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2018 Š PhotographizeMa g

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No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner.

ISSN 2576-2648

All images and text published in PhotographizeMag are the sole property of the featured authors and the subject copyright .

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Photographize PO BOX 20658, 234 10th Ave New York City, NY 10011 United States


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77 who we are

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49 55

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HIGHLIGHTS 03 25 55 77 97

FRANCESCO VULLO PATRICIA VAN DE CAMP JOHN KOSMOPOULOS KATHERINE YOUNG GIOVANNI CASSARÁ

INTERVIEWS 13 39 69 89

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TSANG JOHNSON LOLA DUPRE BARA PRASILOVA PATRICK GONZALES

ARTICLES 35 jUHAMATTI VAHDERSALO

Cardboard worlds using an artist imagination

65 Diptych

What happens when two talented artists collaborate?

GRAPHIC ZONE 49 All images and text published in Photographize Magazine are the sole property of the featured authors and subject to copyright. No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner.

2018 © Photographize Magazine Cover : © Patricia Van de Camp

Photographize aims to become a virtual place based on the immediacy, where images are presented in their pure beauty and have the ability to capture and captivate the viewer. Since its launch in 2010, Photographize has covered the work of a variety of renowned artists from around the globe. We dedicate our space to all kinds of art regardless of technique or period, such as illustration, painting, digital art, photography, sculpture and video.

Join the next issue Photographize will now be publishing 3 issues per year: January, May and September. Due to space, we will only publish 2 artworks per artist. Depending of the content, artist may be contacted for an exclusive interview or highlighted in our coming issues. Deadlines: January Issue: December 1st. May Issue: April 1st September Issue: Nov 1st

How to submit: 1 to 3 jpeg images - 900 pixels @ 72ppi Include your website or social media link in the comment

write to: submissions@photographize.co ISSN 2576-2648

Founder, Chief Editor & Art Director: Andrea Costantini Co-Owner, Editor and Web Administrator: Carla DLM


35 03

89

13

77 who we are

65

49 55

97

69

HIGHLIGHTS 03 25 55 77 97

FRANCESCO VULLO PATRICIA VAN DE CAMP JOHN KOSMOPOULOS KATHERINE YOUNG GIOVANNI CASSARÁ

INTERVIEWS 13 39 69 89

69

25

49

TSANG JOHNSON LOLA DUPRE BARA PRASILOVA PATRICK GONZALES

ARTICLES 35 jUHAMATTI VAHDERSALO

Cardboard worlds from an artist’s imagination

65 Diptych

What happens when two talented artists collaborate?

GRAPHIC ZONE 49 All images and text published in Photographize Magazine are the sole property of the featured authors and subject to copyright. No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner.

2018 © Photographize Magazine Cover : © Patricia Van de Camp

Photographize aims to become a virtual place based on the immediacy, where images are presented in their pure beauty and have the ability to capture and captivate the viewer. Since its launch in 2010, Photographize has covered the work of a variety of renowned artists from around the globe. We dedicate our space to all kinds of art regardless of technique or period, such as illustration, painting, digital art, photography, sculpture and video.

Join the next issue Photographize will be publishing 3 issues per year: January, May and September. Due to space constraints, we will only publish 2 artworks per artist. Depending on the content, the artist may be contacted for an exclusive interview or highlighted in coming issues. Deadlines: January Issue: December 1st. May Issue: April 1st September Issue: Nov 1st

How to submit: 1 to 3 jpeg images - 900 pixels @ 72ppi Include your website or social media link in the comment

write to: submissions@photographize.co ISSN 2576-2648

Founder, Chief Editor & Art Director: Andrea Costantini

Co-Owner, Editor and Web Administrator: Carla De La Matta


ITALY

03

Francesco Vullo was born in 1994 in Palermo, Sicily. From an early age, he has always been interested in drawing and creative activities. His work is strongly influenced by events and contemporary culture and has many ironic nuances and messages of social criticism. His artworks reveal an irreverent vision of the world and society. Francesco is the master of subliminal joke delivering his punchlines through visually captivating and thought-provoking collages that often fuse unexpected objects together. Some of his works want to communicate emotions, stimulate reflection in the public; others, instead, are born from the original combination of contrasting elements coming from different worlds and are characterized by vivid colors. In his creations, we can find remakes of famous paintings, surreal combinations between objects of common use, and illustrations that reveal the dark side of social networks. Most of his works have been published on several blogs and online magazines proving a great success in the network. In 2016 Vullo participated to the Tribeca Film Festival in New York with a work he realized for the premiere of the movie “The bomb� by Smriti Keshari & Eric Schlosser. www.francescovullo.com

