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ISSN 2639-569X

www.alsaffarstudios.com


who we are Photographize is beyond a Magazine! It’s a platform for Artists, Galleries and Creatives. Originated by Photographize, Monochrome Magazine dedicates its space to the passion for monochrome photography. The images chosen affect different kinds of photographic art and are united by a common denominator: black and white. Whether classic, dense and scratchy, painted with light or full of contrast, monochromatic represents the vibrating heart of Photographize Monochrome. Leafing through these pages you can feel the power of a kind of photography which discovers in the colorless color of black and white the charm of shapes and lines, the roundness of chiaroscuro, the roughness of grain, the suggestion of the scents of a darkroom. Have a good journey towards a timeless Art. Founders | Editors in Chief Andrea Costantini & Carla De La Matta Writers Thomas Jukes

Submissions: www.photographize.co/submissions Info: info@photographize.co Sales and Advertising: sales@photographize.co All images and text published in Photographize are the sole property of the featured authors and subject to copyright. No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner.

Photographize

712 H Street NE Suite 1360 Washington, DC 20002 United States

ISSN 2639-5703 - DIGITAL ISSN 2639-569X - PRINT www.photographize.co

2019 © Photographize Magazine Cover : © Antonio Salaverry


who we are Photographize is beyond a Magazine! It’s a platform for Artists, Galleries and Creatives. Originated by Photographize, Monochrome Magazine dedicates its space to the passion for monochrome photography. The images chosen affect different kinds of photographic art and are united by a common denominator: black and white. Whether classic, dense and scratchy, painted with light or full of contrast, monochromatic represents the vibrating heart of Photographize Monochrome. Leafing through these pages you can feel the power of a kind of photography which discovers in the colorless color of black and white the charm of shapes and lines, the roundness of chiaroscuro, the roughness of grain, the suggestion of the scents of a darkroom. Have a good journey towards a timeless Art. Founders | Editors in Chief Andrea Costantini & Carla De La Matta Writers Thomas Jukes

Submissions: www.photographize.co/submissions Info: info@photographize.co Sales and Advertising: sales@photographize.co All images and text published in Photographize are the sole property of the featured authors and subject to copyright. No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner.

Photographize

712 H Street NE Suite 1360 Washington, DC 20002 United States

ISSN 2639-5703 - DIGITAL ISSN 2639-569X - PRINT www.photographize.co

2019 © Photographize Magazine Cover : © Antonio Salaverry


GUDRUN OSER


GUDRUN OSER


11

25

37

75

65

49

17

FEATURED

11 Trevor Cole 25 Moises Levy 37 ANTONIO SALAVERRY 43 WILLIE HSU 55 Hasan Alsaffar 73 LEIF STEINER 79 Miles Johnston 85 PETER WINGERTER

89

43 79

73

31

61

INTERVIEW

17 AARON LACY

ARTICLE

31 Alexey Titarenko 49 Jason Peterson 67 BOGDAN KOTEWICZ

MOFO DEZIN

61 MODERN DESIGN

HIGHLIGHTS

91 Curator’s choice

55

85

67 69

35


11

25

37

75

65

49

17

FEATURED

11 Trevor Cole 25 Moises Levy 37 ANTONIO SALAVERRY 43 WILLIE HSU 55 Hasan Alsaffar 73 LEIF STEINER 79 Miles Johnston 85 PETER WINGERTER

89

43 79

73

31

61

INTERVIEW

17 AARON LACY

ARTICLE

31 Alexey Titarenko 49 Jason Peterson 67 BOGDAN KOTEWICZ

MOFO DEZIN

61 MODERN DESIGN

HIGHLIGHTS

91 Curator’s choice

55

85

67 69

35


UNITED KINGDOM

To capture people and landscapes and the interactions between them in the light of a world in transition is to encapsulate an inimitable moment, which will never again materialize. His own 'take' as a geographer photographer! Born in the City of Derry (Ireland), Trevor has lived most of his life outside the bounds of Ireland: England, Singapore, Togo, Italy, Ethiopia, and Brazil. He returned to Ireland (Donegal) in 2012. His photography, together with travel, have become two of his life’s passions. His photography focuses predominantly on culture and landscapes; images which reflect a spatial and temporal journey through life and which try to convey a need to live in a more sustainable world. He seeks the moment and the light in whatever context he finds himself and endeavors to use his photographic acumen to turn the ordinary into the extraordinary.

www.alternativevisions.co.uk 11

► © Trevor Cole

30 05


UNITED KINGDOM

To capture people and landscapes and the interactions between them in the light of a world in transition is to encapsulate an inimitable moment, which will never again materialize. His own 'take' as a geographer photographer! Born in the City of Derry (Ireland), Trevor has lived most of his life outside the bounds of Ireland: England, Singapore, Togo, Italy, Ethiopia, and Brazil. He returned to Ireland (Donegal) in 2012. His photography, together with travel, have become two of his life’s passions. His photography focuses predominantly on culture and landscapes; images which reflect a spatial and temporal journey through life and which try to convey a need to live in a more sustainable world. He seeks the moment and the light in whatever context he finds himself and endeavors to use his photographic acumen to turn the ordinary into the extraordinary.

www.alternativevisions.co.uk 11

► © Trevor Cole

30 05


► © Trevor Cole TOP Wodaabe tribesman with the characteristic facial tattoos. The Wodaabe are nomadic pastoralists living in the Sahel zone of Sun Saharan Africa. Once a year, after the rains, they come together at a chosen location to celebrate The Gerewol, a festival where the men beautify themselves to attract females.

PREVIOUS PAGE A Young Mundari tribesboy framed by the horns of the Ankosi Watule cattle. The more you see, the more you realise that there is an inextricable bond between the tribe and their cattle. The way they lead them, rub ash into their skins, attend to their needs, use their milk, dung and urine. It is a symbiotic relationship where there is an understanding of the cattle which goes beyond normal animal husbandry. They take pride in their animals and the whole community of man and beast is interconnected. I have never seen anything like it. On the previous evening the air was filled with smoke from the dung and kindle wood fires to keep insects at bay. The dust is used to help dry the dung which is laboriously collected and piled in the mornings. It is then dried as fuel. As the sun sets in African style the light, smoke and dust create an ethereal atmosphere which makes it appear that the Mundari and their cattle fade into a mist. An ancient mist, trapped in time, where tribal traits and traditions are perpetuated in the twenty first century. 13

Suri tribes boy Come on our Tribal Traits and Traditions photo tour to the Omo Valley, Ethiopia ► © Trevor Cole 14


► © Trevor Cole TOP Wodaabe tribesman with the characteristic facial tattoos. The Wodaabe are nomadic pastoralists living in the Sahel zone of Sun Saharan Africa. Once a year, after the rains, they come together at a chosen location to celebrate The Gerewol, a festival where the men beautify themselves to attract females.

PREVIOUS PAGE A Young Mundari tribesboy framed by the horns of the Ankosi Watule cattle. The more you see, the more you realise that there is an inextricable bond between the tribe and their cattle. The way they lead them, rub ash into their skins, attend to their needs, use their milk, dung and urine. It is a symbiotic relationship where there is an understanding of the cattle which goes beyond normal animal husbandry. They take pride in their animals and the whole community of man and beast is interconnected. I have never seen anything like it. On the previous evening the air was filled with smoke from the dung and kindle wood fires to keep insects at bay. The dust is used to help dry the dung which is laboriously collected and piled in the mornings. It is then dried as fuel. As the sun sets in African style the light, smoke and dust create an ethereal atmosphere which makes it appear that the Mundari and their cattle fade into a mist. An ancient mist, trapped in time, where tribal traits and traditions are perpetuated in the twenty first century. 13

Suri tribes boy Come on our Tribal Traits and Traditions photo tour to the Omo Valley, Ethiopia ► © Trevor Cole 14


Mud man, Niugini ► © Trevor Cole

15

Papuan mother and child ► © Trevor Cole

16


Mud man, Niugini ► © Trevor Cole

15

Papuan mother and child ► © Trevor Cole

16


UNITED STATES

INTERVIEW WITH

What is your main source of inspiration? Honestly, I never quite know what is going to inspire me. Sometimes, it’s a song. Other times, it’s a story. Maybe, even a dream. I even get inspired by concepts in quantum physics; such as particle/wave duality. I remain open to as many sources of inspiration as I can. I think the key to this is being present. Paying attention to each of life’s moments. There is inspiration everywhere. What other artists have influenced your work? There are a plethora of different artists that have influenced me over the years. There are many photographers such as Helmut Newton, Richard Avedon, Harold Edgerton, and others that really moved me. The way Avedon incorporated movement, the way Newton could tell a story and pushed the limits, and the way Edgerton was able to freeze action with high-speed photography captivated me.

