Issuu on Google+

Meghalaya Rural Development Society (MRDS) WORKSHOP ON

VALUE CHAIN MAPPING AND ANALYSIS FOR THE PIG AND POULTRY SECTORS

in selected districts of Meghalaya In collaboration with:

AH&V Department, Government of Meghalaya International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) ICSSR North East H University Campus

28-29 April 2011

Compiled and Documented by: Mark Lyngwa & Pier Paolo Ficarelli


TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. 2. 3. 4.

INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................... 3 OBJECTIVES OF THE WORKSHOP ..................................................................................................... 3 WORKSHOP PROGRAM OVERVIEW ................................................................................................. 4 DECIDING WHETHER TO ENGAGE IN LIVESTOCK VALUE CHAIN PROMOTION ........................................... 4

4.1. 4.2. 4.3. 4.4.

LIVESTOCK FOR SRL – APPROACH .................................................................................................................................... 4 LIVESTOCK VC- APPROACH ............................................................................................................................................ 5 LIVESTOCK FOR SRL- SUPPORT ........................................................................................................................................ 5 LIVESTOCK VC - SUPPORT .............................................................................................................................................. 6

5. 6.

SOME MRDS BASIC CRITERIA FOR SUPPORTING LIVESTOCK VCS ......................................................... 6 INTRODUCING THE VALUE CHAIN CONCEPT ...................................................................................... 7

6.1. 6.2. 6.3.

HISTORY OF THE VALUE CHAIN CONCEPT AND KEY ISSUES ..................................................................................................... 7 DIFFERENT VALUE CHAIN APPROACHES ............................................................................................................................. 7 GENERIC FEATURES OF A LIVESTOCK VALUE CHAIN .............................................................................................................. 8

7.

MAPPING MRDS VALUE CHAINS ................................................................................................... 9

7.1. 7.2. 7.3.

VC BASIC INFORMATION ............................................................................................................................................... 9 ACTORS INVOLVED –BASIC INFORMATION ....................................................................................................................... 10 MRDS LIVESTOCK VALUE CHAINS ................................................................................................................................. 11

7.3.1. 7.3.2. 7.3.3. 7.3.4.

PIG VALUE CHAINS- BASIC INFO ........................................................................................................................................................ 11 PIG VALUE CHAIN IN JAINTIA HILLS DISTRICT - ACTOR MAP ................................................................................................................... 12 POULTRY VALUE CHAIN- BASIC INFO .................................................................................................................................................. 13 POULTRY VALUE CHAIN EAST KASI DISTRICT - ACTOR MAP .................................................................................................................... 13

7.4.

ANALYSIS OF MRDS PIG AND POULTRY VALUE CHAINS ...................................................................................................... 14

7.4.1.

VALUE CHAIN ACTOR AND PRODUCT IDS ............................................................................................................................................ 14

7.5.

PRODUCTIVITY AND ECONOMICS FOR SMALL SCALE PIG AND POULTRY UNITS........................................................................... 14

8.

PIG AND POULTRY PRODUCTION IN GARO HILLS ............................................................................. 16

8.1. 8.2.

PIGS ....................................................................................................................................................................... 16 POULTRY .................................................................................................................................................................. 16

9.

VC SUPPORT ACTIVITIES IN THE NEXT 3 MONTHS ........................................................................... 16

9.1. 9.2.

VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS COMPLETION ............................................................................................................................ 16 MRDS TEAM NEXT STEPS ........................................................................................................................................... 17

MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Page | 2


1. INTRODUCTION The Meghalaya Rural Development Society [MRDS] is a society registered in the Society Registration Act 1860. The organisation was established in 22nd June 2004, to implement the Livelihoods Improvement Project for the Himalayas in Meghalaya, a joint venture of the International Fund for Agricultural Development [IFAD] and the State Government of Meghalaya, India. The International Fund For Agricultural Development, a specialised agency of the United Nations working against poverty and hunger the world over, is jointly implementing with the Government of Meghalaya "The Livelihoods Improvement Project for the Himalayas" through the Meghalaya Rural Development Society(MRDS). The MRDS is implementing the project in 5 Districts of the state, i.e. RiBhoi, East Khasi Hills, Jaintia Hills, South Garo Hills and East Garo Hills. The workshop was attended by MRDS district teams led by Augustus Suting and by CBOs representatives in Mawkduk and Pingwait districts involved in pig and poultry production, respectively. The workshop enjoyed also the presence and support of the Animal Health and Veterinary Department of the Government of Meghalaya. The workshop was facilitated by Pier Paolo Ficarelli and Ram Deka from ILRI.

