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DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016

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In a way, I think we are all designers. My grandmother had a torn arm muscle. She got quite handicapped; and everyday tasks caused her a lot of frustration and pain. Still, she barely complained about it, and found beautiful and smart solutions to be able to write letters and to tie her shoelaces. Every day, we need to find creative solutions for various problems. Most of this process happens unconsciously. We all have our own way of finding these solutions, using our creativity and communicating it. The difference with everyone else is that we, as designers, try to understand it. To develop a good idea, I have to see, feel, and understand the true goal that I want to achieve. It’s about getting my own thoughts, controlling them, and structuring them. I think designing starts with understanding yourself. And maybe I can put in a little design here?

Contact me any time: pieter90@gmail.com +31 6 4480 4124 nl.linkedin.com/in/pietersmakman PAGE 2

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016


WHO IS THIS? I am Pieter Smakman, Industrial Designer graduated at the TU Delft. I really like my profession; building new things is something I have enjoyed since I was a child. The projects in and outside the univesity were all confirmations that I wanted to make things, that I enjoyed creating things from scratch and that few things are more satisfying than seeing a sketch turn into a prototype. But none of these moments were the real beginning. I think I chose Industrial Design Engineering when I was 6 years old. I got a tape recorder from my parents for Sinterklaas, I put a strange square object with wheels inside and hit the little triangle. Music seemed to play from inside my head. I was terrified, and then thrilled, and then amazed. I had just witnessed something that I would want for the rest of my life. A moment, where technology seemed to be indistinguishable from magic.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016

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THE CURATIO The development of a dedicated 3D Hand Scanner; my graduation project. The medical branch needs and develops a lot of very personalized products, like tailor-made surgical instruments, orthoses and prosthetics. Right now, scanning a hand is very hard due to the agile nature of the hand and the inability of most 3D Scanners to scan all 360 degrees at the same time.

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Using 32 Raspberry Cameras, 5 Laser Pointers and Photogrammetry software, a 3D Model can be created which can be used to create a 3D Printed brace. A working prototype was built to prove the working principles of the product. With this prototype, detailed hand scans and a couple of printed braces have been produced.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016


TECHNOLOGY THE HUMAN CHOICE HAND Most 3D Scanners are based on an optical technique; this enables flexibility, speed and precision.

With 27 bones, the hand is one of the most flexible and precisely controlled parts of the human body.

Four main groups have been selected to be analyzed in detail. Photogrammetry proved to be the best choice, because it is flexible (a large variety of components and setups can be chosen), it is very fast (scan can be made in 1/100 s) and components are cheap and can be bought off-the-shelf.

Scanning the hand 360° is very difficult due to the agile nature of the hand. Most scanners have a particular point of view; this means that the scanner has to turn around the hand, or the hand has to turn in front of the scanner. Both ways, the hand will move and there will be loss of accuracy.

WHY SCAN THE HAND?

CARPIFIX

ANTHROPOMETRY

MEDICAL INSTRUMENT

PROFESSIONAL GEAR

The Carpifix is a 3D Printed Cast specifically designed for the Distal Radius Fracture (a very common injury). The cure of a Colle’s Fracture, a “broken wrist”, comes most of the time with a plaster cast around the wrist. In contrast, the Carpifix is light, could be taken into the shower and is much more comfortable for the skin.

Every designer understands the importance of reliable anthropometric data. This is essential for developing fitting products and safe equipment.

Often, surgeons have to perfom eight hours of straight surgery. It is obvious that his tools should fit his hand very well, or he will experience a lot of stress and pain in his arms and hands.

Golfing gear which precisely fits your hand, cycling grips individually designed or a steering wheel fitted to a formula 1-driver.

The acquisition of anthropometric hand data is now expensive and labour-intensive.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016

The scanner could be very benefitial, because it can precisely capture the hand in the right position.

The possibilities of professional tools and gear seem endless, when considered that a scan could be sent to a production facility at the other side of the world.

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PHOTOGRAMMETRY A lot of questions had to be answered. How many pictures were necessary to create a good model? Where should the cameras be positioned? What is the influence of light in the environment and projection? To answer these questions, I built a diorama; a flexible setup that allowed me to take a lot of pictures with one Raspberry camera of a mannequin arm. More than 100 scans were made to get insight in the influencing parameters and to design the ‘perfect’ camera setup. After discovering the ideal lighting and projection circumstances, a curve could be made, which showed the relation between the amount of pictures and the accuracy of the model. For a model with a maximum deviation of 1 mm, 32 pictures were necessary.