Aaron Lacy is a fine art photographer that was born in Canton Ohio. Having worked in electrical engineering, he has always possessed expert knowledge of the mechanics of light. Aaron primarily works in black + white and masterfully controls light to create depth and shadow, often giving the appearance that time has frozen in exquisitely focused, suspended reality. African American women are typically at the center of his art, and his work is heavily inspired by the fluidity of the female form. His work has been featured in many galleries, and he won the “Best in Show” award at the Mnemonic Exhibition at H Gallery in 2018. His work is enigmatic and precise and can be found in private collections across the country. Tell us about the development process that culminated in the artist you are today. I began my journey as a child. I used to draw portraits in my sketchpad constantly. I think I was always fascinated by capturing humanity at some level. It wasn’t until engineering school that I picked up a camera. After experimenting with many different types of photography I fell in love with fine art specifically capturing humanity. I loved being able to express myself through another person. My engineering background allowed me to easily understand the technical parts of photography and freed me to focus more on the creative elements.

www.aaronlacy.com 17

Milk ► © Aaron Lacy

I’m also greatly influenced by sculptors such as Rodin and Michelangelo with their work on the human anatomy and form. Rodin would use a candle and walk around his sculptures to see how the light hit them from every angle. I use this same meticulousness when I light the human form. 18


UNITED STATES

INTERVIEW WITH

What is your main source of inspiration? Honestly, I never quite know what is going to inspire me. Sometimes, it’s a song. Other times, it’s a story. Maybe, even a dream. I even get inspired by concepts in quantum physics; such as particle/wave duality. I remain open to as many sources of inspiration as I can. I think the key to this is being present. Paying attention to each of life’s moments. There is inspiration everywhere. What other artists have influenced your work? There are a plethora of different artists that have influenced me over the years. There are many photographers such as Helmut Newton, Richard Avedon, Harold Edgerton, and others that really moved me. The way Avedon incorporated movement, the way Newton could tell a story and pushed the limits, and the way Edgerton was able to freeze action with high-speed photography captivated me.

Aaron Lacy is a fine art photographer that was born in Canton Ohio. Having worked in electrical engineering, he has always possessed expert knowledge of the mechanics of light. Aaron primarily works in black + white and masterfully controls light to create depth and shadow, often giving the appearance that time has frozen in exquisitely focused, suspended reality. African American women are typically at the center of his art, and his work is heavily inspired by the fluidity of the female form. His work has been featured in many galleries, and he won the “Best in Show” award at the Mnemonic Exhibition at H Gallery in 2018. His work is enigmatic and precise and can be found in private collections across the country. Tell us about the development process that culminated in the artist you are today. I began my journey as a child. I used to draw portraits in my sketchpad constantly. I think I was always fascinated by capturing humanity at some level. It wasn’t until engineering school that I picked up a camera. After experimenting with many different types of photography I fell in love with fine art specifically capturing humanity. I loved being able to express myself through another person. My engineering background allowed me to easily understand the technical parts of photography and freed me to focus more on the creative elements.

www.aaronlacy.com 17

Milk ► © Aaron Lacy

I’m also greatly influenced by sculptors such as Rodin and Michelangelo with their work on the human anatomy and form. Rodin would use a candle and walk around his sculptures to see how the light hit them from every angle. I use this same meticulousness when I light the human form. 18


You are a truly multifaceted individual, with a background in electrical engineering. How does this diverse experience contribute to your art? Engineering is a very rule-focused profession. Having to adhere to standards and meet deadlines. It puts you in a box. This is the antithesis of my experience as an artist. But I believe that it is the fight between the engineering thought process and the artist thought process that allows me to create my best images. Essentially putting myself in a box and breaking myself out of it. In your Milk and Water series, you magically freeze time at the precise instant at which these liquids splash against the models’ faces and bodies. The result is exquisite, a perfect combination of human beauty and expression with the spontaneous forms and motion of the fluids. How did you come up with this idea? Fluidity is the quality of being likely to change repeatedly and unexpectedly. It is the ability of a substance to flow easily. This to me has always been fascinating; Fluid Dynamics. I believe that fluidity aligns with the feminine energy. I wanted to superimpose these two elements. I wanted to capture the raw feminine form in combination with the frozen motion of liquid. The 2 forms essentially become one entity. What are the technical challenges of this kind of photography and how did you overcome them? Freezing motion in photography has always had its challenges. You have to make sure that your light is powerful enough while having a short enough flash duration and keep the ambient light at a minimum. At times it also can be difficult to maintain accurate focus on the subject. I use many techniques to overcome these challenges. I use a mirror-less camera that allows me to use touch-focus and focus peaking. I also keep my ambient light to a minimum. This way, my strobe will overpower it to the point where it’s negligible. This is a very delicate process and a lot of trial and error and experimentation led me to my method. 19

Milk ► © Aaron Lacy

Milk ► © Aaron Lacy


You are a truly multifaceted individual, with a background in electrical engineering. How does this diverse experience contribute to your art? Engineering is a very rule-focused profession. Having to adhere to standards and meet deadlines. It puts you in a box. This is the antithesis of my experience as an artist. But I believe that it is the fight between the engineering thought process and the artist thought process that allows me to create my best images. Essentially putting myself in a box and breaking myself out of it. In your Milk and Water series, you magically freeze time at the precise instant at which these liquids splash against the models’ faces and bodies. The result is exquisite, a perfect combination of human beauty and expression with the spontaneous forms and motion of the fluids. How did you come up with this idea? Fluidity is the quality of being likely to change repeatedly and unexpectedly. It is the ability of a substance to flow easily. This to me has always been fascinating; Fluid Dynamics. I believe that fluidity aligns with the feminine energy. I wanted to superimpose these two elements. I wanted to capture the raw feminine form in combination with the frozen motion of liquid. The 2 forms essentially become one entity. What are the technical challenges of this kind of photography and how did you overcome them? Freezing motion in photography has always had its challenges. You have to make sure that your light is powerful enough while having a short enough flash duration and keep the ambient light at a minimum. At times it also can be difficult to maintain accurate focus on the subject. I use many techniques to overcome these challenges. I use a mirror-less camera that allows me to use touch-focus and focus peaking. I also keep my ambient light to a minimum. This way, my strobe will overpower it to the point where it’s negligible. This is a very delicate process and a lot of trial and error and experimentation led me to my method. 19

Milk ► © Aaron Lacy

Milk ► © Aaron Lacy


Your Penumbra series is striking. It explores the interplay between geometric shadows and naked bodies. The result is sensuous, utterly elegant and visually stunning. Tell us how you developed and implemented the concept. In monochrome photography, shapes and form are extremely important to me. I wanted to explore the notion of wearing fabric without actually wearing it. I did this by partially illuminating the subjects with the shadows actually being the focus. The method was shining a focused beam of light through different fabric textures at the bodies of the subject. What are the unique features of monochrome photography and the keys to master it? In monochrome photography, one really gets the opportunity not to be distracted by different colors and focus strictly on the light intensity, shadow, and form. Color, in my opinion, is much more subjective than shape. Color can be interpreted in many different ways depending on the light source and the eye of the viewer, while form remains a more constant element. Understanding the relationship between light and shadow and how they affect one another is one of the most important components to monochrome photography. What is the secret for an image to become unforgettable? I always endeavor to take images that attach themselves to the subconscious mind of the viewer. This can be difficult. Especially, since we are overrun with a multitude of imagery on a daily basis. I believe there are 2 elements that attribute mostly to this; The SHOCK and the STORY. The shock value attracts the viewer and the story pulls them in deeper. What should we expect from Aaron Lacy in the near future? I am planning another exhibition for this summer and I’m working on a new body of work that is completely different than what I’ve shown so far. I’m excited for the rest of this year. Milk ► © Aaron Lacy

Penumbra ► © Aaron Lacy


Your Penumbra series is striking. It explores the interplay between geometric shadows and naked bodies. The result is sensuous, utterly elegant and visually stunning. Tell us how you developed and implemented the concept. In monochrome photography, shapes and form are extremely important to me. I wanted to explore the notion of wearing fabric without actually wearing it. I did this by partially illuminating the subjects with the shadows actually being the focus. The method was shining a focused beam of light through different fabric textures at the bodies of the subject. What are the unique features of monochrome photography and the keys to master it? In monochrome photography, one really gets the opportunity not to be distracted by different colors and focus strictly on the light intensity, shadow, and form. Color, in my opinion, is much more subjective than shape. Color can be interpreted in many different ways depending on the light source and the eye of the viewer, while form remains a more constant element. Understanding the relationship between light and shadow and how they affect one another is one of the most important components to monochrome photography. What is the secret for an image to become unforgettable? I always endeavor to take images that attach themselves to the subconscious mind of the viewer. This can be difficult. Especially, since we are overrun with a multitude of imagery on a daily basis. I believe there are 2 elements that attribute mostly to this; The SHOCK and the STORY. The shock value attracts the viewer and the story pulls them in deeper. What should we expect from Aaron Lacy in the near future? I am planning another exhibition for this summer and I’m working on a new body of work that is completely different than what I’ve shown so far. I’m excited for the rest of this year. Milk ► © Aaron Lacy

Penumbra ► © Aaron Lacy


Penumbra ► © Aaron Lacy

Water ► © Aaron Lacy


Penumbra ► © Aaron Lacy

Water ► © Aaron Lacy


MEXICO

Born in Mexico City in 1963, Moises Levy is a lifelong resident there and works in the city as an established architect. His earliest interest in architecture and photography occurred on a trip to New York City when he was 13 years old. “I was fascinated with the buildings and the evening shadows of the city.” In 1982, when he began his studies in architecture at Universidad Iberoamericana, his appreciation of the natural relation between light and architecture was deepened. Subsequent travel to Boston, Paris, and Venice served to illuminate the unbreakable bond between architecture and its relationship with light. It was this early interest in the qualities of light that lead Levy to photography, and as a counterpoint to his work as an architect, he has now been drawn to landscape work. About 15 years ago (1998) he began to explore photography more deeply, with a broad interest in artistic composition, influences, history, and styles. Levy appreciates the history of the medium and states that he has learned from the photographic work of Sebastião Salgado, Edward Weston, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, and Eugene Atget. From other creative venues, his musical preference is classical and includes Mozart, Bach, and Vivaldi. He also enjoys the written works of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Edgar Allan Poe. www.moiseslevy.com 25

