in Southern Pines (and there are plenty more in Pinehurst and Aberdeen), but these are just a few of the female entrepreneurs I have personally come across. So, this February, when I start thinking of who might be my Valentine and who I might want to send some love and kindness, I think of this strong network of women who put each other first. These beautiful ladies who encourage one another to be there best while they become theirs. I have witnessed an evolution of how women treat one another and the future looks bright—right here Under the Pines. PL

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Sundi McLaughlin is a proud military wife and small business owner. She happily divides her time between her shop, Mockingbird on Broad, and her volunteer work on Fort Bragg and the Sunrise Theater. She also can be seen walking her enormous black lab named Dodge.

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The Garden


The

Gardenia BY DOLORES MULLER

Surrounded by dark green waxy leaves, the exquisite gardenia exudes a sultry, heav y scent. It was this intoxicating

fragrance that captivated an English sea captain traveling through South Africa in 1754, prompting him to bring home one of the native plants as a souvenir. The gardenia plant is in the coffee family and native to the tropical and subtropical regions of Africa, Asia, Madagascar and Pacific Islands. It was customary for upper-class men from New York City to wear a gardenia in their buttonhole during the Gilded Age. Gardenias are lovely tucked into a wedding bouquet or floating in a low bowl as a centerpiece, and a single gardenia makes a wonderful scented corsage or hair accessory. During the ’50s and ’60s, it was the go-to flower for corsages on special occasions. I can remember my dad always gave my mom a gardenia corsage on Mother’s Day. But remember to be gentle; the delicate, creamy ivory petals can bruise easily and turn brown where touched. Fall or spring is the most suitable time for planting a gardenia bush. When grown outdoors, gardenias generally prefer to be kept in partial shade. They also prefer moist yet well-drained acidic soil with plenty of organic matter. Gardenias are cold-sensitive and may die during severe winters, so they are typically grown where the winter weather is reasonably tolerable, like our area. Large 3- to 4-inch blossoms, as well as miniature varieties, are available. The gardenia plant can also be successfully grown in containers indoors as houseplants. When growing indoors, keep in mind that it requires bright light and high humidity. Check out the local garden center to see the many garden varieties available. PL


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A Look Back

John T. Patrick: Entrepreneur of the North Carolina Sandhills by Jean Barron Walker / Images Courtesy of Moore County Historical Association

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P

assengers stepped onto a dry goods box as they alighted from the Raleigh and Augusta train in the fall of 1884 to view the fledgling town of Southern Pines. Denuded land and roaming razorback hogs welcomed the adventuresome. The Moore County Sandhills was known then as The Pine Barrens, an area dismissed by John D. Cameron, a newspaperman and clerk of the North Carolina House of Representatives, as “a place where a pea vine will not grow and a grape vine cannot sprout.” Near the tracks was the Patrick Hotel, the meager hostelry built by John T. Patrick, founder of the new town. The green pine exterior of the building was coated with lime and molasses—a mixture intended to seal the raw wood—and old newspapers covered the walls of the five guest rooms. John Tyrant Patrick was a Southern gentleman, a North Carolinian born in Wadesboro in 1852. Although he had little formal education, Patrick was fortunate to find a job in a printing office, where he learned all the aspects of newspaper production. His knowledge of printing became an important asset to his career as a founder and developer of towns.

North Carolina Governor Zebulon Vance appointed Patrick commissioner of immigration in 1883. Patrick’s mission was to attract newcomers to live in the sparsely populated state. It was a low-paying job with little, if any, chance of success. He was given an office in the agricultural building and was said to have slept and ate in it to save his paltry salary. Patrick then joined the Raleigh and Augusta Railroad as an “industrial agent.” He traveled the state and narrowed his interest to the Moore County Sandhills as an area for potential development. His plan was called “Patrick’s Folly,” since locals said that the land, void of tall pines, was good “only to hold the world together.” But Patrick envisioned a winter resort in the Sandhills, where folks could escape cold Northern winters and embrace the temperate climate and healthy air of the region. As train tracks were laid south of Raleigh toward Hamlet in the mid-1870s, tar, pitch and turpentine stations sprang up at 10-mile intervals. But ideas in Patrick’s mind were beyond this type of settlement. He wanted to establish new towns as planned

PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM 57


Above: Patrick first named the town Vineland but shortly after changed it to Southern Pines. Far right, top to bottom: The Patrick Hotel on Broad St. and New Hampshire Ave, the town’s first hotel/boarding house built in 1885/1886; Guests at the Jefferson Inn; and view of Broad Street and West Pennsylvania Avenue, looking west.

communities. The railroad agreed to his idea but gave him no money other than a tiny commission on the profits they would make from business he generated. Patrick was brimming with ideas for settling his first new town. Riding the train from Raleigh down to the Sandhills, he got off at Manly, which was a distribution point for lumber products. Boarding houses and numerous saloons did a good business serving rugged lumbermen. At Manly, he met Dr. George Sadelson, a physician from Lockport, New York, who had come to the Sandhills to recover from tuberculosis in the healing atmosphere of the pines. Sadelson gave Patrick a statement of support regarding his improved, healthy life. Patrick then asked state geologist Washington Kerr to visit the area. Kerr said he was impressed with the climate, clean water and “pine scented ozone.” He also gave Patrick a letter praising the Sandhills and gave permission for his words to be published. With these endorsements from a medical doctor and a notable scientist, Patrick realized he could put both men’s acclamations into printed material to advertise his new town. Patrick had a survey made of Shaw’s Ridge, south of Manly. At an elevation of 600 feet, it was the highest point along the route of the railroad. In March 1884, Patrick used his own funds to purchase 675 acres for $1,265—less than $2 an acre—and set about establishing the town. At first, Patrick named the town Vineland, but soon renamed it Southern Pines. He had the town site laid out in 400-foot square