The Camera Curve. PAGE 6

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016


PROTOTYPE WORKFLOW The Prototyping phase can be roughly devided in two seperate developments. One is the Photogrammetry part, where I tried to find the ‘perfect’ camera setup. The other one is the development of a system and network of 32 Raspberry Pis which should be able to take 32 pictures at the exact same time.

SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE How to design a 32-fold camera? This has been the most determining question for the project. The main choice was to either build a dedicated computer which could trigger and process 32 cameras at the same time, or divide this task to microcomputers. For this project, 32 Raspberrys were the cheapest and best option. They are controlled with a Python script, which triggers the cameras at the same time. Afterwards, they will send the pictures one by one to a central place via Wi-Fi.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016

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DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016


RESULTS After weeks of intensive optimization, the prototype produced hand scans with a maximum deviation of 1.5 mm from the human hand. The results were of course not perfect yet, but were very promising: fine details, as tendons on the skin, can be discovered and especially the wrist was very accurate.

FINAL PROTOTYPE

BUSINESS MODEL

After acquiring most important parameters, like camera count, camera distance, lighting and projection, the final prototype could be developed. Brackets which precisely fit the laser projectors and cameras could be 3D Printed, the PMMA frame was laser cut and aluminum profiles were used to create 2 rings with cameras. The prototype has been optimized countless times, till it started producing good hand scans (see above).

The Carpifix (3D Printed Brace) was the starting point of the project; the business model has been created with that medical focus.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016

In the Business Model, the docter takes the pictures, sends them to the company, and the company processes them and creates a brace. This way, the doctor doesn’t have to learn any software, the company is in control of all crucial (processing) steps and it can incorporate a product-service model.

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WATERWICK BRIX A modular green building system; our first mass-produced consumer product. During the start of the summer of 2014, Robin Jones, Mauricio Sandoval and I sat together. Although we enjoyed conceptual projects and also executed a couple of embodiment projects, we wanted to make a real, massproduced product. We contacted Visser Supplies, a large Dutch player in the automation industry, for a project. We knew that he tried to make a modular green consumer project, and also that he had trouble with it.

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We suggested to develop the product in EPP (Expanded PolyPropylene), a material which offers great structural properties, possibilities for containing water and production with undercuts. Especially the undercuts ensure a tight fit of the bricks and provide more smart functionality. After 4 months of conceptualization, embodiment, research, a lot of prototyping and tight coorporation with production, the product is now for sale in stores.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016


GREEN WALL Initially, the intention of the product was to build a Green Wall. Along the way, the concept expanded into a fun, modular system which you can use in many different settings. Watering the Brix is easy due to an overflow system. By filling the top Brix, the water will flow down and ultimately filling all Brix.

SCENARIO This product could transform grey cubicles into modern offices with the possibility to adjust the flex-workspot to your liking. The Brix can easiliy give spots more or less privacy by playfully building small green walls or structures.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016

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RESEARCH & PROTOTYPING The watering system plays a big role in the concept. Due to the unique patented Waterwick system, the plant can drink water out the basin in the middle of the brick with a water-absorbing cord, that functions like a straw. The size of the basin was still undefined at the start of the project. We defined a watering period of 2 weeks, and performed tests with the water consumption of various types of plants. The basin is now dimensioned that 5 of the most water-consuming plants could live for 2 weeks on that amount of water.

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Cactus Klimop1 Klimop2 Vetplant

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DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016


BUILDING Two varations have been produced; Building Brix, and Tower Brix. The Tower Brix have plants on each side and can only be extended vertically. The Building Brix can be extended in corners, due to a cut-out in one of the walls.

PRODUCTION WATERFLOW Due to the unique properties of EPP (Expanded PolyPropylene), we were able to create undercuts in the mould. This gave us the freedom to create details like the pot-holder in the picture on the left. It also enabled a good snapfit between the Brix.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016

A dummy-proof Waterflow was one of the thoughest challenges in the project. By using a cheap plastic cap, we made sure that the Brix would fill one by one and that no Brick would be skipped when the holes were located exactly above each other.

