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2103-2014 Newspaper Portfolio Natalie Eppler

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May 9, 2014 BriAnne Chayer Paola High School Journalism Advisor 401 N. Angela Dr. Paola, KS 66071 Dear Mrs. Chayer This class and its staff have had a great impact on my life these last two years. The staff has worked very hard as a team and I have enjoyed getting to know everyone. Thanks to the hard work of staff members, the Reporter has received the All Kansas award again this year. Next year, I hope to help continue this tradition by taking more responsibility for our publication as the online editor. I realize this position will require me to work hard and be responsible for increasing “The Reporter’s” online presence, but I also look forward to the opportunity. I feel that I am qualified for this position because I have the ability to learn, grow, and maintain my responsibilities. Whitney McDaniel has done a very good job this year as online editor, and I am glad she and Brooke will be coeditors in chief next year. I am interested in this position because it will allow me to use social media and technology to reach a wide variety of people. Finally, I look forward to taking this responsibility next year and bringing information to anyone with access to the internet that is timely and that goes beyond what the newspaper allows us to do. The skills of responsibility, patience, and the ability to learn new things will help me be successful as the on-line editor. I have demonstrated responsibility by staying after school to help finish the paper, and by writing stories I was not required to write. Journalism has taught me so much about patience and how to keep going even if the design is not working or the story is not flowing. Through newspaper I have learned how to work with others, how to interview and how to meet deadlines. I admit that many of the responsibilities I will have as online editor will be completely new to me, but luckily I am able to learn new information and use that information in what I do. “The Reporter” reaches thousands of people and provides a variety of information about students and the lives they lead. I appreciate your consideration of my application and your constant patience with me. I hope to increase the number of people “The Reporter” reaches and create a website where visitors can easily access recent information and view articles that are relevant to their lives. I believe that the skills I have gained through journalism will help me to be successful at this new level of responsibility. Thank you, Natalie Eppler Enclosed: Resume

Natalie Eppler 11104 W. 327th St. Paola, KS 66071 (913)594-2144 Natalie_eppler@panthermail.org

Objective: To increase “The Reporter’s” presence online as well as through social media and increase the amount of up-todate information about life at the high school available to anyone with access to the internet. Education: • Completed nearly three years of schooling at Paola High School • Completed one semester of InDesign and one semester of Photoshop Experience: The Reporter, newspaper, Paola High School 2012-present. Reporter. Interviewed, designed using InDesign and Photoshop, sold advertisements, took pictures, and wrote stories. Activities: National Honor Society, sponsor: Sara Allison 2014-present, an organization that promotes community service, leadership, and academics. Track, sponsor: Mike Smith 2012-present, competed in 4x800 meter relay, mile, and two mile races. Cross Country, sponsors: Leslie Wilson and Karl Schmidt 2012-present, competed in the girls 3K race. Babysitting, nursery supervisor: Krystal Sparks 2012-present, cared for, fed, entertained and cleaned children from 0-3 years old. Light House Presbyterian Church youth group, leader: Rachel Beth Peck 2008-present, participated in bible studies, campouts, and community service projects. Busy Beaver’s 4-H Club, leader: Glenda Kinaman 2007-present, participated in leadership, community service, and skill building projects. Awards: All Kansas newspaper publication 2012-2014, reporter on staff Honorable mention sports photography KSPA regional contest 2014 Most valuable staff member March 2014 References: Lesley Wilson, Paola High School cross country and track coach Krystal Sparks, Lighthouse Presbyterian Church nursery supervisor


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was exposed to journalism at a young age by my aunt and uncle. They were the owners of the Miami County Republic and several other newspapers. When I was younger, I always hoped that my uncle might take a picture of me and my face would find its way to his publication. This never happened, and now I am beginning to realize how hard they worked to produce The Miami County Republic and why my face never ended up on the front page. While on staff, I have learned so much about what they spent so much of their lives doing. I have learned how to be dedicated to getting the facts, how to work well with others, and how to interview a wide variety of people. To go from a rough idea to a designed page and written story takes a great deal of dedication and hard work. Deadlines can be daunting especially right before spring break, but I learned to not worry about those deadlines. I realized worrying about those deadlines will not help me complete my stories on time or finish designing my pages. I learned that I need to work harder to meet deadlines and that procrastinating leads to trouble in the long run. During the first newspaper deadline of the year, I was assigned the double page spread. I did not start designing the page soon enough and ended up depending on Mrs. Chayer to finish the design. This was a rough way to start off the year, but I am thankful Mrs. Chayer was there to help me. It helped me to realize I had difficulty with procrastination and I learned to change my work ethic and begin working on the design elements earlier on in the deadline. This is something I am still in the process of learning. I am still not able to meet all deadlines and sometimes I take steps in the wrong direction, but thankfully there are still opportunities for me to use what I have learned. Something that is very special about “The Reporter� staff is we work as a team. This year I have learned to ask for help from others, and I can always depend on someone else to provide me with a camera, an agenda, or writing and design advice. I have also learned how much fun it can be to teach younger staff members how to design and ask good questions during interviews. It was a great learning experience for me to sit next to Audrey Brody. Sometimes she would ask questions that I would not know the answer to. This would allow me to search for the answer and learn something new also. Understandably, she would often ask for design advice. Although this is something I still struggle with, her questions improved my ability to design as well. This newspaper would not have received an All Kansas Award without the staff members’ willingness to work as a team. There are many things that go into producing a newspaper including coming up with interesting ideas, interviewing complete strangers, writing articles, editing those articles multiple times, and designing. This year, I began learning how to ask questions that bring out interesting answers from others. For example, I asked William Bastarache for the muscular dystrophy story what he missed the most about not being able to walk and why he missed that thing. This provided me with information for a lead and hopefully drew readers into the story. Another aspect of production I learned about this year was design. I learned to have a dominant element and to break up text with secondary coverage and subheads. Hopefully I will be able to use this information next year to make the pages I do design more appealing. Finally, I learned to write stories that showed both sides of an issue. I learned that it is important to be an unbiased reporter and to not add your own opinion to an informative article. For example, for the first article about the bond I presented information from those who supported the bond and those who had misgivings about it. Whatever I do can always use improvement and I am eager to continue learning about journalism. One of the most difficult parts of journalism for me was the advertisement sales. I struggle with speaking in front of strangers so these sales were a good opportunity for me to get out of my comfort zone and try something new. I learned to not be afraid to go back a second or third time and ask again. I also learned that having other people there during the transaction makes the task less daunting. Finally, I learned to accept that no matter what some businesses will never buy an advertisement. For example, all the businesses that I returned to a sec


