Page 1

Special Business Edition

Special Report: Jobs increase in Longview

MAY 10, 2012

Jacksonville: The Tomato City ETMC: Health Care Profile

PLUS PLUS

Four Winds Renaissance Faire

Photos, Business Profiles and more


In This Issue

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

By Kelley Connor Managing Editor

East Texans are easing into a surprisingly warm Spring, many of them dreading the possibility of another record-breaking Summer. Much has transpired in the year 1 A.D. (after drought). Wild hog populations have ballooned, causing widespread damage to crops and other agricultural property. Lack of cattle from last year’s drought has caused an increase in meat prices. Gas prices have also been leaping and economists say it will only get worse. Add to that scam artists who have been trying to empty East Texans’ bank accounts and wallets. These concerns and more are addressed in this issue, including a story of rescue and hope for big cats, at Tiger Creek in Tyler. Along with our latest installment of the T-Bone, our fact-finding page, you’ll also find a few words about romance in a fast-paced, digital age. We hope you enjoy.

Front page: Dream Harem, Photo by Kelley

NEWS

6

2  •  The Pine Curtain

With the passing of President Obama’s health care bill, there are several changes scheduled in hospitals, insurance companies and health care providers. Insurance companies are changing their acceptance, coverage, and policies.

Contents T-BONE

4

NEWS

6

ESPECIAL

9

FEATURES

10

ART

20

T-BONE

4

Take your average Tbone steak. Carve away the fat and the bone and the little that remains is meat. Take your average politician. Carve away the bluster and rhetoric and you just may find the Editor-In-Chief truth…or not. In our TBone, we’llMARMOLEJO look at politiIRVING cal quotes that make us wonder where the meat is, closely examine their value and grade them just as a meat inspector might grade cuts of beef: Prime, Choice, Standard or Canner. Then we’ll serve it up to you for your consumption.


JEDCO’s primary goal is to oversee the use of the economic development sales taxes to help the existing industries prosper and grow. Another goal is to attract new industries that would bring new jobs and opportunities to the city.

9

SPECIAL REPORT

The purpose of the partnership is to make the highway more accessible and commercial while providing jobs for residents in the city.

FEATURES

10

David Ruff is an artist of archery. Ruff is the builder and owner of Stickbow Archery, a store inside Four Winds Renaissance Faire.

STAFF Editor-In-Chief

Managing Editor

IRVING MARMOLEJO

KELLEY CONNOR

Contributing Writers JESSICA SWINK

Photographers KELLEY CONNOR

IRVING MARMOLEJO

AMY WEATHERHOLTZ DAVE WEINSTOCK: ADVISOR Comments or questions can be directed to the.pine.curtain.mag@gmail.com The Pine Curtain Magazine is an online publication created by Communication students at the University of Texas at Tyler. Content may not be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission from The Pine Curtain Magazine. ©The Pine Curtain Magazine 2012

  May 10, 2012•  3  

In This Issue

8

BUSINESS PROFILE


T-Bone

“How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever

Take your average T-bone steak. Carve away the fat and the bone and the little that remains is meat. Take your average politician. Carve away the bluster and rhetoric and you just may find the truth…or not. In our T-Bone, we’ll look at political quotes that make us wonder where the meat is, closely examine their value and grade them just as a meat inspector might grade cuts of beef: Prime, Choice, Standard or Canner. Then we’ll serve it up to you for your consumption.

‘Prime’ Truth: Top shelf—Grade A goodness.

‘Choice’ Truth: Mostly true, depending on the bull it came from.

‘Standard’ Truth: Run of the mill bull—more gristle than fat, less meaty than most.

‘Canner’ Truth: I wouldn’t eat that.

--In a graphic posted on his website Tuesday, April 17th.

