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PICSE Purpose The Primary Industry Centre for Science Education (PICSE) is a national collaboration between universities, regional primary industries, national R & D corporations, national and regional agribusinesses, regional research institutes, government authorities, schools and the federal government. The PICSE mission is to: Increase Participation in the Bioscience Professions; through key goals of: 1. Deliver innovative Engagement Programs for students and teachers that make science relevant and exciting 2. Make available a range of Career Experiences that allow students to make informed choices for tertiary science focused study and industry careers, by interacting direct with employers 3. Grow the Partnership Base by being responsive to investors’ drivers and business priorities 4. Effectively Communicate relevance and benefit of the PICSE program role in the attraction pipeline 5. Enhance Program Performance and Innovation through evaluation 6. Deliver to Government Priorities. These goals aim to attract an increased supply of high quality young people into science based primary industries through engagement with them during school years and early university. The program focus is to make them aware that tertiary science courses are the entry point for exciting and satisfying professional careers in primary industries. Industry reports highlight that the shortfall of students enrolling in agriculture and science undergraduate programs results in insufficient science professionals to meet emerging industry needs. This leaves industry, already experiencing a severe shortfall in suitable University graduates, with as many as four out of five positions remaining unfilled by appropriately trained professionals. This shortfall also affects university course viability. The PICSE program’s strategy is based on addressing these three key drivers: • Raising awareness amongst students and those who influence them, about career opportunities in these industries • Creating an interest / intention in young people to seek specific science focussed career options in the primary industries • Increasing participation amongst Yr 11 and 12 students in school science courses, in order to increase participation in tertiary science related courses, which ultimately leads to increased numbers of young people entering suitable primary industry related careers.

Contact: PICSE.Admin@utas.edu.au | Phone 03 64304517 | www.picse.net 14-434 Media Services University of Southern Queensland


I know quite certainly that I myself have no special talent; curiosity, obsession and dogged endurance, combined with selfcriticism have brought me to my ideas.

I am really passionate about science … and I think it is because science gives you a little bit of sanity; it tells you something that’s fairly close to being absolute total and undeniable truth, rather than opinions. And from that truth you can make opinions rather than going the other way round.

– Albert Einstein I spent all those years enjoying myself, for I have always found looking at the natural world and trying to understand it one of the greatest pleasures I know.

– Karl Kruszelnicki

– David Attenborough The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.

I have seen firsthand that agricultural science has enormous potential to increase the yields of small farmers and lift them out of hunger and poverty.

– Leonardo da Vinci

– Bill Gates

Sport … teaches life’s lessons. But there’s no substitute, in my book, for education, because that gives you choice.

What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make. – Jane Goodall

– Fiona Wood

Yes, you can have it all, but not all at the same time. Set your own priorities, trust your gut and follow your heart.

Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure Science.

– Quentin Bryce

– Powell Hubble

Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.

A scientist in his laboratory is not a mere technician: he is also a child confronting natural phenomena that impress him as though they were fairy tales.

– Confucius

– Marie Curie Whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved. – Charles Darwin

Science is not only a disciple of reason but, also, one of romance and passion. – Steven Hawking

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do … Sail away from the safe harbour. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. – Mark Twain


Agribusiness Consultant | Agricultural Engineer | Agro-forest Consultant Agronomist Analytical Chemist | Animal Geneticist | Animal Nutritionist | Animal Physiologist | Apiarist

Aquaculturist | Artificial Insemination Technician

An Aquaculturist farms and researches aquatic organisms like fish, crustaceans and plant life. They also monitor and manage the various aspects of aquaculture including nutrition, water quality, disease and maintenance. They may work for private corporations, independent fish farmers, research bodies or the government. Study Options:

• Bachelor of Aquaculture • Bachelor of Science, majoring in Aquatic Sciences

Case Study: Mr Steven Clarke How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I was born and lived in central Malaysia, where I became interested in snorkelling, gradually collecting about 20 aquaria at home by net or hand from streams that ran through plantations and sometimes from remote jungle locations.

What study path have you taken to get here? When at the University of Adelaide I studied a Bachelor of Science majoring in zoology, botany and geography; followed by Honours in coastal algae and part of a PhD project on seagrass loss. I also completed a Certificate in Business Management.

What do you like most about your job? The great diversity of tasks: constantly learning, facing new challenges, working to get research outcomes taken-up by others (e.g. by industry and government) and meeting and working with interesting people.

Do you have any particular career highlight? Surviving various incidents at sea, visiting many spectacular locations around the world and meeting wonderful people while undertaking research. One highlight would be participating in a colleague’s research that greatly improved protein availability (fish from ponds) for many poor families in a mountainous region of north Vietnam.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Get as high an academic qualification as possible and as many aligned practical qualifications and experience as possible (e.g. diving, boating, photography, holding live animals) while also building one’s network of contacts. Have fun and enjoy what you are doing; if you aren’t change direction.


Biochemist | Biological Scientist | Biomedical Engineer Biometrician Biotechnologist | Botanist | Breeder/Seed Officer | Brewer

A biochemist studies chemical processes occurring within living organisms. This can include anything from how a drug works to why you get fat from eating too many sweets. Laboratory research is central to biochemistry research. It is through laboratory research that knowledge of the chemical pathways within organisms can be investigated, including the chemical interactions for cells to grow and develop, protect themselves from disease and interacting with external environments. Study Options:

• Bachelor of Biomedicine or Bachelor of Science, majoring in Biochemistry or Chemistry.

Case Study: Dr Mark Lynch What do you work in and what is your specialty? I am more focused on the chemistry aspects than on the biological. Possibly the biggest unanswered questions in science is how life evolved from non-living chemicals. We really know very little about this process. So for me the study of the chemistry of life is a fascinating puzzle just waiting to be solved.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? Even when I was very young I had a keen interest in the natural world. I was and still am amazed at the different shapes and forms of life. Also when I was growing up fireworks were readily available and this stimulated my interests in chemistry. It was pretty natural that at some stage I would combine these interests.

What study path have you taken to get here? In high school I did quite well at science, though I was poorly advised that to be a ‘real’ scientist I should focus on chemistry and physics, rather than my real loves of chemistry and biology. However, at university I was allowed to study the things I really wanted to and this consisted of mainly chemistry with biochemistry and some biology thrown in. I did my Honours in Forensic Science, which was interesting in a fairly macabre way. I then reached something of a crossroads in my life, where I was tempted to abandon science altogether. Fortunately I found a PhD project on developing anticancer drugs which fitted my interests quite well.

What do you like most about your job? I like puzzles and there is probably no bigger puzzle than life itself. I often feel like I am an explorer standing at the edge of a vast unexplored ocean with many wonders just waiting to be discovered. I always get a thrill when I find something new.