Fontana Š Francesco Vullo


ITALY

03

Francesco Vullo was born in 1994 in Palermo, Sicily. From an early age, he has always been interested in drawing and creative activities. His work is strongly influenced by events and contemporary culture and has many ironic nuances and messages of social criticism. His artworks reveal an irreverent vision of the world and society. Francesco is the master of subliminal joke delivering his punchlines through visually captivating and thought-provoking collages that often fuse unexpected objects together. Some of his works want to communicate emotions, stimulate reflection in the public; others, instead, are born from the original combination of contrasting elements coming from different worlds and are characterized by vivid colors. In his creations, we can find remakes of famous paintings, surreal combinations between objects of common use, and illustrations that reveal the dark side of social networks. Most of his works have been published on several blogs and online magazines proving a great success in the network. In 2016 Vullo participated to the Tribeca Film Festival in New York with a work he realized for the premiere of the movie “The bomb� by Smriti Keshari & Eric Schlosser. www.francescovullo.com

Fontana Š Francesco Vullo


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4:20 © Francesco Vullo

© Francesco Vullo


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4:20 © Francesco Vullo

© Francesco Vullo


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Fight For Your Ideas - Etnia © Francesco Vullo

© Francesco Vullo


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Fight For Your Ideas - Etnia © Francesco Vullo

© Francesco Vullo


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© Francesco Vullo Crime Scene © Francesco Vullo


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© Francesco Vullo Crime Scene © Francesco Vullo


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Birdie © Francesco Vullo

Premium DIEsel © Francesco Vullo


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Birdie © Francesco Vullo

Premium DIEsel © Francesco Vullo


HONG KONG • CHINA

INTERVIEW WITH “My creative mind is free from anything. Anything could be an inspiration. Sometimes, inspirations come from nowhere or even from totally nothing.”. 13

Johnson Tsang is a clay artist. His works employ an exquisite realistic sculptural techniques accompanied by an extremely imagination. When he first touched clay for the first time (26 years ago), it was like clay was waiting for him. Clay became his best friend since then, and the results speak from themselves. Please briefly tell us about your background. When were you first introduced to this field? I am now 57. I was born in Hong Kong. I work and live in Hong Kong as well. I remember the first time I held a pencil in 1964, I was only 4. I started to draw a wooden clock in my grandma house instead of writing. I haven’t stop drawing since that day. I especially liked drawing on the void space of textbooks during the classes. This empty space gave me unlimited imagination and helped me built my creative mind. This was the starting point that took me where I am now. I am so blessed growing up there. We admire the exquisite level of detail in all your works. Does your creative process start from certain image in your mind, or do you seek for inspiration as you progress?  Either way works and is a pleasure for me. My creative mind is free from anything. Anything could be an inspiration. Sometimes, inspirations come from nowhere or even from totally nothing. They just keep visiting me anytime they like. What I have to do is to just keep my door open. I also enjoy creating works spontaneously. This is a great way to let my inner self take over the job, in the absence of the thinking mind. The results are always surprising.

Tell us about the slab building technique that you use. Do the forms of your sculptural work respond to the imagery or do you create forms as a result of a drawn image you would like to express and explore?   Working with clay is always a challenge for many of us. Different kinds of clay have different characters. Getting to know its weaknesses and abilities is crucial. Otherwise, problems like cracking, air pockets, or even falling apart will occur during the drying or firing processes. This is especially important while working with porcelain, one of the weakest clays of all. Slab building and throwing can provide an even thickness throughout the whole clay body. It reduces the risk of having those problems. Then, I alter the clay body into sculptural form while it is still wet and soft.

