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EXPLORING IDEAS IN LOS ANGELES WITH AROTIN HARTOUNIAN DANIEL JOSEPH MARTINEZ & MARK PANGILINAN T HE NETW ORK OF ART IST, C REATIVE S , AN D E N TRE PRE N E URS O F LOS AN GE LE S .

V O LU M E 1 t I S S U E 1 t S P RING 2011


bonjour reader!

a letter from the editor F

inally this project has gotten off the ground and taken

We’re all about capturing what’s happening now.

off. I’m very proud to present to you LAQUO: VOLUME1

So enjoy this first pilot issue. It’s small, but it’s a good bite

ISSUE1. It’s been almost two years since this project

that’ll feed your artistic hunger. We would also love to hear

started. What orginally was Lifted Living Magazine has now

from you and have you featured in our magazine. Emails

evolved into LAQUO MAGAZINE. The meaning of LAQUO is a

with feedback and suggestions are highly welcomed, oh,

simple and direct one. LA is an abbreviation for Los Angeles

and send over your atwork too! We love that. Til next time Los

and QUO is abstracted from the Latin phrase “Quo Vadis?”

Angeles. Stick around for Issue two because we’ll be back!

meaning, “Where are you going?” So through this magazine, we’re asking the people of Los Angeles where they are going, specifically the youthful artist, creatives, and entrepreneurs. LAQUO seeks to ask the artists, creatives, and entrepreneurs of Los Angeles about their idea’s and goals, directions, opinions, and their influences. We seek to

Editor-In-Chief

capture the flow of energy that circulates within a city as lively as Los Angeles. Many amazing things take place in LA

Christopher Paguio

which give rise to many amazing people, who, often times are not in the spotlight. With this magazine with are hoping to establish a network that intertwines the ideas of the underground talent to the overall city. We’re hoping to serve as an inspiration to all of our brothers and sisters out there who are trying to get started in LA.

COVER OF THE ISSUE taken by editor-in-chief

CONNECT WITH US Twitter.com/laquo Facebook.com/laquo

INTERACT We ask a question on twitter everyday. Follow @LAQUO to join the conversation.

PARTICIPATE We’d love to hear your feedback! As well as feature you! email: we@laquo.org


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S t I t VOLUME 1

SU

T HE NETW ORK OF ART IST, C REAT IVES, AN D E N TRE PRE N E URS OF LOS AN GE LE S .

FEATURED IN THIS ISSUE: interview  with  an  illustrator AROTIN  HARTOUNIAN

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WE SIT DOWN WITH 19 YEAR OLD AROTIN HARTOUNIAN, AN ILLUSTRATOR AND STUDENT OF PASADENA CITY COLLEGE, AND ASK HIM ABOUT HIS INFLUENCES, INTERESTS, AND PHILOSOPHIES.

questions  for  the  contemporary  artist with  DANIEL  MARTINEZ PASADENA CITY COLLEGE LATEST ARTIST IN RESIDENCE DISCUSSES ART THEORIES AND WHAT IT MEANS TO BE AN ARTIST IN THE 21ST CENTURY WITH A SELECTED GROUP OF STUDENTS.

12 hanging  out  with  los  angeles  native with  MARK  PANGILINAN

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SHOTS FROM MARK’S DAY TO DAY EVERYDAY REALITY CAPTURES THE YOUTH AND CREATIVE ENERGETIC VIBE THAT SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA IS KNOWN FOR.

¿Quo Vadis? Where are you going?

1 IN

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SP

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AROTIN

HARTOUNIAN


INTERVIEW WITH AN ILLUSTRATOR

CITY OF RESIDENCE Glendale, California CURRENT SCHOOL Pasadena City College OCCUPATION Sales Associate at Art Center College of Design TOOL OF CHOICE Pencil FAVORITE STYLE OF ART Illustration FAVORITE QUOTE “Being an artist is hard, if you want something easier go to medical school” -David Schoffman

My name is Arotin Hartounian. I am currently 19. I was born and raised in Tehran, Iran and I moved to Autria for 6-7 months before coming to America when I was 9 years old. So I’ve been living in Los Angeles for almost 9-10 years.

Š‡†‹†›‘—ϐ‹”•–•–ƒ”–†”ƒ™‹‰ǫ

How  do  you  approach  your  art?  

Well  I  mean  I  always  drew  as  a  kid  ever   since  I  can  remember.  It  was  always  a   way  for  me  to  make  sense  of  the  world.   And  ge  t  the  images  of  the  emotions  I   have  in  my  head  in  a  way  to  translate   them  into  a  more  wordly  plane.  It  was   another  way  of  me  learning  how  to   communicate  the  things  I  was  feeling   and  precieving  in  the  world.