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blocks, with 80-foot-wide streets cleverly given the names of the New England and Midwestern states from which he hoped to attract settlers: Connecticut, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Michigan, Delaware, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Vermont and Maine. In his plan, Broad Street flanked the railroad tracks as it does today. The new site included a 50-acre park on Bennett Street, with a lake and a mineral spring. Patrick had modest funds but a strong mindset. To entice settlers to the area, he persuaded editors of New England newspapers to carry his advertisements by paying them with deeds to lots in his new town. “In our opinion,” said the editor of the Index of Lisbon, New Hampshire, after visiting Southern Pines, “this section will soon eclipse Florida as a health and winter resort.” He sent brochures to Northern physicians, giving them the opportunity to have a free lot in exchange for extolling the health benefits of the climate and pine-scented air in the Sandhills, which were thought to help cure the respiratory ailment tuberculosis, known as the “White Plague,” that was devastating crowded cities of the North. Financed by the railroad, Patrick toured the Northeastern states in a train car, showcasing exhibits of the good life in the Sandhills. Patrick was not an orator, but spoke honestly at New England town meetings on the merits of his North Carolina location, and he provided a “negro minstrel show” to entertain prospective land buyers.


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And settlers came to live in Patrick’s town! Soon there was a post office, a general store, a drug store, a oneroom 12-foot-by-16-foot schoolhouse, a church where all denominations worshipped by turns, a railroad depot, a sawmill and a newspaper. And there was Pad Kelly’s meat market, which replaced local schooner wagons selling chickens, eggs and meat. Kelly bought meat three times a week. Beef, pork and lamb could be had—any part, for 10 cents a pound. In 1887, with a population of 50, Southern Pines was incorporated by an act of the State Assembly. Charles W. Shaw, who had sold Patrick some of the land for the town, was the first mayor. Townspeople called him “Squire,” as he was also a justice of the peace. Shaw had five town commissioners, all Yankee newcomers from the North. In March 1885, Patrick, never resting, began planning for another town on the rail line seven miles south of Southern Pines. He paid $1,000 for 772 acres, including a millpond, and he named the place Patrick Plantation. He later changed the name to Pinebluff, made it his home for 20 years, and tried to develop it as a winter resort. Patrick designed the layout of this new town on a rectangular grid of streets and blocks, naming the east-west avenues Chicago, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New England and Boston, because these were the areas from which he hoped to attract settlers. Streets were named for fruits, like Currant,

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Pear and Grape; while others were named for nuts: Pecan, Hickory and Walnut. Larger homes were situated to face corners rather than streets and avenues, thus softening the look of the town. Pinebluff was Patrick’s home base. He set up a print shop there, producing newspapers, advertising circulars and a monthly publication called Southern Home-Seekers’ Guide, which was circulated in the Northeast. The Guide of January 1889, announced a Sports Week for Northern Physicians February 8-15 in Southern Pines and Pinebluff. The visitors would hunt for raccoon, opossum and wild turkey and then savor them at the dinner meal. The evening programs included “banjo picking, dancing, mouth organ and reed playing by colored men and women.” Of course, building lots were offered for sale. While Pinebluff had eight major hotels at one time, all eventually would burn to the ground. The resort community never grew as Patrick had hoped. After helping establish other communities in the state, he returned in 1918 to Southern Pines, his proudest achievement. There, he died of influenza in the Southland Hotel on Dec. 7, 1918, and was buried in the family plot in the East View Cemetery, Wadesboro. He was 66 years old. PL Jean Barron Walker is a member of the Moore County Historical Association. For more information on the association, visit moorehistory.com.


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PL

Book Review Between Them: Remembering My Parents

Parents remembered

Richard Ford 192 pages, Ecco Books / $25,99

By Robert Gable

T

rying to make sense of who we are, and why we’re here, is a lifelong process. Of course, the reason we’re alive in the first place is because of our parents. As you get to know your parents, you get to know yourself. Richard Ford had a unique bond with his parents, one that he took years to examine. Between Them is his incisive, heartfelt appraisal of his parents and what they meant to him, and to each other. Ford is a writer who has been honing his talent for decades. A master at his craft, he won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel Independence Day. (His books Canada and Let Me Be Frank With You were reviewed in these pages.) He meticulously plans his books (he does not turn out a book a year in clockwork fashion). Each word of every sentence is carefully chosen with clarity and precision. This book is no exception. The book is divided into two memoirs written 30 years apart. The first part is “Gone: Remembering My Father,” which he wrote most recently. Part Two, “My Mother, In Memory,” was written soon after she died in 1981. There are some deliberate inconsistencies between the two parts, and he retells certain events in each. In the Author’s Note, he writes, “Both of these choices, I hope, will remind the reader that I was one person raised by two very different people, each with a separate perspective to impress on me, each trying to act in concert with the other, and each of whose eyes I tried to see the world through.” Sprinkled throughout the book are 16 black-and-white photos of his family at various times of their lives. Ford recognizes there are things he knows about his parents, aspects he can address, yet there are others he can only guess. He writes, “Incomplete understanding of our parents’ lives is not a condition of their lives. Only ours. If anything, to realize you know less than all is respectful, since children narrow the frame of everything they’re a part of.” He goes on to remark, “To write a memoir and to consider the importance of another human being is to try to credit what might otherwise go unremarked—partly by acknowledging that mysteries lie within us all, and by identifying within those mysteries, virtues.” Ford was an only child, born 15 years into his parents’ marriage, long past the point where they thought they would ever have children. Both his parents survived rough