Do you have any particular career highlight? One of the things you do as a chemist is make new substances. I remember the first time I ever made something that had never been made before and thinking that I am holding something completely unique in the entire universe. Another unique substance I made was very good at killing cancer cells, so for a brief time I thought I had actually cured cancer. More experiments showed that this substance was equally as good at killing healthy cells, so rather than the cure for cancer all I really had made was something extremely poisonous.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Let your curiosity take you where it will take you. You will enjoy the journey!


| Climatologist | Commercial Manager Communications Officer | Conservation Biologist | Conservation Officer Consumer Scientist | Crop Consultant | Cropping Technical Officer Chemist

A Climatologist studies and reports on weather trends over extended periods of time. Climatology is an important area of science in the modern age with debates over changing global weather patterns and implications for individuals, society and the environment. Study Options:

• Bachelor of Science, majoring in Climate Science • Postgraduate Degree, majoring in Climatology or Climate Science.

Case Study: Mr Glenn Cook What do you work in and what is your specialty? I am the Senior Climate Liaison officer with the Bureau of Meteorology in Western Australia (WA). My role is to inform Bureau stakeholders, including local, state, and federal government, industry groups, and the general public, about the climate of WA.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? After about five years as a weather forecaster, I began sharing my time between forecasting and climate work. This introduced me to a wide range of uses for climate data and enhanced my understanding of the climate of WA. In 2000 I moved into the Climate Section as the Consulting Meterologist and have worked in Climate ever since.

What study path have you taken to get here? I studied Physics at the University of Melbourne and was recruited by the Bureau of Meteorology, completing a graduate diploma in Meteorology with the Bureau in Melbourne in 1990.

What do you like most about your job? The part of my job I most enjoy is getting to watch the weather each day! It’s exciting when extreme weather and climate events are occurring with records being broken, and it’s my job to communicate these to the public. I enjoy learning about nature so having the opportunity to learn about the weather and climate of WA and becoming an expert has been a privilege.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? In order to gain employment in this field you need to get good marks at University, and be persistent as there are not many jobs in this field, but if you persevere opportunities do arise. I’ve found meteorology is a great introduction to climatology, moving from day-to-day weather events to the big picture of global circulation patterns has given me many useful insights.


Dairy Researcher Dairy Technologist | Development Officer Dietician | DNA Researcher

A dairy researcher investigates the range of processes that are involved in producing food products made from milk. Australian dairy farms, from a national herd of about 1.65 million cows, produce over 9 billion litres of milk a year – that’s enough to fill the Melbourne Cricket Ground 5 times over. Most of the milk is used in the production of cheese, butter and yoghurt. The different processes used in the dairy industry all follow important guidelines to ensure they are safe to drink and eat, and that they are tasty too of course! Study Options:

• A Bachelor of Science, majoring in Food Science or Agriculture.

Case Study: Mr Shane Mackay What do you work in and what is your specialty? I am a Food Safety and Quality Manager for Danone Australia.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? An opportunity came up in the local area with Danone who were building a factory so it was a chance to get involved with something and build it from the ground up which was an exciting opportunity.

What study path have you taken to get here? I completed a degree in Medical Science and worked in Pathology for a number of years. I found that I needed to do something different and more challenging so I changed careers to work in the Dairy Industry. The good thing about a Medical Science degree is that a lot of the skills that you have can be used in other branches of science as well. It is very adaptable. Danone sponsored me to complete a Diploma in Quality Assurance while I was working too.

What do you like most about your job? The job is constantly challenging so no day is the same as the last.

Do you have any particular career highlights? The Danone manufacturing facility was brand new so starting up with a new company from scratch and being a part of its growth and evolution is very rewarding.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Ensure you have the relevant qualifications and try to get some work experience – you learn a lot from actually doing the job.


Ecologist | Economist | Entomologist | Ecologist Environmental Engineer | Environmental Scientist

Evolutionary Biologist | Ergonomist

An evolutionary biologist researches the information contained in living plants and animals and their fossils to determine how they evolved. They apply this knowledge to understanding biodiversity, solving problems and planning for biodiversity conservation. Study Options:

• Bachelor of Science; Bachelor Applied Science; Bachelor of Science (Evolutionary Biology) • Honours or Masters Degree or PhD in Ecology or Entomology.

Case Study: Dr Sharon Downes What do you work in and what is your specialty? I work as an Evolutionary Biologist for CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences based at the Australian Cotton Research Institute. I study whether the main pest of cotton, a moth known as the cotton bollworm, is developing resistance to insecticidal Genetically Modified (GM) plants that are designed to control it.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I’ve always been interested in the ecology and evolution of nature. I got to a point in my career where I wanted to do applied research and my current job was one of the first opportunities that I came across.

What study path have you taken to get here? I studied a Bachelor of Science with Honours in landscape ecology. I then did a PhD in experimental ecology studying predator-prey interactions between snakes and lizards. A Postdoctoral Fellowship in Belgium on competition between two lizards was next before returning to Australia to take up a Postdoctoral Fellowship on the impact of weed invasion on the basking behaviour of lizards. I then moved into my current role with CSIRO which is on a group that I’d not worked on previously (insects) but addresses the same broad questions about ecology and evolution that I studied since doing my PhD.

What do you like most about your job? I like that my research has a direct practical application to a progressive and receptive industry. I like that my job allows me to work at an institute within a cohesive and hospitable rural community. I like working for an ethical organisation that fosters a safe, fair and rewarding work place.

Do you have any particular career highlights? I represented the cotton industry at “Science meets Parliament” a few years ago which was a fascinating insight into political science. It opened my eyes to the importance of preparing and prioritising information in order to influence people that can make a difference.

 What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area?  eep your job opportunities open by designing research, especially early in your career, that K teaches you broad skills.