Well  most  often  it  starts  with  research.   And  to  quote  Daniel  Martinez,  “Art starts  with  an  idea.”  That’s  it.  There’s no  other  way  around  it.  First  you  get the  idea.  Which  is  your  consciousness   picking  up  something  in  your  percep-­‐ tion  that  really  sparks  something  in   your  soul.  Something  that  is  inspira-­‐ tion,  to  say  in  a  simple  form.  But  it

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I N T E R V I E W C O N T.

starts  out  with  an  idea  you  have.   Something  that  just  resonates  in  your conscious  and  spirit;  something  of great  emotion  or  intellectual  value.   So  once  I  have  the  idea..  usually  the   idea  sparks  through  the  research  I  do   with  art  history.  A  lot  of  my  art  works  I   look  at  other  artworks  from  differ-­‐ ent  periods  of  time  in  art  history  and   also  looking  at  the  art  of  other  artist.   So  it  first  starts  out  with  me  looking   through  history  and  trying  to  see  how   others  approached  art  from  there  and   trying  to  borrow  the  success  of  the   artist  and  adding  it  to  my  own  through   research.  And  also  making  a  social   commentary,  for  example  DJ  Dali  Lama   series.  What  it  does  is  that  it  takes...   by  looking  at  traditional  Buddhist  art and  Nepalese,  and  taking  that  and making  it  modernized  and  western-­‐ ized,  and  exploring  concepts  such  as   idolizing,  and  that’s  something  I’ll  talk about  more  later.  The  reason  why  I  put   such  an  iconic  Buddhist  figure  in  the   traditional  Buddhist  style  art  but  in-­‐ stead  placing  him  as  a  DJ  which  is  very   western  and  very  contemporary.  It’s   that  juxtaposition  of  both  eastern  and   western  art,  and  his  spiritual  presence     and  the  connection  of  music  and  art  as   a  spiritual  expression. ‘—”•‡–…Š„‘‘‹•ƒ‹’”‡••‹˜‡ „‘†›‘ˆ™‘”Ǥ ‘™™‘—Ž†›‘—†‡Ǧ •…”‹„‡›‘—”•‡–…Š„‘‘ǫ

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Simply  put,  it’s  a  documentation  of my  life.  I  number  all  the  pages  in  my sketchbook  and  try  to  date  the  pages to  kind  of  show  my  development  of an  artist,  and  it  kind  of  shows  my influence,  what  I’ve  been  to  exposed to  as  far  as  arts  and  culture.  As  with most  sketchbooks  it’s  just  where  I work  out  my  ideas  and  gather  all  the inspiration  that  I  come  across  and  then   refer  back  to  it,  almost  as  a  reference material.  It’s  also  overall  the  most importance  of  the  sketchbook  is  ex-­‐ perimentation.  I  collect  all  these  dif-­‐ ferent  inspirational  things  that  capture   the  attention  of  my  soul  or  resonating   emotions  and  then  just  experimenting  

with  them  and  what  concepts  come   about.  And  how  I  can  develop  the  basis   of  the  concept  and  also  the  basis  of  the visual  vocabulary-­‐how  I  orchestrate things  together  using  my  skills  in   drawing  and  painting. ‘Š‘™‘ˆ–‡†‘›‘—™‘”‘›‘—” •‡–…Š„‘‘ǫ –Ž‘‘•Ž‹‡ƒŽ‘–‘ˆ ›‘—”™‘”‹•‹Š‡”‡Ǥ

Yes.  It’s  all  in  the  sketchbook,  probably because  it’s  the  most  accessible  one. But  recently  I  haven’t  had  a  chance  to work  in  my  sketchbook  because  I’m   currently  working  on  a  larger  piece. You  pick  out  the  things  you  like  and you  decide  to  pursue  a  certain  idea that  you’ve  explored  in  your  sketch-­‐ book  onto  a  larger  piece,  and  I’m  cur-­‐ ”‡–Ž›™‘”‹‰‘–Šƒ–Žƒ”‰‡ϐ‹ƒŽ’‹‡…‡Ǥ


Who is the Dalai Lama? Dalai Lamas are the most influenial figures in the Gelugpa lineage of Tibetan Buddhism. Tibetans traditionally belive the Dalai Lamas to be manifestations of Avalokiteshvara or Chenrezig, the Bodhisattva of Compassion and patron saint of Tibet. It’s said that Bodhisattvas are enlightened beings who have postponed their own nirvana and chosen to take rebirth in order to serve humanity.