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childhoods in rural Arkansas. Married in 1928, they were able to eke out a comfortable existence during the Depression. His father had a steady job, always on the road, selling laundry starch for The Faultless Company out of Kansas City to wholesale grocer companies throughout the rural South. In looking back now, he remembers his father as a kind of “presence,” and an often absent one at that. He notes, “I cannot remember, over the years, my father ever explicitly teaching me much—except to ride a bicycle, and how the column shifter worked on his 3-speed Ford coupe.” He remembers things his father did not do, such as hunt, or fish, or play sports, or ask him about school. As a traveling salesman, he was home only on the weekends. Ford adds, “I do not believe, however, that I was ever ignored or given a short straw, or that my father was anything but a good father—as good as he could be.” His father died of a heart attack when Ford was 16, so he never got to speak to his father as an adult—a loss he feels to this day. Ford spent more time with his mother, so he has a different perspective of her, a more complete recollection. During the week, it was just the two of them, giving him more memories of events that happened with her while his father was away. Then, since his mother lived another 21 years after his father died, she had to make a life of her own. She settled in Little Rock while Ford was starting a career in writing and academia. They had a close bond, though they always lived at a distance from each other. She fought cancer for seven years before it eventually it killed her in 1981. Ford excels with his clear thinking and careful phrasing. He is not gushing or f lowery, but he’s not overly spare or terse, either. Pithy—to the point—is a way to describe his prose. In this manner, he describes the importance of thinking about our parents when he writes, “The more we see our parents fully, after all, see them as the world does, the better our chance to see the world as it is.” PL

Robert Gable worked in book publishing for 18 years before going into the golf industry. He lived and worked in Pinehurst for five years and still misses it. He currently lives in Queens and works as an assistant golf pro at Metropolis Country Club in White Plains, New York.


Book Club

books

January book for Part-timers The Truth about the Harry Quebert Affair By Joël Dicker

Libby McGowan Photography

A boutique event planning and design group specializing in full service weddings and southern celebrations. www.MagnoliaAndPineEvents.com | 910.742.8298

Library Pick Melissa Bielby, Given Memorial Library The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

Editor’s Choice Arundel by Kenneth Roberts

PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM 63


On the Buckle

PL

Angel in Our Midst By Toby Raymond

T

his is a story about Wendy Preble, Poppy—her pretty, brown pony—and an angel named Angela. But really this is a story about the magic that happens when all things are possible between horses and their people. Before it unfolds, I first need to set the stage with a word about Wendy. Of a certain age, Wendy is over-the-top charismatic, with the most delightful British accent, but do not be deceived by her teacup size and cream puff exterior. This is one tough-as-nails Brit, who is the epitome of the truism, Keep Calm and Ride Your Horse. And she does. Every day. Oh, and get out of her way because she probably can outride the best of us. So, it happened 10 years ago, on a sunny summer afternoon when Wendy and her best friend Angela, an accomplished horsewoman in her own right, were at a funeral of yet another horse friend. While listening to the eulogy, Angela leaned over and

whispered in Wendy’s ear, “I’m leaving Poppy to you in my will.” Naturally Wendy dismissed the idea with an off-hand comment to the effect that Angela wasn’t going anywhere for a long time. And what she remembers not saying is: “And thank goodness, because I don’t want that naughty pony!” Renowned for her antics—not of the good kind—Poppy was a force to be reckoned with beyond the typical bad behavior ponies are pretty much known for, yet despite it all she was Angela’s favorite hunt and driving pony. Wendy, on the other hand, who didn’t consider herself to be half the rider Angela was, only saw the prospect of getting bucked off, one of Poppy’s favorite tricks. But that was the furthest thing from her mind the following week as she was dashing about getting ready for her and her husband Steve’s annual Fourth of July cookout when she called to invite Angela on the off-chance she

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wasn’t going to the party she usually attended. No answer. Wendy recalls being unconcerned until the next morning when she called again and there still was no answer; that’s when the alarm bells rang. She alerted a neighbor who rushed to the house where Angela was found on the front doorstep in her beekeeper’s outfit. She had apparently succumbed to a heart condition that she had kept hidden from everyone. And this is the part where “toughas-nails Wendy” comes in. Angela was true to her whispered promise, but unfortunately the last version of her will had not been witnessed; consequently, the estate reverted to a distant relative in France, who instead of honoring Angela’s wishes, saw Poppy as a money-making opportunity. Upon hearing the news, Wendy recalls her exchange with the lawyer, which started out with her saying, “Angela wanted me to take care of


Poppy for the rest of her life, and I’m not going to pay for her,” and ended with her saying, “You’ll get this pony over my dead body,” which I’m sure she relayed like cotton candy wrapped around a steel blade. Laughing as she looks back on it now, Wendy says that although she didn’t need another pony, a promise was a promise so as far as she was concerned no one was going to take Poppy away. Not then, not ever. And now comes the part where the Angela makes her heavenly debut. Poppy was brought to Wendy’s farm for care while the estate was being settled. As Wendy tells it, Poppy was grazing at the farthest corner of the pasture shortly after arriving at the farm that sad first day. Feeling rather hesitant, Wendy called out to her not expecting much would happen. But to her surprise Poppy spun around and, with lightning speed, galloped down the length of the field, whereupon she screeched to a halt and rested her head on Wendy’s shoulder. Looking up at the sky with tears in her eyes, Wendy thanked her dear friend because at that moment she knew everything would be OK. For those of us who know Wendy, there is little doubt the outcome would be anything but successful, since there is no one more resourceful when she puts her mind to something. So it came as no surprise that she devised a clever scheme. Charging the inheritor a daily boarding rate plus expenses until the estate settled, the total sum miraculously equaled the asking price, which was the winning ticket that secured Poppy’s place

in the herd at Wendy and Steve’s Inglewood Farm. And so began their journey together. Wendy initially drove Poppy, but it clearly was not meant to be. In fact, as soon as she saw the carriage she would run away, so Wendy sent her apologies to Angela and turned her sights to riding instead. And Poppy happily responded to her dressage lessons. She reached for the bit, went into a lovely frame and off they went collecting ribbons everywhere. They then went on a Hunter Pace adventure, which Wendy admits had her a little nervous, but she had another word with Angela, and Poppy was perfect every step of the way. Not only that; they won their division. Remarkably, as time has gone on, a once-naughty pony has become a willing pony and the love of Wendy’s life. And the funny thing is Poppy still is snarky to everyone— everyone except Wendy, that is. It seems Angela always knew that’s how it would be. It’s not every day that an angel steps in to help horses and people find their “one.” It’s not how it happens. But for anyone who has been lucky enough to have experienced a bond like no other, maybe, just maybe it is how it happens after all. It is with the greatest sadness that there is a postscript to this story. Poppy surrendered to colic early in the morning of December 7, with Wendy and Steve by her side. For those of us who believe in angels, it is a comfort to think she is with Angela once again. But even so, Poppy, the pretty brown pony, will be forever missed. PL

Toby Raymond is a dressage rider and equine PR and features writer living in Southern Pines. When she’s not writing she is (where else?) ... in the barn.