Field Hydrologist | Field Technician | Financial Advisor | Fisheries Officer Floriculturalist | Food Microbiologist

| Food

Scientist

Forensic Scientist | Forestry Officer

A Food Scientist investigates the nature of foods, the causes of their deterioration, and the principles underlying food processing by drawing on the disciplines of biology, physical sciences, and engineering. The processed food and beverage industry is the largest manufacturing sector in Australia contributing billions of dollars to the economy. Some of the opportunities available to a food scientist include research and product development, food safety and regulation, quality assurance in a food processing company and food product development. Employment for food and wine scientists is projected to grow very strongly into 2014-2015 as consumer trends come and go quickly and it is a constant push to keep ahead of the game. Study Options:

• Bachelor of Science (Nutrition & Food Sciences), majoring in Food Science & Technology

Case Study: Ms Emma Hill What do you work in and what is your specialty? I work for Campbell’s Soup Company, in the position of Research and Development (R&D) Product Development Technologist. I specialise in developing new soups and related products such as V8 juices. This position requires knowledge of thermal processing and UHT technologies.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I became interested in food science when I was looking for a change of careers. I was previously a chef and was looking for a job that was still based in the food industry. I started my current role in August 2011. We have a lot of ingredients on hand and it is rewarding to create a new product whilst keeping within the constraints of the production line capabilities, nutritional claims and budget. I also really like working in a factory environment, there are over 200 people on site and every section within that site must work together and communicate effectively to ensure that our products hit the shelves on time and within the set cost constraints

What study path have you taken to get here? I completed a Bachelor of Food Science and Human Nutrition in July 2011. I found this degree to be highly compatible with my job. I draw on the knowledge that I gained at University in most aspects of my daily work as well as my background in cooking. My favourite part of the job is the initial product development stage, where I create kitchen batches on concepts which I research or that Marketing supply to me.

What do you like most about your job? / Do you have any particular career highlights? My career highlights have been seeing my products on the supermarket shelves. R&D Technologists are all guilty of tidying up their products on the supermarket shelves when shopping! What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? I would advise someone who was interested in this career to apply to large global companies. Job stability/retention is more likely with a larger company. For example, Campbell’s Soups also owns Arnotts and has many other sites and companies around the world. You will most likely have to be flexible in where you live and work. Most manufacturers are either on the very outskirts of cities or in the country. Personally, I love working under pressure, however if you are interested in Food Science/Product Development as a career you must be aware that consumer trends come and go quickly and it is a constant push to keep ahead of the game.


Geneticist | Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Officer Geologist | Geophysicist

As a geneticist you can work with anything containing DNA and cover topics from the underlying mechanisms of cancer development to aspects of biodiversity and conserving endangered species. Geneticists can also work outside the lab as this profession is at the heart the biotechnology industry. Knowledge of molecular biology is also useful in such commercial fields as patent law. Study Options:

• A Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Applied Science • Honours or Masters Degree or PhD in Molecular Biology/Biotechnology.

Case Study: Dr Dale Shelton What do you work in and what is your specialty? After working for a number of years as a research scientist, I recently moved in to the commercial side of science and now work as Clinical Sales and Support Manager at AdvanDx. In this position I provide support for people all over Europe who use our molecular diagnostic products for identifying which bacteria are causing blood stream infections in hospital patients.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I always had an interest in the more applied and commercial aspects of biotechnology and preferred being closer seeing the applied use of the technology. I spent over 12 years as a research scientist but have been in this type of position for just over 2 years.

What study path have you taken to get here? I started by taking a Bachelor of Applied Science (Biotech) and moved straight into doing an Honours degree then moved interstate to my Ph.D. almost immediately after. Once you have a PhD it is easier to move your skills overseas, which is what I did, and moved to Denmark. I started working at the Carlsberg [Research Laboratories] and moved on to both the Technical University of Denmark and the University of Copenhagen where I worked as a post-doctoral scientist then as an Assistant Professor. A few years ago, an opportunity came up to use my academic background and my teaching experience in a commercial setting, so I took it.

What do you like most about your job? Professionally, I like that my work has an applied angle and actually saves people’s lives. The type of work I have always done, but now more than ever, has given an international perspective on life and I enjoy that too.

Do you have any particular career highlights? When I was an academic at the university, I still remember getting my first journal article published with me as the first author as a particular highlight.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? If you want to move into the commercial side of science, I would recommend taking qualifications in both these areas. I never did but wish I did in hindsight.


Harvest Manager | Harvesting Forest Supervisor Hatchery Manager | Horse Nutritionist

Horticulturist | Hydrologist A Horticulturist is involved in the research and understanding of the cultivation, propagation, processing and marketing of ornamental plants, flowers, turf, vegetables, fruits, grapes (dried, fresh and wine grapes), and nuts. The horticultural industry is the second-largest industry in agriculture and employs about one-third of those employed in agriculture. Study Options:

• Bachelor of Agricultural Science • Honours, or Masters, PhD in Agricultural Science.

Case Study: Dr Dugald Close What do you work in and what is your specialty? I am the centre leader for perennial horticulture at the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA) at the University of Tasmania.. I am interested in applied tree ecophysiology which includes tree photosynthesis, pigment and antioxidant chemistry, tree-water and nutrient-relations

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? A family connection to farming got me interested initially, however I had a genuine interest in the breadth of science involved with studying Agriculture. Not knowing what I would specialise in was the exciting part.

What study path have you taken to get here? I studied Agricultural Science and specialised in horticulture/tree physiology. Studying Agricultural science allowed me to decide the topics I liked and was interested in further study, which lead me to do a PhD studying eucalypt seedling physiology applied to nursery production and successful early establishment. Since completing my study, I have held various positions working with industries around the country, along with the Kings Park Botanical Gardens in Western Australia, and government research bodies; eventually returning to Tasmania to work most recently with TIA on different production crops.

What do you like most about your job? It is rewarding teaching students, working in different environments and going to interesting places.

Do you have any particular career highlights? Travel to different countries and working with different communities has been a great. I have also enjoyed making new discoveries and being published in well recognised scientific journals. One new discovery highlight included developing a new cherry tree pruning method for higher yield – this is now standard practice, in Tasmania – we are the leading growers of quality cherries in Australia!

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Try your best to work out what you are interested in and what you are passionate about – you want to make a job not a job.


I

Ichthyologist | Immunologist | Industrial Chemist Industrial Pharmacist | Information Scientist | Insurance (Agricultural) Agent Irrigation Engineer | Irrigation Specialist

An ichthyologist investigates, explores and helps solve the problems faced by fish (including sharks and rays) and their environment. Ichthyology, the branch of zoology dedicated to the study of fish, can lead to pathways including research, teaching, working in conservation and fisheries departments and involves the use of advanced underwater technologies. Study Options:

• Bachelor of Science, majoring in Zoology or Marine Science.

Case Study: Dr Gary Jackson What do you work in and what is your specialty? I am currently a research scientist specialising in fisheries and finfish at the Department of Fisheries.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I have been fascinated by fish and all things fishing since a very young age.

What study path have you taken to get here? After high school, I studied fisheries under a Bachelor of Science and then completed my PhD.

What do you like most about your job? I work with lots of great people, have the opportunity to do field work and travel extensively. The work I do makes a difference with Western Australia (WA) having some of the best managed fisheries in Australia because of the work we do.

