Page 1

About Face

May 15, 2012 – February 28, 2013


About Face May 15, 2012 – February 28, 2013


cover: Hendrik Kerstens, Hairnet, 2000. above: Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse, Lift Portrait 13, Ponte City, Johannesburg, 2008.


About Face Pier 24 Photography presents About Face, an exhibition focusing on the tradition of portrait-based photography. On view are nearly one thousand photographs drawn  primarily from the Pilara Foundation’s permanent collection. Revelations – the Diane Arbus retrospective at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art – inspired the purchase of the Foundation’s first photograph, a portrait from her challenging and emotive Untitled series. The emotional intensity characterizing this photograph has informed subsequent acquisitions for the collection.

Wearing, Yasumasa Morimura, and Tomoko Sawada, in which the artists alter their appearances to challenge traditional  notions of identity.

About Face encompasses wide-ranging approaches to portraiture from the mid-nineteenth century to present-day. The typology becomes a vehicle for chronicling individuals of a particular region and time in August Sander’s Face of Our Time and Richard Avedon’s The Family. Jim Goldberg’s Rich and Poor and Larry Sultan’s SF Society consider the socio-economic divide in San Francisco. Through a series of 66 self-portraits by Lee Friedlander from the past 50 years, one encounters many of the themes that have come to characterize his practice. Self-examination is also the  focal point in selected works by Cindy Sherman, Gillian

The exhibition also examines utilitarian modes of photography. On display are over 300 American mugshots from the early twentieth century, as well as a selection of hand-painted family portraits from Brazil known as Retratos Pintados.

The unique large-scale prints by Richard Learoyd, as well as Hiroshi Sugimoto’s series of Henry VIII and his six wives reconsider the long history of portraiture in painting. Hans-Peter Feldmann’s 100 Years consists of 101 portraits of people born from 1900 to 2000, tracing the span of a human life within which viewers can position themselves.

With the exponential growth of image-making, portraiture remains the most popular photographic genre. The exhibited works in About Face provide a context within which to consider the unique dynamic between the subject, photographer and viewer.


18 19

16

17

20

12 09

11

15

13

10

05

14

08 06 02

04

01 03 Restrooms

Entrance

07


01 Richard Avedon

02 Retratos Pintados

03 Hai Bo

04 Selected Portraits from the Pilara Foundation Collection 05 Nan Goldin:

13 Selections from Japan: Nobuyoshi Araki Katsumi Watanabe Rinko Kawauchi Tomoko Sawada

14 Selections from China: Wang Ningde Adou Hai Bo Liu Zheng

15 Diane Arbus

The Ballad of Sexual Dependency

06 August Sander: Face of Our Time

07 Mugshots Danny Lyon Paul Schiek 08 Hiroshi Sugimoto 09 Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood: Selections from the Carla Emil and Rich Silverstein Collection

16 Richard Avedon: In the American West

17 Hans-Peter Feldmann: 100 years

18 Lee Friedlander: Self Portraits, 1958-2011

19 Richard Avedon Mike Mandel Chuck Close Victor Skrebneski

10 Richard Avedon: The Family

11 Richard Learoyd

20 Larry Sultan: SF Society

12 Selections from South Africa: David Goldblatt Pieter Hugo Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse Zwelethu Mthethwa

Jim Goldberg: Rich & Poor


PIER 24 PHOTOGRAPHY Pier 24 Photography offers a venue for photographers, educators, collectors and curators to share photography and photographic ideas with the community. Our aim is to provide an environment to experience and quietly contemplate photography. In addition to presenting ongoing exhibitions, Pier 24 houses the permanent photographic collection of the Pilara Foundation. Richard Avedon, Richard Avedon, photographer, New York, May 31, 2002, 2002.


Richard Avedon 01


Retratos Pintados 02

“If you visit a house in the northeast of Brazil, you are very likely to see a photo painting on the wall. This is a tradition that dates back many years, when a black-and-white image was not deemed exciting enough. Painted photos are a way of bestowing status on members of your family (both dead and alive) and giving them an iconic, almost saint-like look. When the roving dealers visited these houses, in search of commissions, they were able to facilitate any dream. They could bring back the dead, dress you in expensive clothes and jewelry, and make you look years younger.� Martin Parr, 2010

Selected Retratos Pintados from Northeastern Brazil, n.d.