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Healthy Choices

As IF by Robert Nason

T

he act of fasting has a long history. Primitive cultures fasted for a variety of reasons, from appeasing angry gods to avoiding natural disasters to gaining strength before battle. Major religions all incorporate fasting with their spiritual rites and rituals, often as a form of penitence. And then there is fasting as a form of protest—Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela and so many others—to fight injustice. Fasting is also used to support health. Hippocrates of ancient Greece and the “father of modern medicine” prescribed fasting to his patients, noting, “Instead of using medicine, better fast today.” And many other physicians throughout history heralded the virtues of fasting, believing it can boost metabolism, improve cardiovascular health, lower blood pressure, decrease inflammation, improve memory, help with weight loss and improve skin integrity, to name a few. Even Benjamin Franklin extolled the benefits, writing, “The best of all medicines is resting and fasting.” Of course, as with most diets and other forms of food control, there is a danger in fasting unless it’s properly managed. Too much fasting can damage the liver and kidneys, exacerbate an already present eating disorder and wreak havoc on the immune system. What IF? Intermittent fasting (IF) is the most recent trend hitting the mainstream. Popular for several years now, IF incorporates fasting into a diet for short periods of time. The idea is to make you eat fewer calories throughout the week without drastically impacting your diet or your lifestyle. Several scientific studies have found this type of fasting is effective in losing weight. There are several variations of IF, and below are a few examples: The Leangains fast requires no eating for 14-16 hours and then eating within the remaining eight to 10 hours of a day. Coffee, diet sodas and sugar-free gum are allowed during the fast period. A simple way to achieve this IF program is to schedule the fast period during the night while sleeping and breaking the fast about six to eight hours after waking up. A common fast for people who work out, Leangains allows you to eat whenever you want during the eating period and what you eat depends on your workout schedule. It’s recommended

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to eat increased carbohydrates for workout days and high levels of protein ever day. The Eat Stop Eat IF program has participants fasting for 24 hours once or twice a week (diet sodas, tea, sparkling water and coffee are OK to drink during the fast). After the fast, you then eat normally. The creator of this program, Brad Pilon, says the idea behind this fast is to reduce your overall calorie intake during the week without limiting what you eat. He also recommends gradually building up your tolerance for the fast, so the first time you may only fast for 18 hours and then you can build up to 24 hours. UpDayDownDay requires participants to eat a small amount one day and normally the next. The lower calorie days should be about one-fifth your normal caloric intake, so for a female who normally intakes 2,000 calories in a day would intake just 400 calories on the “down day.” And it’s recommended you exercise on the “up day.” Ashley Carpenter, a registered dietitian at FirstHealth Fitness, says research on animals suggests IF not only reduces obesity but also cancer, diabetes and conditions like nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, but cautions more human studies are needed to determine the health benefits as compared to other calorie-restricted diets. “It appears that almost any intermittent fasting plan can result in some weight loss,” she says. “After all, it’s likely that by limiting when and how much you eat, you’ll reduce your calorie intake enough to result in weight loss. Currently, there’s not enough data to determine the ideal fasting period, and data is also lacking regarding the effects of intermittent fasting on other health behaviors such as diet quality, sleep and physical activity—all important factors in overall health. Although research shows this may be a promising approach for weight loss and metabolic health, as a dietitian, I wouldn’t recommend it for everyone.” If you do decide to try an IF program, like with everything health-related, be sure to consult your physician first and approach IF with moderation. If one version of IF doesn’t work with your lifestyle, try a different one until you find the one that fits. PL


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Puzzles Across 1. Writing instrument 4. Tolled 8. Which person 11. State in the W United States 13. Ireland 14. Did possess 15. Starch used in puddings 16. Resembling a sepal 18. Main artery 20. Brings up 21. One of the three Magi 23. Malt beverage 24. North American nation 25. Naïve person 27. Crustacean 31. Polynesian carved image 33. Revised form of Esperanto 34. Hades 35. Travel on water 36. Narcotics agent 38. Former coin of France 39. Consume 41. Simpler 43. Influential person 46. Cut into small pieces 47. Abnormal egotism 49. Furniture wood 52. Long-sleeved linen vestment 53. Small mountain lake 54. Poker stake 55. Wreath of flowers 56. Having eyes 57. Cardinal number