2.

OBJECTIVES OF THE WORKSHOP

• To understand the concept of value chains and the implications for MRDS support. • To start mapping a pig and poultry VC in two village clusters, based on the available information. • To identify present opportunities, issues/barriers information gaps in each chain. • To start identifying key support activities and next step for the upgrading of each chain.

MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Page | 3


3. WORKSHOP PROGRAM OVERVIEW Day 1: Thu. 28th

Day 2: Fri. 29th

 Introductions and Objectives

 Presentation Value Chain & Discussion

 Why engaging in Value Chain?

 Opportunities, gaps, issues, & barriers in VCs

 Introducing the Value Chain concept

 Promotion activities in VCs & strategies

 Mapping Pigs & Poultry Value Chain

 Next steps  Evaluation

4. DECIDING WHETHER TO ENGAGE IN LIVESTOCK VALUE CHAIN PROMOTION Before engaging in a value chain analysis awareness of the participants was raised about the implications of choosing a value chain approach. This was necessary to ensure that the context chosen by MRDS and the initiated support activities can respond to the necessary criteria and preconditions that apply for a market-oriented livestock production. Participants were asked to reflect in groups on the difference of approach and support activities between: a) b) c)

Pro-poor livestock development for sustainable rural livelihoods (SRL) Pro-poor livestock value chains What does this difference mean in terms of what should be done to promote one or the other? i.e. what are possible key support activities in case of a) and b)

4.1.

LIVESTOCK FOR SRL – APPROACH

Objectives

Self-reliance Food security Social empowerment Rural livelihood perspective

Focus

Farmer Types

Farmer Org.

Market

Link between on – farm and off-farm activities

Poor resource

Unorganised

Informal rural

Smallholder majority

CBOs

Natural resource management (NRM)

Landless

Informal

Occasionally accessed (cash need)

SHG

Women-centred

Female headed households

Marginal areas

Mixed farms Agriculture - 20% of household income

Village based organisational structures

MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Low income market Quality criteria by rural consumers

Page | 4


4.2.

LIVESTOCK VC- APPROACH

Objectives

Focus

Income increase

Productivity

Farm specialisation

Efficiency

National/Urban food supply chain

Quality produce Potential areas

Farmer Types

Better off small holders “Right” smallholder farmers Male oriented Commercial/semicommercial producers

Farmer Org.

Structurally organised

Formal

Legally recognised (e.g. coop)

Organised Urban/Export

Area based

High income

Regional and National branches

Agriculture - 50% of household income

4.3.

Market

Quality criteria by urban and international standards Regular produce outlet

LIVESTOCK FOR SRL- SUPPORT

Objectives

Intervention Type

Technologies

Type of service

Risk mitigation through diversification and complementarity on-farm

Household and local level

LEISA

Community mobilisation

Minimum/simplest execution Maximum benefit to livestock keepers (e.g. vaccination)

Access to basic agricultural information

Integration in farming system

Appropriate to local condition and farmer capacity

Climate change adaptation Community empowerment and farmer motivation Pro-poor policy advocacy

Maximisation of use of locally available resources

Environmentally friendly

Access to innovation Free services

Based on local know-how Local/local improved breeds

Strengthening community and farmer self-help organizations Action-learning e.g. through farmer experimentation

MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Page | 5


4.4.

LIVESTOCK VC - SUPPORT

Objectives

Market linkages Capacity development of existing farmer organisations

Intervention Type

Access of smallholders to formal markets

Technologies

Type of service

Modern

Integrated,

Science based

Decentralised

Comprehensive (from production to policy)

Based on global knowledge

Right quantity (scale)

Capacity building of service providers

Multi-level (local, district, state, national/international)

Exotic/ locally selected breeds

Right quality (standard)

Linkages with Service Providers

Economically viable

Intensification of production

Paid services

Access to financial services Financial risk management (e.g. insurance)

5. SOME MRDS BASIC CRITERIA FOR SUPPORTING LIVESTOCK VCS As a summary of the lively discussions, we also defined some MRDS context specific criteria for embarking in the support of pig and poultry value chains were as follows: Criteria for starting a Value Chain in Meghalaya              

Follow a step-by-step approach Build producer capacity in a gradual way! Road Connectivity Well trained Farmers (theory and practice for both fattening and breeding) Producer motivation Long term relationship with SHGs at village level Well established village cluster organisations and village representation mechanisms (CBOs) Market Access (urban and peri-urban) Availability of inputs at a reasonable distance (max. 20 Km), especially concentrate feeds, day old chicks and piglets Presence of bare-foot service providers (in remote areas) Organisation of decentralized veterinary services (in accessible rural areas) Public Vet. services commitment (in peri-urban areas) Access to insurance and finance services (only to larger scale operations e.g. for more than 100 birds) Co-ordination mechanism of service providers (service provision platforms) etc. etc. etc.

MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Page | 6


6. INTRODUCING THE VALUE CHAIN CONCEPT 6.1.   

HISTORY OF THE VALUE CHAIN CONCEPT AND KEY ISSUES

Value chain” type of constructs and their analysis originated from the manufacturing industry (1940) The value chain (VC) concept in the industry was coined more recently (Porter, 1980) The VC concept was applied to the agricultural development context only in the last decade (IDS,2000) ValueLinks manual (GTZ,2007)

VC Definition: “The full range of activities which are required to bring a product or service from conception, through the intermediary phases of production, delivery to final consumers, and final disposal after use”. VC concept emphasizes the linkages existing between or within networks of actors at each stage of the chain (different from the supply chain concept) The following points are common features in any Value Chain initiative: • • • • • • • •

Market as the main entry point for analysis Relationships between networks of producers, traders, processors, exporters, and retailers The means by which actor networks are/can be accessed Functions (the what) of each actor (by whom) along a value chain Standards for products Public private partnerships (PPP) and Community public private partnership (CPPP) Qualitative aspects (equity, quality of relations, governance etc.) Quantitative aspects (cost of raw materials, annual revenue, margins, volumes etc.)

6.2.

DIFFERENT VALUE CHAIN APPROACHES

As part of the introductory discussion on the Value Chain concept different approaches were also discussed to further clarify scope of application of the Value Chain concept to the MRDS context: 1. Market pull approach – Market/retailers define product, set price and standards and often vertically integrate the chain (contract farming, produce for export, including fair trade) 2. Problem- solving approach – How smallholders can access an existing chain or actor network in the market 3. Local provision approach – A specific local product is identified by producers to serve a specific local demand (large). Individual farmers and existing producer organizations carry out most of the value chain components. Public sector organizations/NGOs may play a facilitating role along the chain. The local product has to generate a tangible income change.

MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Page | 7


It was agreed that the second approach is the one that may be pursued by MRDS. This requires specific market outlets or network of actors involved in the pig and poultry markets to be indentified in Meghalya. Once suitable entry points have been identified direct deals between producers and retailers could be arranged to maximize producers’ profits. First priority in MRDS, though remain the strengthening of the producer base, in terms of quantity, quality and organization. On the other hand, it is important to avoid concentrating solely on the producer base following a so called “supply chain approach, without a deep understanding of the different markets targeted and assessing where opportunities are for higher producer participation and benefits. It has also to be remarked that nowadays the difference between a supply chain and a value chain analysis is often blurred. It was suggested that also the third approach could be of MRDS interest, once potential for the “right” product could be identified. The example of local provision system and marketing of certified OPV maize seeds of farmer preferred varieties was taken to the attention of participants, as an example of high value produce, fulfilling a high local market demand.

6.3.

GENERIC FEATURES OF A LIVESTOCK VALUE CHAIN

Based on the above example of a generic livestock value chain, participants were also made aware about the fact that livestock value chains are much more complex than crops. The risks involved in rearing animals and the complexities of interactions amongst actors along the chain make the development and implementation of pro-poor interventions following this approach very challenging. From here, the high rate of project failures experienced across the developing world. This obstacle was discussed just as a warning to the young MRDS staff about the need of caution, when embarking in this topic. The need of thorough knowledge management (i.e. learning from success and failure stories in India) and in the region was also highlighted in order to avoid repeating basic mistakes and incurring in failures. MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Page | 8


7. MAPPING MRDS VALUE CHAINS This table was presented in order to introduce the first step of a value chain mapping. The following table wanted focuses the attention of participants on the various actors and their different functions along the main chain components. Activities Actors

Planning Production Collection Retailing Consumptions

Producers

X

CBOs

X

X

X

Vets

X X

Researchers

X

[X]

X

Input suppliers

Extension

[X]

X

Processors

X

X

Retailers

X

X

Govt. Dept.