Do you have any particular career highlights? Career highlights include being part of the team that won the WA Premiers Award for Excellence in 2006. Becoming President of Australian Society for Fish Biology and going to the European Fish Expo as part of WA Fishing Industry-Ministerial delegation.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? My advice to those interested in the field is study hard particularly in maths and statistics. Get a degree but think about what you want to do after that. Ask people for advice, make connections and find a mentor. I would recommend volunteering for the Department of Fisheries or a similar organization. You must be prepared to travel and read lots.


Journalist in Agriculture

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I’m from a farm in northwest NSW, where my family grow cotton, wheat and other crops (barley, sorghum, sunflowers, faba beans, chick peas and corn), and run cattle. I guess you could say I was born into it! Although I loved growing up on the farm, and all the adventures that came with it (mustering cattle, riding horses, swimming in irrigation channels, cotton picking and wheat harvest), I – unlike my born-to-befarmers brothers – had more of a passion for telling agriculture’s story than working in production agriculture, so I went on to work in communications.

What study path have you taken to get here?

A journalist in agriculture reports, writes, edits, designs and produces content for a range of media including radio, television, online, newspaper and magazines in rural settings. Alternatively Applied Media will prepare you with the digital skills you will need to work across many contemporary work environments. By polishing your skills in television and radio studios you will have an excellent grasp of what is going on behind the camera, as well as in front of it. This will enable you to report upon and even produce stories about agricultural industries helping to bridge the great urban rural divide present in Australia. You will have an opportunity to celebrate the successes and report upon the plight of the agricultural industry. Study Options:

• Bachelor of Arts (Journalism), Bachelor of Communication (Journalism) or Bachelor of Applied Media (Journalism)

Case Study: Ms Ruth Redfern What do you work in and what is your specialty? I work in the field of agricultural communications – helping to tell the story of agriculture. This field is very closely aligned to agricultural journalism: agricultural communications specialists work with journalists to help raise awareness of agricultural news and issues. While journalists work for news organisations across radio, TV and print media, agricultural communicators work in agencies or in-house at agricultural organisations. The fields are very closely aligned. We all have a love of communicating – talking to people and building relationships, making complex issues easy to understand for others, staying on top of news and events – along with a love of English and a passion for agriculture and rural communities.

I took the road less travelled and didn’t do an undergraduate degree – instead, I started my career working as an intern at a major public relations agency. Years later, I decided to go back and hit the books – I now hold a Masters Degree in Media from the University of Sydney. Given I work in agriculture, many people are surprised that I don’t have an agricultural degree – but for me, coming from a farming background, it was more important to step outside the world of agriculture to live and work in the city and to study with people who have very little understanding of, or connection with, our farmers. It made me realise what a huge opportunity (and challenge) there is in the field of agricultural communications. It just goes to show there are many different pathways to agricultural careers – you don’t have to study agriculture to work in it!

What do you like most about your job? The enormous variety – and using the huge range of communications tools available. There’s no such thing as a normal day for me: on any given day I might be out in the field talking to farmers, in the office writing media releases and designing publications, or out on the road visiting journalists in their newsrooms. At the same time, I’m on Twitter and Youtube, logging QR codes with my Smartphone, and checking out the latest agricultural applications on my tablet. It’s a really exciting time to be involved in agricultural communications (and agriculture in general, given it’s such a technologically savvy industry). Watch this space!

Do you have any particular career highlights? Over the past ten years I’ve been lucky enough to work with a huge range of agricultural and rural organisations – from public relations (PR) consultancies (major firms to boutique agencies), federal and state government departments, industry bodies, state farming organisations, rural not-for-profits as well as research and development corporations. I’ve flown with medical teams at the Royal Flying Doctor Service to create a series of videos; interviewed farmers and industry leaders for a weekly radio program; staged a major national conference where both the Prime Minister and the Opposition Leader spoke to a room full of farmers; and achieved front page stories in The Australian and the Sydney Morning Herald newspapers.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Talk to people in the industry and find out what career suits you best. You might want to work in the bush (as an ABC rural reporter) or you might want to work in a boardroom (as the communications specialist for a major agricultural company). Work experience is an excellent place to start.


Kinesiologist

A Kinesiologist investigates how physiological, mechanical and psychological mechanisms affect the human body. Kinesiologists are often known as exercise and sports scientists and sometimes sports biomechanists. Many kinesiologists work in the sporting arena with elite athletes to enhance performance or other areas of sport. But these allied health professionals also work in diverse research areas such as investigating how heat stress can affect athletic or work performance. Study Options:

• A Bachelor of Science (Sports or Human Movement) • Masters of Science (Biomechanics or Sports Science); PhD

Case Study: Associate Professor Ian Tim Heazlewood What do you work in and what is your specialty? I work at Charles Darwin University as an Associate Professor - Exercise and Sports Science. My research interests are in mathematical and statistical modelling of high performance athletes who participate on Olympic Games and World Championships and World Masters sports. Prediction of performance using multivariate statistical modelling and multidisciplinary (biomechanics, exercise physiology, sport psychology, motor control and learning) approaches. Exercise and sport psychology, including research designs and applications of neural networks across sports of World Masters Games, athletics, Master’s rugby and rugby, triathlon and karate. Interrelationships of force, power, speed, work and fatigue indices predicting and discriminating ability levels within competition sports performance.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I have always have been interested in playing sport, coaching sport and understanding why people have different sporting abilities. Back in the 1970’s and 1980’s scientific approaches to understanding sport and exercise the relationships expanded rapidly. A combination of study and involvement in sport motivated me to dig deeper for answers so my postgraduate studies and current research focus were and are on why people have different sporting abilities and how these predict sports performance. Today approximately 28 Australian universities deliver undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in exercise and sports science.

What study path have you taken to get here? Undergraduate and postgraduate studies at the University of Sydney; joining many professional associations that focus on the science of sport and exercise and who publish research articles; undertaking research and research publications in exercise and sports science; joining editorial boards of exercise and sports science based journals, and international conference presentations, where like minds share like ideas, and which also serves as professional development.

What do you like most about your job? I get to understand the complex relationships that explain sport and exercise performance from a multidiscipline approach and then apply this knowledge to enhancing sports performance in athletes of all types, although I have worked with many high performance athletes. I also get to travel the world and share ideas with sports scientists from around the world.

Do you have any particular career highlights? Yes, seeing athletes realising their athletic potential based on the support I provide to them combined with their pursuit of sporting excellence. Adding to people’s quality of life through exercise and sport.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Make your hobby your work and each day will be interesting and you can combine sport, exercise and study into a career. Australia has a history of where sport and exercise are cultural dimensions to our nation but we need the smarts to continue this rich history of achievement. Old sports scientists are going to be replaced by young sports scientists to keep the traditional alive. If this is your passion then run with it. Today we discover there are over fifty employment outcomes for people trained in exercise and sport science.