Down 1. Purulence 2. 7th letter of the Greek alphabet 3. Seaport on W Kyushu 4. Confinement 5. Extent of space 6. Pinch 7. Knot 8. Command to stop a horse 9. Bristles 10. Probability 12. Circular band 17. Bloodsucking worm 19. Hurried 21. Intersects 22. Continent 23. Beforehand 26. Highest mountain in Crete 28. Residing 29. Drug-yielding plant 30. Make indistinct 32. Lower portion of the small intestine 37. Automobile 40. Winged 42. Bristle 43. Repast 44. Look at amorously 45. Desert in E Asia 46. Male parent 48. Denial 50. Consumed 51. Understanding

word search ALTAR ANNIVERSARY BACHELOR BOW BRIDE CEREMONY CHAMPAGNE COMMITMENT CORSAGE

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COUPLE DANCE DIAMOND DRESS FLOWERS GALA HONEYMOON JOY KISS

MARRIAGE MATRIMONY PARTNER RECEPTION SPEECH SWEET TOKEN VEIL WEDDING


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golf

Unpredictable Woods by Helen Ross Photo Courtesy of Tufts Archives

The first time I ever saw Tiger Woods play golf was in Pinehurst. He was 16 years old, and he had come to the Sandhills to play in the 1992 Insurance Youth Golf Classic. Woods led wire-to-wire in the tournament, which was played at Pinehurst No. 7, the fine Rees Jones design that had opened just six years earlier. The win was his second in the IYGC, and made Woods, at the time, just the second two-time winner of the event, joining Billy Andrade, who had gone on to star at Wake Forest. Woods set records that week for margin of victory, outdistancing Michael Jones of Mesa, Arizona, by nine strokes,

Hard to believe that was 25 years ago. We knew he was going to be good—that’s why Kim and I and all those other sportswriters had come to Pinehurst that day to see this teenager from California play golf. But none of us could have predicted the dominant player Woods would soon become—not without a crystal ball, anyway. He’s given us so many memories. Towering shots that split the fairway or cozied up to the pin. Improbable putts that he seemed to will into the hole. Guttural yells and animated fist pumps. Even tears that fell after he won the 2006 Open Championship a few months after his beloved father died.

The most important question as 2018 begins is how will Woods’ back hold up—not whether he’ll break Nicklaus’ record or catch Snead. and 72-hole score, shooting 8 under. He also won the seventh annual National Junior Long Drive competition with a poke of 281 yards. I remember walking a few holes with his dad, Earl, and Kim Hasty, who was then writing sports for the Fayetteville Observer. Earl talked about the gangly teen, who was all arms and legs back then, and how Woods had taken to the game at such an early age. He was clearly proud of his son but not over-the-top in his pronouncements, as was sometimes the case as Woods’ career skyrocketed. At one point, Earl pulled a well-worn photo out of his wallet to show us. It was a picture of Tiger, so young he was still in diapers, swinging the hose of a vacuum cleaner and posing like he would soon be doing with a cut-off club. It was a sweet moment. After the tournament was over, organizers moved quickly to spirit Woods away until Melody Dossenbach Crow, who was then handling public relations for Pinehurst, stepped in—much to the relief of the sportswriters who had come to write about him. So, we each got some one-on-one time with him. I remember he was icing his wrist when we talked.

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His 79 wins rank second on the PGA TOUR only to Sam Snead, his 14 majors just four shy of Jack Nicklaus’ mark. But as we contemplate 2018, no one knows quite what to expect of Woods, who turned 42 on Dec. 30 and enters the New Year looking to break a four-year victory drought. That’s because a chronically aching back has limited Woods to just 16 TOUR starts—and just one top-10 at the 2015 Wyndham Championship in Greensboro—since that five-win season in 2013. He’s had three microdiscectomies in the interim, followed by spinal fusion surgery last year. Did the fusion surgery work? Early reports are positive, and Woods’ well-scrutinized performance at the Hero World Challenge that he hosted in December certainly heightened the excitement—his as well as ours. He tied for ninth, albeit 10 strokes behind the winner, Rickie Fowler, and broke par in three of the four rounds in shooting 8 under. Woods is nothing if not a creature of habit, so his next start on the PGA TOUR will likely come in the Farmers Insurance Open in late January. He’s won that tournament seven times so there’s a huge comfort zone there—not to mention, Woods also captured


A young Tiger Woods at Pinehurst in the early 1990s.

the 2008 U.S. Open at the stunning ocean-side layout, playing on essentially one leg. Beyond that, though, what will his schedule look like? There are the usual haunts like Bay Hill and Augusta National and TPC Sawgrass and Muirfield Village, all sites of multiple Woods victories. But some of the tournaments he’s taken for granted—like the World Golf Championships—are based on the world rankings and his has slipped to triple digits (although he was 1199th before the Hero.) The most important question as 2018 begins is how will Woods’ back hold up—not whether he’ll break Nicklaus’ record or catch Snead. We need to let him become comfortable with his new normal and see what happens. He is nothing if not determined, so if his health allows we could be in for a show. PL

Helen Ross is a freelance golf writer, who spent 20 years working for the PGA Tour and 18 more at the Greensboro News & Record. A UNC-Chapel Hill graduate, she has won multiple awards from the Golf Writers Association of America.

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15 Hole th

Forest Creek, North Course

Par 4, 431 yards Designer: Tom Fazio, 2005 Forest Creek Golf Club’s North Course is rated among the Top 100 Residential Courses in the U.S., and among the top 10 in the state of North Carolina. With 30 acres of sand and jagged edges throughout, the North Course has been likened to Pine Valley. The Fazio gem features rolling Bentgrass greens and Bermuda fairways. Photogr aph courtesy of Forest Creek

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January/February 2018

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Dates and times subject to change. Check directly with event organizers before making plans.