“He returns to his native region, each time discovering, with some remorse, new wrinkles on the faces of the people he knows. As one ages, the seasons and the years succeed each other ever more rapidly and become less distinct in the warehouse of memory.â€? Monica DemattĂŠ, 2010


Hai Bo 03

Hai Bo, 2008-1, 2008.


Paul Strand, Blind Woman, New York, 1916.


Selected Portraits from the Pilara Foundation Collection 04

Selected Portraits from the Pilara Foundation Collection Spanning over a century of the photographic medium, the 55 portraits on view in this gallery are drawn from the Pilara Foundation Collection. Canonical images such as Paul Strand’s Blind Woman, New York, Walker Evans’ photograph of Allie Mae Burroughs and Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California are positioned adjacent to contemporary color works by Alec Soth, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, and Rineke Dijkstra. By situating such wide-ranging works within a single gallery, relationships emerge based on aesthetic, scale, content and intent, between both familiar and lesser known photographs.


Selected Portraits from the Pilara Foundation Collection 04


1

1. 2. 3. 4.

2

3

Walker Evans, Penny Picture Display, Savannah, 1936. Mike Disfarmer, Arby and his sister and mother, c. 1940-45. Koos Breukel, Survivor of an Aircrash, 1998. Self Portrait, NYC, [Photobooth portrait taken during the 1976 William Eggleston MoMA exhibition], 1976.

4

5


Selected Portraits from the Pilara Foundation Collection 04

6

5. 6. 7.

Hendrik Kerstens, Hairnet, 2000. Frank A. Rinehart, Naiche, Hereditary Chief, Chiricahua Apaches, 1898. Peter Hujar, Queen with Fur Stole, Halloween, 1976.

7


1

2

3

4

5

6

7

5

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Paul Strand, Blind Woman, New York, 1916. Helmut Newton, Lisa, the beginning of “The Big Nudes,” Vogue Studios, Paris, 1981. Lisette Model, Coney Island, NYC, Bather Reclining, 1939-1941. Robert Bergman, Untitled, 1989. Nicholas Nixon, The Brown Sisters, 1976. Helmar Lerski, Metamorphosis, 595, from the series: “Metamorphosis through Light,” Tel Aviv, 1935-1936. Vanessa Beecroft, Black Madonna with Twins, 2006.


Selected Portraits from the Pilara Foundation Collection 04

8

9

10

11

12

11

8. Edward Steichen, Gloria Swanson, 1924. 9. Hellen van Meene, Riga Latvia, 2004. 10. Joe Schwartz, The Feminist, Broadway, Near Houston Street, New York City, 1930’s. 11. Edward Weston, Nude, 1939. 12. Alec Soth, Mother and Daughter, Davenport, Iowa, 2002. 13. Henry Wessel, Southern California, 1985. 14. Katy Grannan, Anonymous, Los Angeles, Boulevard 11, 2009.

13

14


1

2

3

5

4

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

William Eggleston, Memphis, c. 1969. Harry Callahan, Eleanor, c. 1947. Irving Penn, Alexandra Beller (D), New York, 1999. Jeff Wall, Young Man Wet with Rain, 2011. Todd Hido, Untitled #10502-42, 2011. Judith Joy Ross, The Stewart Sisters, H.F. Grebey Junior High School, Hazleton, Pennsylvania, 1992.

6

7


Selected Portraits from the Pilara Foundation Collection 04

8

7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

9

Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Head #11, 2000. Alec Soth, Charles, Vasa, MN, 2002. Richard Avedon, Andy Warhol, artist, New York City, August 20, 1969, 1975. Rineke Dijkstra, Almerisa, Asylum Center, Leiden, The Netherlands, March 14, 1994. Dorothea Lange, Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936.

10

11


Alec Soth, Charles, Vasa, MN, 2002.


Selected Portraits from the Pilara Foundation Collection 04

Rineke Dijkstra, Almerisa, Asylum Center, Leiden, The Netherlands, March 14, 1994.