X

Consumers

X

NGOs/NSA

X

Bankers/Insurers

X

Others private

[X]

X

Then, a number of different charts were developed to guide the two groups (one on pig and the other on poultry) in first the mapping exercise and secondly, in the analysis of each chain. The focus of the analysis was on the initially chosen district realities. The analysis carried out was based on the available information amongst staff and the farmers. This was also an exercise necessary to highlight the existing information gaps in order to understand Value Chains and the type of support needed.

7.1.

VC BASIC INFORMATION

The objective of a VC mapping was articulated as follows: “To map systematically the actors participating in the production distribution marketing and sales of a particular product”

MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Page | 9


Issues often considered during the analysis of an agricultural VC are as follows:            

Boundaries of the chain Product definition Relationships & co-ordination Opportunities and barriers Information flow Infrastructure Productivity Performance Upgrading activities Winners & losers (margins/profits) Seasonality Gender participation

First participants were asked to focus on basic information for each chain based on the following guidelines: VC Boundaries

VC Location

Type of product (meat, live animals, egg)

Cluster, district

Type of market (rural, urban, informal, formal)

Distance from main town

Type of Consumers (Urban, rural-high, income/ low income)

Road accessibility Type and level of infrastructures relevant to the chain (e.g. Vet. Clinics)

7.2.

ACTORS INVOLVED –BASIC INFORMATION

Then in order to be able to map the different local actors participants were asked to list all the actors involved in the chosen clusters for both pig and poultry based on the following given categories:     

Producers (Farmers, CBOs, Breeders, SHG, Association) Intermediaries (Traders, Slaughterhouses, wholesalers ) Ancillary Service Providers (Feed, Vets, Transporters, Breeding Centres/units) Retailers (Hotels, Butchers, Supermarkets etc.) Consumers (Rural-Urban, Income-Low/High)

In a second step, participants were asked to create functional linkages amongst the different actors, as indicated in sketch visualised here: a VC map:

MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Page | 10


7.3.

MRDS LIVESTOCK VALUE CHAINS

7.3.1. PIG VALUE CHAINS- BASIC INFO This was the information presently available that started to be collected during the workshop: District Name: Ri Bhoi Type of product: Pork (Traders are in general also retailers) Type of market: (Rural informal/Urban) Type of consumers: (Rural/Urban) Infrastructure and services: ? Lumdiengan cluster

Wahmyntait cluster

Common Issues

No of villages (total)

No of villages (total)?

No of villages (active)

No of villages (active)?

Supply of Piglets

40 Households

27 Households

Breeding organisation

3 SHG (30 Members)

2 SHG (22 Members)

No of producers - 5

No of producers - 7

Financial support strategy (e.g. for pig-sty construction & feed)

Avg. no of pigs/producer-

Avg. no of pigs/producer- ?

No of breeding units – 1

No of breeding units – 1

No of breeding sows/unit -

No of breeding sows/unit?

Breed - ?

Breed - ?

Closest town?

Closest town?

Accessibility?

Accessibility?

Water availability Low-cost concentrate availability at local level

Another potential area of intervention for the support of a pig value chain seemed to be in the Jaintia hills District. Activities have started in the Mawkduk cluster. Other clusters seem to be more potential. For instance, the Rodonald cluster around the Kyndongtuber village. A survey in the area is currently undergoing to assess the potential for supporting market – oriented pig production in this cluster.

District Name: Jaintia Hills Type of product: Pork Type of market: Urban/formal Type of consumers: Urban Infrastructure and services:

MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Page | 11


Mawkduk cluster

Rodonald cluster

No of villages (total)?

No of villages (total) -

No of villages (active) - 3

No of villages (active) - No of Households - 800

No of Households - 36 No of SHGs – 2 (18 members) No of pig producers -12 Avg. no of pigs/producer- ? No of breeding units – 1 No of breeding sows/unit -?

Common Issues ?

No of SHGs – 20 (X members) No of pig producers – 500 Avg. no of pigs/producerNo of breeding units – 50 No of breeding sows/unit – 1-2 Breed - ?

Breed - ?

Closest town: Bhoirymbong (8 Km) Accessibility: Good all year round (new road in final stages of constructions)

Closest town: Jowai (15 Km) Accessibility: ?

7.3.2. PIG VALUE CHAIN IN JAINTIA HILLS DISTRICT - ACTOR MAP Based on the information available participants developed the following map starting identifying the various actor presently involved in the chain.

MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Page | 12


7.3.3. POULTRY VALUE CHAIN- BASIC INFO This was the information presently available that started to be collected during the workshop: District name: East Kasi Hills Type of product: live birds Type of market: Urban (Shillong) Rural (Smit) Type of consumer: Urban & Rural Infrastructure and services:????? Pingwait Cluster No of Villages - 5 Number of producers - 15 Average poultry unit size -? Birds produced from Nov.2010 to May 2011 - 3000 (2 cycles/year max.3) Breed - Kuroiler Closest town Shillong: (42 Km) Closest market: Smit (12 Km) – rural market Farthest market: Jowai (60 Km) – urban market Accessibility: Good

7.3.4.

Issues Infrastructure (?) Electricity Labour availability Availability of day-old chicks from Gvt. farm Distance for feed and day-old chicks Need of heating system for large units Lack of scientific approach Financial assistance procedures and purpose from MRDS, LIFCOM & Banks

POULTRY VALUE CHAIN EAST KASI DISTRICT - ACTOR MAP

MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Page | 13


7.4.

ANALYSIS OF MRDS PIG AND POULTRY VALUE CHAINS

After the mapping exercise, the first level of a VC analysis, we started deepening the analysis by identifying more specifically each actor and the product based on the available information (second level of analysis. For instance the role of local trader, that seems to carry different functions Participants realized that much more information is required and more work on data collection has to be carried out, which should be based on the guidelines below:

7.4.1. VALUE CHAIN ACTOR AND PRODUCT IDS Actor ID for each Actor

Name/ Acronym/ No. Key Function(s) Location and Distance from Cluster Gender Networks/ Org of service providers Loan amount (when applicable) Cost of service (hidden or real)

7.5.

Product ID

Live weight price of live animal at farm gate Price of product (eggs, broiler, pig) at farm gate Market Price for both product and live animals Output/ farmer/ time Output trader/processor/ time Cost of Feed /Kg Cost of production inputs (day old chicks & piglets) Cost of feed (concentrate & single feed component used) Quantity of input used per production cycle Transport costs Rs/mt./km

PRODUCTIVITY AND ECONOMICS FOR SMALL SCALE PIG AND POULTRY UNITS

Key component of a value chain analysis are volumes and gross income and margins at the different level of the chain. Participants found difficult to estimate the producer output of each chain based on average pig and poultry productivity parameters and to assess the number of producers and/or breeders needed to attain specified market targets. Similarly, data were missing to establish which amount of inputs was required for each production cycle to establish a basic economic balance sheet to establish internal rate of returns. Pig unit production parameters

Crossbred

A B C D

Average Price Kg/LW (INR) Price of a breeding sow (INR) Price of a breeding boar (INR) Growing period to market size (months)

100

E F G H I

Average litter size Farrowing Interval (months) Annual reproductive rate (piglets) Piglet survival rate at weaning Mortality rate after weaning

10 7.5 16 0.8 0.05

J K

Effective farrowing rate LW at 10 months/market size (Kg)

12.8 80

10

MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Page | 14


L

LW production /sow (kg)

M N O P

Average fattening unit size Output/unit/cycle (pigs) Output/unit/year (pigs) Output/unit/year (INR)

Q

No. sow/boar

1024 2 1.9 2.28 18240 5-10

The big question going around during the workshop was what is needed to produce one pig to be sold to the market every day over 365 days. Participants were asked to try to answer the first question for pigs. Based on the production parameters in the table above, we reached the following conclusions:    

To make available a fatten pig a day every day of the year (365/N)= 192 Avg. fattening units have to be active in a given area. The number of weaners to be made available annually is therefore (N*192)=384 To produce 384 weaners/year a min. of (384/J)=30 breeding sows have to be in production Assuming a sow mortality rate of about 5% , a min. of 17 breeding units of 2 sows have to be in place