We’ve noticed that most of your artworks are made without adding color. However, you use color in many others. What can you tell us about the decision of including color into your works? How do you see the interaction between a plain artwork and one that use color in this society?   When I create works in 'Imagine Nation', most of them are in white color. I would say it is a kind of light form. But it doesn't mean I have to follow these visions exactly. In fact, I sometimes introduce some changes. But, personally, I love white. It's the combination of all colors. I like its purity, innocence, calmness, peace, and I feel closer to where I’m supposed to be. If I could, I would use as few colors as possible. That's why I choose porcelain as my favourite material for my works.

I don’t limit the ways in which I come up with ideas. Practically, many ways work for me. However, I enjoy finding thoughts without using the thinking mind. This state of being is like meditation. Thanks to having practiced meditation for years, I can do it anywhere and anytime I want. It is just like jogging, walking, taking showers, exercising, traveling, waiting for buses, working and even shopping in a crowded mall. Over there, I see things in 3D, everything looks real to me. Anything can be changed by me along with my thoughts. I can go to any place around the world or even the universe, I can meet anyone if I like to. There are no boundaries or limitations. Even time doesn't exist. I create, build and alter my work there like a magician. Sometimes I even get advice from the people there. Sometimes, some sculptural forms just appear in front of me without any of my input. I can go around the piece to have a clear 3D perspective. The whole piece of work can be completed in one visit, sometimes a few. I call this place ‘Imagine Nation’. For me, this is as real as our physical world.

14

When I return to the real world with these creations, I usually draw them on my notebook. Or I write down some important points in my cell phone. I may turn them into reality later on. 'Lucid Dream' and 'Open Mind' series are examples of this process.

www.johnsontsang.wordpress.com Tearpot © Johnson Tsang


HONG KONG • CHINA

INTERVIEW WITH “My creative mind is free from anything. Anything could be an inspiration. Sometimes, inspirations come from nowhere or even from totally nothing.”. 13

Johnson Tsang is a clay artist. His works employ an exquisite realistic sculptural techniques accompanied by an extremely imagination. When he first touched clay for the first time (26 years ago), it was like clay was waiting for him. Clay became his best friend since then, and the results speak from themselves. Please briefly tell us about your background. When were you first introduced to this field? I am now 57. I was born in Hong Kong. I work and live in Hong Kong as well. I remember the first time I held a pencil in 1964, I was only 4. I started to draw a wooden clock in my grandma house instead of writing. I haven’t stop drawing since that day. I especially liked drawing on the void space of textbooks during the classes. This empty space gave me unlimited imagination and helped me built my creative mind. This was the starting point that took me where I am now. I am so blessed growing up there. We admire the exquisite level of detail in all your works. Does your creative process start from certain image in your mind, or do you seek for inspiration as you progress?  Either way works and is a pleasure for me. My creative mind is free from anything. Anything could be an inspiration. Sometimes, inspirations come from nowhere or even from totally nothing. They just keep visiting me anytime they like. What I have to do is to just keep my door open. I also enjoy creating works spontaneously. This is a great way to let my inner self take over the job, in the absence of the thinking mind. The results are always surprising.

Tell us about the slab building technique that you use. Do the forms of your sculptural work respond to the imagery or do you create forms as a result of a drawn image you would like to express and explore?   Working with clay is always a challenge for many of us. Different kinds of clay have different characters. Getting to know its weaknesses and abilities is crucial. Otherwise, problems like cracking, air pockets, or even falling apart will occur during the drying or firing processes. This is especially important while working with porcelain, one of the weakest clays of all. Slab building and throwing can provide an even thickness throughout the whole clay body. It reduces the risk of having those problems. Then, I alter the clay body into sculptural form while it is still wet and soft.

We’ve noticed that most of your artworks are made without adding color. However, you use color in many others. What can you tell us about the decision of including color into your works? How do you see the interaction between a plain artwork and one that use color in this society?   When I create works in 'Imagine Nation', most of them are in white color. I would say it is a kind of light form. But it doesn't mean I have to follow these visions exactly. In fact, I sometimes introduce some changes. But, personally, I love white. It's the combination of all colors. I like its purity, innocence, calmness, peace, and I feel closer to where I’m supposed to be. If I could, I would use as few colors as possible. That's why I choose porcelain as my favourite material for my works.