ond or third time refused to buy an advertisement. Thankfully, many businesses were willing to purchase an advertisement. Ethically, I learned to reach out to anyone who may play an important part in the story. For example for the Muscular Dystrophy story I spoke to William, to William’s mother, the school nurse, and the school physical therapist. I also learned that it is important to take good notes and only quote the words they actually say not what I think they said. For Andrew Henn’s senior plans article I was tempted to write what I thought I remembered him saying. Instead I interviewed him a second time and he gave me even better information. I learned that it is important to be ethical, reach out to as many sources as possible, and that no matter what it is important to tell what really happened. There is no other course like journalism at the high school. In no other class do students create something that thousands of people read and look forward to receiving. There is no other class where students have so many opportunities to be creative and learn so many things that can be used throughout life. This is a very valuable course to take, and I will use the skills I have learned for the rest of my life. When I am met with a difficult situation I will be able to remember the difficulties I had in journalism and how they were overcome with teamwork. I will also be able to use the interview skills I learned this year to help myself speak to authority figures in a confident and respectful way Journalism is a constant learning experience and I have learned to be dedicated, to avoid procrastination, to work with others, to sell advertisements, and to be ethical no matter what. I may never fully understand what goes into publishing a professional publication, but my experience with The Reporter staff will definitely help me through the rest of my life.

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I have had the opportunity to write a variety of different articles this year. I have learned from and enjoyed writing each. The most significant work I completed this year is the “Living Life Article” published in the March issue. This article is significant to me because it showcases an individual who is overcoming major obstacles and who deserves to have his story told. The original idea behind the article was to bring to other students’ attention the difficulties that fellow students deal with on a daily basis. The pain William Bastarache deals with on a daily basis is not something that not many high school students can understand, and I wrote this article to hopefully show other students how fortunate they are and how tough William is. In the article, I focused on how muscular dystrophy affects Bastaraches life, what he does to handle the affects, and what the disease is. I used quotes from Bastarache and the school nurse to support my article and was able to contact Bastarache’s mom prior to publication. She gave me some very good insight, more detail about the disease, and about Bastarache’s personality. Unfortunately, the information from Bastarache’s mom did not make it into the final copy. Writing this article was an eye opening experience for me. It brought to my attention how truly blessed I am to be able to walk and run. I learned to keep asking questions and to get as many viewpoints as possible on a subject. I also learned that the more questions I ask and the more time I take to get to know the person I am interviewing the better responses I receive. The first step I took to write this article was to interview William and Mrs. Kinaman. I wrote the first draft and then I interviewed William another time to get more information. I wrote the article again and was also able to watch Bastarche perform physical therapy. I learned about the exercise he does each week and was able to take pictures. I regret not using the information I learned from watching Bastarache work out, but thankfully I was able to use one of the pictures. There are definitely improvements that can still be made to this article, but I am happy with the information with in the article and I am happy that it is short and tells the story of someone who does not always receive the recognition they deserve.