► © Moises Levy


MEXICO

Born in Mexico City in 1963, Moises Levy is a lifelong resident there and works in the city as an established architect. His earliest interest in architecture and photography occurred on a trip to New York City when he was 13 years old. “I was fascinated with the buildings and the evening shadows of the city.” In 1982, when he began his studies in architecture at Universidad Iberoamericana, his appreciation of the natural relation between light and architecture was deepened. Subsequent travel to Boston, Paris, and Venice served to illuminate the unbreakable bond between architecture and its relationship with light. It was this early interest in the qualities of light that lead Levy to photography, and as a counterpoint to his work as an architect, he has now been drawn to landscape work. About 15 years ago (1998) he began to explore photography more deeply, with a broad interest in artistic composition, influences, history, and styles. Levy appreciates the history of the medium and states that he has learned from the photographic work of Sebastião Salgado, Edward Weston, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, and Eugene Atget. From other creative venues, his musical preference is classical and includes Mozart, Bach, and Vivaldi. He also enjoys the written works of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Edgar Allan Poe. www.moiseslevy.com 25

► © Moises Levy


► © Moises Levy

Although much of his photographic studies have been self-taught, he has taken several workshops along the way (with Academia de Artes Visuales Dan Burkholder, Mark Nelson, Byron Brauchli). While his career is centered on architecture, and his appreciation of light began there, he states “I have a preference for landscape photography because it lets me be more organic and flexible than my work as an architect.” For that reason, he is working on a project titled Naked Earth – where land meets the sky – and nary a support column in sight. Alzheimer ► © Paco Garzón 27

► © Moises Levy


► © Moises Levy

Although much of his photographic studies have been self-taught, he has taken several workshops along the way (with Academia de Artes Visuales Dan Burkholder, Mark Nelson, Byron Brauchli). While his career is centered on architecture, and his appreciation of light began there, he states “I have a preference for landscape photography because it lets me be more organic and flexible than my work as an architect.” For that reason, he is working on a project titled Naked Earth – where land meets the sky – and nary a support column in sight. Alzheimer ► © Paco Garzón 27

► © Moises Levy


► © Moises Levy

► © Moises Levy


► © Moises Levy

► © Moises Levy


Living and working within the city saw the photographer facing the city scenes every day and his descriptions of the atmosphere at the time are truly moving to read. One would be quite forgiven to think that they were listening to the words of an author or that of a poet as Titarenko depicts the winter nights of the city. “one cold and gloomy day, I strolled sadly down a street which used to be packed with people, which used to be full of joyful vibrancy and dynamism. It was poorly lit; the evening was settling in. There was not a single car visible. The depressing and strange quietness was interrupted by the sounds of banging grocery store and bakery doors, stores in which the shelves were absolutely empty. I saw people on the verge of insanity, in confusion: unattractively dressed men and women with eyes full of sorrow and desperation, tottering on their routine dreary routes with their last ounce of strength, in search of some food which could prolong their lives and the lives of their families. They looked like shadows, undernourished and worn out.”

ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

ALEXEY TITARENKO | City of Shadows

www.alexeytitarenko.com

SREDNIY PROSPEKT, 1992 (CROWD 3)

by Thomas Jukes Born on the island of Vassilievsky in St Petersburg in 1962, Titarenko was set to grow to adulthood through some of the most turbulent and culturally altering times in Russian history, developing himself as a photojournalist with a degree from the Leningrad Public University of Society-related Professions in 1978 and joining an independent photography group called “Zerkalo” (The Mirror). Titarenko began his journey into photography 2 years later after being dismissed from his obligatory military service of 18 months as an infantryman in the Soviet Army. 31

His first series of work entitled “Nomenklatura of Signs” set the stage for what was to come from this visionary photographer. Having grown up during the Communist regime and seeing first hand the treatment of the Russian citizens Titarenko used his photography as a way of conveying and commenting on the oppression that was dealt out by the regime. This series of work would go on to tour the US as part of the Photostroyka exhibition, highlighting Soviet photography in 1989. With the coming of the new decade came yet more hardship for the people of Russia.

After many years of strife, the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991 and its effects would be felt around the world. For Alexey Titarenko this period of drastic change was seen and felt during his time spent in his native city of St Peterburg, all contributing to the evolution of his next series of work which would become titled, “City of Shadows”. This series of photographs were captured and compiled by Titarenko during the years following the collapse of the Soviet Union and were made as a way of the artists portraying his vision of the state of society in St Petersburg at the time. LEHKLEBTORG (BAKERY), 1992

VASILEOSTROVSKAYA METRO STATION, 1992 (CROWD 1) 32


Living and working within the city saw the photographer facing the city scenes every day and his descriptions of the atmosphere at the time are truly moving to read. One would be quite forgiven to think that they were listening to the words of an author or that of a poet as Titarenko depicts the winter nights of the city. “one cold and gloomy day, I strolled sadly down a street which used to be packed with people, which used to be full of joyful vibrancy and dynamism. It was poorly lit; the evening was settling in. There was not a single car visible. The depressing and strange quietness was interrupted by the sounds of banging grocery store and bakery doors, stores in which the shelves were absolutely empty. I saw people on the verge of insanity, in confusion: unattractively dressed men and women with eyes full of sorrow and desperation, tottering on their routine dreary routes with their last ounce of strength, in search of some food which could prolong their lives and the lives of their families. They looked like shadows, undernourished and worn out.”

ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

ALEXEY TITARENKO | City of Shadows

www.alexeytitarenko.com

SREDNIY PROSPEKT, 1992 (CROWD 3)

by Thomas Jukes Born on the island of Vassilievsky in St Petersburg in 1962, Titarenko was set to grow to adulthood through some of the most turbulent and culturally altering times in Russian history, developing himself as a photojournalist with a degree from the Leningrad Public University of Society-related Professions in 1978 and joining an independent photography group called “Zerkalo” (The Mirror). Titarenko began his journey into photography 2 years later after being dismissed from his obligatory military service of 18 months as an infantryman in the Soviet Army. 31

His first series of work entitled “Nomenklatura of Signs” set the stage for what was to come from this visionary photographer. Having grown up during the Communist regime and seeing first hand the treatment of the Russian citizens Titarenko used his photography as a way of conveying and commenting on the oppression that was dealt out by the regime. This series of work would go on to tour the US as part of the Photostroyka exhibition, highlighting Soviet photography in 1989. With the coming of the new decade came yet more hardship for the people of Russia.

After many years of strife, the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991 and its effects would be felt around the world. For Alexey Titarenko this period of drastic change was seen and felt during his time spent in his native city of St Peterburg, all contributing to the evolution of his next series of work which would become titled, “City of Shadows”. This series of photographs were captured and compiled by Titarenko during the years following the collapse of the Soviet Union and were made as a way of the artists portraying his vision of the state of society in St Petersburg at the time. LEHKLEBTORG (BAKERY), 1992

VASILEOSTROVSKAYA METRO STATION, 1992 (CROWD 1) 32


It is this last sentence which sticks so vividly in the reader's eye and what really sums up the essence of the “City of Shadows” series. During his time at university towards the end of the 1970s and the start of the 1980s Titarenko experimented with the now famous technique of long exposures through research he had conducted into the techniques used by the 19th Century French photographers, many of whom are commonly heralded as the creators of modern street photography. We can see these techniques very clearly in the series of photographs in which the artist is able to capture these ethereal and ghostly images. Large crowds of people rush past the camera and the long exposure transforms them from human beings in swarming masses. Large dark conglomerations with no discernible features except the odd hand or foot which can be distinguished amongst the churning sea. Some images we are able to ascertain figures and faces amongst the swirling vortices that are the other people in the scene.

CROWD AROUND VASILEOSTROVSKAYA METRO STATION, 1992 (CROWD 4)

BOY, 1993

You would think that this would make us imagine that these visible characters are the lucky ones, who are not swept up in the human tide, however, from the photos we can see that this simply isn’t the case. They all look lost, sad or confused. A boy stands seemingly alone in a doorway with only his face visible underneath the layers of clothing to protect him from the bitter cold of the Russian winter days. He looks straight into the camera as the figures around him appear like smoke caught in a maelstrom, his face manages to conceivably hold no emotion at all but a vacant stare. In most images, everybody is doing the exact same thing, following a herd. There is no individuality to the subjects in the images, they have become like robots or more fittingly phantoms who seem to follow the same path and routine every day and the photographer is capturing the repetition in their day to day lives. Banisters railings and gateways feature heavily in the series and give an impression of artificial constructs that have been rendered to constrict and guide the people on this path, perhaps a comment on the oppressive Communist rule that focused on creating a world of singular purpose and people as cogs in a machine or drops in an ocean of conformity.

CROWD AT THE METRO ENTRANCE, 1993 (CROWD 2)

34


It is this last sentence which sticks so vividly in the reader's eye and what really sums up the essence of the “City of Shadows” series. During his time at university towards the end of the 1970s and the start of the 1980s Titarenko experimented with the now famous technique of long exposures through research he had conducted into the techniques used by the 19th Century French photographers, many of whom are commonly heralded as the creators of modern street photography. We can see these techniques very clearly in the series of photographs in which the artist is able to capture these ethereal and ghostly images. Large crowds of people rush past the camera and the long exposure transforms them from human beings in swarming masses. Large dark conglomerations with no discernible features except the odd hand or foot which can be distinguished amongst the churning sea. Some images we are able to ascertain figures and faces amongst the swirling vortices that are the other people in the scene.