I don’t limit the ways in which I come up with ideas. Practically, many ways work for me. However, I enjoy finding thoughts without using the thinking mind. This state of being is like meditation. Thanks to having practiced meditation for years, I can do it anywhere and anytime I want. It is just like jogging, walking, taking showers, exercising, traveling, waiting for buses, working and even shopping in a crowded mall. Over there, I see things in 3D, everything looks real to me. Anything can be changed by me along with my thoughts. I can go to any place around the world or even the universe, I can meet anyone if I like to. There are no boundaries or limitations. Even time doesn't exist. I create, build and alter my work there like a magician. Sometimes I even get advice from the people there. Sometimes, some sculptural forms just appear in front of me without any of my input. I can go around the piece to have a clear 3D perspective. The whole piece of work can be completed in one visit, sometimes a few. I call this place ‘Imagine Nation’. For me, this is as real as our physical world.

14

When I return to the real world with these creations, I usually draw them on my notebook. Or I write down some important points in my cell phone. I may turn them into reality later on. 'Lucid Dream' and 'Open Mind' series are examples of this process.

www.johnsontsang.wordpress.com Tearpot © Johnson Tsang


However, I sometimes create works purely using my thinking mind to express my feelings. In these cases, I use more colors to interpret the facts, like in 'A Piece of China' series, 'The Great Again Wall' and some of my early works like 'Karma III-The Battlefield' and 'Make Tea, Not War!'. In addition, looking back, I used more colors in my early works. There are flesh and blood, fear and anger, hatred and anxiety. I chose those unpleasant ways to express my feelings towards things happening around the world. That was the real me in that period. I was holding my own ruler to measure what is right and wrong, good and evil. Then I reacted with anger and horror. Life is in progress. 10 years ago, my mother passed away after 9 months in bed. I saw her accept peacefully what life had given her. No fights, struggling nor complain. Then even pain went away. I found another meaning of life. Fight and struggle no longer exist in my path. Since then, my works express my feelings differently. I went deeper into my inner self to find peace and joy.

Many of your artistic works are extremely expressive. To us, this is what instantly defines your style. Expression of suffering, sadness, tiredness, and boredom can be seen in babies, kids and adult faces. Is there any meaning in the use such detailed facial expressions in your artworks?   I am not good at words, so I don't speak much. On the other hand, I trust my feelings towards people. There are messages beyond what words can express. Facial expression is an example. It is an inherent language of all humans. Even a newborn baby knows it. It provides me with a way to express how I feel about the relationships between people and all things. And finally, it's all related to the word 'Love'. To me, the word 'Love' doesn't only represent the pretty things. Love is the combination of all our positive or negative feelings and emotions. Hate and fear are not the absence of love. They're just elements of it. We just swing from one side to the other. It's hard to stay still in love. That's why our emotions swift constantly. For example, we wouldn't feel sad if someone we don't love left us or hurt us. Parents push their kids to do some things they don't want in the name of love. War may start because both sides claim they want to protect their beliefs, a God they love. Sometimes we don't feel love until we lose it. We must learn how to love in the absence of love. That's why we say love is the strongest power in the universe. After all, love is everything. This is why you can find so many facial expressions in my works.

15

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Storm in My Bowl © Johnson Tsang

Whp Did it © Johnson Tsang

Gifted © Johnson Tsang


However, I sometimes create works purely using my thinking mind to express my feelings. In these cases, I use more colors to interpret the facts, like in 'A Piece of China' series, 'The Great Again Wall' and some of my early works like 'Karma III-The Battlefield' and 'Make Tea, Not War!'. In addition, looking back, I used more colors in my early works. There are flesh and blood, fear and anger, hatred and anxiety. I chose those unpleasant ways to express my feelings towards things happening around the world. That was the real me in that period. I was holding my own ruler to measure what is right and wrong, good and evil. Then I reacted with anger and horror. Life is in progress. 10 years ago, my mother passed away after 9 months in bed. I saw her accept peacefully what life had given her. No fights, struggling nor complain. Then even pain went away. I found another meaning of life. Fight and struggle no longer exist in my path. Since then, my works express my feelings differently. I went deeper into my inner self to find peace and joy.