“President Obama’s suggested reduction in spending for next year: $0.” --Mitt Romney Romney has a point...a smudged point, but a point nonetheless. It’s true that President Obama’s final budget proposal makes no mention of reducing spending; in fact, it increases spending by two-tenths of 1 percent. But Romney’s graphic omits the fact that spending increases, according to the budget, come from mandatory spending--social security, medicare and medicaid--and net interest. Mandatory spending, which Obama has no control over, makes up about 65 percent of the budget. In fact, Obama did propose cuts in discretionary spending which would have decreased total spending by 4.3 percent. Romney needs to sharpen his pencil and check his numbers next time. But for now, his statement is mostly true; we award him a grade of Standard. 4  •  The Pine Curtain


r remains, however improbable, must be the truth?”—Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Sherlock Holmes) The Sign of Four. --In a Rose Garden speech Tuesday, April 17th.

In the past three years, “we’ve added enough new oil and gas pipeline to circle the Earth and then some.” --President Barack Obama

--In a “Face the Nation” interview Sunday, April 1st.

“General Motors is the largest corporation in the world again.” --Vice President Joe Biden We just had to throw this one in for entertainment purposes. Sure, GM is on the “Forbes” and “Fortune 500” lists of top companies, but it didn’t even place in the top 10. It ranked 20 and 61, respectively. There are many auto makers higher up on the lists than GM. They include Toyota, Volkswagon and Daimler (Mercedes-Benz). General Motors is ranked number 18 in sales on the “Forbes” list; maybe that’s what Biden was talking about. But to translate that into being the strongest company in the world is pure fantasy. This quote is like the beanstalk to Biden’s Jack--the stuff fairy tales are made of. We give it a Canner grade.

May 10, 2012•  5  

T-Bone

Do politicians just spew these quotes out and hope to get lucky, or do they actually research them? Either way, Obama is right. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, the U.S. oil and gas industry added nearly 30,000 miles of pipeline in the last three years. NASA lists the Earth’s circumference at the equator as nearly 26,000 miles. Whether Obama pulled this one out of the air or actually did some research, the quote is accurate. We give it a Prime grade.


Four Winds Reinassance Faire’s Businesses. Page 10

East Texas

A detailed Business Profile about the medical care system in East Texas. The History of the company that grew to face new challenges

By Jessica Swink In this building, no one ever stays still for long. The East Texas Medical Center’s Family Medicine Clinic in Tyler is brimming with energy. Nurses tend to their patients, handing them forms to fill out. Children play and chatter as they wait, filling the room with childish glee. Every few minutes more nurses come from behind the waiting room counter to bring patients back to see physicians. This is only one of nearly 50 clinics in the East Texas area owned by ETMC. This includes hospitals in Athens, Carthage, Clarksville, Crockett, Fairfield, Gilmer, Henderson, Jacksonville, Mt. Vernon, Pittsburg, Quitman, Trinity and three inpatient facilities in Tyler. Overall, the East Texas Medical Center Regional Healthcare System has a network of 15 hospitals that care for more than 300,000 East Texans a year. With such a large variety of care available, ETMC is one of the leading

sources of health care in the area. The company’s rise to the top took 63 years. The East Texas Hospital Foundation, a new community organization dedicated to Tyler’s development as a health care center, was incorporated in 1949. That same year, Smith County residents approved a $1 million bond issue for the new hospital. According to corporate director Carroll Roge, a major incentive aiding the proposal for Medical Center Hospital was the low number of hospitals in the area. “Per every 1,000 members of the population, we’d be eligible for a $500,000 grant from the federal government,” Roge said. The not-for-profit hospital began operations in September 1951. By 1971, the hospital had completed a two-year, $6.5 million building and expansion program, which tripled its size to 250,000 square feet. In the early 1980s, a $42 million construction project was in progress at Medical Center Hospital. The first phase

ETMC Tyler’s rehabilitation Center, Olympic Plaza

6  •  The Pine Curtain

Photo by Irving Marmolejo

News

Contributing Writer


Medical Center measured by “how our efforts improve the quality of life for people and communities in East Texas. Our primary responsibility is not to seek profit but to ensure that we’re meeting the health care needs of those we serve.” With the passing of President Obama’s health care bill, however, there are several changes scheduled in hospitals, insurance companies and health care providers. For example, insurance companies are changing their acceptance, coverage, and policies. This could be the start of many transformations in how ETMC deals with its customers, which could be a good or bad thing depending on one’s beliefs. ETMC staff members declined to share their opinions on the health care reformation. As ETMC is Continues on ETMC pg 16