Laboratory Technician | Land Economist Landscape Ecologist| Life Scientist | Livestock Manager

A Laboratory Manager in a university is someone who manages a laboratory or in my case several laboratory areas. The job usually involves managing a large group of technical staff, the maintenance of all associated laboratory facilities, the purchase of equipment and consumables, making sure all practical classes run efficiently and on time and making sure that all of the above activities are carried out in a safe manner. A Laboratory Technician is more directly involved in the setting up of practical classes for students. This involves trialling all procedures prior to the practical class. This can mean determining suitable chemical concentrations, making sure all the equipment is calibrated and functioning correctly and sometimes demonstrating techniques to students. Study Options:

• Bachelor of Laboratory Medicine or Bachelor of Biomedical Science.

Case Study: Mr Patrick McConnell What do you work in and what is your specialty? I work as a Laboratory Manager at the University of Southern Queensland. The work involves the supervision of six Technical Staff, and as a team we look after the areas of Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Wine Technology at campuses in Toowoomba, Fraser Coast and Stanthorpe. We also have an astronomy centre at Mt Kent near Cambooya.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? While studying at the University of Southern Queensland I became interested in laboratory work. It was a very practical and hands-on course. After I completed my science degree I did laboratory and field work at the Department of Primary Industries in Toowoomba and Biloela in their Entomology Branch. I worked there for four years before starting work as a Laboratory Technician at USQ in 1986. I became Laboratory Manager in 1990.

What study path have you taken to get here? I completed a degree in Animal Biology with a sub-major in Plant Biology. I have also done short courses in procurement, change management and leadership development.

What do you like most about your job? I like the diversity and the regular challenges that the job brings as well as being part of a great team of people.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? One of my career highlights was being involved in the construction and design of our new science laboratories. Another highlight is the collaborative work we do with NASA and the University of Louisville at our Mt Kent Observatory. Also in my work with the Department of Primary Industries I was involved in trials trying to develop a strain of sorghum that was Sorghum Midge resistant. This was some of the first work done on this anywhere in the world.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? It is important to do the job to the best of your ability, to pay attention to detail, to complete tasks in a timely manner and to be a good team player.


Manufacturing Manager | Marine Biologist | Marine Scientist Market Development | Marketing Researcher | Meat Inspector Meteorologist

| Microbiologist

Microbiologists study microorganisms: bacteria, yeasts, algae, fungi, protozoa and viruses. Although they are the smallest form of life on earth they have had a huge impact on human history; the Black Plague was caused by bacteria, the Irish Potato famine by a water mould, and the colds and flus we get every year by a virus. Even single-celled algae like the green slime that covers the edges of ponds and lakes plays an important role, producing 70-80% of the oxygen we breathe. They are not the best to ingest though, so algae, and other microorganisms, need to be removed from water before being safe for humans to drink. Study Options:

• A Bachelor of Science majoring in Microbiology.

Case Study: Ms Michelle Murphy What do you work in and what is your specialty? I work at Central Highlands Water (CHW) in the Laboratory Services team. The bacteria we routinely test for in water supply samples include E. coli, Total Coliforms, Plate Count, and Pseudomonas. Our Laboratory is accredited by NATA (National Association of Testing Authorities) and it is our role to continually monitor the safety and quality of water supplied throughout our service area.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I was unsure of what I wanted to do after finishing high school, however I knew science was a strength of mine at school and I really enjoyed science. I also wanted to live and work in Ballarat to be close to family. I first started working as a Microbiologist at CHW in 2010.

What study path have you taken to get here? I completed a three-year degree in Food Science at the University of Ballarat (now Federation University). After finishing university I started work in a quality assurance laboratory at a local food manufacturing plant for 2 ½ years (microbiology and analytical testing), and then progressed to a quality assurance technical role which involved the auditing of raw material suppliers and the development of raw material specifications.

What do you like most about your job? I work with a great team of people, we have a lot of variety and can take on extra projects within the laboratory, and we can pursue training opportunities to improve our skills. I also enjoy getting out in the field and doing some water sampling at our reservoirs, water treatment plants, tanks, and customer addresses.

Do you have any particular career highlights? I was recently approved by the National Associations of Testing Authorities (NATA) as a signatory microbiologist, and I have also been accredited by the Department of Health for E. coli testing.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Learn your microbiology laboratory skills well, as you will be using them a lot! Keep a good knowledge of government regulations in relation to water quality and the Safe Drinking Water Act and Regulations.


Nanotechnologist | Natural Resource Manager

Nematologist | Nutritionist

Nematologists study nematodes which are microscopic thread-like animals that are found in water, land, plants, bodies of animals (including humans) and insects. They are the most abundant multi-cellular life form on earth. Nematodes are essential in ecosystems, they are used for biological control of insects and the first multi-cellular organism to have its genome completely sequenced was a nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. Nematodes that infest and damage plants are called plant-parasitic nematodes. Worldwide they cause enormous losses to crops and are very difficult to control. In southern Queensland-northern NSW root-lesion nematodes cost our wheat farmers $47million per year. Study Options:

• Bachelor of Science in Agriculture; Bachelor of Applied Science • Master of Science in Nematology

Case Study: Dr Kirsty Owen What do you work in and what is your specialty? I work in Toowoomba at the Leslie Research Facility, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Queensland. My specialty is the management of root-lesion nematodes by crop rotation to help farmers grow better wheat crops.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I enjoyed agriculture at school and after I completed a little research project in Year 12 I wanted to learn more about the science of agriculture. I was looking for a career in which I could work outside, apply my organisational skills and also try new things.

What study path have you taken to get here? I completed a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture at the University of Sydney and specialised in plant pathology in 4th year. I really loved doing research and so when a PhD for a nematologist was offered I decided it was an opportunity to learn something new; I studied the resistance processes of grapevines to root-knot nematodes. I also travelled to the USA to study nematodes.

What do you like most about your job? It’s a great mix of working in a laboratory, glasshouse, in the field and in an office. I apply my skills in writing, public speaking, organisation and a bit of muscle to collect soil and plants. Best of all are the people I work with.

Do you have any particular career highlights? Discovering something new and telling people about it is very rewarding. During my PhD I discovered a new use for a plant tonic that protected grapevines against nematodes which resulted in an international patent (and a bit of money too). Talking to farmers who use my research is very satisfying – it’s great to make a difference.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Take up new opportunities, be prepared to travel and dare to take risks. Nematologists are a rare breed - so if you find one, ask lots of questions!