January

1.5.2018 Friday Night LIVE with the Farmer and Adele Poplar Knight Spot | 114 Knight St. | Aberdeen Cost: $10 | 6:46 p.m. Contact: 910.944.7502, theroosterswife.org 1.5.2018 Feeding our Feathered Friends (For Wee Ones) Weymouth Woods | 1024 Fort Bragg Road | So. Pines Cost: FREE | 10 a.m. Contact: 910.692.2167, ncparks.gov 1.6.2018 Winter Bird Walk Weymouth Woods | 1024 Fort Bragg Road | So. Pines Cost: FREE | 8 a.m. Contact: 910.692.2167, ncparks.gov 1.7.2018 Weymouth Chamber Music Series - Mallarme Chamber Players Weymouth Center for the Arts & Humanities | 555 E. Connecticut Ave. | So. Pines Cost: $10/member, $20 nonmember | 3 - 5 p.m. Contact: 910.692.6261, weymouthcenter.org 1.7.2018 The Gibson Brothers Poplar Knight Spot | 114 Knight St. | Aberdeen Cost: $33-42 | 12:46 p.m. and 6:46 p.m. Contact: 910.944.7502, theroosterswife.org 1.10.2018 Symphonic Masterworks: Beethoven’s Fifth & Schubert’s “Unfinished” Symphonies Owens Auditorium, SCC | 3395 Airport Road | So. Pines Cost: $11 - $60 | 7:30 - 9:30 p.m. Contact: 910.687.0287, carolinaphil.org 1.11.2018 NC Symphony Presents Pictures at an Exhibition R.E. Lee Auditorium | 50 Voit Gilmore Lane | So. Pines Cost: $18 - $54 | 8 - 10 p.m. Contact: 877.627.6724, ncsymphony.org 1.11.2018 The Lure of Pinehurst and other Sandhills Hotels and Inns Given Memorial Library | 150 Cherokee Road | Pinehurst Cost: FREE | 3:30 p.m. Contact: 910.295.3642, giventufts.org 74 PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM

1.11.2018 The Lure of Pinehurst and other Sandhills Hotels and Inns Given Outpost | 495 Cherokee Road | Pinehurst Cost: FREE | 7 p.m. Contact: 910.295.6022, giventufts.org 1.14.2018 Cliff Eberhardt with Louise Mosrie Poplar Knight Spot | 114 Knight St. | Aberdeen Cost: $15 | 6:46 p.m. Contact: 910.944.7502, theroosterswife.org 1.14.2018 Backyard Bird Feeding 101 Weymouth Woods | 1024 Fort Bragg Road | So. Pines Cost: FREE | 3 p.m. Contact: 910.692.2167, ncparks.gov 1.19.2018 Ben and Joe Poplar Knight Spot | 114 Knight St. | Aberdeen Cost: $10 | 6:46 p.m. Contact: 910.944.7502, theroosterswife.org 1.20.2018 Hot Glass Fundamentals STARworks | 100 Russell Drive | Star Cost: $125 | 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Contact: 910.428.9001, starworksnc.org 1.21.2018 The Contenders with special guest Randy Hughes Poplar Knight Spot | 114 Knight St. | Aberdeen Cost: $15 | 6:46 p.m. Contact: 910.944.7502, theroosterswife.org 1.21.2018 Squirrels of the Sandhills Weymouth Woods | 1024 Fort Bragg Road | So. Pines Cost: FREE | 3 p.m. Contact: 910.692.2167, ncparks.gov 1.21.2018 Romeo and Juliet - Bolshoi Ballet Sunrise Theater 250 NW Broad St.| So. Pines Cost: $15 - $25 | 1 – 3:30 p.m. Contact: 910.692.3611, sunrisetheater.com


2018

Moore County’s Finest Home Improvement Show more than 40 companies for you to find everything you need to create a better home

Built with YOU in Mind! Brought to You by

demonstrations • seminars plus a very special thursday night charity benefit

March 2 - 4, 2018 The Fair Barn 200 Beulah Hill Road S Pinehurst, NC

tickets $7 at the door for more information call 910.944.2992 mchba.com/annual-spring-home-garden-expo/ Follow Us on Facebook.com/MCHBA

fabulous Botanicals Fabulous Flowers & Events Carol Dowd Owner/Designer 91o.692.38oo • botanicalsweb.com PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM 75


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January/February 2018

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

1.26.2018 Graymatter Poplar Knight Spot | 114 Knight St. | Aberdeen Cost: $10 | 6:46 p.m. Contact: 910.944.7502, theroosterswife.org 1.27.2018 Puccini’s Tosca – MET Opera Live Sunrise Theater | 250 NW Broad St. | So. Pines Cost: $27 | 1 – 3:43 p.m. Contact: 910.692.3611, sunrisetheater.com 1.27.2018 Wildlings: Adventure Maps Weymouth Woods | 1024 Fort Bragg Road | So. Pines Cost: FREE | 10 a.m. Contact: 910.692.2167, ncparks.gov

Sandhills Wedding Expo 2018

January 28, 2018 Fair Barn | 200 Beulah Hill Road |Pinehurst Cost: $10+ | 12 p.m. VIP entry, 1 p.m. general admission For more information, or to reserve your ticket, visit www.sandhillsweddingandevents.com

1.28.2018 Rachel Baiman Poplar Knight Spot | 114 Knight St. | Aberdeen Cost: $15 | 6:46 p.m. Contact: 910.944.7502, theroosterswife.org 1.28.2018 Staying Warm in Winter Weymouth Woods | 1024 Fort Bragg Road | So. Pines Cost: FREE | 3 p.m. Contact: 910.692.2167, ncparks.gov

February

2.1.2018 NC Symphony presents Dvořák Serenade for Strings R.E. Lee Auditorium | 50 Voit Gilmore Lane | So. Pines Cost: $18 - $54 | 8 - 10 p.m. Contact: 877.627.6724, ncsymphony.org 2.3.2018 Missy Raines and the New Hip Poplar Knight Spot | 114 Knight St. | Aberdeen 76 PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM

Cost: $15 | 6:46 p.m. Contact: 910.944.7502, theroosterswife.org

Mardi Gras Miles 5k & Fun Run February 3, 2018 St. John Paul II School | 2922 Camp Easter Road |So. Pines Cost: $15+ | 9:30 a.m. For more information, visit www.mardigrasmiles.com