1

11

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

2

12

3

13

Valerie Belin, Untitled, 2001. Nicholas Nixon, The Brown Sisters, Truro, Massachusetts, 2011. Lee Friedlander, Topless Bridesmaid, Los Angeles, California, 1967. Alec Soth, Daniel, Niagara Falls, Ontario, 2004. Philippe Halsman, Refugee Girl, Paris, 1938. Nicholas Nixon, John Royston, Easton, Massachusetts, 2006. Irving Penn, Truman Capote, New York, 1948. Neil Selkirk, Certain Women – Trina W., n.d. Walker Evans, Alabama Tenant Farmer Wife [Allie Mae Burroughs], 1936.

4

5

14

15


Selected Portraits from the Pilara Foundation Collection 04

6

7

16

17

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

8

9

18

Stephen Shore, Catfish Hunter, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 1978. Richard Avedon, Oscar Levant, pianist, Beverly Hills, California, April 12, 1972, 1972. Judith Joy Ross, Untitled, 1984. Jackie Nickerson, Paul, tea pruner, Malawi, 1999. BrassaĂŻ, A Prostitute playing Russian Billiards, Boulevard Rochechouart, Montmartre, c. 1932. William Eggleston, Untitled, 1973. Jacques Henri Lartigue, RenĂŠe Perle, Fingers to Lips, 1931. Lewis Hine, Happy street boy in Pennsylvania mill town, 1910. Consuelo Kanaga, She is a Tree of Life to Them, 1950.

10


1

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

2

Ralph Eugene Meatyard, Untitled, c. 1955. Helen Levitt, New York, c. 1940. Lucas Foglia, Acorn with Possum Stew, Wildroots Homestead, North Carolina, 2006. E.J. Bellocq, Storyville Portrait, c. 1912. Larry Clark, Untitled, from the series Teenage Lust, 1983.

3


Selected Portraits from the Pilara Foundation Collection 04

4

5


1 1.

Nan Goldin, Greer and Robert on the bed, NYC, 1982.


Nan Goldin 05

“THE BALLAD OF SEXUAL DEPENDENCY is the diary I let people read. My written diaries are private; they form a closed document of my world and allow me the distance to analyze it. My visual diary is public; it expands from its subjective basis with the input of other people. These pictures may be an invitation to my world, but they were taken so that I could see the people in them. I sometimes don’t know how I feel about someone until I take his or her picture. I don’t select people in order to photograph them; I photograph directly from my life. These pictures come out of relationships, not observation. People in the pictures say my camera is as much a part of being with me as any other aspect of knowing me. It’s as if my hand were a camera. If it were possible, I’d want no mechanism between me and the moment of photographing. The camera is as much a part of my everyday life as talking or eating or sex. The instant of photographing, instead of creating distance, is a moment of clarity and emotional connection for me. There is a popular notion that the photographer is by nature a voyeur, the last one invited to the party. But I’m not crashing; this is my party. This is my family, my history.” Nan Goldin, 1986

Nan Goldin, The Ballad of Sexual Dependency, 1983-2008.


August Sander, Antlitz der Zeit (Face of Our Time), 1910-1929.


August Sander 06

August Sander, Young Farmers, 1914.


August Sander, Pastry Cook, 1928.


August Sander 06

August Sander, Boxers, 1929.


August Sander, Antlitz der Zeit (Face of Our Time), 1910-1929.


Danny Lyon, Texas Prison, 1968


Danny Lyon, Paul Schiek, Anonymous Mugshots 07

1

2

4

3

5

“Classic mug shots, which typically pair a full-face picture with a profile, tend to be as impersonal as photo-booth pictures but more brutally matter-of-fact. The results aren’t intended as character studies; they’re descriptive, recording a hooked nose, a jutting chin, a mole, a scar –– features that can be used to identify the suspect if he ever comes to the police’s attention again. There’s no photographer behind the camera hoping to open a window on his subject’s soul, but because most mug shots are taken shortly after a suspect’s arrest, in a moment fraught with tension, fury, defiance, and shame, they can be incredibly revealing. Only the most carefully composed arrestee can avoid being emotionally naked.” Vince Aletti, 2012

1. 2. 3.