May 10, 2012•  7  

News

culminated with the opening of the new four-story north wing in June 1983. The spring of 1984 saw the remodeling and expansion of the hospital’s Day Surgery Center. In addition, the hospital opened its cancer center for radiation therapy in 1982. “New alliances with hospitals throughout East Texas concluded with a new name for the hospital in 1990: East Texas Medical Center. The parent company became the East Texas Medical Center Regional Healthcare System,” Roge said. ETMC’s progress hasn’t been all positive. In recent years, ETMC, like so many businesses across the country, has been hit hard by the recession. Numerous layoffs were made in 2011, and the company’s Fitch bond rating (an international credit rating agency based out of New York City and London) dropped from “stable” to “negative.” Mike Thomas, VP of Strategic Planning, said doing business sometimes calls for very difficult decisions to be made. A news release issued by ETMC in June of 2011 cited economic troubles and reductions in “third-party payors, and federal and state reimbursement cuts” as the reason behind so many layoffs. Thomas isn’t worried about ETMC’s future, however. In an interview with the Athens Daily Review in 2011, he said, “…We have no choice. We have to reduce our costs, and still do the same things. Is it catastrophic? Are we going under? No. It’s very do-able.” Despite losing members of its staff, ETMC still has an expansive reach over much of East Texas. In fact, it can be hard to keep up with just who ETMC’s base customers or patients are. Thomas believes his company’s success is


Jacksonville Economic Development Commission

Special Report

By Irving Marmolejo Editor in Chief

On Saturday June 9, thousands of visitors will journey to Jacksonville for its annual Tomato Bowl, the biggest celebration in town. Dozens of activities are slated, including tennis, fishing and soccer tournaments and street dancing--and the most popular event, the tomato eating contest. The weekend is a great opportunity for the local businesses. There are over two hundred vendors who line the streets, and not all are in the agricultural business, according to Peggy Refro, Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce president. The chamber’s job is to approach different businesses, which could choose Jacksonville as their location. “It is a small community but it is located in 3 major highways, which is a really attractive place for companies, especially if they ship in and out,” said Darrell Prcing, Jacksonville Economic Development Corporation’s president. Jacksonville’s geographic location makes it attractive to several businesses. It is not too far from Houston, Dallas, or the Gulf Coast. Jacksonville currently has over 69 ‘green’ manufacturing companies. The companies are diverse: some build signs, some bows; others make moulds. “We came to Jacksonville primarily for its location. We wanted to get closer to some of our customers’ bases. Some are in Mexico, Tyler, Longview, etc. We expanded here to service them better and reduce costs,” said David Mayer, director of manufacturing and technology at Luvata. There is also a very good work force for 8  •  The Pine Curtain

manufacturing processes. The Jacksonville Economic Development Corporation also has financial support for new businesses. “We have incentives for land grants in our industrial park, to performance grants or expansion grants for companies looking for employees,” Prcing said. The 130-acre Summers A. Norman Industrial Park is home for companies that obtained their land through incentive packages. The park has access to Highway 69 and has good infrastructure with all the services required for most companies. One of the businesses located at the park is the Luvata Electro Fin Inc. “We planned to go to Longview, and we came here primarily based on the Economic Development Incentive Program,” Mayer said. JEDCO’s primary goal is to oversee the use of the economic development sales taxes to help the existing industries prosper and grow. Another goal is to attract new industries that would bring new jobs and opportunities to the city. “We have business after hours, where members interact with each other and that helps their businesses in the community,” Refro said. The Chamber of Commerce has business after-hours, conventions, expos, training classes and meetings to help the local businesses to grow and expand. They also try to attract new businesses to the area which will create new job opportunities. According to JEDCO website, since 1995 over $13 million has been pledged for infrastructure, land grants or cash to businesses. This has helped to create more than 3,000 jobs Continues on Jacksonville pg 17


Over 19,000 New Jobs in Longview By Jessica Swink Contributing Writer

“ If you shop locally ...You are keeping local dollars here at home, our jobs and schools