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Z-BIN POLITO Creating the ultimate beach bin for Zweva; a multidiciplinairy master project. There is just something special about the beach. Everybody loves the beach; it’s a moment in pure nature, you can find yourself when you feel lost and you feel more balanced after a visit to the beach. It also really hurts to see litter on the beach; it’s disgusting, and feels more wrong than trash in other places. The

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beach is something precious, and we can do better. Our design team got the assignment to design something in waste managment, we decided to design the Ultimate Beach Bin. The project became a puzzle, where we had to increase Interaction, solve Ground Water issues and improve the Emptying system.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016


COMPANY ANALYSIS

CRITERIA

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3 4 WASTE MANAGEMENT INDUSTRY

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FARMS SEPERATE SANITATION OFF SHORE

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HOUSEHOLDS

10 11 12 POTENTIAL MARKETS

FOOD WASTE

MARKET CHOICE

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ENERGY GENERATION URINE COLLECTION

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HOUSEHOLD

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BEACH

10 11 12 DIRECTIONS

DIRECTION CHOICE

DIRECTIONS

INTERACTION

The project started with a very extensive Analysis phase. We explored various markets and places for our project, from Yacht Clubs to Farms. Beaches proved to be most promising, because the market size, necessary partners and Rotational Molding (batch size, investment) suited each other very well.

The project became Integrated Design, where we had to work on several parts at the same time. I focus mainly on the technical parts of the project, but the Interaction part of was also very important. We researched who polluted the beach most, why they did it and how we could raise awareness in these specific user groups.

GROUNDWATER

COLLECTION

The Technical part of the project can be divided in two sub-parts; Groundwater and Collection. It became clear that it would be beneficial to place an extra row of containers closer to the sea. This would significantly decrease the average walking and viewing distance, thereby increasing the opportunity for interaction with the bins. In order to do this it is necessary to find a solution for the groundwater problem (bins pop out of the sand with high groundwater).

The Situational Analysis gave some interesting insights in the emptying process that is now needed to empty the Semi-Underground Zweva bins; they need a crane for the (max) 60 Kg bags. A Hand-Emptying solution will make sure that the new Zweva bin is the 贸nly bin that is Semi-Underground, and can still be bought without needing a huge truck. It will give a huge Unique Selling Point to the Z-Bin Polito, and make it possible for every beach to get this volume.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016

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MULTIPLE BAGS

ERGONOMICS

The concept is based on the principle of reducing the force by splitting up the total amount of weight by three. This means the bags are able to be taken out by hand, because the force will fall in the ARBO-legislation when divided by three (60/3 = 20). The propellor lid makes sure that you can easily see which bag is not full, and no garbage will end up on the edges between the bags.

The videos of the emptying test were analysed to see the positioning of the body during the process. These positions influenced parameters in a calculator that is provided by the FNV, used to calculate the maximum weight an employee is allowed to lift in the Netherlands. We made a quick Prototype in our workshop with steel profiles to test and optimize the emptying process.

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DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016


PRINCIPLE

TESTING

When the groundwater level rises and the bin is (partially) submerged in this water, the air inside the bin (which is of course lighter than the water) will make the bin want to “float”. To keep the bin in place, the volume of sand (mixed with water) above the anchor ring should exceed the volume of air inside the bin that is “submerged”.

In order to verify the working principle of the groundwater solutions a test with a scale models has been performed. Models of the proposed 500L bin with groundwater concepts have been built on a 1:7.5 scale. With the right scale factors, we determined the anchoring force and force needed for placement and removal.

END RESULT The end result is a modular product, where the client can choose volume, various Interaction top parts, Emptying method and Groundwater anchoring.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016

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DE TOGO TOGETHER Fitting the warm, classic DE moment in the cold, hectic To Go environment. This project was executed for Douwe Egberts, the biggest Dutch coffee company and a big player on the European coffee market. The assignment was titled “Enhancing the Quality Coffee Experience� in the To-Go scene. Clearly, there is a trend in people demanding more quality and getting higher expectations for coffee. With very successful other brands like Nespresso and Starbucks, DE has to

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be able to still stand out, be innovative and identify who they really are. While Nespresso gives you a star-treatment and Starbucks aims for reaching trendy, young people, DE gives a more classic, warm, coming-home feeling. The DE Togo Together uses these values to make DE stand out in the cold, hectic To-Go environment.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016


THE VISION

THE CONCEPT

When looking at the values of DE, it seems that almost everything is the opposite of the To-Go environment. DE is Warm, Together and Coming Home; To-Go is Cold, Alone and Hectic. This makes the environment very interesting for DE, because everyone’s morning can be improved by cleverly implementing the classic DE moment.