Paul Scheik, Bridges, 2011 Paul Scheik, Dunnell, 2011 Paul Scheik, Franklin, 2011

4. 5.

Paul Scheik, Smith, 2011 Anonymous, Mugshots, Scranton, Pennsylvania, 1900s-1940s.


2

1

1. 2.

Anonymous, Mugshots, Fulton County Prison Farm, Atlanta, Georgia, 1940s -1960s. Anonymous, Mugshots, Washington State, 1915-1923.


Anonymous Mugshots 07

Anonymous, Mugshots, Washington State, 1915-1923. (detail)


Anonymous, Mugshots, Scranton, Pennsylvania, 1900s-1940s. (detail)


Hiroshi Sugimoto 08


“In the sixteenth century Hans Holbein the Younger, German court painter to the British Crown, painted several imposing and regal portraits of Henry VIII. Based on these portraits, the highly skilled artisans of Madame Tussauds wax museum re-created an absolutely faithful likeness of the king. Using my own studies of the Renaissance lightning by which the artist might have painted, I remade the royal portrait, substituting photography for painting. If this photograph now appears lifelike to you, perhaps you should reconsider what it means to be alive here and now.� Hiroshi Sugimoto, 2005


Hiroshi Sugimoto 08

Hiroshi Sugimoto, Henry VIII, 1999.


1

2

4

5

Hiroshi Sugimoto, 1. Catherine of Aragon, 1999. 2. Anne Boleyn, 1999. 3. Jane Seymour, 1999.


Hiroshi Sugimoto 08

3

6

4. 5. 6.

Anne of Cleaves, 1999. Catherine Howard, 1999. Catherine Parr, 1999.


1


Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood 09

2

3

Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood: Selections from the Carla Emil and Rich Silverstein Collection “I’ve always been drawn to psychological pictures. In fact, most of the art that interests me, including film, theater and literature, deals with complicated psychological issues. And what is more complicated than the self? I think I started collecting pictures that deal with this subject before I even realized that I was doing it. At some point, though, I became quite aware of the attraction and the focus became intentional. I’m very pleased to curate this gallery at Pier 24 Photography and share some of our pictures in this wonderful space.” Carla Emil, 2012

1. 2. 3.

Gillian Wearing, Me as Warhol in Drag with Scar, 2010. Robert Mapplethorpe, Self-Portrait, 1988. Sophie Calle, Plastic Surgery, 2000.


1

2

3

“The group of self-portrait photographs on exhibition here ranges from the modernist period and culminates with pictures made in our own times. They were selected for personal reasons, and together they form a series of variations on self-inquiry. All of them express the wonderful variety and richness of the self, and the very individual approaches to the subject by these imaginative artists. They begin, chronologically, with the intensely psychological self-examination by the Polish writer and artist, Stanislaw Ignace Witkiewicz, his piercing gaze probably enhanced by drugs, and continue with the Dada picture by Sophie Tauber Arp, married to the sculptor Hans Arp. She sets up a comparison between her own features and the “Dada Head,” – a puppet figure she made and used. She seems to give precedence or cede authority to the abstracted twin, examining us (and herself) modestly behind a veil. The wonderfully strange picture by Man Ray, a portrait of his friend, Marcel Duchamp in drag, is both resonant and unnerving. The Surrealist commitment to psychology as a deep well of artistic possibility speaks to our own times, and informs other pictures presented here. In fact, self-invention, the fashioning of a persona like the mysterious Sélavy surely has profitably influenced the pictures of splendid self performance, 1. 2. 3.

Cindy Sherman, Untitled #199-A, 1989. Stanislaw Ignace Witkiewicz, Self-Portrait, Zakopane, c. 1912. Gillian Wearing, Self-Portrait as My Mother, Jean Gregory, 2003.