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The Reporter • March 2014

Living life Bastarache overcomes physical limitations

natalie eppler reporter For junior William Bastarache, climbing stairs is merely a dream. Bastarache is confined to a wheelchair. “I was born with a mix between Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease [a form of muscular dystrophy] and another disease called scoliosis,” Bastarache said. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease causes muscles to weaken and waste away, the loss of some, but not all feeling in the legs and arms, the formation of stiffened joints and scoliosis, or curvature of the spine according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke website. Bastarache first noticed symptoms of the disease in the first grade, although his mom thought he had the disease soon after birth. “My handwriting was terrible,” Bastarache said. “I can’t really write for too long because my hands get tired.” Bastarache also struggles with transportation. “It’s hard to get in and out of cars,” Bastarache said. “Usually my mom just picks me up and puts me in [the car].” To deal with the symptoms of the disease, Bastarache does physical therapy exercises during second hour every black day

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in room 114. He also meets with physical therapist Marilyn Friesen once a week. “I work out,” Bastarache said. “I lift weights and do other exercises.” School nurse Glenda Kinaman sees students living with chronic illnesses every day. “[Individuals with Muscular Dystrophy] commonly have regularly structured physical therapy and occupational therapy,” Kinaman said. To keep a positive attitude, Bastarache makes jokes about himself. “Other people don’t like it, but I do,” Bastarache said. Treatment of muscular dystrophy has improved throughout Bastarache’s life with better technology, better surgical procedures and better physical treatment. “It’s getting a lot better because now people actually know what it is,” Bastarache said. Bastarache enjoys attending the yearly Muscular Dystrophy Association Camp at Tall Oaks Conference Center in Linwood. “Other than the camp,” Bastarache said. “Muscular Dystrophy sucks.” Muscular dystrophy is a degenerative disease, meaning Bastrache’s muscles will always be weakening. Kinaman said, “People who deal with [chronic illness] can learn to live within their restrictions. It doesn’t have to stop them from living life.” photo by Natalie Eppler

Making adjustments

Junior William Bastarache works with physical therapist Marilyn Friesen on standing with a walker. Although Bastarache is often in his wheel chair, he can move in and out of the chair by himself. Bastarache stood for one minute, 20 seconds.

natalie eppler reporter One morning, a 10 year old girl did not wake up. She was rushed to the hospital where she would spend the next twothree weeks. She weighed only 50 pounds and drank almost constantly to flush the toxins from her body. She recovered and was released from the hospital but, her life would be forever changed. “It was kind of a shocker,” junior Taylor D’Urso said. “I lived 10 years of my life without having [diabetes] and it’s still taking a lot of time to get used to it.” School nurse Glenda Kinaman said there are two types of diabetes: type one and type two diabetes. In type one diabetes, the pancreas or the organ that produces insulin completely stops working. In type two diabetes, the pancreas still produces some insulin, a protein used to regulate carbohydrates and fats, but not enough to meet the demands of the body. “There is nothing you can do to avoid getting type one diabetes,” Kinaman said. “It is commonly hereditary.” D’Urso has type one diabetes. 4-5 times a day, she pricks

Both Sloan and D’Urso must be prepared. “I always have stuff in my backpack just in case,” Sloan said. “Mostly, I have juice boxes, granola bars [and] dried fruit, anything with a lot of carbs in it.” Kinaman said it is important for diabetics to have a supply of snacks in case their blood sugar falls below the normal level. “When my blood sugar gets to low I get really pale and my vision is blurred,” D’Urso said. “I start shaking a lot and I don’t focus on stuff.” D’Urso has been hospitalized twice since her diagnosis 10 years ago. “I wasn’t taking care of myself,” D’Urso said. “They told me while I was in the hospital that if I hadn’t gone to the hospital at the time that I did I probably wouldn’t be here.” Although life with diabetes is not easy, D’Urso is hopeful that her faulty pancreas will be replaced by an artificial pancreas in 2015. “That would completely take care of the problem,” D’Urso said. “That would be awesome.”

Juniors learn to live life with diabetes

her finger to check her blood sugar level. To maintain a good blood sugar level she gives herself insulin before eating. For D’Urso, a good blood sugar level is between 70 and 140 mg/ dL. “It’s really difficult to keep it in that range,” D’Urso said. “Most of the time the blood sugar is out of that range.” Junior Nick Sloan also depends on insulin injections to maintain his blood sugar level. “It’s just kind of part of my life now,” Sloan said. “I don’t really think twice about it.” Diabetes has changed a lot of things in both Sloan and D’Urso’s lives. “I can’t go in a hot tub, I can’t swim for too long at a time, and I can’t just eat anything I want,” D’Urso said. To stay healthy, Sloan also closely monitors the food he eats and does not drink pop. “It’s not like I can’t drink it, but it’s just not really good for me because it [makes] my blood sugar go up really fast and then drop,” Sloan said.

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Journalism is a learning experience and there is always something I can improve on. The article that I believe needs the most work is the “Behind the Scar” article. This article was published as the double truck in the October issue. I was unable to finish designing the spread and the design itself was not eye appealing. From this experience I learned to ask for help when I do not know how to do something and how to depend on others. This article was a lot of fun to write and the people I interviewed were extremely helpful but I failed to add art to the spread that would make students want to read the stories. I also learned that lighting is very important with pictures on a page and if there are cut outs on a page they should each be in proportion to one another. The importance of filling the page is something else I learned from designing this spread. Most importantly I learned that design is not easy, but it is not something to give up on. Originally the double page was formatted horizontally and there was no secondary coverage on the page. I then added a number line to the spread to rank the pain level of the scars from 1-10. Next, thankfully you suggested that I change the page to a vertical layout. This was a good idea because it made the page different from every other page in the paper. I then added cut outs of each person interviewed and added the expert to the spread as well. Finally I added a poor picture of bandages to the lower left hand corner of the page. Unfortunately I was not able to finish this spread by myself, but thankfully you were there to make the page seem mo re professional. As I look back on the page now I would do many things differently. To improve this piece, I would add more secondary coverage to attract readers to the stories. Next, I would have each person in the cutouts pose in the same manner. I would also format the information from Mrs. Kinaman differently with possibly bolded text and numbering to make it easier to read, finally I would ask those I am interviewing more open ended questions to help me fill the white space on the page. Now, I feel that designing this spread were a very good learning experiences for me, and I am glad I had the opportunity to do it. Hopefully, I will be able to use what I learned from this spread next year.