of  it.  I  mean  the  concept  of  the  piece  is very  important,  but  if  the  piece  is  not visually  stimulating  and  doesn’t  draw   you  in,  the  concept  won’t  get  trans-­â€? ferred.  So  in  a  way  if  I  develop  an  idea in  my  sketch,  at  first  it  has  to  be  very visually  pleasing  to  look  at.  From  then if  I  like  how  it  looks  I  will  go  on  to  de-­â€? velop  and  explore  the  concept  more  to try  and  explain  why  I  chose  the  certain visual  vocabulary  and  imagery  that  I like.  And  from  then  if  I  look  at  it  and see  the  piece  is  very  comprehensive ƒÂ?†™‹ŽŽÂ?ƒÂ?‡ƒ‰”‡ƒ–Ď?‹Â?ƒŽ’‹‡…‡ǥ–Š‡Â?

ÇŻÂŽÂŽ’—”•—‡‹–Ǥ‘Ď?‹”•– ‰—‡••…‘Â?‡•–Š‡ visual  imagery  with  a  little  bit  of  con-­â€? cept  behind  it.  And  if  I  like  how  it  looks and  if  it  looks  like  it  would  stimulate the  viewer,  then  I’ll  start  developing the  concept.  So  drawing  the  viewer  in by  how  overall  nice  the  visuals  look, drawing  them  in  by  the  craftsmanship, and  then  raising  questions  after  draw-­â€? ing  it.  But  looking  at  it  and  liking  how   it  looks  like,  I  ask,  “What’s  the  meaning   behind  it?â€?  So  that’s  the  process  that  I   go  through  with  starting  and  develop-­â€? ing  my  ideas. ĥŽ‹˜‹Â?‰‹Â?‘•Â?‰‡Ž‡•…ŠƒÂ?‰‡† –Š‡™ƒ››‘—Â†Â”ÂƒÂ™ÇŤ”Š‘™™‘—Ž† ›‘—†‡•…”‹„‡–Š‡‹Â?Ď?Ž—‡Â?…‡–Šƒ–‘• Â?‰‡Ž‡•Šƒ†‘Â?›‘—”™‘”Â?ÇŤ

an  illustration  of  the  14th  Dalai  Lama,  Tenaain  Gyatso

So  I’ve  been  focusing  more  of  my  at-­â€? tention  on  finalizing  one  of  my  large pieces  rather  than  working  on  new ideas.  So  not  as  often  as  I  would  like  to,   I  would  like  to  go  out  sketching  more.   Taking  notes  and  inspiration,  but  real-­â€? istically  it  doesn’t  happen  as  often  with   ƒŽŽ–Š‡–Š‹Â?‰• Šƒ˜‡–‘Ď?‹Â?‹•Š™‹–Š™‘”Â? and  school.

–™Šƒ–’‘‹Â?–†‘›‘—†‡…‹†‡–‘•–‡’ ‘—–‘ˆ–Š‡•Â?‡–…Š„‘‘Â?ƒÂ?†’—”•—‡ƒ „‹‰‰‡”…ƒÂ?Â˜ÂƒÂ•ÇŤ Well,  being  an  illustrator  myself,  I  do   value  a  lot  the  merit  of  draftsmanship   and  just  how  visual  stimulating  a  piece   looks.  So  having  my  background  as  a   draftsman  and  an  illustrator  I  do  place   special  importance  on  the  aesthetics

Well  of  course  greatly.  There  is  a   •’‡…‹ˆ‹…•–›Ž‡ƒÂ?†ƒ•’‡…‹Ď?‹…Â?‘˜‡Â?‡Â?– in  art  that  is  more  characterized  by   being  in  Southern  California  and  Los   Â?‰‡Ž‡•Ǥ’‡…‹Ď?‹…ƒŽŽ›–Š‡’‡‘’Ž‡ Šƒ˜‡ been  around,  the  schools  I  have  been   to,  and  the  people  I  learn  from  all  have   distinctive  West  Coast  or  specifically   Southern  California  style.  For  example,   schools  like  Art  Center,  which  I  have   been  involved  with,  and  Cal  Arts,  and   all  the  students  that  have  been  in  that   circle  all  have  a  distinctive  approach   to  art,  whether  it’s  figurative  art  or  

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I N T E R V I E W C O N T.