The Final Concept is called “DE Togo Together”. It’s a standing table, shaped in the logo of DE. The concept offers a warm seat for the coffee drinker, who can relax and enjoy a moment of warmth together with other travelers. The tables can be placed in various configurations, and a small bar is included.

Half a million Dutch people travel by train each day. Especially during Winter times, the platform can be very unpleasant; windy, cold, and trains are often delayed. Right now, people have to get coffee by waiting in line, pay, and return to the cold platform (to see the train).

Because people often travel alone, it was chosen to create a very uncomplicated, easy social environment for the consumers. The travelers sit together and will experience the social aspect of the environment, but they sit next to each other and not towards each other.

In the new process, some important things change; the consumer can get coffee with his DE Club Card among other Club Members, he gets his personal taste with one swipe of his card, Then, the consumer will be enjoying his coffee in a warm, relaxed and social way. He will have a moment of rest and be busy with the coffee instead of the trains. This will have a very positive influence on his perception of the coffee.

Most people don’t have the need to socialize and meet new people on a busy, hectic morning. But that doesn’t mean that they have to drink their coffee alone; it’s just like a bar or a restaurant.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016

In high-traffic hours, there will be someone occupying the little bar. It’s then possible to buy coffee via self-service, or via the personnel.

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PRODUCTION

CONFIGURATIONS

When choosing a batch for more than 100 tables, Sheet Forming becomes most interesting; the cost price can become lower than 550 euros per unit with a batch size over 100 pieces. The whole Table is designed in a way that there are a lot of parts identical; the four sides are exactly the same. The Top Part can also be Sheet Formed to lower the cost price.

The tables can be placed in various configurations, since every station is very different. For large stations, more tables might be needed, while for smaller stations three tables will be sufficient. The placement of the tables is also adjustable; the tables can be placed in a very strict order, or in a playful way. It’s easy to adjust the configurations per platform.

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DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016


DE CLUB The DE Club Card is a very important part of the concept. Getting coffee at the station is now often paid with cash, people have to grab coins or their pin card for each cup of coffee. With the DE Club Card, people can pay very easy for their coffee, with their account. Multiple subscriptions can be chosen, for instance a subscription for employees to encourage them to use public transport.. The feeling of a club is most important here; DE becomes a part of you, and gives an exclusive feel to the coffee and the environment.

DETAILS To make the product suitable for mass production, the product should be very simple to produce and assemble. The bottom of the Table is made out of 4 welded plates. On top of these plates, the seats will be placed in one piece. Mounted in this Top Part are 8 Barcode Scanners and 8 Halogen Heating Elements, to make

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016

the warmth of the concept possible. The seats are made with a special pattern, so the light of the Halogen Elements will shine through and give the feeling of warmth, and it shows to other people that the seats are heated (see below). The heaters are activated by placing the cup with a unique bar code on the scanner.

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PROJECT DRYCOURT Redesigning with a giant prototype; a project in Embodiment Design. On a rainy day, an idea came to Ronald van der Horst, a professional Tennis Teacher that organizes his own Future Tennis Tourney every year. When it starts to rain heavily during this tournament, it results in a small disaster; the gravel court will be overwhelmed by water and it will take many hours and hard work to dry the court. He was tired of this terrible risk, and wanted to prevent the court from getting wet. He made a prototype, but the project failed.

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That is when he came to TU Delft to breathe new life into the project. We (a team of 6 designers) were asked to redesign the prototype, test it and embody it. It was a huge challenge, due to the very difficult requirements; the product has to withstand a storm, but we were unable to make adjustments to the court or attach it to objects around the court. It resulted in an extensive ideation process, many expert-visits and the production of a giant prototype.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016


CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

NEW STORYBOARD

HOW IS IT IMPROVED? The DryCourt got a huge make-over. After exploring other options of covering the huge area of the tennis court and surroundings (i.e. using cables or frames), an inflatable frame proved to be the best choice. With the addition of a sloped canvas with drainage, an easy folding system and metal help-tools, some significant improvements have been realized. With a slight increase of budget, the built-up time has been brought down by 83%, weight has almost been halved and amount of people needed is also halved.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016

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DEVELOPMENT & PROTOTYPING In this part I eleborate more on a very interesting part of the project; the Tools. In the second half of the project after we agreed on the global design, I mainly focussed on the development of these Tools, so this part feels more like “my design� than other specific parts of the DryCourt (like water drainage). The Tools enabled the

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DryCourt (150 kg) to be transportable by one person, and dramatically decreased the build- and removal time of the DryCourt. We conducted a lot of tests and made many Prototypes to test the concepts. While testing often unexpected problems came up, so we had to solve this with new ideas and many adjustments..