Longview’s unemployment rate for February 2012 was at 6.1 percent, down from January’s rate of 6.5 percent. “LEDCO is dedicated to maximizing Longview’s potential as a thriving regional hub for businesses, jobs, health care, education and economic opportunity,” said Dan Droge, board president of LEDCO. To help this initiative take off, LEDCO has three main programs to help promote Longview’s economic success. The first program is business retention and expansion, the second is new business development and the third May 10, 2012•  9  

Special Report

The city of Longview was able to create 1,900 jobs in the past year with the help of the Longview Economic Development Corporation. Of the 1,900 new jobs, around 900 were created in the mining, logging and manufacturing fields. Since LEDCO’s purpose is to constantly create and retain jobs, the jobs served as a huge success for the corporation.

involves workforce development. The corporation also recently announced that starting this year, it will partner with the Longview Metropolitan Planning Organization, Gregg County, the City of Longview and the Texas Department of Transportation on the multi-million dollar, FM 2275/ George Richey Road expansion. The purpose of the partnership is to make the highway more accessible and commercial while providing jobs for residents in the city. Besides the road expansion, LEDCO provides numerous incentives for companies already rooted in Texas, including more funding availability for potential businesses in the area. Lynda David, LEDCO’s business recruitment and marketing director, says that each incentive is diverse and helpful to all types of companies. “We have a number of incentives that we offer-they could be tax abatement, cash incentives, or Continues on Jacksonville pg 18 even discounted


Shadowhawk Blades Forging a Business By Irving Marmolejo Editor in Chief

Features

Heat fills the air as the forge reaches over 2,500 degrees. Long tongs hold the hot metal to place it on an anvil. The piece of wrought iron that went in the forge black comes out molten red. Sparks fly as the blacksmith starts forging the steel; its shape starts to change. It is impressive to watch a dusty, dull piece of metal turn into a shining, artistic weapon. “We can do almost any kind of blacksmith work...if someone requests it, but we concentrate in blade work. We can do anything from kitchen knives to samurai swords,” said Charles L. Adams, owner of Shadowhawk Blades.

hair sticks and bracelets. “It started as a hobby just playing around, and it led to a really lucrative hobby and now is what I do for a living,” Adams said. Shadowhawk Blades is a 27-year-old business. Adams goes to multiple Renaissance Faires offering handmade blades and services. His home forge is in Winnsboro. He also sells his creations through his website: shadowhawkblades.com. Because the process of making a fine steel sword is long, swords are made by special order. Shadowhawk Blades offers a unique opportunity to Adams’ customers--a

We are working on a custom Japanese sword. When finished this katana will be worth $15,000 ,

The sound of metal against metal drives curious customers to the blacksmith forge and shop inside the Four Winds Renaissance Faire. The shop is full of swords, katanas, military knives, cooking knives, 10  •  The Pine Curtain

complete day making their own knife with an instructor’s (Adams) help throughout the process. “We would sit down and discuss all the details and that is what will determine the price of the blade. It depends on the


Photo by Kelley Connor

Top: Still hot. A black and green marble created at Shadowhawk Blades. Bottom: Charles Adams pouring some water at his forge located in the Four Winds Renaissance Faire.

Features

size, how elaborate it is and what metals you want it made of,” Adams said. Adams is not only a businessman but also an inspiration and instructor to younger generations. He is a 4th degree black belt karate instructor and mentor in escrima sword and stick fighting. His classes are offered at First Christian Church in Tyler every Tuesday and Thursday, for everyone interested in martial arts. “If you take karate for three months, I get to know you and if I like what I see I invite you to escrima. If you come you are required to make your own blade,” said Adams. All escrimadors are required by Adams to become apprentices. Keila Steppe is one of Adams’ apprentices and works with him in his shop. The process for her started by making hair sticks and bracelets. When working with the forge she wears a leather apron and gloves for safety. She heats up the oven before putting stock into the middle of the fire. “At the moment I am working with round stock turning it to square stocks, and tomorrow we will learn to put marbles into our hair sticks,” Steppe said. The forge is always supervised by one of the two masters, Adams or his friend Dan Davis. Davis owns Davis Steel Work. Davis is also a student of traditional Japanese blade smithing. The two businesses work side by side. Adam’s and Davis’ different styles give variety to the creations shown at the shop. Both masters are working together on one special custom blade project at Continues on Shadowhawk pg 17