Oceanographer | Oenologist | Operations Manager

Organic Chemist | Organic Farmer Organic chemists study molecules that contain carbon, particularly those found in nature and industrial and pharmaceutical applications. They characterize, synthesize and find applications for organic molecules. Organic chemists typically work with advanced, computerdriven equipment as well as traditional chemistry lab equipment and chemicals. Study Options: • • •

A Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry/Organic Chemistry. Honours Degree Masters degree or PhD in Organic Chemistry

Case Study: Professor Andrew Abell What do you work in and what is your specialty? I work at The University of Adelaide, as the Head of School (Interim), School of Chemistry & Physics. My Work as a Bio-organic Chemist involves identifying and characterising the next generation of pharmaceuticals to treat diseases such as cataracts and cancer and also developing new antibiotics.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? Interest developed in my early days at university but really crystallised during higher degree study and when on sabbatical leave and worked as a consultant for a major pharmaceutical company in the United States for a year.

What study path have you taken to get here?

• • • •

Bachelor of Science with Honours PhD (Chemistry of natural compounds from Australian indigenous plants) Post-doctoral fellowship at Cambridge University Appointed to the University of Canterbury in New Zealand

What do you like most about your job?

• Solving problems • Interacting with young students and researchers and with a range of professional people from all over the world – e.g. Chemists, Patent Lawyers • Making a difference

Do you have any particular career highlights? Being involved in the commercialisation of research, and setting up a company to develop a treatment for cataracts.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area?

• Spend time learning the fundamentals of Science before specialising • Work hard • Interact with as many people as you can from varied backgrounds – working well with people is really important.


Parisitologist | Pharmacologist | Plant Breeder | Plant Geneticist Plant Morphologist | Plant Nutritionist |

Plant Pathologist

Plant Physiologist | Policy Advisor | Poultry Scientist | Pharmacologist

Plant Pathologists study the causative agents of plant disease, in particular, fungi, bacteria, viruses, nematodes and phytoplasmas. The detection of plant diseases, along with the pathogens and environmental conditions that cause them, is very important due to their potential damage to agricultural and horticultural production. S tudy Options:

• Bachelor of Applied Science.

Case Study: Peter Cross What do you work in and what is your specialty? I am team leader in plant pathology in the Plant Biosecurity and Diagnostics Branch (PBDB) within the Department of Primary Industry, Parks, Water and Environment. There is a significant management role to play as team leader with the design of work programs for staff and the branch as a whole. I also spend a few hours a week in the lab making decisions on testing strategies for submitted samples, and performing electron microscopy tests. Within this discipline of science I specialise in plant virology.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I first became interested in plant virology when I was employed as a technical officer for three months working on a ‘viruses of white clover’ national research project in 1990.

What study path have you taken to get here? My qualification was a Bachelor of Applied Science (TSIT/University of Tasmania) majoring in Biology and Chemistry, but was quite general.

What do you like most about your job? I like that my job has plenty of variety and still involves some laboratory and field work. Clients regularly wish to discuss testing options to suit their needs – whether it is for crop certifications, exports, imports, or disease management issues.

Do you have any particular career highlights? Highlights are when we detect something new, interesting or exotic – especially in a border interception whereby we feel that we are contributing successfully to Tasmania’s biosecurity. Recently we detected Blueberry rust in NSW blueberries in time to avoid the entry and establishment of this disease in Tasmania.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? My advice for people thinking of working in this area would first be to establish if you/your personality like laboratory and field work, and working with plants.


Quality Control Scientist | Quantitative Geneticist |

Quarantine Officer

Quarantine Officers inspect and certify goods which are being imported and exported into Australia but also between State borders. In primary industries, the aim of this is to minimise the risk of pests and disease in our products. Quarantine officers help to protect our agricultural industry, our environment and our health. Study Options:

• Bachelor of Agriculture with further study (Masters or PhD) desirable.

Case Study: Dr Pauline Glocke What do you work in and what is your specialty? I am a Research Officer and Manager with South Australian Research and Development Institute, working in a small team of three people. I am responsible for plant quarantine compliance and management on the Waite campus for South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI) and the University of Adelaide.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I joined SARDI in 2007 after my university funding finished and this looked like an interesting job with a different aspect.

What study path have you taken to get here? Degree in Agricultural Science with Honours, I have a PhD in Agriculture and Natural Resource Sciences, but a PhD is not necessary for this position.

What do you like most about your job? I love working with all the different people, different backgrounds and cultures, assisting them in importing valuable research germplasm and helping them through the minefield of quarantine.

Do you have any particular career highlights? We detected a pathogen of quarantine concern that arrived with a consignment of rice, which threatened other plants growing in the containment greenhouse, with some lines represented 10 years of breeding. I liaised with all the government bodies and University and helped coordinate and write the management practices for the material so the non-infected pants could be saved and material harvested for continued research.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Biosecurity is a wide area with lots of variety; there are many interesting jobs. For this role you need to be a patient, well organised person who loves working with people.


Ranger | Regulator | Remediation Officer | Remote Sensing Officer Renewable Energy Specialist |

Researcher

Research Assistant/Technician | Resource Manager

A Scientific Researcher can be found in academic institutes and within industry. In partnership with academic research, experiments need to be designed, conducted and analysed. This role also involves writing research proposals, collaborating with other researchers, reviewing your own research and that of others and communicating your research findings. Study Options:

Any undergraduate degree in the area of agriculture, food and wine.

Case Study: Bronya Alexander What do you work in and what is your specialty? I am a research officer for the South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI), working as part of a small team looking at the effect of varying future climates on various crops including grapes, apples, cherries and cereal crops.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? Whilst studying a Bachelor of Science, I realised the link between global climate and agriculture, and went on to complete Honours in Atmospheric Science.

What do you like most about your job? The aspect of my role as a researcher which I enjoy the most is collaborating with different people, including other researchers, agricultural consultants or farmer.

Do you have any particular career highlights? A highlight of my career was taking up a volunteer position with CSIRO on a supply trip to Antarctica for two weeks to collect ocean temperature and salinity measurements.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? The most valuable part of my university degree was my Honours year where I had a specific research project. It was interesting to get access to real data to investigate and discover something ‘new’, which is the draw card of being a scientist!


Science Field Officer | Secondary School Teacher – Science/Agriculture | Seismologist Senior Scientist | Soil Scientist | Soil and Water Conservationist Solar Energy Researcher | Statistician |

Sustainability Officer

As a Sustainability Officer in Local Government I am involved in an array of different projects. I have worked on energy and water savings initiatives, water and noise monitoring evaluation, biodiversity conservation, climate change policy development, community capacity building, waste avoidance programs and many more. As sustainability is such a broad field I also get the chance to work in many different settings with many different professional groups and this keeps the work new and interesting. Study Options:

• Bachelor of Natural Science (Environmental Health), Bachelor of Environmental Science (Natural Resource Management), Bachelor of Arts (Natural Resource Management).