Many of your artistic works are extremely expressive. To us, this is what instantly defines your style. Expression of suffering, sadness, tiredness, and boredom can be seen in babies, kids and adult faces. Is there any meaning in the use such detailed facial expressions in your artworks?   I am not good at words, so I don't speak much. On the other hand, I trust my feelings towards people. There are messages beyond what words can express. Facial expression is an example. It is an inherent language of all humans. Even a newborn baby knows it. It provides me with a way to express how I feel about the relationships between people and all things. And finally, it's all related to the word 'Love'. To me, the word 'Love' doesn't only represent the pretty things. Love is the combination of all our positive or negative feelings and emotions. Hate and fear are not the absence of love. They're just elements of it. We just swing from one side to the other. It's hard to stay still in love. That's why our emotions swift constantly. For example, we wouldn't feel sad if someone we don't love left us or hurt us. Parents push their kids to do some things they don't want in the name of love. War may start because both sides claim they want to protect their beliefs, a God they love. Sometimes we don't feel love until we lose it. We must learn how to love in the absence of love. That's why we say love is the strongest power in the universe. After all, love is everything. This is why you can find so many facial expressions in my works.

15

16

Storm in My Bowl © Johnson Tsang

Whp Did it © Johnson Tsang

Gifted © Johnson Tsang


We find your series of artworks “Lucid Dream” fascinating. Please tell us where this idea came from and what inspired you. As I mentioned before, I created those works in 'Imagine Nation'. I can talk a little more about it. Over there, I can feel unlimited ideas are drifting in the air. Even though it's invisible, I know it's there. I just open my heart and accept whatever comes into my imagination. Creativity is like a playground or a game without rules. To get rid of the rules, we must let go our educated mind from parents, schools, society and our previous experiences.

17

When I was young, I felt strange when people said their mind couldn't stop thinking. I wondered how come I can stop thinking almost any moment I want to. I thought I must have some kind of mental problem. Then I found peace and joy in it. I rarely get angry or anxious. I know that I am fine even though I don’t react towards things like most other people. If I must, I would say my inspirations are from how I choose to react to the things happening around me.

Lucid Dream-Backup © Johnson Tsang

Lucid Dream-Powerful Speech © Johnson Tsang Lucid Dream-Shaping Love © Johnson Tsang

Lucid Dream-The Comfort © Johnson Tsang

Regarding your artwork “The great again wall”. Do you think any artistic work should contain a message? Do you look forward to transmit a message with your creative process?   There isn’t any rule that we must have a message in our artworks. We all have free will to choose whatever we like. I believe everything that happens to be here must have a reason. It may not appear to be a readable message. We never know who's going to see it and how it may change others. This is, for me, the reason why an artist creates the artwork. It doesn't mean that this is the only meaning for others. So I really don't mind what the public feels about my work. It doesn't mean I don't care. I just don't expect my works to be interpreted the way I did even though I created all of them. I'm a person who trusts his feelings. It won't lie to me. I do wish the audience to trust themselves and to see my works without any input from others or even me. I accept whatever they feel about it. Everyone can have their own interpretation due to their grownup background, experiences, attitudes and characters. It means there can be unlimited meanings. I believe that if my work reaches or touches someone's -

© Johnson Tsang


We find your series of artworks “Lucid Dream” fascinating. Please tell us where this idea came from and what inspired you. As I mentioned before, I created those works in 'Imagine Nation'. I can talk a little more about it. Over there, I can feel unlimited ideas are drifting in the air. Even though it's invisible, I know it's there. I just open my heart and accept whatever comes into my imagination. Creativity is like a playground or a game without rules. To get rid of the rules, we must let go our educated mind from parents, schools, society and our previous experiences.

17

When I was young, I felt strange when people said their mind couldn't stop thinking. I wondered how come I can stop thinking almost any moment I want to. I thought I must have some kind of mental problem. Then I found peace and joy in it. I rarely get angry or anxious. I know that I am fine even though I don’t react towards things like most other people. If I must, I would say my inspirations are from how I choose to react to the things happening around me.