…‘…‡’–—ƒŽƒ”–‘”„‘–ŠǤ†•’‡…‹ϐ‹…ƒŽŽ› right  now  there  is  a  lot  happening  in   LA  as  far  as  art  hotspot  withing  the   whole.  So  being  involved  in  this  whole   mess  that  is  going  on,  culturally  and   artistically,  has  greatly  influenced  the   way  I  go  about  making  my  art. —‘ƒ†‹•ǫŠ‡”‡ƒ”‡›‘—‰‘‹‰ǫ

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I  guess  overall  pursuit  in  the  long  run   is..  well  I  plan  to  work  as  a  commer-­‐ cial  artist  doing  illustrations.  Which   is  more  of  my  means  of  surviving,   my  bread  and  butter.  It’s  just  the  way   I’ll  approach  making  money  in  art,   but  also  my  overall  long  term  goal  of   what  I’m  doing  in  my  life’s  work  on  is   studying  the  human  need  to  create  art   and  seeing  how  different  human  be-­‐ ings  in  different  culture  periods  have   approached  art  making  and  what  func-­‐

tion  art  serves…  basically  art  history.   But  yes,  exploring  the  human  urge  and   need  to  create  art.  I  mean  this  interest   first  came  when  looking  at  works  of   cave  paintings  and  hearing  the  reasons   why  prehistoric  human  beings  felt   the  urge  to  express  these  ideas  and   thoughts  in  their  head  and  try  to  bring   it  into  life  with  art.  And  then  how  art   from  there  developed  taking  on  a  dif-­‐ ˆ‡”‡–•‹‰‹ϐ‹…ƒ…‡‘ˆ’‡‘’Ž‡ƒ‹‰‹– in  relation  to  their  life  and  the  culture   they’re  in.

has  a  very  strong  root  in  spirituality.   And  to  quote  an  artist  I’ve  been  look-­‐ ing  into,  an  artist  by  the  name  of  An-­‐ drew  Jones,  or  Android  Jones,  and  one   of  his  quotes  quite  simply  talks  about   is  how  art  is  the  fruit  of  consciousness.   The  process  of  art  making  happens  as   the  consciousness  in  humans  develop.   And  as  human  beings  gain  conscious-­‐ ness  of  their  world  around  them,  art   becomes  a  way  to  communicate  how   they  perceive  the  world.  And  there’s  a   really  strong  spiritual  connection.

Šƒ–ǯ•‘‡–Š‹‰›‘—Šƒ˜‡…‘‡–‘ ”‡ƒŽ‹œ‡™‹–Š‹›‘—”™‘”ǫ

My  life  goal  is  as  far  as  learning  about   art  is  understanding  how  different   cultures  approach  different  art  and  the   •‹‰‹ϐ‹…ƒ…‡‡ƒ…Šƒ”–™‘”Šƒ•ǤŠ‡™ƒ› an  artist  makes  his/her  art  is  a  direct   commentary  of  how  they  perceive  the   ™‘”Ž†ƒ†–Šƒ–ǯ•Žƒ”‰‡Ž›‹ϐŽ—‡…‡†„› what’s  going  on  around  them.

That’s  one  thing  I’ve  realized  is  that  art   making  is  a  very  spiritual  experience,   past  the  function  it  serves  socially  and   past  the  means  of  how  it’s  been  just   job  for  people  to  make  money.  It  also  


QUESTIONS

FOR THE

CONTEMPORARY

ARTIST

with

daniel

martinez 12

During his week of residency at Pasadena City College, Daniel decided in order to maximize his presence on campus as a resource, he will hold a 3-day class in which he titled, “Everything you wanted to know about the art, artists, graduate schools, galleries, theory, reading and anything else you can think of, but were afraid to ask. Or a taste of something both sweet and sour and bittersweet.” Students were invited to the class based on their future goals and their involvement with art. A series of discussions were held where questions were raised on what it means to be an artist in the 21st century–a vital question for any contemporary artist. DANIEL JOESEPH MARTINEZ IS A NATIVE OF LOS ANGELES AND IS PASADENA CITY COLLEGE’S 2011 ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE. HE IS INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED FOR HIS POLITICALLY CHARGED ART THAT HAS BEEN EXHIBITED INTERNATIONALLY SINCE 1978. HE EMPLOYS DIVERSE MEDIA TO ADDRESS THE NATURE OF DEMOCRACY, CITIZENSHIP, CULTURAL MEMORY, AND “THE FUTURE OF THE SPECIES.” MARTINEZ IS ALSO A PROFESSOR AT THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY OF IRVINE WHERE HE TEACHES A CLASS


BUILD A LIBRARIES FOR OURSELVES.