4

5

beginning of course with Andy Warhol, and culminating in the picture from an ongoing series of self-imaginings by Cindy Sherman. Some of the more uncanny pictures here were made by the Japanese artist, Yasumasa Morimura, who presents himself as Marilyn Munroe, a celebrity who was represented publically in often unnervingly intimate posture. Morimura also confected the re-rendition of the Vermeer portrait of a girl in tender half light, glancing out of the picture and at the viewer. The Morimura version shows the subject, projected by him, as vulnerable and fierce. These pictures prompt questions --what, exactly, constitutes a self, is it self-made? Is it unique? Is it finally unknowable? How does the exterior self, the self that others see—define who we are inside? And how does photography, which has purported to represent the “truth,” report on the interior truthfully? The nude self portrait made by Diane Arbus when she was newly pregnant and sent to her husband in the army, is radically different from the Self-Portrait as My Mother, Jean Gregory by Gillian Wearing, where we can trace the barely discernable outline of a mask around the eyes, a physical, and psychological projection of her self. The photograph proves to be a responsive medium, poetically and intellectually, to the questions raised in self-portraiture.” Sandra S. Phillips, 2012


Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood 09

2

4 4. 5.

Man Ray, Portrait of Rrose SĂŠlavy, 1921. Yasumasa Morimura, Vermeer Study, 2008.


1

1

1. 2. 3.

Lee Friedlander, Tokyo, 1994. Gillian Wearing, Me As Arbus, 2008. Diane Arbus, Naked self-portrait by windows, N.Y.C., 1944.

2

3


Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood 09

5

6

3

4

5

4. 5. 6.

Yasumasa Morimura, Self-Portrait (Actress) Red Marilyn, 1996. Claude Cahun, Le Mystère d’Adam, 1929. Claude Cahun, Autoportrait, c. 1928.

6


1


Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood 09

2

3

“As part of an information-driven society wherein the protocols of status are determined by the unshakeable knowledge that one is who one claims to be, Wearing’s art opens up the possibility of greater benefits (but also heightened uncertainty) to be derived from the possibility that one is a composite of many people at once, including the anonymous stranger in the street.” Dan Cameron, 2004

1. 2. 3.

Gillian Wearing, Self-Portrait as My Father, Brian Wearing, 2003. Andy Warhol, Untitled, c. 1964. Sophie Taeuber-Arp, Self-Portrait with Dada-Kopf (Dada-Head), 1920.


“These photographs of the power structure of America – heads of unions, people in government, bankers, heads of media – are a composite portrait of the power elite, but I didn’t feel anything about most of these people. I didn’t want to pit Democrats against Republicans, or good versus bad. It’s too easy for a photographer to do that. In a way these pictures were almost taken by the people in the pictures. I didn’t tell them what to wear. I didn’t tell them how to pose. However they presented themselves, I recorded with very little manipulation.” Richard Avedon, 1991

Richard Avedon, The Family, a portfolio of 69 portraits, 1976. Richard Avedon, Henry Kissinger, Secretary of State, Washington, D.C., June 2, 1976, 1976.


Richard Avedon 10


Richard Learoyd, Rachel, 2009.


Richard Learoyd 11

“I think that maybe my search for detail or perfection in photographs is a desire to illuminate imperfection and humanness. The invitation to scrutinize another, which is undoubtedly in my work, inevitably highlights the loneliness of the soul and the depressing isolation of the human condition.� Richard Learoyd, 2010


1

Richard Learoyd, 1. Hair hare, 2012. 2. Survivor, 2011.

2


Richard Learoyd 11

3

4 5

3. 4. 5.

After Ingres, 2011. Headless man, 2010. Headless woman, 2010.


1

South Africa, Japan, China Selections from South Africa, Japan and China present 12 artists whose works are held in the Pilara Foundation Collection. These galleries situate works from established photographers alongside emerging contemporary artists. The photographs of Pieter Hugo, Zwelethu Mthethwa and Liu Zheng consider the impact of industrialization on local cultures, while David Goldblatt, Rinko Kawauchi, Hai Bo, and Adou take an intimate approach to

documenting individuals within their respective countries. Tomoko Sawada’s photo booth pictures demonstrate the flexibility of appearance and perceptions of self in order to investigate culturally-based notions of identity. Though varied in their subjects and methods, each of these photographers turn to portraiture to examine social concerns that resonate universally.


2

3 1. 2. 3.

Rinko Kawauchi, Untitled, from the series “Cui Cui,” 2005. David Goldblatt, Shop assistant, Orlando West. Soweto, 1972. Liu Zheng, Coal Miner, Xinjiang Province, 1996.