2.4.2018 The Lady of the Camillias – Bolshoi Ballet Sunrise Theater | 250 NW Broad St. | So. Pines Cost: $15 - $25 | 1 – 4:05 p.m. Contact: 910.692.3611, sunrisetheater.com 2.7.2018 A Night at the Opera, featuring four vocal soloists Owens Auditorium, SCC | 3395 Airport Road | So. Pines Cost: $11 - $60 | 7:30 - 9:30 p.m. Contact: 910.687.0287, carolinaphil.org 2.9-11.2017 19th Annual Mid Pines Men’s Invitational Mid Pines Inn & Golf Club | 1010 Midland Road | So. Pines Cost: TBD | 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Contact: 910.692.8611, pineneedles-midpines.com 2.10.2018 Donizetti’s L’Elisir d’Amore – MET Opera Live Sunrise Theater | 250 NW Broad St. | So. Pines Cost: $27 | 1 – 3:43 p.m. Contact: 910.692.3611, sunrisetheater.com 2.10.2018 English Speaking Union Shakespeare Competition Pinehurst Village Chapel | 10 Azalea Rd | Pinehurst Cost: Free | 2:00 p.m. Contact: romanbob@hotmail.com 2.10.2018 Heart ‘n Soul of Jazz Pinehurst Resort | 80 Carolina Vista Drive | Pinehurst Cost: $65 $75 | 8 - 11 p.m. Contact: 910.692.2787, mooreart.org


Mark: 585.233.2237 | Karen: 910.725.0220 Tomas: 910.303.4933 | Tracy: 910.633.9553 WeKnowMooreNC.com facebook.com/TheHomeTeamNC

Mark & K aren Caulfield Tomas Stevens & Tr acy Murphy

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January/February 2018

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 2.10.2018 The 4th Biennial Pinehurst Chocolate Festival Pinehurst UMC | 4111 Airport Road | Pinehurst Cost: Free | 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Contact: pinehurstumc.com/chocolatefestival 2.11.2018 NC Song Circle Poplar Knight Spot | 114 Knight St. | Aberdeen Cost: $15 | 6:46 p.m. Contact: 910.944.7502, theroosterswife.org 2.13.2018 The 2018 Holly & Ivy Dinner Holly Inn | 155 Cherokee Road | Pinehurst Cost: $125 | 6:30 p.m. Contact: 910.295.6022, giventufts.org 2.13.2018 Dinner and Mardi Gras with Dennis Stroughmatt and Creole Stomp Poplar Knight Spot | 114 Knight St. | Aberdeen Cost: $25 | 6:46 p.m. Contact: 910.944.7502, theroosterswife.org

Chef-prepared cuisine delivered anywhere!

Dennis Stroughmatt and Creole Stomp

2.17.2018 Raise the Roof – A Variety Show to Benefit the Sunrise Theater Sunrise Theater | 250 NW Broad St. | So. Pines Cost: $15, $20 VIP | 7:30 p.m. Contact: 910.692.3611, sunrisetheater.com Carol and her team of culinary experts will delight you and your guests alike with dishes made fresh and fast and more importantly, anywhere your heart desires. They can customize any menu to fit your taste and your budget!

315.405.0200 themilitarymomstruck@yahoo.com militarymomstruck.com

Weddings Receptions parties Rehearsal Dinners Bridal showers

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2.24.2018 Zeffirelli’s La Boheme – MET Opera Live Sunrise Theater | 250 NW Broad St. | So. Pines Cost: $27 | 12:55 p.m. Contact: 910.692.3611, sunrisetheater.com


Life • Art • Celebrations

Shaw House-Museum Tours • Photo Archives • Bookshop

e Experience History f

Shaw House c. 1820s • Garner House c. 1790s • Sanders Cabin c. 1770s Corn Crib • Tobacco Barn

Moore County Historical Association 110 West Morganton Road • Southern Pines Open 1 - 4pm Tuesday - Friday Free Admission • info@moorehistory.com

www.moorehistory.com 910.692-2051

THE 2018

Holly & Ivy Dinner

Weddings & Events Design & Styling/Vintage Rentals Custom Handmade

IndigoEarthEvents.com Vintage & Eclectic Rentals • Design & Styling Custom Artwork & Sculpted Cake Toppers by appointment indigoearthevents@icloud.com | 910-638-8322

Celebrating

Mardi Gras at The Holly Inn Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Cocktails at 6:30pm • Dinner at 7:30pm $125 Per Person Tickets available January 5, 2018 A Special Benefit for the Given Memorial Library & Tufts Archives MARDI GRAS attire is encouraged, but optional Make your reservations at www.giventufts.org For more information call 910-295-6022

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January/February 2018

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

2.26.2018 Classical Concert Series - Escher String Quartet Sunrise Theater | 250 NW Broad St. | So. Pines Cost: $30/member, $35/nonmember | 8 - 10 p.m. Contact: 910.692.2787, mooreart.org

Email upcoming events to

events@pinehurstlivingmagazine.com Escher String Quartet

puzzle solution from page 68

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EAT, DRINK, LIVE LOCAL

support locally-owned, independent businesses

Discover your choices for fun things to do and places to go in Moore County, NC!

www .moo

rech

oice

s.ne

t

includes: O nl in e Website Eve nt C ale n da r & S o M uch M ore!

- Weekly Calendar - Restaurants - Upcoming Events - Live Music - Entertainment - Indoor Kids Activities - Outdoor Activities FOLLOW US - Kids Sports Health & Fitness ON SOCIAL MEDIA!- Kids Birthday Party Venues - Shops - Kids Lessons & Classes

we have stylists and makeup artists as well as other spa services to make your wedding day special!

100 Magnolia Road Village of Pinehurst

910.255.8369

www.TheVillageFox.com

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA!

PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM 81


EAT, DRINK, LIVE LOCAL

support locally-owned, independent businesses

Your After-Reception-After-Party destination.

The Sandhills’ premier boutique for children’s and women’s needs with a

MODERN

elegance.

Nursing and maternity fashion Children’s fashion up to age 8 Sustainable toys

DINING Monday- Saturday 11:30am-10pm Sunday: Noon-9pm

Local art and handmade gifts

Live Music!

Tuesday - Saturday

AFTER PARTIES a Specialty!