CROWD AROUND VASILEOSTROVSKAYA METRO STATION, 1992 (CROWD 4)

BOY, 1993

You would think that this would make us imagine that these visible characters are the lucky ones, who are not swept up in the human tide, however, from the photos we can see that this simply isn’t the case. They all look lost, sad or confused. A boy stands seemingly alone in a doorway with only his face visible underneath the layers of clothing to protect him from the bitter cold of the Russian winter days. He looks straight into the camera as the figures around him appear like smoke caught in a maelstrom, his face manages to conceivably hold no emotion at all but a vacant stare. In most images, everybody is doing the exact same thing, following a herd. There is no individuality to the subjects in the images, they have become like robots or more fittingly phantoms who seem to follow the same path and routine every day and the photographer is capturing the repetition in their day to day lives. Banisters railings and gateways feature heavily in the series and give an impression of artificial constructs that have been rendered to constrict and guide the people on this path, perhaps a comment on the oppressive Communist rule that focused on creating a world of singular purpose and people as cogs in a machine or drops in an ocean of conformity.

CROWD AT THE METRO ENTRANCE, 1993 (CROWD 2)

34


All of Titarenko’s photos are rendered by hand in the darkroom allowing the artist to take much more control of his printed work. He uses the technique of bleaching and toning the negatives. This technique is incredibly useful when dealing with long exposure film shots. Toning generally works by adding a brown/sepia tone to the negative to increase its density. This, in turn, allows the negative to block more light allowing for the print to be lighter. This technique is used by Titarenko to enhance the grey palettes within his images and intensifies the sensation of a bleak and washed out world.

BLACK MARKET, 1992

“City of Shadows” is a very impactful series of photographs, the artist's vision of the world around him is clearly conveyed to the viewer. We see faceless masses or blurred and lost individuals in a grey and dismal world. Alexey Titarenko set out to show the past and present pains that the Russian people have suffered through and that during the 90’s he was seeing a city and its people devoid of colour, personality or vitality. There can be no doubt that he accomplishes this incredibly well, leaving the viewer in awe of his ability to impart a holistic sense of the city and its entire populace. This series of work gained him worldwide recognition as is surely deserved for this insightful and talented photographer. He has continued to produce exciting and thought-provoking work ever since moving further afield to New York, Havana and Venice, always with the same focus on the cities history and its people.

UNDER WOODEN SCAFFOLD, 1992 “I attempt to express my thoughts and sentiments about Russia through the prism of this city and the images of its residents. St. Petersburg serves as a tool. All the techniques I employ are used to produce an accurate portrayal of my feelings about my city. I print all the pictures with my own hands. If you want to convey a certain mood or weather, you need to take care of the printing, because it is there where you can get all these nuances. Black and white photography is a special kind of art.” - Alexy Titarenko

35

SREDNIY PROSPEKT, 1992 (CROWD 3)

36


All of Titarenko’s photos are rendered by hand in the darkroom allowing the artist to take much more control of his printed work. He uses the technique of bleaching and toning the negatives. This technique is incredibly useful when dealing with long exposure film shots. Toning generally works by adding a brown/sepia tone to the negative to increase its density. This, in turn, allows the negative to block more light allowing for the print to be lighter. This technique is used by Titarenko to enhance the grey palettes within his images and intensifies the sensation of a bleak and washed out world.

BLACK MARKET, 1992

“City of Shadows” is a very impactful series of photographs, the artist's vision of the world around him is clearly conveyed to the viewer. We see faceless masses or blurred and lost individuals in a grey and dismal world. Alexey Titarenko set out to show the past and present pains that the Russian people have suffered through and that during the 90’s he was seeing a city and its people devoid of colour, personality or vitality. There can be no doubt that he accomplishes this incredibly well, leaving the viewer in awe of his ability to impart a holistic sense of the city and its entire populace. This series of work gained him worldwide recognition as is surely deserved for this insightful and talented photographer. He has continued to produce exciting and thought-provoking work ever since moving further afield to New York, Havana and Venice, always with the same focus on the cities history and its people.

UNDER WOODEN SCAFFOLD, 1992 “I attempt to express my thoughts and sentiments about Russia through the prism of this city and the images of its residents. St. Petersburg serves as a tool. All the techniques I employ are used to produce an accurate portrayal of my feelings about my city. I print all the pictures with my own hands. If you want to convey a certain mood or weather, you need to take care of the printing, because it is there where you can get all these nuances. Black and white photography is a special kind of art.” - Alexy Titarenko

35

SREDNIY PROSPEKT, 1992 (CROWD 3)

36


BRAZIL

"To me, photographing in the field is just the beginning of an artistic process which takes its final form after digitally editing and processing the image and aims to transport the observer into a universe different from the usual one". Brazilian fine art photographer Antonio Salaverry masters a wide range of styles and genres, from urban and nature landscapes to street photography and architectural abstract or wide angle. He used to work as an engineer for one of the largest companies in Brazil but it did not take long for him to realize that photography was his channel for communicating to the world. Antonio perceives the world around us as an unlimited source of visual ingredients for his creations. Architecture provides him with lines, curves, three-dimensional geometries and light/shadow interactions. Armed with incredible sensitivity, he captures perfect angles, creates unique arrangements and turns them into visual gems. In his fine architectural photography, Antonio tries to achieve a minimalistic composition. Black and white is therefore an obvious choice for him: it is about getting rid of the color distraction and trying to show the soul of the architect. The more famous the building is, the more interesting the challenge of coming up with something original. Antonio’s work has been recognized internationally. The photographs in this article are based on the buildings of Brazilian famed architect Oscar Niemeyer, widely known for its characteristic curved structures. www.antoniosalaverry.com 37

► Š Antonio Salaverry


BRAZIL

"To me, photographing in the field is just the beginning of an artistic process which takes its final form after digitally editing and processing the image and aims to transport the observer into a universe different from the usual one". Brazilian fine art photographer Antonio Salaverry masters a wide range of styles and genres, from urban and nature landscapes to street photography and architectural abstract or wide angle. He used to work as an engineer for one of the largest companies in Brazil but it did not take long for him to realize that photography was his channel for communicating to the world. Antonio perceives the world around us as an unlimited source of visual ingredients for his creations. Architecture provides him with lines, curves, three-dimensional geometries and light/shadow interactions. Armed with incredible sensitivity, he captures perfect angles, creates unique arrangements and turns them into visual gems. In his fine architectural photography, Antonio tries to achieve a minimalistic composition. Black and white is therefore an obvious choice for him: it is about getting rid of the color distraction and trying to show the soul of the architect. The more famous the building is, the more interesting the challenge of coming up with something original. Antonio’s work has been recognized internationally. The photographs in this article are based on the buildings of Brazilian famed architect Oscar Niemeyer, widely known for its characteristic curved structures. www.antoniosalaverry.com 37

► Š Antonio Salaverry


► © Antonio Salaverry

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► © Antonio Salaverry

40


► © Antonio Salaverry

39

► © Antonio Salaverry

40


► © Antonio Salaverry

41

► © Antonio Salaverry

42

► © Nathan Wirth


► © Antonio Salaverry

41

► © Antonio Salaverry

42

► © Nathan Wirth


United States

Artist Willie Hsu is an expert in the creation of three-dimensional sketches on two-dimensional surfaces. His technique is based on the interplay with light and shadows. He primarily works with monochrome sketching on paper, creating ghostly figures that serve as stages for the stories of anonymous silhouettes. His works emphasize the emotion of the moment, accentuating the intriguing aspect of his final work. “Here we hover, restless and forgotten souls left behind. Bound and tethered by an unknown purpose yet to be defined.” www.williehsuart.bigcartel.com 43

► © Willie Hsu


United States

Artist Willie Hsu is an expert in the creation of three-dimensional sketches on two-dimensional surfaces. His technique is based on the interplay with light and shadows. He primarily works with monochrome sketching on paper, creating ghostly figures that serve as stages for the stories of anonymous silhouettes. His works emphasize the emotion of the moment, accentuating the intriguing aspect of his final work. “Here we hover, restless and forgotten souls left behind. Bound and tethered by an unknown purpose yet to be defined.” www.williehsuart.bigcartel.com 43

► © Willie Hsu


► © Willie Hsu 45

► © Willie Hsu


► © Willie Hsu 45

► © Willie Hsu


► © Willie Hsu

► © Willie Hsu

48


► © Willie Hsu

► © Willie Hsu

48


Light is the first thing that Peterson looks for, often returning again and again to the same location until the lighting is just right. This understanding of the importance of lighting mixes with his other technique, one which helps to create a crisp clear image even when using a phone camera. Hard Light photography makes use of a strongly focused light source; in Jason’s images, he uses the bright sunlight of a sunny day. This, in turn, creates sharp shadows and gives a brilliant definition between light and dark. This gives Jason’s Peterson's photos their characteristic high contrast and dramatically silhouetted subjects. Another striking brilliance of Peterson’s photography is the use of composition. The classic rule of three is heavily prevalent in many of the photos to be found on Peterson’s Instagram feed. Time and careful consideration clearly run through the entire process, from taking the initial photo to posting on the app. The squared images perfectly balance the inclusion of light and dark, often allowing for Peterson to make the human figure/subject the main focus of the image, even when they are the smallest part of the photo. It is through Peterson’s use of composition that we also pick up on his use of scale and angle. He often uses this to create an exaggerated sense of size between a subject and the human figures within the image. This relates heavily to the artist's love of conveying the scale of human beings within the urban environment. On the other hand, we also see this technique used in natural environments, notably beaches. Here we see Peterson use the distance from his subject to portray the vast scale of the natural world in stark contrast to the tiny figure that exists within it.