A second set of questions that derived from the first one were how much feed would be then required and what would be the gross and net income of an intensive and semi-intensive pig or poultry unit. MRDs took the challenge to work out the answers to these questions for both pigs and poultry and start collecting data and creating different databases/spreadsheets. From very rough calculations made during the workshop, the cost of feeding is critical for the efficiency of a pig unit. The high market price of concentrate feeds for pigs makes smallholder pig enterprise economically non viable. Exclusive use of locally available pig feed resources, without appropriate protein, vitamin and mineral supplementation, stunt growth of penned pigs. Strategies for low-cost pig feeding and decentralized concentrate feed production units are a key to the success of smallholder pig enterprises. Similarly, we also demonstrated in poultry that feeding Kuroilers with concentrate, as they were commercial broiler breeds, is very inefficient because of the Kuroilers slower growth rate. Local poultry breeds perform economically much better than Kuroilers raised in an intensive manner. Semi-intensive system for Kuroiler production and local availability of chicks are a key to the success of smallholder poultry enterprises in Meghalaya. Larger scale poultry intensive systems using commercial broiler breed may succeed, when rigorous management, appropriate bird housing, and poultry health/vaccination services are available. This may require also different organizational arrangements of producers and role of MRDS in to make intensive poultry rearing a viable economic enterprises for SHGs. The experiences of PRADAN in MP in pro-poor poultry VC were also shared during the workshop and a film on this topic showed.

MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Page | 15


8. PIG AND POULTRY PRODUCTION IN GARO HILLS The Garo Hills district is very remote and very few village clusters seems to be appropriate for starting a real market-oriented livestock production. In the majority of the villages, intervention types should follow a livestock for SRL approach, as described in ch. 4. MRDS activities for both pigs and poultry are moving in this direction.

8.1.

PIGS

System basic info Breed – Local No of pigs/unit – 3-5 Purpose- cash for emergency Housing – local material Feeding – Jungle leaves, tubers, maize Medicine – traditional Market - weekly Pig LW Price/kg - ? Piglet price – 700- 1500 Rs Pork price – 170/kg

8.2.

Intensification Constraints Diseases? Vet. Medicines? Remoteness and poor connectivity?

On-going activities Vaccination? Food feed crops? Training of para-vets?

POULTRY

System basic info Breed- Local /Kuroiler No of households- 10-20 Purpose – egg, meat, religious, emergency Bird housing – Local materials Feed sources- Free range scavenging maize grains Medicine – Local herbs Market – Weekly Price – 300 – 350 Rs/chicken

Intensification Constraints Diseases Vet. medicines Remoteness and poor connectivity Source of chicks ( Govt. poultry farm)

On-going activities Mass vaccination Fodder crops Vet inputs to MT (?) Medicine storage Attachment to vet farm for MT (?)) Bangladeshi technique of hatching

9. VC SUPPORT ACTIVITIES IN THE NEXT 3 MONTHS 9.1.

VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS COMPLETION

Workshop participants agreed on the following activities in order to complete the value chain analysis initiated during the workshop: 1. Develop a service provider profile based on given guidelines (functions, quantitative data, qualitative capacity analysis 2. Develop a service provider database 3. Collect information based on gaps identified for economic data for poultry and pigs. MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Page | 16


4. Put economic data on Excel spread sheets for feeding, production and breeding etc. 5. Pig cluster data collection data for assessing basic economics at producer and cluster level 6. Poultry cluster input/output modelling and data collection for assessing basic economics at producer and cluster level Responsible AMTS for 1. to 6. covering the 5 Districts 7. ILRI to retrace the VAIMS software – (Value Addition Information Management System) for livestock, developed by GTZ in West Africa.

9.2. A.

MRDS TEAM NEXT STEPS

Pig production

Pig review model for Pig breeding and fattening (Mawkduk district) Review the 8 pig units

Participatory Planning with SHG’s based on reviewed guidelines in Jaintia hills

B.

Poultry Production

Review approach in Pingwait district Intensive poultry training (15 – 20 Days) Identify commercial unit and arrange for farmer training

Pilot-test one intensive broiler unit (200 broilers) Address housing and electricity issues

Test low-cost alternatives for poultry unit heating Test a Kuroiler poultry Unit (Semi-intensive) Min. concentrate feed requirement (only at night) 10 – max. 20 Birds/Units 5 Units Local hatcheries based on Bangladesh model – (see Garo Hills first expereinces)

To be exposed to the overall Bangladeshi model (ILRI - MRDS)

C.

Development of Standard Operational Procedure

Develop guidelines for: Pig breeding units (Design training mgt.) Pig Fattening Unit Feeding Strategy Financial support from LIFCOM/Banks The same for intensive and semi-intensive poultry units (based on tests)

D.

Garo Hills (East and South)

Document herbal medicine Video & written documentation

Follow up initiated activities as planned

MRDS – Value Chain Mapping for the Pig and Poultry Sectors in Meghalaya

Page | 17


Pig Value Chain Meghalaya North East India