No.2 Market Square / Pinehurst / 910.295.3400 www.DugansPub.net

Bump & BabyPUB HOURS Open Daily from 11:30am 3 Market Square untilNCthe crowd goes home Pinehurst, thebumpandbaby.com

910-420-8655

Find us on Facebook! Find us on Instagram!

Give your bridesmaids

a Special Thank You!

A Full Circle Massage Therapy

Gift certificates available 130 W. Indiana Avenue Southern Pines

919.353.0420

Dixie Parks 82 PINEHURSTLIVINGMAGAZINE.COM

Certified in pregnancy massage for more than 13 years

NCMBT #1806


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Sandhills Sightings

JANUARY FEBRUARY 2018

with DOLORES MULLER

Moore Humane Society

“Unleashing the Possibilities” Fundraiser Fair Barn Pinehurst October 17

From top, clockwise: Emily Muse, Kaye Fritz and Megan Huff; Holly Alexander and Lynn Conrad; Gary Steinhafel and Jocelyn Servick; Tammie Hand, Phil Fulghum and Kari Skellington; and Tim & Kim Grant.

Derby Aerodome Open House Derby October 21

From top, clockwise: Mike Jones, Annie Hallinan and Jim Wiltjer; Alan & Sharon Kane, Jim Murray and K.H. Morgan; WWII training plane; Joe Fitzgerald and John Thomas; and Patricia & Jon Bolles, Elmer Countryman and Larry Harter.

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Sandhills Sightings Holly Arts & Crafts Festival Pinehurst Village October 21

From top right, clockwise: Master Gardeners Susan Strine, Linda Querec and Tonya Hart; pottery; Josh & Tanya Martin with Meghan Machella and Ben Fleming; Annaka, Maggie, James & Mike Murphy; and Kathy Snyder, Karen Gilbert, Barb Rueb and Jude Winkley.

Chef’s Feast

Benefiting the Local Food Bank Pinehurst Members Club Pinehurst October 24

From top right, clockwise: Jim & Kathleen Tanski with Patrick Kelly and Sandhills Food Bank Branch Director Michael Cotten; Ronald Wyche and Rochelle Myrick; Stacy & Christopher Sweet; Food Lion Divisional VP Tray Zeshko and Food Lion managers; and Carol Weiss, Sandy Hubbard, Diane Anello and Lynn Hancock.

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Sandhills Sightings An Evening of Patriotic Expression Benefiting local veterans Fair Barn Pinehurst October 29

From top right, clockwise: Grant Roper, founder and executive director of An Evening of Patriotic Expression, and directors Vicki Haidet and Darroll Buytenhuys; Bridget Johnson with John & Pat McMahon; Larry Harter, David Colescott and Juan Russ; Pat Halligan and Kathy Leuck; and Laura Grevter, Jim Mikus and Nancy & Doug Schmidt.

17th Annual Blues Crawl Southern Pines November 4

From top right, clockwise: Becca Rae, Kevin Dietzel, Jessica Harrelson and Aimee Rotting; Ashley Randolph and Tara Neel; Corin, Jarrett, Evenstar & Rae Heavenston; Entertainer Nathan Pope; and Tom, Katy & Eva Hanes.

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Sandhills Sightings Oh, the Places You’ll Go

Companion Animal Clinic Fundraiser Weymouth Center Southern Pines November 17

From top right, clockwise: Deborah Wilson, Betsy Best and Mary Griffith; Theresa Gagan, Scott David and Morgan McGrath; Martha Hart, John Burgess and Kate Holmes; Ginni & Victor Pimentel; and Bob Andrade and Angela Zumwalt.

Festival of Trees

Benefiting the Sandhills Children’s Center Carolina Hotel Pinehurst November 30

From top right, clockwise: Co-chairs: Jeanie Eastman, Teresa Copper and Wanda Crenshaw; Ken & Lois Lee; Sandy Gernhart and Nancy Oakley; Teresa Holliday with Ashley, JP, Lilly & Connor Linden; and Christmas trees up for auction.

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Sandhills Sightings Christmas at Weymouth Weymouth Center Southern Pines December 6

From top right, clockwise: Larry & Carol Westerly with Kurt Kreuger and Alex Klalo; Event co-chairs Janet Farrell and Ellen Burke; Janet Galloway and Mark Gredel; Melissa Hall and Katia Weaver; and Jane & Gene Casnellie with Terry & John Lowry.

Santa Visits the Sandhills Woman’s Exchange Pinehurst December 9

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Sandhills Sightings? Contact

Dolores Muller 910.295.3465

Sightings@ PinehurstLivingMagazine.com From top right, clockwise: Kaiden, Carolyn, Parker, Drew & Lynnsey Canady; Abigail, Emily and Caroline Seskey; Linda Cockman; Cav Peterson and Chris Engelfried; and John, Taylor, Josh & Kaley Kipp.

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PL

Last Impression

Right of Way photograph and caption courtesy of The Moore County Historical Association

Thomas stable on Thomas Road, off of Midland Road, was one of the area’s largest riding stables. Fellow horsemen John Thomas and Corbett Alexander kept hunters for private owners and saddle horses for the public to ride. Many open fields and peach orchards were nearby for the riders. Occasionally, fox hunts with the Moore County hounds originated from the stable. PL

Every man should be born again on the first of January. Start with a fresh page. Take up one hole more in the buckle, if necessary, or let down one, according to circumstances; but, on the first of January let every man gird himself once more, with his face to the front, and take interest in the things that are and are to be, and not in the things that were and are past. - Henry Ward Beecher

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Pinehurst Living Magazine January/February 2018  

From our gorgeous photography and detailed calendar to our local columnists and “Pick of the Pines” where-to-shop section, visitors and resi...

Pinehurst Living Magazine January/February 2018  

From our gorgeous photography and detailed calendar to our local columnists and “Pick of the Pines” where-to-shop section, visitors and resi...

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