Photo by Kelley Connor

May 10, 2012•  11  


C mbine B By Irving Marmolejo Editor in Chief

The instructor gives some last indications to a beginner for his last shot. The new apprentice aims at the target, takes a last breath and releases the string. The arrow flies at 200 feet per second across the field and hits the target placed in front of a hay roll. The arrow lays in the circle numbered nine, way better than the first shot. Someone yells ‘line closed’ and two instructors in medieval cloth walk to the targets to count the arrows. The young man’s score is high enough to compete for today’s competition. “We want people to develop their shooting and have fun at the same time,” said William Winnie, owner of Sherwood Forest Archery. Sherwood Forest Archery--one of the many

I actually do trick sho and...I

about starting a combined business. The plan was simple; Winnie would run a target shooting stand with the bows and arrows from the business next door. Eight years have passed since Sherwood Forest Archery started in Four Winds. The business moves along from place to place with other Renaissance Fairs as well. It has grown and now employs four to five people who work each

They asked me if I could build bows, so they bought the bows and arrows and started using them in the range...It sure helped my business,

attractions at the Four Winds Renaissance Faire-is one of the visitors’ favorites. The business started when Winnie visited Four Winds and, after checking out the archery store, came up with an idea. He talked with the store owner 12  •  The Pine Curtain

Photo by Irving Marmolejo

Features

Sherwood Forest Archery


Bussinesses

ooting, where I take a bottle or a can some one holds it shoot it out of their hand at 20 feet,

Photo by Irving Marmolejo

Left: Tom McCurty,an instructor from Sherwood Forest Archery trying his luck after a busy day at the Renaissance Faire. Top: David Ruff, Stickbow Archery owner, is fletching arrows for the shooting range. John Yost, Four Winds visitor. Sherwood Forest Archery offers archery instruction services. Almost all the equipment comes from Stickbow Archery, the store next door. Sherwood Forest Archery has a Facebook page to advertise its services for private parties or future visits to different Renaissance Faires. Continues on pg 14 May 10, 2012•  13  

Features

weekend. “I came on a Saturday and after winning a second place medal they ask me if I wanted to come back and work here. I came the next day and I have been working for four and a half years,” Miranda Glaze said. For three dollars Sherwood Forest Archery’s visitors purchase 10 shots of arrows and direction from an instructor. Every shooter has an instructor which is why there are not many people shooting at the same time on the target line. The family environment drives Sherwood Forest Archery’s owner to have a deep concern for safety. “We carry insurance through the National Archery Association, but the best kind of insurance is prevention, which is why we have instructors for every shooter: to pay close attention and encourage precaution,” Winnie said. After the ten shots the shooting line is closed and the instructors add up the points in the target. If the numbers are high enough the visitor can enter a daily competition and earn a medal. Each competitor who wins a medal or ribbon has the chance to join the tournament on the last faire weekend. “The first time I shot here was almost a year and a half ago. I won a medal last season; it was from the semifinals in the Master Tournament,” said


Stickbow Archery

Features

The movie Hunger Games is one of the latest sensations, and along with it the practice of archery. Characters like Katniss(“Hunger Games”), Legolas(“Lord of the Rings”), Susan(“Narnia”), Paris(“Troy”), Neytiri(“Avatar”), Theseus(“Immortals”) and many others have made archery part of their persona. The bow and arrow has inspired legends and has accompanied heroes, which is why many prefer the simple but lethal version of the ancient bow rather than the modern version. The creation of a handmade bow is an art, and David Ruff is an artist of archery. Ruff is the builder and owner of Stickbow Archery, a store inside Four Winds Renaissance Faire. Ruff ’s business participates in other Renaissance faires as far away as Oklahoma, Wisconsin, Ohio, Louisiana and North Carolina. Its permanent location is Mount Pleasant. The store is full of