1

7

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

2

3

8

David Goldblatt, Shop assistant, Orlando West. Soweto, 1972. David Goldblatt, An elder of the Dutch Reformed Mission church walking home with his family after the Sunday service, Carnavon, January, 1968, 1968. David Goldblatt, A farmer’s son with his nursemaid, Heimweeberg, Nietverdiend, 1964, 1964. David Goldblatt, A man and a passing woman, Tladi. 5 November 1972, 1972. David Goldblatt, A plot-holder, his wife and their eldest son at lunch, Wheatlands, Randfontein, September 1962, 1962.


Selections from South Africa 12

4

5

9

6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

6

10

11

David Goldblatt, Mrs. Miriam Diale in her bedroom, 5357 Orlando East, Soweto, Johannesburg, 1972. Pieter Hugo, David Akore, Agbogbloshie Market, Accra, Ghana, 2010. Pieter Hugo, Yaw Francis, Agbogbloshie Market, Accra, Ghana, 2009. Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse, Lift Portrait 16, Ponte City, Johannesburg, 2008. Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse, Lift Portrait 24, Ponte City, Johannesburg, 2008. Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse, Lift Portrait 13, Ponte City, Johannesburg, 2008.


Selections from South Africa 12

Zwelethu Mthethwa, From the series Sugar Cane, 2003.


1

2

5

6

Nobuyoshi Araki, 1. Untitled, 1985. 2. The World of Girls, 1984. 3. The World of Girls, 1984. 4. Izumi Suzuki, c. 1960.


Selections from Japan 13

3

4

7

Rinko Kawauchi, 5. Untitled, from the series “Cui Cui,” 2005. 6. Untitled, from the series “Cui Cui,” 2005. 7. Untitled, from the series “Cui Cui,” 2005. 8. Untitled, from the series “Cui Cui,” 2005.

8


1

2

7

8

Katsumi Watanabe, 1. Untitled, 1969. 2. Untitled, 1969. 3. Untitled, 1983.

3

9

4. 5. 6.

Untitled, 1966. Untitled, 1972. Untitled, 1969.


Selections from Japan 13

4

5

6

10

11

12

7. 8. 9.

Untitled, c. 1970. Untitled, 1969. Untitled, 1974.

10. 11. 12.

Untitled, 1968. Untitled, 1966. Untitled, 1969.


Tomoko Sawada, Recruit/Gray, 2006. (detail) Recruit/Navy, 2006. (not pictured) Recruit/Black, 2006. (not pictured)


1


Selections from China 14

3 2

4

“There is no difference between taking a picture of others and myself. The camera may be pointed outward, but whether you like it or not, it always reveals you.” Adou, 2009

1. 2. 3. 4.

Hai Bo, The Northern – A Man is Riding No. 1, 2005. Wang Ningde, Some Day No. 1, 2002. Adou, Man Clutching Goose, 2006. Adou, Man and Sheep, 2006.


1

2

3

6

7

8

Liu Zheng, 1. Coal Miner, Xinjiang Province, 1996. 2. Three Country Strippers, Houshentai, Henan Province, 2000. 3. A Poetess, Beijing, 1998. 4. Convicts Fetching Water, Baoding, Hebei Province, 1995. 5. A Dying Old Woman, Beijing, 1995.


Selections from China 14

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

4

5

9

10

Transsexual Nude, Beijing, 1998. An Old Peking Opera Actor Playing a Female Role, Beijing, 1995. A Rural Boy In School Uniform, Fengxiang, Shaanxi Province, 2000. Two Miners, Datong, Shanxi Province, 1998. Warrior on Donkey, Longxian, Shaanxi Province, 1999.


“Her pictures are concerned with private rather than social realities, with psychological rather than visual coherence, with the prototypical and mythic rather than the topical and temporal. Her real subject is no less than the unique interior lives of those she photographed.� John Szarkowski, 1972

Diane Arbus, 1. Identical twins, Roselle, N.J., 1967. 2. A young man in curlers at home on West 20th Street, N.Y.C., 1966.