Case Study: Mr James Allsop What do you work in and what is your specialty? In my current role my major function is project development and implementation. I work with all departments of Council to identify areas within Council’s Operations or within the Community, which is impacting significantly on the environment. Together with the relevant stakeholders we develop a project plan to address this issue and then seek funding. If funding is attained the project is rolled out, evaluated and then reported on. Over my career I have been involved in many projects including award winning water harvesting, community education and asbestos removal projects

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I first became interested in sustainability as it allows you to identify a problem, develop a way to remedy the problem and then roll it out. It can be very difficult getting projects up and running but the reward for all the hard work is seeing your project succeed.

What study path have you taken to get here? My study path started with a Degree in Environmental Management and completed a Diploma of Environmental Health and Building Surveying at TAFE. Half way through the Diploma I landed a Traineeship at Holroyd Council in the Environmental Health Unit, back then the Environmental Health Unit did everything relating to the environment including waste collection. After finishing the Traineeship an Environmental Projects Officers roll opened up. Since then I have completed a Diploma in Project Management and management training. I am also in my final year of a Bachelor Degree at Southern Cross University in Environmental Science (Natural Resource Management).

What do you like most about your job? Rolling out successful projects and seeing what you have designed and created work. Also winning awards.

Do you have any particular career highlights? I have a number of career highlights but recently rolling out projects that reduced Council’s emissions by 453 tonnes of CO2 per year

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Join professional organisations; take on any work that comes your way. A new job offers new challenges and keeps the work fresh. Have a good understanding of project management and finance. 


Technician | Technical Officer | Tissue Culture Technician

Toxicologist | Tree Surgeon | Turf Scientist

Toxicologists study the adverse effects of chemical, physical, or biological agents on people, animals, and the environment. Toxicology is the scientific study of the harmful effects of drugs, environmental contaminants (such as pollutants) and naturally occurring substances found in food. Study Options:

• Bachelor of Chemistry; Bachelor of Biochemistry; Bachelor of Molecular Biology • Master of Science (Biochemistry) or PhD

Case Study: Dr Elizabeth Snow What do you work in and what is your specialty? I am an Associate Professor of Environmental Health and Molecular Biology, in the School of Health Sciences of the University of Tasmania. What I specialize in can be considered to fit within the area of Genetic Toxicology.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? As long as I can remember I have always asked a lot of questions, particularly about science and the environment. I also read a lot; cereal boxes, library books, even the encyclopaedia. Wikipedia is not really the same.

What study path have you taken to get here? In secondary school I took as many science courses as I could, I liked the challenge and learning how things worked. At university I did a Degree in Chemistry (back then biochemistry wasn’t really on offer). Today I would do a Degree in Biochemistry or Molecular Biology. With my bachelor’s degree I went on to do a PhD in Biochemistry, but I didn’t finish it right away. Some years passed and I started a family before finishing my PhD. Eventually I got a PhD in Biomedical Science (in the area of molecular genetics).

What do you like most about your job? The best part of my job is teaching undergrad and postgrad students, fostering their interest in science and getting them interested in research.

Do you have any particular career highlights? I think the best part of my career has been the opportunity to go to meetings with leaders in the field of DNA repair and genetic toxicology and to share my ideas with them and have them listen to what I have to say. It is a wonderful validation and just plain fun!

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? If you have questions and like to understand how things work, go to university and take a science course, it doesn’t matter what one, but learn how to ask questions and to exchange your ideas with others with similar interests. It can be challenging, rewarding and give you the opportunity to try any one of many different and interesting career pathways.


University Lecturer

A University Lecturer’s role includes teaching and researching. They are responsible for planning courses and delivering lessons, practicals and tutorials at a tertiary level. In addition they must also conduct research in a specialised area with the aim of having the findings published in professional and academic journals. Study Options

• Bachelor of Chemistry; Bachelor of Biochemistry; Bachelor of Molecular Biology • Master of Science (Biochemistry) or PhD

Case Study: Dr Carolyn Schultz What do you work in and what is your specialty? My PhD training was in plant genetics and molecular biology. I research symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi to explore how fungal diversity can contribute to sustainable agriculture, for example to reduce the impact of drought.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I became interested in mycorrhizal fungi when I became aware of the research of one of the top Professors at the University of Adelaide and was looking for a new career challenge for my Sabbatical (study leave) in 2007.

What study path have you taken to get here? Science teaches you critical thinking and problem solving so it is quite easy to move field. I completed a Bachelor of Science (Genetics and Statistics), with Honours in marsupial cytogenetics. My career has included working in New York at the Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, completing a Masters and PhD at New York University where I became interested in plants. This training led to a Post Doctorate at University of Melbourne for 6 years then an academic position at the University of Adelaide’s Waite Campus.

What do you like most about your job? There is always something challenging and interesting to do. I love it when I get to the lab/field to do experiments and when I am thinking about solutions to complex problems.

Do you have any particular career highlights? When I was awarded Plant Physiology’s Young Scientist’s Best Paper Award in 2002. This journal is one of the top international Plant journals and recognised an innovative bioinformatics approach I developed in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Melbourne.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Have fun, learn lots and find good people to study with/work for. Opportunities will come if you are open minded.


Vegetation Manager | Veterinarian | Veterinary Pathologist | Vintner Virologist |

Viticulturist

Viticulturists plan, supervise and coordinate the growing of selected grape varieties for the production of wine. Viticulture is the science, production and study of grapes. Study Options

• Bachelor Agricultural Science (Honours)

Case Study: Dr Jo Jones What do you work in and what is your specialty? I work in viticulture, developing close relationships with the wine industry and understanding what the industries’ expectations are. I assist wine makers with their yearly management, maintaining a consistent supply of grapes, which includes pruning, canopy management, disease control, fertility management (fertilisers), irrigation and set the vine for optimal fruit. This all requires a science knowledge and specialisation in vine physiology.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? It was family role models that lead me down this path of study. My dad was passionate about Tasmanian produce. While studying Ag Science I identified interests in both Horticulture and Animal production, but followed my interests into Horticulture.

What study path have you taken to get here? I completed a Bachelor of Agricultural Science and did Honours in Viticulture. Then I completed a PhD in Viticulture.

What do you like most about your job? I enjoy science and working outdoors, which has provided me with a great opportunity to travel, to conduct research or attend conferences. The wine industry is incredibly ‘thirsty’ for knowledge and want to be involved in what is going on in terms of research, and drive the research to tackle some interesting problems.