long bows, cross bows, re-curve bows, flat bows, arrows and other handmade equipment. “Traditionally the bow is made with a draw knife and then carved out of a single piece of wood. That process is called a self bow,” Ruff said. Ruff has been making handmade bows and arrows for more than a decade. In his shop, he has bows made of hickory and others made of ipe, which is a Brazilian tree. “If somebody wants a traditionally handmade bow then I will do it that way, but mainly these are (machine-made). The reason why is because I have to be able to make them quickly in order to make a profit out of it,” Ruff said. He started building bows out of a personal challenge that later became a profitable business. “People started wanting my bows so I gave them away, and more people wanted them so I started selling them. From there I made it (building bows) better and better,” Ruff said. The number of employees grew over the years and it changes along with the location they

Photo by Irving Marmolejo

14  •  The Pine Curtain


Photo by Irving Marmolejo

Photo by Irving Marmolejo

Left: David Ruff fixing an arrow inside his shop. Top Right:Practice, practice. Jonathan Yost trying to hit the long range target. Middle left: Jonathan and John Yost Right : Sheerwood Forest Archery crew(from left to right)William Winnie, Miranda Glaze, Alex Blanchard and Tom McCurty

Photo by Irving Marmolejo

May 10, 2012•  15  

Features

are traveling to, but mainly Ruff and his wife work in the shop. Sherwood Forest Archery’s owner, William Winnie, asked Ruff to supply his business with handmade arrows and bows made by Ruff. This combined arrangement helped both businesses, and now they are working in Four Winds next to each other. “They asked me if I could build bows, so they bought the bows and arrows and started using them on the range. It sure helped my business,” Ruff said. Ruff worked with those suffering from mental handicaps before starting his own archery business. Ten years ago Ruff ’s 29-year hobby became his business. “On both of my (previous) jobs I went to work one day and there was no more job. I just got sick and tired of being laid off. I said, ‘I am going to try this’ and it worked,” Ruff said. His future plan to attract more people to his business involves a trick-shooting performance. “I actually do trick shooting, where I take a bottle or a can and someone holds it, and I shoot it out of their hand at 20 feet,” Ruff said. This will show how accurate and reliable the bows and arrows from his shop are. For more information visit stickbowarchery.com.


Features

ETMC nonprofit, the company does not partner with other hospitals or medical centers, but with the local community instead. “We partner with other non-profits and governmental agencies to work together to help them provide services. For example, our ambulance company works closely with and is a partner in a sense with local fire and police agencies. We also look upon those who donate to ETMC to help us in our mission of charitable care as partners,” Thomas said. ETMC also is aware of its competitors, which consist mostly of health care providers outside of the East Texas area. “We would not be a progressive organization if we weren’t,” Thomas added. “After all, understanding their efforts and their accomplishments allows us to recognize what we need to do to meet the needs of those we serve,” he said. Part of its philosophy of service is to provide as many local health care options as possible so residents can heal in their home communities. Ultimately, ETMC looks to other health care organizations in the the area as partners they can work with to provide care as necessary for the best patient outcomes.On the financial side, ETMC established a few other separate companies in addition to their hospitals and clinics. These include HealthFirst TPA (a third-party

page 7 administration firm that helps organizations offer self-funded health plans to their employees), FirstChoice Cooperative (a large purchasing group that serves hundreds of clients with volume purchasing of goods) and Paramedics Plus (an ambulance management service that administers EMS care in certain areas of Florida, Oklahoma, Indiana and California). The company is not publicly traded. “We are an independent organization that is selfowned. There are no stockholders at ETMC,” said Byron Hale, Chief Financial Officer. ETMC also works with their patients for all financial issues. “ETMC works with people each day to provide affordable health care. We discount heavily for those without insurance, and we are open to working with people in need of payment plans for their health care services. We do this every day in our facilities,” Hale said. Although ETMC has several hospitals and clinics spread throughout the area, the organization is currently planning two more. “ETMC Henderson is currently undergoing a major renovation to expand and modernize much of the facility, including adding an all-new emergency department. Construction is also under way for a brand new $35 million ETMC Quitman hospital,” Roge said.