The Reporter • October 2012

(features)

Behind Scar Senior: Alicia Morgan A squirrel was under attack. Senior Alicia Morgan’s second favorite animal was on the ground wrestling with a dog. It was just Morgan and a random dog, so Morgan took action. “I thought I should go help. [The squirrel] looked very helpless,” Morgan said. Morgan ran over to the animals, tried to pick the squirrel up, but it bit her on her left middle finger and ran up into a tree. “It did not hurt that bad. It was mostly shock,” Morgan said. “I was just surprised it happened.” Although Morgan was able to save the squirrel from the dog, she could not save it from being shot. “It was really sad,” Morgan said. Since the incident Morgan has owned three pet squirrels. “I love them more than ever,” Morgan said.

Sophomore: Audrey Robinson Sophomore Audrey Robinson and her brother Eli were not supposed to be there, but that’s when Robinson was lifted up off the ground and bitten on the right shoulder. “Oh my goodness,” Robinson exclaimed. “I was in utter surprise, just really, really surprised.” On that fateful day eight years ago, Robinson was picked up and dropped by a horse. The stallion not only left a black and blue mark, but a scar as well. “[The scar] seems like a bond between me and my brother. It brought us closer together, and we learned how to cover for each other,” Robinson said. After Robinson was bitten by Jack, the horse, Eli threatened to beat Robinson up if she told their mom. Robinson’s mom was eventually able to get the truth from Robinson and she did not get beaten up by her brother.

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School Nurse: Glenda Kinaman School nurse Glenda Kinaman has been in nursing for over 20 years and deals with injuries every day. “Frequently [I see] kids fall off monkey bars onto the woodchips, but here it is more severe like getting cut in the woodshop,” Kinaman said. Kinaman has seen many scars throughout her career including those from surgeries and accidents. “A lot of times you see scars on people and they tell a story of their medical history. The bigger the scar the more profound the story,” Kinaman said. Scar prevention is mostly dependent on how the School wound is cared for, Kinaman said. N Photo otic oi urse Glend by Nata nt a lie Eppl “How you put it back together and how the er studen ment and ba Kinaman us ts’ wou es ndages wound is treated have a big effect on scaring,” Kinands. to prot antibiect man said. According to Kinaman, new technologies in hospitals such as wound vacuums help speed the healing process by providing a dry clean environment for the injury, but for most school related injuries Kinaman said she uses antibiotic ointment and wraps the wound. “Keep it clean,” Kinaman said.

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Re Senior: Jamie Silvers It was probably a good thing senior Jamie Silvers had no idea what was going on because he had just indented his skull with a computer monitor. “I was mostly numb and I cried, but my dad patted me on the head and said it was going to be okay,” Silvers said. When Silvers was 8 years old he moved with his dad into a new home. Boxes and a dog filled the living room. Silvers chased the dog, tripped and collided with a computer monitor lying on the floor. “Luckily, I did not hit too many nerves,” Silvers said. “I hit that thing pretty hard,” To care for the wound, Silvers wore a gauze pad over the injury and had to stay home. It took one month for Silvers to recover. “I do not even notice it anymore,” Silvers said. “I do not think people notice it, so it does not really matter.”

Junior: Jacob Drews

Junior, Jacob Drews, having 15 scars has become very familiar with the topic. Out of all 15, the most memorable would be the most recent. Billy, a bull, smacked him in the face, pushed him up against the fence for 67 seconds and beat him with his 8 inch horns. “I don’t know what happened; I just got up over the fence, my adrenaline going. I was dazed because he hit me so hard.” Drews said. They super glued the wound shut, an hour later he was back up on the bull again. “I was kind of mad, but ready to get back on again,” he said. Another scar that stands out to Drews is the one from when his dog bit off the tip of his ear. The dog had been missing all day. When Drews finally found him, he picked him up to put him back in his cage. The dog seemingly did not like this idea, so he bit off the tip off his ear. It was a ten minute drive to the nearest emergency room where Drews received multiple shots to his skull to keep the wound from getting infected. After about 3 months the cartilage in his ear grew back, and they got rid of the dog. Now the only thing left to remind Drews of this is a scar.