Do you have any particular career highlights? Seeing some students that have tackled a science degree, who may have struggled and then been rewarded by being presented with their degree has really been fantastic.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Don’t be scared off by the chemistry in Ag Science. There are incredible support networks at university – and if you happen to fail, don’t give up, find ways to get through because there are great rewards at the end.


Water Engineer | Weed Scientist | Wildilife Biologist | Wood Scientist | Winemaker

W

Water Engineers make things happen with water. Urbanisation, agricultural food production, safe drinking water and sanitation are all underpinned by the capture, treatment, transportation and use of water through engineered systems. Water engineers build, operate and maintain the heart and circulatory system of our modern society. Study Options

• Bachelor of Engineering (Civil or Environmental) • Masters of Engineering Science and/or Natural Resource Management or PhD

Case Study: Mr Paul Heaton What do you work in and what is your specialty? I work in water supply and sewerage systems. Professionally I am a generalist and in the last several years have moved into more senior utility management positions.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I have always been interested in anything to do with water whether it is water supply, irrigation, catchment management or coastal engineering. Water is such a central part of our lives physically, physiologically, environmentally, socially and culturally.

What study path have you taken to get here? Bachelor of Civil Engineering (University of Queensland) followed by a Post-graduate Diploma of Natural Resource Management (University of New England) and then Master of Engineering Science (University of Western Australia).

What do you like most about your job? Doing a job that is critically important to the community and doing it with a team of dedicated people.

Do you have any particular career highlights? On a professional level, winning a Churchill Fellowship to study Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) systems in the United States and then establishing the first SAT system in Australia, in Alice Springs. On a personal level, being able to assist recovery in Sri Lanka following the Boxing Day Asian tsunami.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Get as broad an experience as you can in a range of water business situations and locations. Listen and learn from those around you. Don’t reinvent the wheel but look at everything from fresh eyes.


X-Ray/Radiographer | Xylotomist

A Radiographer provides diagnostic medical imaging to assist doctors in understanding human anatomy, physiology and pathology. This imaging includes taking x-rays, fluoroscopy, CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). A radiographer images all areas of the body, thus is required to have a sound understanding of anatomy, physiology and pathology. Study Options • A degree in Diagnostic Radiography from a recognized university • Statement of accreditation from the Australian Health Practitioner Regulatory Agency (AHPRA).

Case Study: Mr Greg Cracknell What do you work in and what is your specialty? I work as a senior radiographer in CT. My specialty is CT cardiac angiograms but I can scan anything from spines and brains to complicated oncology, angiographic and perfusion (4D) studies.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I became interested in CT and MRI when I was studying the physics at university. I started working in CT in my first year of full time work after university.

What study path have you taken to get here? I completed the Bachelor of Applied Science (Medical Radiation Sciences) Diagnostic Radiography at the University of Sydney. I am currently completing my Master of Medical Radiation Science.

What do you like most about your job? I think this job has such good variety of areas to work in. I love mixing technology with pathology and people!! I get to work with some very technologically advanced (and expensive) equipment, see some fascinating pathologies yet also work with and for people to hopefully help them.

Do you have any particular career highlights? I have scanned a man that had a nail gun nail in his head! No wonder he had a headache for three days (that’s how long it had been there). I also enjoy being part of the highs and lows of our oncology patients. They are amazing people and it is an honour to be a part of their lives and their fight.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Study at least one science subject at school. They may not be prerequisites for the course, but there is a lot of physics, chemistry and biology involved in radiography and having some knowledge in one or two of those areas are a huge help in first year university. If you can, try and do some work experience in a private radiology practice. It gives you an idea of what radiographers do, day-to-day.


Yeast Distiller

A Yeast Distiller uses microorganisms and the process of fermentation to produce a range of products including beer and rum. You’ll be surprised at the number of foods you eat every day that rely on microorganisms for their production. We wouldn’t have cheese and chocolate without bacteria and we wouldn’t have bread, beer and wine without yeast. Yeast is an unicellular eukaryotic fungus found just about anywhere where it’s warm and damp with plenty of sugar, like the skin of ripe fruit on a warm summer day. To make beer requires yeast, and using different kinds of yeast can produce different types of beers, like lagers and ales. Study Options • A Bachelor of Science majoring in Microbiology or Food Science.

Case Study: Dr Peter Aldred What do you work in and what is your specialty? I work at Mt. Helen campus of Federation University in the microbrewery producing lagers and ales.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I started home brewing when I was 18 and really enjoyed it, and after completing a degree and PhD in Biochemistry I am able to work as a University Lecturer teaching Brewery science.

What study path have you taken to get here? I completed a degree and PhD in Biochemistry, but there are lots of other ways you can get into brewing, including completing a Graduate Diploma in Brewing after a Science Degree.

What do you like most about your job? Sampling the end product!

Do you have any particular career highlights? Being awarded the Brewers Engineers Association Engineering award in 2008, and making a beer that people will enjoy.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Learn your chemistry and biology well, you’re gonna need it! And you have to like cleaning too.


Zoologist

Zoologists study animals on many levels including their evolution, classification, anatomy, physiology, behaviour, distribution and habitats. Zoology allows you to work in fields ranging from zoos and museums, Government environment and conservation departments and educational institutions to name a few. In order to qualify as a zoologist it is recommended that you have an interest in biology and chemistry. Study Options

• Bachelor of Science majoring in zoology.

Case Study: Dr Christine Cooper What do you work in and what is your specialty? I am an academic in the department of Environment and Agriculture, specialising in terrestrial vertebrate ecophysiology. The activities I am involved in with my job include research, field work, laboratory work, animal capture and care, data analysis, writing papers and teaching.

How did you become interested in this area and when did you first start? I have always been interested in animals and the natural world. While at school and during my undergraduate studies I worked in wildlife parks, rehabilitation centres and volunteered for scientific research programs to gain practical experience.

What study path have you taken to get here? I enrolled in a Bachelor of Science at the University of Western Australia, completing majors in Zoology and Geography. I completed Honours and then went on to complete a PhD. After a one-year postdoctoral position at the University of New England, I commenced my current job at Curtin University.

What do you like the most about your job? I enjoy the variety of activities that I get to undertake–research involving field work, laboratory work, and animal capture and care, data analysis and writing research papers. Ialso get to share my work through teaching university lectures and laboratory classes and supervising student projects.

Do you have any particular career highlights? Working on a project studying the use of water by marsupials has been a particular career highlight.

What advice would you give to someone interested in working in this area? Decide what it is you want to do and then work really hard to make sure you have the right qualifications and experience.


Acknowledgements Without the support of the following National Partners in Education and Industry, the PICSE program would not be feasible.


Living science