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016


ROLL TOOL

RIDE TOOL

Probably the most important Tool is the Roll Tool. It’s a bar with two wheels on each side, that you can use to roll up the DryCourt. First, the DryCourt will be folded till it is one stroke. You then place the Roll Tool at the end. Secondly, the DryCourt will be attached to the bar at two attac;hment points. Than two persons have to twist the wheels to wrap the lane around the bar.

An important addition to the Roll Tool is the Ride Tool. A very small frame made from various profiles, that makes sure the DryCourt (150 kg) can be transported by one person. First, get two Ride Tools, then insert the Tool in one of the openings of the beams in the wheels, then turn the Roll around. When the castors are placed on the ground, you have the DryCourt on wheels.

OPTIMALIZATION

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016

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LONGBOARD LIGHTING Creating the first Longboard Lighting; project for Spanninga. Longboard Lighting; the first lighting ever that is developed especially for the Longboard. Longboarders tend to travel often in the dark, and are at great risk because of their poor visibility towards cars and other traffic. This lighting will fit on almost every Longboard, is very easy to mount and dismount and will increase

their safety dramatically. One front light will be mounted on the left side of the front, and a second light will be mounted on the tail. Now , there are no lights available for skate- and longboards, while they are very necessary for their safety. Longboarders travel more or less with the same speed as cyclists, and encounter the same risk.

PRODUCT

PLACEMENT

Front View PAGE 26

Side View

Rear View

Lighting on several boards

Placement of feet

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016


LONGBOARD STUDY

PERSONA

Adjusting the lighting is simple. First, the knob has to be twisted until the lighting almost fits the thickness of the longboard. From this point, the user only has to turn over the handle to tighten the mechanism to the longboard. This way, the user can make the lighting fit tight and steady with very little force and effort.

Also, the lighting is very adjustable for each longboard. Longboards are often quite different from each other, in form and sort. Important requirements are that it should fit on (almost) every Longboard, it should be easy, light and small. The lights became quick and handy; being safe has never been this easy.

ADJUSTING

OVERVIEW

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016

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3D/CAD SIMULATION A project with CAD in SolidWorks and SW Simulations. This project was executed for an elective, in which we had to model a real product in SolidWorks to a very detailed level. We (team of 2) took a mixer for the project; a common kitchen appliance. In our case there was a very interesting detail; one of the main parts of the mixer was

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broken. We executed various simulations to understand this mechanical failure of the product. It was a very good practice with the modelling of a real product, the mechanism inside the product (which could be turned on in SolidWorks), a MoldFlow analysis and static analysis.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016


BEFORE The choice for the part that we simulated was easy; this part was broken in the product. (See top left picture) It is a crucial part of the Mixer, the cast iron part that connects the engine to the gears that will rotate the beaters. There is a lot of stress and force on this part, because there are a lot of vibrations.

AFTER It is obvious that the improvements had a great impact; the Von Mises stress was brought down from 188 to 135 MPa. This was done with very little material; the rib is now 0,5 mm thicker and the fillets are only 2 mm. Most interesting is to note that the real product broke exactly on these places.

ADJUSTMENTS

An important reason for the fact that the part broke down, was the very thin wall thickness of the broken section. In the picture on the right, it is shown that in the crucial cross sections the ribs are 0.5 mm thick. With two simple improvements, we can increase the stress that this part can handle. First, we increased the wall thickness of these ribs to 1 mm. Then we added an extra rib, right across the area where the part broke. This diagonal rib will also make sure that the part can endure more stress by strengthening the part on its weakest point. Together with some fillets, the part became much stronger. DESIGN PORTFOLIO / PIETER SMAKMAN / 2016

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Industrial Design Portfolio 2016  
Industrial Design Portfolio 2016  
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