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Final Draft

Marks tell stories of memories, accidents

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The Reporter • October 2012 The Reporter • October 2013

Freshman: Danielle Beachboard Freshman Danielle Beachboard was in the wrong place at the wrong time. “I didn’t realize I was bleeding until I touched my face. There was blood on my hand and I started screaming,” Beachboard said. Beachboard was on a camping trip in Canton Oklahoma. She and her cousin were playing croquet. During the game, her cousin swung her mallet back and it collided with Beachboard’s face just below the left eye. “I think my cousin was more upset than I was,” Beachboard said. Beachboard needed medical attention, but the hospital was three hours away. “My parents stayed calm and mom held me on the way. When we got there mom stayed in the hallway and I screamed while I was getting stiches,” Beachboard said. After five stiches and four weeks of recovery Beachboard was left with only a scar.

The fact that Jeremy Criddle is in the middle of falling through the air draws me to this picture. I like how it is not like most basketball pictures and that it fills the frame. I also like how clearly you can see the other person and that the picture follows the rule of thirds.

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This picture catches my attention because of the intensity in Gio’s face and the vivid colors in the picture. I also like the runners in the background they add a depth of field and make the race come to life. Finally I like how this photo uses the rule of thirds.

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I really like this picture because you can see the emotion on Andrew Henn’s face and you can tell he is putting a lot of effort into his throw. I also like how the picture follows the rule of thirds and I like that it fills the frame. Finally, this picture shows a sport that many students no little about.

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The best part of journalism is the people I have the opportunity to work with and learn from. This newspaper would not be the same without all the hard work everyone has done this year. It takes teamwork to put out a newspaper and my job this year has been primarily to write and design different pages. I enjoy being a part of this team and I have shown my commitment to the team by spending extra time in the journalism room, writing extra stories, and by helping new staff members. Getting deadlines done on time is not something I am very good at, but thankfully you have always let me come in early in the mornings or stay after school to help me get the job done. I have also been able to attend some work nights and I really appreciate the extra time that provides. I enjoy learning about people’s stories and having the opportunity to write about them. This year I have had the opportunity to write many different stories from basketball to disabilities to community service to scars. I have learned so many different things and I was able to write extra stories for the March issue about basketball and wrestling. This allowed me to explore sports writing for the first time and learn about different sports. One of the neat things about journalism this year was watching the new staff members learn about the different aspects of journalism and excel at interviewing, writing, and designing. It is amazing how much everyone on staff has grown and I enjoyed being able to help Audrey come up with interview questions, help her design spreads, and help her write stories. Honestly this probably helped me learn more about design and writing than it helped her, but I am very glad she will be back next year. It has been really good being a part of journalism this year and I look forward to doing this next year.

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Usually life does not go exactly the way we want it to, but thankfully it always works out in the end. Looking back now I am thankfully that junior year is nearing a close and that the problems I faced are behind me. I am also glad things did not always go the way I wanted them to because I definitely learned a lot from them. I dealt with design and time management issues. For me, design is the most difficult part of journalism. It always seems to take me hours to do the simplest things, and the designs usually don’t look very good when I am finished with them. The good thing is there are others on newspaper staff with much more design skills than myself. I definitely could have handled this situation better. This situation taught me to ask others for help when I need it and to not be afraid to try new things. One way I can work to improve my design is by taking a design class or trying new things on InDesign or Photoshop in my free time. There are so many things to do with these programs I just need to find out how to do them. Another thing that I struggle with is managing my time. Between running, journalism, and taking care of animals I seem to just run out of time sometimes. I tried to find ways to fit everything in, but sometimes I was not successful. As a result, I would end up neglecting something in my life, and that is not the right thing for me to do. Sometimes I was able to manage my time well, but other times I became overwhelmed. I learned from this to plan ahead and to consider what I am already doing before signing up for something else. I hope to remedy this problem next year by becoming more organized, writing down what I need to do in advance, and by working hard. This year was a great opportunity for me to grow and learn. I look forward to learning new things next year, and I hope to use what I have learned from this year in the future.

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6 n tio c fle Sports Story: p. 14 Issue 5 e R I chose this story because I had a lot of fun writing it.

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I also like this story because I was able to be at the game and this allowed me to give a more interesting lead to the story. This was also a major accomplishment for the basketball team Fighting to the finish and I was glad I was able to talk to so many of the players al- Girls win sub state against Louisburg Invading Salina though I did not talk to any coaches. Photo by Natalie Eppler

The girls basketball team celebrates after its substate championship win against Louisburg in which they won in a last second shot 43-40. They will play again on March 12 against Andover-Central to compete for the State title.

Photo by Natalie Eppler

Justin Criddle and Mason McDow celebrate after winning the Sub-State Championships on March 8. They won 57-26 against Spring Hill. They will play again on March 13 against Winfield to compete for the State title.