ARTICLE

www.instagram.com/jasonmpeterson

INSPIRATION

JASON M PETERSON | THE BLACK-AND-WHITE PHOTO MASTERY by Thomas Jukes To take even a brief look through the Instagram page of Jason Peterson is to not only realize just how many followers he has, (it’s 1.1 million at my last check!) but also to realize the images show a truly masterful street photographer. Peterson doesn’t see himself as a photographer, however, more of “an Art Director with an iPhone.”. And it is through this description that we begin to understand what Jason’s photos really capture; a sheer and undeniable beauty in moments. It’s hard to comprehend after flicking through the incredible photos, that 90% of Peterson’s 49

images are captured using an iPhone. He admits to using a Canon 5D Mrk III for some of the images from helicopters but other than that it’s all using the native camera app on his phone. In reality, though this makes perfect sense. Jason Peterson sets out to show us the moments that so frequently pass us by within our busy lives, capturing the interaction between human beings and the city environment that we now call home. If you have ever tried to go out into the streets using a traditional camera, you will know that you are made visible to all passers-by, and with the loss of

subtlety, one finds it increasingly difficult to portray people interacting naturally. The iPhone allows the photographer, in this case, Jason Peterson, to blend into what has become a very ordinary scene in our lives. Having said this, Peterson’s success doesn’t simply come from being in the right place at the right time. Even if Jason does not identify as a photographer, it is hard to deny that his study of photo history and design in college has created and inspired Jason to become someone able to perfectly use light and composition to turn each image into a work of art. ► © Jason M Peterson


Light is the first thing that Peterson looks for, often returning again and again to the same location until the lighting is just right. This understanding of the importance of lighting mixes with his other technique, one which helps to create a crisp clear image even when using a phone camera. Hard Light photography makes use of a strongly focused light source; in Jason’s images, he uses the bright sunlight of a sunny day. This, in turn, creates sharp shadows and gives a brilliant definition between light and dark. This gives Jason’s Peterson's photos their characteristic high contrast and dramatically silhouetted subjects. Another striking brilliance of Peterson’s photography is the use of composition. The classic rule of three is heavily prevalent in many of the photos to be found on Peterson’s Instagram feed. Time and careful consideration clearly run through the entire process, from taking the initial photo to posting on the app. The squared images perfectly balance the inclusion of light and dark, often allowing for Peterson to make the human figure/subject the main focus of the image, even when they are the smallest part of the photo. It is through Peterson’s use of composition that we also pick up on his use of scale and angle. He often uses this to create an exaggerated sense of size between a subject and the human figures within the image. This relates heavily to the artist's love of conveying the scale of human beings within the urban environment. On the other hand, we also see this technique used in natural environments, notably beaches. Here we see Peterson use the distance from his subject to portray the vast scale of the natural world in stark contrast to the tiny figure that exists within it.

ARTICLE

www.instagram.com/jasonmpeterson

INSPIRATION

JASON M PETERSON | THE BLACK-AND-WHITE PHOTO MASTERY by Thomas Jukes To take even a brief look through the Instagram page of Jason Peterson is to not only realize just how many followers he has, (it’s 1.1 million at my last check!) but also to realize the images show a truly masterful street photographer. Peterson doesn’t see himself as a photographer, however, more of “an Art Director with an iPhone.”. And it is through this description that we begin to understand what Jason’s photos really capture; a sheer and undeniable beauty in moments. It’s hard to comprehend after flicking through the incredible photos, that 90% of Peterson’s 49

images are captured using an iPhone. He admits to using a Canon 5D Mrk III for some of the images from helicopters but other than that it’s all using the native camera app on his phone. In reality, though this makes perfect sense. Jason Peterson sets out to show us the moments that so frequently pass us by within our busy lives, capturing the interaction between human beings and the city environment that we now call home. If you have ever tried to go out into the streets using a traditional camera, you will know that you are made visible to all passers-by, and with the loss of

subtlety, one finds it increasingly difficult to portray people interacting naturally. The iPhone allows the photographer, in this case, Jason Peterson, to blend into what has become a very ordinary scene in our lives. Having said this, Peterson’s success doesn’t simply come from being in the right place at the right time. Even if Jason does not identify as a photographer, it is hard to deny that his study of photo history and design in college has created and inspired Jason to become someone able to perfectly use light and composition to turn each image into a work of art. ► © Jason M Peterson


Though not a self-identifying street photographer, Jason Peterson really does embody the true spirit of the subject. A great street photographer must be constantly looking, most importantly seeing, and being aware of the environment in which he or she finds themselves. Peterson strives to capture the moments that are happening all the time around us. Although there could be much debate as to whether the phone camera will ever truly replace its bigger counterparts, he shows us that given thought and consideration to photographic practices, the iPhone can be an invaluable tool for the modern street photographer. This allows Peterson to always have a camera on hand to document the dramatic and unseen world around him. I look forward to following the continued work of Jason Peterson through his Instagram feed @jasonmpeterson and to being constantly blown away by his ability to produce breathtaking imagery in a style that harks back to the original premise of street photography. “My best images haven’t happened yet. I’m hunting for them.” Jason Peterson 52


Though not a self-identifying street photographer, Jason Peterson really does embody the true spirit of the subject. A great street photographer must be constantly looking, most importantly seeing, and being aware of the environment in which he or she finds themselves. Peterson strives to capture the moments that are happening all the time around us. Although there could be much debate as to whether the phone camera will ever truly replace its bigger counterparts, he shows us that given thought and consideration to photographic practices, the iPhone can be an invaluable tool for the modern street photographer. This allows Peterson to always have a camera on hand to document the dramatic and unseen world around him. I look forward to following the continued work of Jason Peterson through his Instagram feed @jasonmpeterson and to being constantly blown away by his ability to produce breathtaking imagery in a style that harks back to the original premise of street photography. “My best images haven’t happened yet. I’m hunting for them.” Jason Peterson 52


67►

© Jason M Peterson

► © Jason M Peterson


67►

© Jason M Peterson

► © Jason M Peterson


KUWAIT

Ted Grant once said that when you photograph people in color, you only photograph their clothes, but when you portrait them in black and white you photograph their soul. Acclaimed Kuwaiti photographer Hasan Alsaffar takes this words to a whole new level, shooting mesmerizing portraits that connect us to the lives and rich stories of his subjects. His quest to reveal the beauty of our world and the essence of the people that inhabit it has taken him from the depths of the Arabian And Red Seas to the peaks of the highest mountains in India. It was in the midst of this artistic journey that Hasan discovered his true passion: “to capture the heart and soul of humans”, particularly of those from primitive cultures around the world. Hasan’s beautiful pictures perpetuate the voices of these communities, which are in danger of disappearing, victims of globalization. In the years following this revelation, he has visited and photographed some of the most elusive communities in the world, including native people in Africa, Cambodia, West Papua and Ladakh. The deep humanity that permeates his work is not an accident, he fully immerses into the daily life of his subjects. This intangible connection between artist and subjects transcends all of his images. www.alsaffarstudios.com 55

MONK | This Monk was among many at the Angkor Wat Temple. I had the chance to get a few minutes and took a few shots using only natural light ► © Hasan Alsaffar


KUWAIT

Ted Grant once said that when you photograph people in color, you only photograph their clothes, but when you portrait them in black and white you photograph their soul. Acclaimed Kuwaiti photographer Hasan Alsaffar takes this words to a whole new level, shooting mesmerizing portraits that connect us to the lives and rich stories of his subjects. His quest to reveal the beauty of our world and the essence of the people that inhabit it has taken him from the depths of the Arabian And Red Seas to the peaks of the highest mountains in India. It was in the midst of this artistic journey that Hasan discovered his true passion: “to capture the heart and soul of humans”, particularly of those from primitive cultures around the world. Hasan’s beautiful pictures perpetuate the voices of these communities, which are in danger of disappearing, victims of globalization. In the years following this revelation, he has visited and photographed some of the most elusive communities in the world, including native people in Africa, Cambodia, West Papua and Ladakh. The deep humanity that permeates his work is not an accident, he fully immerses into the daily life of his subjects. This intangible connection between artist and subjects transcends all of his images. www.alsaffarstudios.com 55

MONK | This Monk was among many at the Angkor Wat Temple. I had the chance to get a few minutes and took a few shots using only natural light ► © Hasan Alsaffar


► © Hasan Alsaffar Tribe Women | This woman showing her right hand with its missing finger Vertebrae. Women in Papua do this as a sign of Grief for losing their beloved ones.

Monochrome photography directly appeals to the most instinctive feelings of the viewers, challenging them to actively engage their imagination. Its language is subtle; the absence of color brings visual expression to its purest form, the binary interplay between light and darkness. A key signature of Hasan’s work is indeed a masterful control of the interactions between light and shadows. Manipulating light at his will, he manages to communicate a wide range of moods and emotions. Through his lens, characters reveal their complexities, stories, struggles, pride and spiritual dimension. Hasan Alsaffar’s photographs are a feast to the eyes and the heart. Every one of his photographs is a visual delight, a creative masterpiece and a powerful reminder of what makes us human. 57

► © Hasan Alsaffar Aged Kashmiri Man | He was just sitting outside his house door steps, after greeting and asked him thru our guide to take his some pictures. This man was very modest and collaborated with me, this was very helpful and made the shot as I wanted it to be. 58


► © Hasan Alsaffar Tribe Women | This woman showing her right hand with its missing finger Vertebrae. Women in Papua do this as a sign of Grief for losing their beloved ones.