Photo by Irving Marmolejo

16  •  The Pine Curtain


Jacksonville

page 8

and retain existing jobs in Jacksonville. This September Luvata will purchase a building in the industrial park through an incentive plan offered by JEDCO, in which they provide the property and a portion of the funding for the building. “They also provide us with some training and employment incentive plans. In the first two years, for the first 50 employees, they provided us with a couple of incentive programs,” Mayer said. The Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce works along with Mayer and the Jacksonville Economic

Bottom Right: Dan Davis, owner of Davis Steel Work and Keila Steppe, one of Adam’s apprentices working at the forge . Bottom Left: Steppe is waiting for the forge to reach higher temperature to start working on some hair sticks.

Features

the moment. “We are working on a custom Japanese sword. When finished this katana will be worth $15,000,” Davis said. According to Adams and Davis this specific sword takes four blacksmith masters working together for at least six months with total concentration. Anyone interested in blades and

page 11

Photo by Irving Marmolejo

Shadowhawk

Development Corporation to attract new businesses interested in relocating to Jacksonville. “We are trying to work with companies and manufacturing to strengthen their manufacturing process and to improve their bottom line profit,” Prcin said.

Photo by Irving Marmolejo

May 10, 2012•  17  


Features

Longview land from our business parks. It’s all about getting businesses in town,” David said. According to David, Longview is an ideal place for businesses to make their home. One reason is the city is centrally located on the I-20 corridor. Also, Longview is not considered a metro area, which David said is a point in its favor. “Longview also has a lot of water,” she added. “Even through the drought, we had and still have an abundance of water.” In recent years, the most well-known company that has made Longview its home is Neiman Marcus. The luxury retail store made Longview the location of its national distribution center. “Again, it’s because of location. We’re centrally located between the East and West Coast,” David said. Longview’s Chamber of Commerce is pushing for local shops to thrive as well. “If you shop locally you are keeping local dollars working here at home; our community, local businesses, jobs and schools all prosper,” Diana Northcutt, community development coordinator for the Longview Chamber of Commerce, said. The Longview Chamber, Northcutt said, highlights one of its members each week in its blog The Business View. The promotion is part of a program called “Try It Local”. “In 2011, the Longview Chamber of Commerce accepted a contract from LEDCO to handle commercial and retail development. Through this contract we promote our community for potential commercial and retail development, attend state and national trade shows, and assist existing business owners to grow and prosper,” Community 18  •  The Pine Curtain

page 9 Development Director Mary Whitton said. Ultimately, Northcutt believes that for fledgling companies, businesses and industries, Longview is one of the best places to settle down. “Longview is the commercial hub for the Longview Metropolitan Statistical Area and the regional hub for medical services, employment, shopping, entertainment, restaurants, events and outdoor recreation. There are over 300,000 people that travel to Longview to shop, play, and dine,” Northcutt said.


Cross Roads ISD Graduation By Amy Weatherholtz

achieve her associate degree from TVCC before she receives her high school diploma.” Cross Roads High School is located in a rural cattle-producing community approximately nine miles from Malakoff and 12 miles from Athens at the junction of FM 3441 and Highway 59.

May 10, 2012•  19  

News

Fifty-six seniors will cross the stage during the Cross Roads Independent School District commencement ceremony on June 1. “We are graduating 100 percent of our seniors,” said Kim Mattingly, Cross Roads High School Student Support Director. CRHS has maintained its 100 percent ratio for an average of 50 students each year for the past few years. Mattingly said CRHS participates in a credit recovery system for students who are behind on course credits. “Our commitment at Cross Roads is to provide a high quality educational experience for every child attending our school,” CRISD Superintendent Clay Tompkins said. Students not only receive support from the staff at CRISD and community members, they also receive life lessons. “Our ultimate goal is to help in the development of graduates to be responsible, productive adults with values reflecting outstanding citizenship,” Tompkins said. Students also receive recommendations to take concurrent classes at Trinity Valley Community College in Athens, as well as classes eligible for both high school and college credits. Mallory Garcia, a current junior at CRHS has been participating in concurrent classes. “My daughter (Mallory) is an A student,” Rhonda Garcia said. “At the rate she is going she will


Opinion

Four Winds Renaissance Faire Bottom: A lady weaving to make medieval clothe. Left: DeWitt’s ‘Punch & Judy’ show, a comedy puppet show. Next Page : Iron Hill Vagabonds. The Celtic music group.