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(features)

The Reporter • March 2014

Living life Bastarache overcomes physical limitations

natalie eppler reporter For junior William Bastarache, climbing stairs is merely a dream. Bastarache is confined to a wheelchair. “I was born with a mix between Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease [a form of muscular dystrophy] and another disease called scoliosis,” Bastarache said. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease causes muscles to weaken and waste away, the loss of some, but not all feeling in the legs and arms, the formation of stiffened joints and scoliosis, or curvature of the spine according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke website. Bastarache first noticed symptoms of the disease in the first grade, although his mom thought he had the disease soon after birth. “My handwriting was terrible,” Bastarache said. “I can’t really write for too long because my hands get tired.” Bastarache also struggles with transportation. “It’s hard to get in and out of cars,” Bastarache said. “Usually my mom just picks me up and puts me in [the car].” To deal with the symptoms of the disease, Bastarache does physical therapy exercises during second hour every black day

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in room 114. He also meets with physical therapist Marilyn Friesen once a week. “I work out,” Bastarache said. “I lift weights and do other exercises.” School nurse Glenda Kinaman sees students living with chronic illnesses every day. “[Individuals with Muscular Dystrophy] commonly have regularly structured physical therapy and occupational therapy,” Kinaman said. To keep a positive attitude, Bastarache makes jokes about himself. “Other people don’t like it, but I do,” Bastarache said. Treatment of muscular dystrophy has improved throughout Bastarache’s life with better technology, better surgical procedures and better physical treatment. “It’s getting a lot better because now people actually know what it is,” Bastarache said. Bastarache enjoys attending the yearly Muscular Dystrophy Association Camp at Tall Oaks Conference Center in Linwood. “Other than the camp,” Bastarache said. “Muscular Dystrophy sucks.” Muscular dystrophy is a degenerative disease, meaning Bastrache’s muscles will always be weakening. Kinaman said, “People who deal with [chronic illness] can learn to live within their restrictions. It doesn’t have to stop them from living life.”

Junior William Bastarache works with physical therapist Marilyn Friesen on standing with a walker. Although Bastarache is often in his wheel chair, he can move in and out of the chair by himself. Bastarache stood for one minute, 20 seconds.

natalie eppler reporter One morning, a 10 year old girl did not wake up. She was rushed to the hospital where she would spend the next twothree weeks. She weighed only 50 pounds and drank almost constantly to flush the toxins from her body. She recovered and was released from the hospital but, her life would be forever changed. “It was kind of a shocker,” junior Taylor D’Urso said. “I lived 10 years of my life without having [diabetes] and it’s still taking a lot of time to get used to it.” School nurse Glenda Kinaman said there are two types of diabetes: type one and type two diabetes. In type one diabetes, the pancreas or the organ that produces insulin completely stops working. In type two diabetes, the pancreas still produces some insulin, a protein used to regulate carbohydrates and fats, but not enough to meet the demands of the body. “There is nothing you can do to avoid getting type one diabetes,” Kinaman said. “It is commonly hereditary.” D’Urso has type one diabetes. 4-5 times a day, she pricks

Both Sloan and D’Urso must be prepared. “I always have stuff in my backpack just in case,” Sloan said. “Mostly, I have juice boxes, granola bars [and] dried fruit, anything with a lot of carbs in it.” Kinaman said it is important for diabetics to have a supply of snacks in case their blood sugar falls below the normal level. “When my blood sugar gets to low I get really pale and my vision is blurred,” D’Urso said. “I start shaking a lot and I don’t focus on stuff.” D’Urso has been hospitalized twice since her diagnosis 10 years ago. “I wasn’t taking care of myself,” D’Urso said. “They told me while I was in the hospital that if I hadn’t gone to the hospital at the time that I did I probably wouldn’t be here.” Although life with diabetes is not easy, D’Urso is hopeful that her faulty pancreas will be replaced by an artificial pancreas in 2015. “That would completely take care of the problem,” D’Urso said. “That would be awesome.”

her finger to check her blood sugar level. To maintain a good blood sugar level she gives herself insulin before eating. For D’Urso, a good blood sugar level is between 70 and 140 mg/ dL. “It’s really difficult to keep it in that range,” D’Urso said. “Most of the time the blood sugar is out of that range.” Junior Nick Sloan also depends on insulin injections to maintain his blood sugar level. “It’s just kind of part of my life now,” Sloan said. “I don’t really think twice about it.” Diabetes has changed a lot of things in both Sloan and D’Urso’s lives. “I can’t go in a hot tub, I can’t swim for too long at a time, and I can’t just eat anything I want,” D’Urso said. To stay healthy, Sloan also closely monitors the food he eats and does not drink pop. “It’s not like I can’t drink it, but it’s just not really good for me because it [makes] my blood sugar go up really fast and then drop,” Sloan said.

The girls’ varsity basketball team went on to the state tournament in Salina where they played against Andover Central on March 12. “Knowing that the season wasn’t over overwhelmed me,” junior Lyndsee Johnson said. “Getting a second chance to go to state was so exciting.” The varsity girls’ basketball team lost to Andover Central 50-58. “It’s big to make it to the state tournament,” sophomore Morgan Laudan said. “Any team we play is going to be difficult.” The girls’ varsity basketball team finished the season as sub-state champions with a winning record of 16-3 “We are really close,” Paulsen said. “I love the girls.” Senior Emilee Johnson said she loved how the team became like a family. “I love being around the girls,” Johnson said. “I will miss the family atmosphere.” Sophomore Morgan Laudan looks forward to competing at state again next year. “We need to focus on how good of a season we had and on getting better for next year,” Laudan said.