Diane Arbus 15

1

2


1

2

3

10

17

11

18

Diane Arbus, 1. Two girls in identical raincoats, Central Park, N.Y.C., 1969. 2. Bishop by the sea, Santa Barbara, Cal., 1964. 3. A young Brooklyn family going for a Sunday outing, N.Y.C., 1966. 4. The Junior Interstate Ballroom Dance Champions, 1963. 5. Man at a parade on Fifth Avenue, N.Y.C., 1969. 6. A Jewish giant at home with his parents in the Bronx, N.Y., 1970.

19

7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Frank Stella, in the park, N.Y.C., 1966. Two friends at home, N.Y.C., 1965. Tattooed man at a carnival, Md., 1970. A husband and wife in the woods at a nudist camp, N.J., 1963. A young man in curlers at home on West 20th Street, N.Y.C., 1966.


Diane Arbus 15

4

5

6

12

20

12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

13

21

7

8

14

15

22

A family one evening in a nudist camp, Pa., 1965. Puerto Rican woman with a beauty mark, N.Y.C., 1965. Child with a toy hand grenade in Central Park, N.Y.C., 1962. Young couple on a bench in Washington Square Park, N.Y.C., 1965. Girl sitting in bed with her boyfriend, N.Y.C., 1966. Identical twins, Roselle, N.J., 1967. Woman in a rose hat, N.Y.C., 1966.

9

23

19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

16

24

25

A naked man being a woman, N.Y.C., 1968. A family on their lawn one Sunday in Westchester, N.Y., 1968. A young man and his pregnant wife in Washington Square Park, N.Y.C., 1965. Untitled #20, 1970-1971. Teenage couple on Hudson Street, N.Y.C., 1963. Self-portrait pregnant, N.Y.C., 1945. Woman at a counter smoking, N.Y.C., 1962.


Richard Avedon 16


Richard Avedon, Roger Tims, Jim Duncan, Leonard Markley, Don Belak, coal miners, Reliance, Wyoming, August 29 1979, 1979.


Richard Avedon 16


1

2

5

Richard Avedon, 1. Juan Patricio Lobato, carney, Rocky Ford, Colorado, August 23, 1980, 1980. 2. Joe Butler, coal miner, Reliance, Wyoming, August 28, 1979, 1979. 3. Charlene van Tighem, physical therapist, Augusta, Montana, June 26, 1983, 1983. 4. B.J. Van Fleet, nine year old, Ennis, Montana, July 2, 1982, 1982.

6


Richard Avedon 16

3

4

7

5. 6. 7.

James Story, coal miner, Somerset, Colorado, December 18, 1979, 1979. Clarence Lippard, drifter, Interstate 80, Sparks, Nevada, August 29, 1983, 1983. Boyd Fortin, thirteen year old rattlesnake skinner, Sweetwater, Texas, March 10, 1979, 1979.


Hans-Peter Feldmann 17

“Death is coming. That’s why I did it, to find out more about life and death. To look at my self, and determine: ‘Where am I?’ The work contains pictures of my family, friends, and acquaintances. It’s my life’s circle. According to age, the work appears different to everybody. You’re in your thirties, whereas the next person who enters the room might be fifty, or seventy-five. You’re all confronted with the possible span of your own lifetime. From zero to nothing.” Hans-Peter Feldmann

Hans-Peter Feldmann, 100 Years, 2001.


Lee Friedlander, Selected Self-Portraits, 1958-2011.


Lee Friedlander 18


“…one could think of these pictures not exactly as portraits but as sketches of tentative identities being tried out to see if they fit, in which case they might by adopted as more or less permanent roles…In the Friedlander pictures the fictional identities are not attached to older historical or literary characters, but are new personae constructed out of the process of photography.” John Szarkowski, 1970


Lee Friedlander 18

1

2

Lee Friedlander, 1. Philadelphia, 1965. 2. New York City, 1966.


Richard Avedon 19

Richard Avedon, Lee Friedlander, photographer, New City, NY, May 24, 2002, 2002.


1

1. 2. 3.

2

Mike Mandel, The Baseball-Photographer Trading Cards, 1975. Victor Skrebneski, Jeanne Robertson, 1994. Richard Avedon, The Beatles, London, August 11, 1967: John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, 1967.