Monochrome photography directly appeals to the most instinctive feelings of the viewers, challenging them to actively engage their imagination. Its language is subtle; the absence of color brings visual expression to its purest form, the binary interplay between light and darkness. A key signature of Hasan’s work is indeed a masterful control of the interactions between light and shadows. Manipulating light at his will, he manages to communicate a wide range of moods and emotions. Through his lens, characters reveal their complexities, stories, struggles, pride and spiritual dimension. Hasan Alsaffar’s photographs are a feast to the eyes and the heart. Every one of his photographs is a visual delight, a creative masterpiece and a powerful reminder of what makes us human. 57

► © Hasan Alsaffar Aged Kashmiri Man | He was just sitting outside his house door steps, after greeting and asked him thru our guide to take his some pictures. This man was very modest and collaborated with me, this was very helpful and made the shot as I wanted it to be. 58


► © Hasan Alsaffar Mursi Woman | A portrait of a young women from Mursi. She was waring a Bull horns as a decoration. Its amazing how the people of this tribe decorate themself; they are very creative and use many of the things that surrounds them and reuse it. Also you can notice the detailed marks on her arm which are made for girls on purpose and are a sign of beauty for the girls and women of the Mursi tribe. 59

A solo portrait of the Karo tribe woman ► © Hasan Alsaffar

60


► © Hasan Alsaffar Mursi Woman | A portrait of a young women from Mursi. She was waring a Bull horns as a decoration. Its amazing how the people of this tribe decorate themself; they are very creative and use many of the things that surrounds them and reuse it. Also you can notice the detailed marks on her arm which are made for girls on purpose and are a sign of beauty for the girls and women of the Mursi tribe. 59

A solo portrait of the Karo tribe woman ► © Hasan Alsaffar

60


For many years, society has been focused on one particular way to do things. And even now, we base our greatest masterpieces on the traditional ways of our ancestors. But as our definition of art evolves, so does the way we interpret design. Modern Design is one of the many ways people have decided to depict our understanding of the times ahead of us. This particular way of art showcases the simplicity and avant-garde designs that humans have created in order to move closer into the future. Much of Modern Design usually consists of geometric shapes as well as some straightforward decor to make everything tie up. It bases its image off of the turn humanity has taken in order to

B&W illustrations for New York Times "Flood of Guns in America" by Eiko Ojala

stretch our knowledge of design. To say the least, it’s a movement. It’s a path that many follow in order to think outside the box, it’s something that allows artists to think of ways to venture into the future of design and art, and it’s something that creates a sense in us to become more open-minded about the definition of art. For example, our definition of art started out as things being classic and straight to the point. But now, this has changed. We are now able to accept things being diverse and abstract . It’s how we change. And Modern Design is an excellent representation of how far we’ve come.

iPod Classic 4th Designed by Apple, California

61

MNML Minimal Forms and Structures by Igor Martins & UP Inspiring Motion

      ©   


For many years, society has been focused on one particular way to do things. And even now, we base our greatest masterpieces on the traditional ways of our ancestors. But as our definition of art evolves, so does the way we interpret design. Modern Design is one of the many ways people have decided to depict our understanding of the times ahead of us. This particular way of art showcases the simplicity and avant-garde designs that humans have created in order to move closer into the future. Much of Modern Design usually consists of geometric shapes as well as some straightforward decor to make everything tie up. It bases its image off of the turn humanity has taken in order to

B&W illustrations for New York Times "Flood of Guns in America" by Eiko Ojala

stretch our knowledge of design. To say the least, it’s a movement. It’s a path that many follow in order to think outside the box, it’s something that allows artists to think of ways to venture into the future of design and art, and it’s something that creates a sense in us to become more open-minded about the definition of art. For example, our definition of art started out as things being classic and straight to the point. But now, this has changed. We are now able to accept things being diverse and abstract . It’s how we change. And Modern Design is an excellent representation of how far we’ve come.

iPod Classic 4th Designed by Apple, California

61

MNML Minimal Forms and Structures by Igor Martins & UP Inspiring Motion

      ©   


ARCO FLOOR LAMP, ACHILLE AND PIER GIACOMO CASTIGLIONI, 1962 The Arco lamp is possibly the most well-known lighting piece among the many from Achille Castiglioni. In 1962 Achille decided to solve a specific need: he noticed that there wasn’t a floor lamp that could create overhead light. Let’s say you need light above a table (and you don’t want rewiring in order to add a ceiling pendant), what do you do? He wanted to use a floor lamp. The challenge was to place it close to a wall (to reach the socket) and at the same time create overhead light on the table without loosing balance. That’s exactly what the Arco lamp does! The heavy Carrara marble base balances the weight. And the Arc is so tall that people can easily walk below it.

ACHILLE CASTIGLIONI | LIFE & WORK: 1918-2002 Achille graduated from the Milan Polytechnic University in 1944. During his career he worked at the architectural design practice that his older brothers Livio and Pier Giacomo had started with Luigi Caccia Dominioni in 1938. He designed furniture, lighting, radiograms and other objects, collaborating with many brands such as Flos, Zanotta, Alessi, Brionvega, De Padova, Driade, Olivetti, Moroso, Knoll and countless others. VISION: Son of Rationalism, he thought that every design concept has to be related to a function, a problem to solve. And that things have to be reduced to their essential elements, that’s why he enjoyed working with the manufacturers. He went on his life stating that good design should last over time and that “There has to be irony, both in design and in the objects”. He loved people in general and solving problems for them. Thanks to this positive attitude (that he applied to both his work and life) he was able to design objects that supported people’s lives throughout the years. 63

Radiofonografo, Brionvega RR-226-O RADIOFONOGRAFO BV ORIGINAL Achille e Pier Giacomo Castiglioni, 1965 Half a century of uniqueness, told by a smile that was like the first day. Signed in 1965 by designer Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni, the Radiofonografo is perfect because only thanks to a style incomparable. Shapes retro charm, combined with an incredible sound definition and the ability to orient and move the crates in the most suitable to the surrounding environment, for listening experience stimulating and intriguing. Today, radiofonografo rr226-O re-borns: only radio and turntable like the original of the 1965. A deserved tribute to one of the most iconic and desired object of the industrial design made in italy. Capable, with his unique style, to be part of the private collections of many famous artists, musicians and design lovers from all over the world. Ideal for a complete sensory listening. Thanks to the Aux connection, also, you can match any device, to play your favorite music without any limitations! Radiofonogrado rr226-O, that continues to surprise thanks to the materials provided by the original design, is made in Italy and is available in white with inserts tobacco. Radiofongrafo rr226-O is produced on request and each piece is unique and different from the other. 64


ARCO FLOOR LAMP, ACHILLE AND PIER GIACOMO CASTIGLIONI, 1962 The Arco lamp is possibly the most well-known lighting piece among the many from Achille Castiglioni. In 1962 Achille decided to solve a specific need: he noticed that there wasn’t a floor lamp that could create overhead light. Let’s say you need light above a table (and you don’t want rewiring in order to add a ceiling pendant), what do you do? He wanted to use a floor lamp. The challenge was to place it close to a wall (to reach the socket) and at the same time create overhead light on the table without loosing balance. That’s exactly what the Arco lamp does! The heavy Carrara marble base balances the weight. And the Arc is so tall that people can easily walk below it.

ACHILLE CASTIGLIONI | LIFE & WORK: 1918-2002 Achille graduated from the Milan Polytechnic University in 1944. During his career he worked at the architectural design practice that his older brothers Livio and Pier Giacomo had started with Luigi Caccia Dominioni in 1938. He designed furniture, lighting, radiograms and other objects, collaborating with many brands such as Flos, Zanotta, Alessi, Brionvega, De Padova, Driade, Olivetti, Moroso, Knoll and countless others. VISION: Son of Rationalism, he thought that every design concept has to be related to a function, a problem to solve. And that things have to be reduced to their essential elements, that’s why he enjoyed working with the manufacturers. He went on his life stating that good design should last over time and that “There has to be irony, both in design and in the objects”. He loved people in general and solving problems for them. Thanks to this positive attitude (that he applied to both his work and life) he was able to design objects that supported people’s lives throughout the years. 63

Radiofonografo, Brionvega RR-226-O RADIOFONOGRAFO BV ORIGINAL Achille e Pier Giacomo Castiglioni, 1965 Half a century of uniqueness, told by a smile that was like the first day. Signed in 1965 by designer Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni, the Radiofonografo is perfect because only thanks to a style incomparable. Shapes retro charm, combined with an incredible sound definition and the ability to orient and move the crates in the most suitable to the surrounding environment, for listening experience stimulating and intriguing. Today, radiofonografo rr226-O re-borns: only radio and turntable like the original of the 1965. A deserved tribute to one of the most iconic and desired object of the industrial design made in italy. Capable, with his unique style, to be part of the private collections of many famous artists, musicians and design lovers from all over the world. Ideal for a complete sensory listening. Thanks to the Aux connection, also, you can match any device, to play your favorite music without any limitations! Radiofonogrado rr226-O, that continues to surprise thanks to the materials provided by the original design, is made in Italy and is available in white with inserts tobacco. Radiofongrafo rr226-O is produced on request and each piece is unique and different from the other. 64


The Wing Armchair by Dmitry Kozachyshyn

Minimalist Bathroom Design by Nichba Design


The Wing Armchair by Dmitry Kozachyshyn

Minimalist Bathroom Design by Nichba Design


ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

Bogdan Kotewicz | Poetry in Black and White

www.bkotewicz.com

by Photographize Artistic photographer Bogdan Kotewicz was born in Poland and has lived in Paris for many years. His first contact with photography dates from his teens, when he discovered traditional photography and the magic of the development process at his improvised home lab. Unfortunately, this fascination did not last long and it gave way to other, not always artistic, activities. Nevertheless, his creative inclinations persisted and he always felt the need to express them. His interest in photography reemerged some years ago and has since become a real passion. At present, Bogdan mainly practices monochrome photography. He believes that the lack of chromatic distraction makes the creation of a peculiar atmosphere easier by focusing on the subject in its pure form. The result can sometimes look like a poetic, mysterious and even surreal dimension. Our natural perception of our surroundings is based on color, and its removal can surprise us and spur our imagination. This is nevertheless not an absolute rule. He continuously explores other creative techniques, such as digital manipulation of photos where color is often present. Bogdan’s photographs frequently include perfectly staged human characters, making us fantasize about their possible stories and reminding us that we are an active part of our ever-changing dynamical environment. He masterfully captures the essence of these individuals, often representing them merely by their dark silhouettes in sharp contrast with the background. Bogdan’s goal is to create a new world through his art and imagination. Join us in a trip into his stunning universe. 67