Boys place third Sophomore Alex Wilson said he was happy with the outcome at state. at state “It could’ve always have been has always been our goal.”

brooke prothe sports editor The boys’ basketball team beat El Dorado 72-56 for third place at the state tournament. They won their first game against Winfield 5748. On March 14, the team lost in overtime 58-56 against McPherson, keeping the score close the entire game. “Going to state was a dream come true,” senior Andrew Henn said. “We’ve all been playing together since we were kids and this

better, but third place is better than fourth,” Wilson said. This year was the first time since 1995 that the boys’ basketball team has made it to state. “We were excited to go to state and proud of our kids,” Cash said. Wilson said the season went better than he expected. “At the beginning of the season I didn’t even expect to go to state,” Wilson said. “But we ended up getting third place at state and that’s a great feeling.”

Read about season wraps ups for wrestling and boys swim at www.phsjournalism.com

Feature Story: p. 11 Issue 5

J:/2013-2014Reporter/StaffFolders/NatalieEppler/Issue5/ William

reporter

the

Making adjustments

Juniors learn to live life with diabetes

natalie eppler reporter The game was tied with less than a minute remaining in the second half. Junior Lyndsee Johnson passed the ball to sophomore Taylor Williams who stood just beyond the three-point arch. Williams shot the ball and the ball found the basket. “It was just a shot like I have taken a hundred times maybe a million times before,” Williams said. “I didn’t think about it being close to the end, I just shot.” The shot broke the tie, and the Panthers won the sub-state title game 43-40, defeating the Louisburg Wildcats. “Right after the shot I knew we could finish strong,” Williams said. “I was at a loss for words.” Williams does not take credit for the narrow victory, but credits the win to all of the hustle plays and other great plays made by her teammates. “The adrenaline of our bench was great,” Senior Remick Paulsen said. “The Rat Pack and everyone cheering kept me going during the game.” As the clock reached zero the sub-state champions cheered, embraced and cried. “That was probably the most intense game I have ever witnessed,” senior Regan Boyer said. “Our hard work was finally paying off.”

This story caught my attention because it puts the spotlight on an individual who has overcome many difficulties, but does not always receive recognition for his accomplishments. I also liked this story because I was able to explain about this disease and how it affected his life.

photo by Natalie Eppler

News Story: p. 1 Issue 2

Paola High School • 401 N. Angela • Paola, KS 66071

I chose this story because I really liked how I was able to interview so many different people and the information they gave me definitely brought the story to life. I also like how the lead highlights one main person and what she does is pretty amazing. Finally, I chose this story because it provides information about how students can volunteer in the community. J:/2013-2014Reporter/StaffFolders/NatalieEppler/Issue2/HelpingOthersFinal

n ctio

The Reporter • March 2014

November 2013

Academics

3 (news)

Fall play

5 (Entertainment)

Rocking out

6-7 (features)

Senior sendoffs

10 (sports)

E-Cigarettes explode in popularity

photo illustration by Jackson Setter A student holds an e-cigarette confiscated by the administration. E-cigeratte usage has increased amongst high school students.

jackson setter opinion editor Electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, are a new fad vice principal Jeff T. Hines doesn’t foresee lasting long. “Like most new things, everyone wants to try it out,” Hines said. “Plus it makes people feel rebellious.” Electronic cigarettes are battery-powered devices that vaporize flavored liquid meant to replace cigarettes. Some liquids may contain nicotine, while others may be nicotine free. Nicotine is an addictive substance in both electronic cigarettes and convential cigarettes. According to the Center for Disease Control, electronic cigarette usage among high school students increased from 4.7 percent to 10 percent during 2011-2012. Although they don’t contain tobacco, e-cigarettes are still banned in tobacco-free zones, such as schools. Hines said the board of education adopted the following policy: “Smoking by students and/or the possession or use of any other tobacco product or electronic cigarette is prohibited in any district facility; in school vehicles; at school-sponsored, activities, programs, or events, and on school property. Administrators may report students who are in violation of this policy to the appropriate law enforcement agency.” Possession or the use of an electronic cigarette warrants the same three-day out-of-school suspension as the use of chewing tobacco or cigarettes. Senior Augustus* said he doesn’t see a problem with using electronic cigarettes.

Lending a hand natalie eppler reporter Noodles, sandwiches, canned goods and clothing: the items junior Cassye Blanc and other Uplift volunteers bring the 2,434 homeless in Kansas City are constantly changing, but the goal is not. “I go to Kansas City to feed the homeless,” Blanc said. Once a month, Blanc goes with her church, Holy Trinity, to Uplift. According to Uplift’s website, it is an organization dedicated to caring for the homeless living in Kansas City. While there, the group fills vans with hot meals, canned goods and clothing. They then travel on one of three routes distributing the needed supplies. “A lot of [the homeless] thank us,” Blanc said. “A lot say you brighten my day or God bless.” Blanc has volunteered with Uplift seven times and has learned a lot along the way.