Mike Mandel, Victor Skrebneski, and Richard Avedon 19

3


Mike Mandel, The Baseball-Photographer Trading Cards, 1975. (detail)


Mike Mandel and Chuck Close 19

Chuck Close, Self Portrait, 1999.


“Soon I began to think more conceptually about the project, and the interviews evolved to become not only direct questions about the pictures themselves and the relationships they presented, but also abstract queries about appearances, self-consciousness, money, power, success, social responsibility.� Jim Goldberg, 1985

Jim Goldberg, Selections from Rich & Poor, 1977-1985.


Jim Goldberg 20

1

1. 2.

Countess Vivianna de Blanville and her mother, 1982. El Chuco & Manny Garcia, 1982.

2


1 Larry Sultan, 1. Denise Hale, 2007. 2. Dede Wilsey, 2007. 3. Vanessa and Bill Getty, 2007.


Larry Sultan 20

2

3


Pier 24 Photography would like to acknowledge the following individuals and lenders for their assistance in making this exhibition possible. Sharon & Michael Blasgen Carla Emil and Rich Silverstein Bob and Randi Fisher Fraenkel Gallery Jeffery Fraenkel Marian Goodman Gallery Pace MacGill Gallery Mathew Marks Gallery Sandra Phillips Jeanne Robertson Rose Gallery Larry Sultan Estate Stephen Wirtz Gallery

©2012 Pier 24 Photography All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any manner whatsoever without the prior written permission of the publisher / copyright holder. Publication Editors: Seth Curcio Allie Haeusslein Christopher McCall Art Direction and Design: Seth Curcio Nate Phelps Installation Photography: Tom O’Connor Edition: 2,000 ISBN: 978-0-9839917-1-7 Printed in the United States

Pier 24 The Embarcadero San Francisco, CA 94105 p. 415.512.7424 f. 415.512.7456 e. info@pier24.org

Hendrik Kerstens: © Hendrik Kerstens, Courtesy Danziger Gallery, New York. / Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse: © Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse, Courtesy of the artists / Richard Avedon: © The Richard Avedon Foundation / Hai Bo: © Hai Bo, Courtesy Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York / Paul Strand: © Aperture Foundation, Inc., Paul Strand Archive / Nicholas Nixon: © Nicholas Nixon, Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco and Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York / Edward Weston: © 1981 Center for Creative Photography, Arizona Board of Regents / Alec Soth: © Alec Soth, Courtesy the artist / Rineke Dijkstra: © Rineke Dijkstra, Image Courtesy Marian Goodman Gallery / Nan Goldin: © Nan Goldin, Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery / August Sander: © 2012 Die Photographische Sammlung / SK Stiftung Kultur August Sander Archive, Cologne / ARS, NY) / Danny Lyon: © Danny Lyon/Magnum Photos / Hiroshi Sugimoto: © Hiroshi Sugimoto, Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco and Pace Gallery, New York / Gillian Wearing: © Gillian Wearing, Courtesy Maureen Paley Gallery / Man Ray: © 2012 Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY / ADAGP, Paris / Lee Friedlander: © Lee Friedlander, Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco / Diane Arbus: © The Estate of Diane Arbus / Andy Warhol: © 2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / Sophie Taeuber-Arp: © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn / Richard Learoyd © Richard Learoyd, Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco / Rinko Kawauchi: © Rinko Kawauchi, Courtesy of Rose Gallery / David Goldblatt: © David Goldblatt, Courtesy of Marian Goodman Gallery / Liu Zheng: © Liu Zheng, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York / Zwelethu Mthethwa © Zwelethu Mthethwa, Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York / Tomoko Sawada © Tomoko Sawada, Courtesy Rose Gallery / HansPeter Feldmann: © Hans-Peter Feldmann, Courtesy the artist and 303 Gallery, New York / Chuck Close: © Chuck Close, Courtesy Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York / Jim Goldberg © Jim Goldberg, Courtesy Pace/ MacGill Gallery, New York / Larry Sultan: © Sultan Estate, Courtesy the Sultan Estate


About Face Exhibition Guide  

Full guide for the 2012/13 exhibition, About Face, at Pier 24 Photography. The gallery guide is 112 pages with 60 color reproductions, and i...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you