Photo by Kelley Connor

Photo by Kelley Connor

20  •  The Pine Curtain


News

Photo by Kelley Connor

Photo by Kelley Connor

May 10, 2012•  21  


The Knights Bottom: Clean impact during the jousting competitions. Next Page page: Sir Dustin.

Photo by Irving Marmolejo

News

Right: Sir Ronald ‘the hammer Martel’ Slashing an apple

Photo by Irving Marmolejo

22  •  The Pine Curtain


News Photo by Kelley Connor

May 10, 2012•  23  


News

Photo by Irving Marmolejo

Photo by Irving Marmolejo

Photo by Irving Marmolejo

Photo by Irving Marmolejo

24  •  The Pine Curtain

Right : Sir Dustin aiming with his spear. Top right: Captain Thom Bedlam prepared for battle. Top Left: The youngest of the knights. Middle left: Sir Dustin helmet on. Left: Sir Roland heading to the jousting line.

Photo by Irving Marmolejo


Art by: Irving Marmolejo Collection: Pencil, Color and InkNatural Beauty

Art + Life

It is something in your smile That made me feels addicted And during the night By your arms I fell abducted It was something in your eyes That made the wrong right And during the day The desire of try it again How far are your steps, how distant the train? Continues on pg 26 May 10, 2012•  25  


You are beautiful under the sun under the rain Golden skin dry or wet You are my Mary Jane My drug with a Latin name If I’m a star you are my fame Do not run away, I have a plan, I found the way to be together always and always. I will kidnapped you If it is your desire To be always at my side From today until I die

Art + Life

Continues on pg 29

26  •  The Pine Curtain


Art + Life Drawing by Irving Marmolejo

May 10, 2012•  27  


Art + Life

Drawing by Irving Marmolejo

28  •  The Pine Curtain


Be my everything, my whole truth or my sweet lie be my smile or a tear when I cry I want you to be my achievement or the proud say of a hard try be my welcome or a beautiful bye like a wave she comes and goes to the bay

Drawing by Irving Marmolejo

like a rainbow she appears when it rains You are in my heart you are in my veins This is your poem; do you want to hear the end? Just stay.

Drawing by Irving Marmolejo

May 10, 2012•  29  

Art + Life

-Irving Marmolejo


The Process:

Sketches Drawing by Irving Marmolejo

Art + Life

Drawing by Irving Marmolejo

Drawing by Irving Marmolejo

30  •  The Pine Curtain

Drawing by Irving Marmolejo


Art + Life Drawing by Irving Marmolejo

May 10, 2012•  31  


Unconditional love a ‘Rover’ requirement Top far left: little Katie is happy to have her little Romeo back; Left: Teresa Johnson gets a hug from Little Man; Direct Bottom: Daisy gives the day’s list of chores to owners Kyle Jenkins and Debra Parker.

Art + Life

Lower Left: Bailey, who just arrived with Kyle, sits waiting in the Jeep for another ride. Lower Right: the “most dreaded duty at the shop,” according to Chad Jenkins... Poop-scooping;

32  •  The Pine Curtain


Dog quotes of the day: Top: “I thought we had a deal, man. No bath.” Bottom: “Did I hear you say ‘Bacon’? Cuz I could have sworn...” Top: Eva Davis talks to Precious while trimming the hair between her toes; Right: Debra takes Gretchen in for her bath. Bottom Right: Charlie braces himself against Teresa while getting the spa treatment; Bottom Left: Toothpaste flavor? Chicken; and a face only a mother could love; Background :Lights flicker on at 7 a.m., the beginning of another busy day.

Art + Life May 10, 2012•  33  


Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good; his love endures forever. Psalm 107:1

The Pine Curtain, Issue 9, Special Business Edition  

In this Special Business Edition we are featuring profile of two of the most interesting local artisans who has become part of the tradition...

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