“Some choose to be homeless,” Blanc said. “It is difficult to see how they live and how they could live.” Like Blanc, senior Kelsey Slawson has learned to put others before herself. “It’s a fun way to get involved with your community and have fun at the same time,” Slawson said. By participating in Camp Out for Cash, Trick or Treat so Kids Can Eat, taco feeds, benefit tournaments and other community service projects Slawson has learned to be grateful for everything. “It’s good to give back,” math teacher and cheerleading coach Natalie Steutermann said. “What good is playing video games or shopping when you could be out helping a good cause?” Steutermann volunteers at Prairie Paws, an Ottawa animal shelter. Steutermann has also introduced the cheerleading squad to

“It’s not harming anyone else and I enjoy it, so why not do it?” he said. Although he has never smoked a cigarette, Augustus said e-cigarettes are healthier than regular cigarettes. Augustus said electronic cigarettes are cheaper than regular cigarettes. His main reason for using an e-cigarette isn’t for the nicotine, he said. “I have it to do smoke tricks and plus it tastes good,” Augustus said. “It’s also relaxing in times of stress.” He said he plans on using it for a while “I’ll use it as long as it brings me joy,” he said. “I think this trend will last a while.” Unlike Augustus, senior Hazel* started using electronic cigarettes because she didn’t like the odor of conventional cigarettes. “I didn’t like the way I smelled and my teeth weren’t white,” she said. “Everything was gross.” She was skeptical about transitioning to electronic cigarettes. “I used to think it was worse for you than regular cigarettes,” Hazel said. “I also used to think it was trashy.” She said got addicted to her e-cigarette, but switched to nicotine-free flavored juice. *Names have been changed at the discretion of The Reporter staffmembers

Vaporizing: see page 2

Blanc, Slawson, Steutermann, Thompson, Aguinaga volunteer in spare time

the shelter. “I want my girls to learn to help out just because it is a good thing not just to earn points,” Steutermann said. Steutermann said the cheerleading squad held a fundraiser on Nov. 2 raising money and collecting goods. Developmental Leadership teacher Cristie Sims has witnessed the effects of helping others in the last six years she has taught the class. “It’s a ripple effect,” Sims said. “A lot think volunteering is just for that person, but in turn it helps the volunteer as well.” Students in the Developmental Leadership class volunteer in a variety of ways including: teaching senior citizens how to use cell phones, participating in Campout for Cash, recycling and working at benefit tournaments. “Volunteering means providing for other

people,” sophomore Sean Thompson said. On Oct. 27, Thompson helped distribute plastic bags and information about Trick or Treat so Kids can eat to homes in Paola. “[High School students should volunteer] to help out other people instead of themselves,” sophomore Andrew Aguinaga said. Aguinaga helps train middle school wrestlers “They were really thankful,” Aguinaga said. “Because of me they won the match.”

For information about the Angel Tree visit phsjournalism.

7

There are always ways to improve because nothing is ever perfect. Thankfully I will have another year to work on these problems. Next year I need to work on meeting deadlines on time, designing artistic spreads, interviewing a wide variety of sources, and establishing an online presence for “The Reporter”. This year, I was unable to meet all of my deadlines. As a result my designs suffered and I was unable to catch all the errors on each of my pages. To prevent this from happening next year, I need to plan ahead by writing in my planner and by making realistic goals for myself and sticking with those goals. Another thing that would help other staff members and myself make the March deadline is to lengthen the time between publication of the February and March issues. This extra time could possibly be found in the February deadline, and would help us write story with fewer errors and design better pages. It is not easy to make deadlines, but hopefully I will be able to make more next year. Another way in which I can improve is in my designs. This year my designs lacked secondary coverage and something to draw in readers. Often, my designs were text heavy and very rarely was secondary coverage involved. To remedy this problem I will hopefully be able take a class on InDesign in the future and use what I learn to design. I also think it would be helpful to give new staffers a crash course on InDesign and Photoshop. Finally I think it would be helpful to make a book of hand out with basic rules and directions for Photoshop and InDesign. If approached right I think designs for the newspaper can become more artistic and complex next year. There are so many people at Paola High School, but I need to make more of an effort to interview more of the student body. It is very easy to interview the same group of people for each issue, but everyone has a story to tell and they all deserve to have their stories told. To reach more people from each grade I need to make more of an effort to highlight names on the hit list. I also think it would be helpful to have a different color of highlighter for each time the individual is used. Finally I think it would help to have the hit list on the door of the room or the South wall. This would force staff members to at least look at the list while leaving or entering the room. Today, a very important form of communication is the internet. I believe one way our paper could be improved is through publishing more articles on-line and updating the website with school news on a regular basis. In order to establish our on-line presence I hope to put new articles or sports updates on our website weekly and publish our issues online similarly to “The Harbinger’s” online publication. I also think it is important to let students know there is a website. One way this could be done is by putting up posters with QR codes and information about the website on them. The internet is a great way for our publication to grow and reach more people. There are so many things that we do right as a journalism staff and I am glad that what we do need to work on can easily be improved. I am looking forward to working on these improvements next year. I realize it will not be easy, but I hope to learn new things a long the way.

Natalie Eppler  
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