► © Bogdan Kotewicz


ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

Bogdan Kotewicz | Poetry in Black and White

www.bkotewicz.com

by Photographize Artistic photographer Bogdan Kotewicz was born in Poland and has lived in Paris for many years. His first contact with photography dates from his teens, when he discovered traditional photography and the magic of the development process at his improvised home lab. Unfortunately, this fascination did not last long and it gave way to other, not always artistic, activities. Nevertheless, his creative inclinations persisted and he always felt the need to express them. His interest in photography reemerged some years ago and has since become a real passion. At present, Bogdan mainly practices monochrome photography. He believes that the lack of chromatic distraction makes the creation of a peculiar atmosphere easier by focusing on the subject in its pure form. The result can sometimes look like a poetic, mysterious and even surreal dimension. Our natural perception of our surroundings is based on color, and its removal can surprise us and spur our imagination. This is nevertheless not an absolute rule. He continuously explores other creative techniques, such as digital manipulation of photos where color is often present. Bogdan’s photographs frequently include perfectly staged human characters, making us fantasize about their possible stories and reminding us that we are an active part of our ever-changing dynamical environment. He masterfully captures the essence of these individuals, often representing them merely by their dark silhouettes in sharp contrast with the background. Bogdan’s goal is to create a new world through his art and imagination. Join us in a trip into his stunning universe. 67

► © Bogdan Kotewicz


► © Bogdan Kotewicz

► © Bogdan Kotewicz

70


► © Bogdan Kotewicz

► © Bogdan Kotewicz

70


71

► © Bogdan Kotewicz

► © Bogdan Kotewicz


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► © Bogdan Kotewicz

► © Bogdan Kotewicz


UNITED STATES

“By definition, I’m a photographer. But I’ve got the mind of a scientist, the heart of the poet, and a camera to capture it all. When the lights go out, what really matters? People, relationships, and our interconnected humanity.” Leif Steiner creates soulful portraits that open a window into the daily existence of traditional communities with minimal contact with the outside world. Before venturing into photography, he had a long trajectory in the creative world as the founder and director of an internationally acclaimed design and advertising agency. About a year ago, he decided it was time to walk up to the edge again. He handed the keys to his company over to several employees and left. He reasoned that if you’re not living, you’re dying. And after twenty years of success in one industry, he was ready to be hungry and scared again. Leif believes that this moment is an extraordinary window of opportunity to document some of the last remaining independent native communities before they’re gone forever. Globalization is inexorably leading to homogenization. In the coming decades, civilization will transform into a one-world monoculture. Along with this progress, we will lose vast quantities of knowledge, diverse ways of thinking, and cultural differentiation. Two hundred years ago, much of the world was still relatively isolated and inaccessible. A century from now, the entire world will be interconnected; isolated and distinct groups of people will no longer exist. He’s currently working on a multiyear project devoted to photographing and documenting traditional cultures around the world. www.instagram.com/leif_steiner 73

PORTRAITS OF HUMANITY ► © Leif Steiner


UNITED STATES

“By definition, I’m a photographer. But I’ve got the mind of a scientist, the heart of the poet, and a camera to capture it all. When the lights go out, what really matters? People, relationships, and our interconnected humanity.” Leif Steiner creates soulful portraits that open a window into the daily existence of traditional communities with minimal contact with the outside world. Before venturing into photography, he had a long trajectory in the creative world as the founder and director of an internationally acclaimed design and advertising agency. About a year ago, he decided it was time to walk up to the edge again. He handed the keys to his company over to several employees and left. He reasoned that if you’re not living, you’re dying. And after twenty years of success in one industry, he was ready to be hungry and scared again. Leif believes that this moment is an extraordinary window of opportunity to document some of the last remaining independent native communities before they’re gone forever. Globalization is inexorably leading to homogenization. In the coming decades, civilization will transform into a one-world monoculture. Along with this progress, we will lose vast quantities of knowledge, diverse ways of thinking, and cultural differentiation. Two hundred years ago, much of the world was still relatively isolated and inaccessible. A century from now, the entire world will be interconnected; isolated and distinct groups of people will no longer exist. He’s currently working on a multiyear project devoted to photographing and documenting traditional cultures around the world. www.instagram.com/leif_steiner 73

PORTRAITS OF HUMANITY ► © Leif Steiner


PORTRAITS OF HUMANITY: Q’ero

(Indigenous

Andean)

//

15,038’

elevation. I’ve just returned from a 5-day trip up into the Q’eros Nation, one of the most remote and difficult to reach corners of the Andes. New Age practitioners and pseudo-shamanic healers have capitalized on the mythology of these isolated pastoralists… and created an entire industry around a romanticized concept that the Q’ero people are the last remaining Inca. The contrast is fascinating — while the ‘modern’ world capitalizes on them (or the concept of them)… the Q’ero quietly go about their simple life up in the mountains. Many of them have never left the area and the older generations are mostly unaware of how the outside world operates. Curious, I asked one man if the world was flat or round. He had no idea. Nor had he heard of oceans. Or countries. And he didn’t care to know. I asked if he was worried about losing his culture to the ‘outside world.’ “No. Long after you’re gone, we will still be here.” And THAT I think is the essence of their appeal — Isolated, living in harmony with the earth, and entirely self-sustaining.

► © Leif Steiner

Remarkably, this project made him realize the profound coincidences that define us as humans. In his words: “We come in a thousand different shapes and colors, but underneath that thin layer of skin, we’re far more similar than we are different. Even the most remote and isolated groups of people share the same basic kindness, the same intellectual curiosity, and the same empathy we’d expect from our next of kin.” 75

► © Leif Steiner PORTRAITS OF HUMANITY: Q’ero (Indigenous Andean) // 13,750’ elevation. In Q'eros, there is no flat. Things go up or down but never flat. There are glaciers above, jungle below, and thousands of vertical feet in every direction. In the middle is Q'eros. During the rainy season when moisture rolls up from the Amazon, it can snow. When the sun returns in April, mist continues to rake across the alpine landscape. Mosses and lichens compete with wild grasses. There are no trees at this high elevation, but water is everywhere. // This is a portrait of Sebastian Quispe Zamata. He doesn’t know whether he is 66, 76, or 86. More incredibly — He doesn’t own a mirror and (before this photo) had never seen an image of himself. Photographing him was a challenge; the sun had set, another bank of clouds was drifting up from the jungle… and Sebastian was fascinated with the camera equipment. 76


PORTRAITS OF HUMANITY: Q’ero

(Indigenous

Andean)

//

15,038’

elevation. I’ve just returned from a 5-day trip up into the Q’eros Nation, one of the most remote and difficult to reach corners of the Andes. New Age practitioners and pseudo-shamanic healers have capitalized on the mythology of these isolated pastoralists… and created an entire industry around a romanticized concept that the Q’ero people are the last remaining Inca. The contrast is fascinating — while the ‘modern’ world capitalizes on them (or the concept of them)… the Q’ero quietly go about their simple life up in the mountains. Many of them have never left the area and the older generations are mostly unaware of how the outside world operates. Curious, I asked one man if the world was flat or round. He had no idea. Nor had he heard of oceans. Or countries. And he didn’t care to know. I asked if he was worried about losing his culture to the ‘outside world.’ “No. Long after you’re gone, we will still be here.” And THAT I think is the essence of their appeal — Isolated, living in harmony with the earth, and entirely self-sustaining.

► © Leif Steiner

Remarkably, this project made him realize the profound coincidences that define us as humans. In his words: “We come in a thousand different shapes and colors, but underneath that thin layer of skin, we’re far more similar than we are different. Even the most remote and isolated groups of people share the same basic kindness, the same intellectual curiosity, and the same empathy we’d expect from our next of kin.” 75

► © Leif Steiner PORTRAITS OF HUMANITY: Q’ero (Indigenous Andean) // 13,750’ elevation. In Q'eros, there is no flat. Things go up or down but never flat. There are glaciers above, jungle below, and thousands of vertical feet in every direction. In the middle is Q'eros. During the rainy season when moisture rolls up from the Amazon, it can snow. When the sun returns in April, mist continues to rake across the alpine landscape. Mosses and lichens compete with wild grasses. There are no trees at this high elevation, but water is everywhere. // This is a portrait of Sebastian Quispe Zamata. He doesn’t know whether he is 66, 76, or 86. More incredibly — He doesn’t own a mirror and (before this photo) had never seen an image of himself. Photographing him was a challenge; the sun had set, another bank of clouds was drifting up from the jungle… and Sebastian was fascinated with the camera equipment. 76


► © Leif Steiner PORTRAITS OF HUMANITY: Peru, with the Yanamayo // You’ll never read about Julian Yupanqui. You can’t call him or text him or even write him a letter. He lives high up on the eastern slopes of the Andes, right before the mountains drop down into the Amazon. At 13,300’, it’s cold at night and there's no electricity. Meat is hung out to dry, but mostly he and his wife live off potatoes. If you walk past Julian on the trail, he might be heading up into the high country to check on his alpacas. He’ll smile and wave and quietly keep walking. If you speak Quechua, he might invite you over for a meal. You’ll talk for hours; Julian is a humble man but has a lifetime of stories. He’ll tell you about floods and snow and the tropical birds that rise from the jungles below. But he won’t tell you he’s a descendant of Inca royalty. (Google his last name and you can read about it yourself.) Julian Yupanqui doesn’t care about ‘likes’ or ‘share’s’ or how many ‘followers’ he has. Julian is just Julian; a good husband, good father, and a good friend. PORTRAITS OF HUMANITY ► © Leif Steiner 77