WHY BE AN ARTIST? INVENT A PARADIGM YOU WANT TO LIVE IN.

WHO ARE WE AS HUMAN BEINGS IN THE 21ST CENTURY? YOU CANNOT MAKE ART IF YOU DO NOT KNOW WHAT HAPPENED IN THE 21ST CENTURY

DON’T BE SOCIALIZED AND BRAINWASHED EVERYDAY.

WHAT’S THE MOST POWERFUL TOOL AN INDIVIDUAL HAS? THE CONVENTIONAL SOCIETY TRAINS YOU TO MAKE “DECORATIONS”

WHY SHOULD WHAT ARE YOU ONE TRAIN AND EDUCATE THE WILLING TO BRAIN? GIVE UP AS AN MAKE ART, READ ARTIST?

DECIEVING YOURSELF TO FEEL GOOD IS LIVING IN IGNORANCE.

WHY IS ART BASED ON A RETINAL EXPERIENCE?

EVERYDAY, AND ENGAGE IN DISCOURSE.

WHAT IS QUALITY WORK? DON’T LEAVE A NEW PLACE WITHOUT SEEING ITS ART.

WHERE DOES POWER EMINATE FROM? KNOWING VS UNDERSTANDING

AS AN ARTIST, WHAT ARE ONE OF YOUR RESPONSIBILITIES? TO PROTECT THE CONSCIOUNESS OF OUR CULTURE. IF WE FALL, THE CULTURE FALLS

WHY DO YOU READ AS AN ARTIST? NEVER BE AFRAID OF ANYTHING YOU DO NOT KNOW.

WHEN DO YOU GET SICK AND TIRED AND GIVE UP?

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hanging with la native

mark pangilinan

MARK

CITY OF RESIDENCE Pasadena, California CURRENT SCHOOL Pasadena City College TOOL OF CHOICE Yashica FX-D

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FAVORITE QUOTE “touche”


PH OTOS BY MARK 2011

SO WHAT KIND OF ART DO YOU LIKE TO MAKE?

WHAT ARE SOME OF MEDIUMS YOU WORK WITH?

SO TELL ME ABOUT THE TOOLS THAT YOU USE.

I just like making things and just going with it. Whatever I find and feel like, but when it comes to shooting, everything is candid with what I do. I don’t really have a favorite because I just really try out everything.

What medium? Women. I like to work with women. Mostly candid though. I also like to draw and shoot with my camera. And even do collages and such.

I use a Yashika FX D which is a 35 mm film and I use a Nikon D3000 and I use my MacBook.


SO WHAT ARE SOME THINGS YOU ARE WORKING ON?

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At the moment I am working with this blog. It’s a brand new blog that we’re creating and it’s called Artisan’s Archive. We’re doing a lifestyle blog. I’m sure you guys been on a lot of lifestyle blogs. And I’m doing work with another blog Shakethehand which is another thing going on. And there are a couple little project

shoots that I have going on where my subjects are women and their beauty of their ways and their process of beautifying themselves.


HAS LIVING IN LOS ANGELES INFLUENCED YOU?

0[OPURP[OHZPUÅ\LUJLK T`^OVSLSPMLHJ[\HSS` Cause I grew up on the I\ZVY^HSRPUN0NYL^\W everywhere around LA; )\YIHUR,HNSL9VJR Hollywood, La Puente, West Covina–I grew up L]LY`^OLYLZV0»THJ[\HSS` PUÅ\LUJLKI`L]LY`[OPUN even the suburbs even though theres nothing YLHSS`[OLYL

AND WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO WITH THE PICTURES YOU TAKE? I usually just have my flickr or my tumblr or I do things for websites, blogs, and I do shoots for whatever.

F L I C KR . C O M / PH OTO S/SH OTBY M A R K M A R K S M E L LO W.TU M B L R . C O M


WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE SUBJECT MATTER TO PHOTOGRAPH?

7YL[[`T\JOT`MYPLUKZVY L]LY`KH`SP]PUN0M0»TV\[ZPKL0»SS ZOVV[^OH[L]LYZHYV\UKTL6Y in the house I’ll just shoot any Z\IQLJ[ZPU[OLOV\ZL0SV]LYPKPUN T`IPRLHUKQ\Z[ZOVV[PUN( JV\WSLVMKYP]LI`ZHUK[OH[»ZP[


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多QUO VADIS?


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