78

GRVTY No.3 © Daniel Garay Arango


► © Leif Steiner PORTRAITS OF HUMANITY: Peru, with the Yanamayo // You’ll never read about Julian Yupanqui. You can’t call him or text him or even write him a letter. He lives high up on the eastern slopes of the Andes, right before the mountains drop down into the Amazon. At 13,300’, it’s cold at night and there's no electricity. Meat is hung out to dry, but mostly he and his wife live off potatoes. If you walk past Julian on the trail, he might be heading up into the high country to check on his alpacas. He’ll smile and wave and quietly keep walking. If you speak Quechua, he might invite you over for a meal. You’ll talk for hours; Julian is a humble man but has a lifetime of stories. He’ll tell you about floods and snow and the tropical birds that rise from the jungles below. But he won’t tell you he’s a descendant of Inca royalty. (Google his last name and you can read about it yourself.) Julian Yupanqui doesn’t care about ‘likes’ or ‘share’s’ or how many ‘followers’ he has. Julian is just Julian; a good husband, good father, and a good friend. PORTRAITS OF HUMANITY ► © Leif Steiner 77

78

GRVTY No.3 © Daniel Garay Arango


UNITED KINGDOM

English Artist Miles Johnston creates works designed to expose the mutable, transient and ultimately insubstantial nature of our default sense of self. From mathematics, physics, philosophy, art, Miles always wanted to see the world around him as if for the first time. Miles works primarily in graphite and oils, using the human form as a vehicle to attempt to process the intensity and profound strangeness of the collective human experience. The distortions and transformations of his subjects undergo serve to represent the experience of our internal state during crucial moments in our lives. Instead of focusing on literal representations of the world. Miles depicts the surreal and abstract qualities of our subjectivity with the goal of creating works with a deep emotional resonance. He looks for his creations to hit on a deeper level, and to speak to the unavoidable experiences built in for existence in an impermanent universe. Loss, Guilt, Fear, and Pain can all be used to form a deeper sense of compassion for all beings, that isn't predicated on any personal history or mutual traits. www.milesjohnstonart.com 79

► Š Miles Johnston


UNITED KINGDOM

English Artist Miles Johnston creates works designed to expose the mutable, transient and ultimately insubstantial nature of our default sense of self. From mathematics, physics, philosophy, art, Miles always wanted to see the world around him as if for the first time. Miles works primarily in graphite and oils, using the human form as a vehicle to attempt to process the intensity and profound strangeness of the collective human experience. The distortions and transformations of his subjects undergo serve to represent the experience of our internal state during crucial moments in our lives. Instead of focusing on literal representations of the world. Miles depicts the surreal and abstract qualities of our subjectivity with the goal of creating works with a deep emotional resonance. He looks for his creations to hit on a deeper level, and to speak to the unavoidable experiences built in for existence in an impermanent universe. Loss, Guilt, Fear, and Pain can all be used to form a deeper sense of compassion for all beings, that isn't predicated on any personal history or mutual traits. www.milesjohnstonart.com 79

► Š Miles Johnston


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► © Miles Johnston

► © Miles Johnston

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► © Miles Johnston

► © Miles Johnston

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► © Miles Johnston

► © Miles Johnston

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► © Miles Johnston

► © Miles Johnston

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GERMANY

Peter F. Wingerter was born in Germany in 1969. He is specialized in Seascape, Landscape and Nature Photography. However, he is mostly known for his long exposure photos. Peter has always been interested in photography. His first experiences in analogue photography were made when he was a teenager. However, since 2010, he began to follow photography with greater interest. This passion took him in a permanent quest for the unknown, escaping the everyday routine.

www.peterwingerter.de 85

► Š Peter Wingerter


GERMANY

Peter F. Wingerter was born in Germany in 1969. He is specialized in Seascape, Landscape and Nature Photography. However, he is mostly known for his long exposure photos. Peter has always been interested in photography. His first experiences in analogue photography were made when he was a teenager. However, since 2010, he began to follow photography with greater interest. This passion took him in a permanent quest for the unknown, escaping the everyday routine.

www.peterwingerter.de 85

► Š Peter Wingerter


► © Peter Wingerter

► © Peter Wingerter

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88


► © Peter Wingerter

► © Peter Wingerter

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88


► © Peter Wingerter

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► © Peter Wingerter

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► © Peter Wingerter

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► © Peter Wingerter

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Highlights Anna Łachut UNITED STATES

Author:Anna Łachut

www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001495762924 www.instagram.com/anna_lachut

Eye see you ► © Anna Łachut 91

92

The wall and life behind it ► © Anna Łachut


Highlights Anna Łachut UNITED STATES

Author:Anna Łachut

www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001495762924 www.instagram.com/anna_lachut

Eye see you ► © Anna Łachut 91

92

The wall and life behind it ► © Anna Łachut


Highlights Mostafa Nodeh

Author: Mostafa Nodeh

IRAN

93

► © Mostafa Nodeh

www.mostafanodeh.com

www.instagram.com/mostafanodeh

► © Mostafa Nodeh


Highlights Mostafa Nodeh

Author: Mostafa Nodeh

IRAN

93

► © Mostafa Nodeh

www.mostafanodeh.com

www.instagram.com/mostafanodeh

► © Mostafa Nodeh


Highlights Martina Dimunová CZECH REPUBLIC

Friendship ► © Martina Dimunová 95

Author: Martina Dimunová

www.facebook.com/mdimun04 www.instagram.com/mdimun

Jing Jang ► © Martina Dimunová 96


Highlights Martina Dimunová CZECH REPUBLIC

Friendship ► © Martina Dimunová 95

Author: Martina Dimunová

www.facebook.com/mdimun04 www.instagram.com/mdimun

Jing Jang ► © Martina Dimunová 96


Highlights Liz Y Ahmet UNITED KINGDOM

Author: Liz Y Ahmet

www.facebook.com/Lizyahmetart www.instagram.com/lizyahmet

97

► © Liz Y Ahmet

► © Liz Y Ahmet

98


Highlights Liz Y Ahmet UNITED KINGDOM

Author: Liz Y Ahmet

www.facebook.com/Lizyahmetart www.instagram.com/lizyahmet

97

► © Liz Y Ahmet

► © Liz Y Ahmet

98


Highlights Gus Spain

Author: Gus

www.gusfineart.es www.facebook.com/gus.fineart.501

www.instagram.com/gusfineart

99

Best friends ► © Gus

Autumn Rain ► © Gus


Highlights Gus Spain

Author: Gus

www.gusfineart.es www.facebook.com/gus.fineart.501

www.instagram.com/gusfineart

99

Best friends ► © Gus

Autumn Rain ► © Gus


Highlights Hadi Gala ITALY

Author: Hadi Gala

www.behance.net/hadigala

www.instagram.com/gala.hadi

Gluttony ► © Hadi Gala 101

102

Wrath ► © Hadi Gala


Highlights Hadi Gala ITALY

Author: Hadi Gala

www.behance.net/hadigala

www.instagram.com/gala.hadi

Gluttony ► © Hadi Gala 101

102

Wrath ► © Hadi Gala


Highlights Radu Nuta ROMANIA

► © Radu Nuta

Author: Radu Nuta www.instagram.com/radu.en/

► © Radu Nuta

104


Highlights Radu Nuta ROMANIA

► © Radu Nuta

Author: Radu Nuta www.instagram.com/radu.en/

► © Radu Nuta

104


Highlights Sevil Çetin Turkey

Author: Sevil Çetin

Birth and Death ► © Sevil Çetin 105

Birth and Death ► © Sevil Çetin

106


Highlights Sevil Çetin Turkey

Author: Sevil Çetin

Birth and Death ► © Sevil Çetin 105

Birth and Death ► © Sevil Çetin

106


Highlights Gudrun Oser GERMANY

► © Gudrun Oser 107

Author: Gudrun Oser

www.flickr.com/photos/blackheartpicture

www.instagram.com/gudrunoser

www.facebook.com/gudrun

► © Gudrun Oser

108


Highlights Gudrun Oser GERMANY

► © Gudrun Oser 107

Author: Gudrun Oser

www.flickr.com/photos/blackheartpicture

www.instagram.com/gudrunoser

www.facebook.com/gudrun

► © Gudrun Oser

108


Highlights Nina Spernjak BELGIUM

Author: Nina Spernjak www.instagram.com/ninaspernjak

► © Nina Spernjak

109

► © Nina Spernjak

110


Highlights Nina Spernjak BELGIUM

Author: Nina Spernjak www.instagram.com/ninaspernjak

► © Nina Spernjak

109

► © Nina Spernjak

110


Highlights Victor Utama united states

Author: Victor Utama

www.victorutama.photography www.instagram.com/victor_utama

Half Dome ► © Victor Utama 111

Brooklyn Bridge ► © Victor Utama

112


Highlights Victor Utama united states

Author: Victor Utama

www.victorutama.photography www.instagram.com/victor_utama

Half Dome ► © Victor Utama 111

Brooklyn Bridge ► © Victor Utama

112


Highlights Mohammad Rahman AUSTRALIA

Author: Mohammad Rahman

www.mohammad-rahman.com

ta s t e H U N T E R S

food lovers

www.forksnroses.co 113

► © Mohammad Rahman


Highlights Mohammad Rahman AUSTRALIA

Author: Mohammad Rahman

www.mohammad-rahman.com

ta s t e H U N T E R S

food lovers

www.forksnroses.co 113

► © Mohammad Rahman


ISSN 2639-569X

www.alsaffarstudios.com

Profile for Photographize Magazine

Photographize Monochrome | Issue 03 | June 2019