Lucid Dream-Backup © Johnson Tsang

Lucid Dream-Powerful Speech © Johnson Tsang Lucid Dream-Shaping Love © Johnson Tsang

Lucid Dream-The Comfort © Johnson Tsang

Regarding your artwork “The great again wall”. Do you think any artistic work should contain a message? Do you look forward to transmit a message with your creative process?   There isn’t any rule that we must have a message in our artworks. We all have free will to choose whatever we like. I believe everything that happens to be here must have a reason. It may not appear to be a readable message. We never know who's going to see it and how it may change others. This is, for me, the reason why an artist creates the artwork. It doesn't mean that this is the only meaning for others. So I really don't mind what the public feels about my work. It doesn't mean I don't care. I just don't expect my works to be interpreted the way I did even though I created all of them. I'm a person who trusts his feelings. It won't lie to me. I do wish the audience to trust themselves and to see my works without any input from others or even me. I accept whatever they feel about it. Everyone can have their own interpretation due to their grownup background, experiences, attitudes and characters. It means there can be unlimited meanings. I believe that if my work reaches or touches someone's -

© Johnson Tsang


- heart, there must be a reason. That reason is more important than my work. My work sometimes acts like a wake-up call for them. I have received lots of positive comments from around the world. Messages sharing their feelings and stories on how my works speaks to them. Although they're just a small fraction of the people who saw my works, I feel so thankful and blessed that I have created those works. Every one of them is the fuel for my next creation. I am non-religious but a new age thinker. I do wish to make a better world. Somehow, I couldn’t find a better way to do this as I am not good at any other territory. Thankfully, I found art. When I asked myself what art could bring through me, I became aware that I am sending messages from a higher side. It's all about love.

19

You are a well-known figure in this field and an inspiration for many young artists. Who are the artists that influenced and inspired you at the beginning of your career? For me, 'Being creative' is a natural thing and a gift that our universe gave only to the human species. It is a gift for all of us. People do it in many different fields. Science, technology, architecture, medicine, education, politics, sociology, ecology, written work, film making, performance art ... we wouldn't move on if we didn't have creative minds. We are all born to be creative. But not everyone is aware of it and uses it. I am just one of them who treasure this ability. The only thing left for me is how I am going to use this gift in the best way. I choose to share the goodness, love and joy to the world with my creations. I can't name an artist that had a tremendous influence on me. My mentor is inside me. If I may, I would say I admire and appreciate people who did great things for humanity, to help people with less power, to save our Mother Nature from man-made destruction, to care for all living beings, to fight for freedom, to embrace peace and to show great compassion to all beings. They are all our real teachers. We should always look up to them.

20

© Johnson Tsang

Our Mother Nature is another mentor for me, the most important one, which gave me the best lessons. Looking at the quiet starry night, I see no stars are misplaced. Looking at a tree, I see no good or bad leaves. Looking at a rocky beach, I see no right or wrong rocks. Looking at the wild world, I don't hate a lion for eating baby zebra. They're just doing what they really are. Looking at the human world, we're doing exactly what we are. I believe no two stars, trees, rocks, animals are symmetrical. They're all unique individuals doing what they are supposed to do, just like us. There is no right or wrong, good or bad, high or low. There is only how we choose to react, to love or not. Thankfully, we have many choices. Those choices will change us and create a new us.

The Guardian © Johnson Tsang


- heart, there must be a reason. That reason is more important than my work. My work sometimes acts like a wake-up call for them. I have received lots of positive comments from around the world. Messages sharing their feelings and stories on how my works speaks to them. Although they're just a small fraction of the people who saw my works, I feel so thankful and blessed that I have created those works. Every one of them is the fuel for my next creation. I am non-religious but a new age thinker. I do wish to make a better world. Somehow, I couldn’t find a better way to do this as I am not good at any other territory. Thankfully, I found art. When I asked myself what art could bring through me, I became aware that I am sending messages from a higher side. It's all about love.

19

You are a well-known figure in this field and an inspiration for many young artists. Who are the artists that influenced and inspired you at the beginning of your career? For me, 'Being creative' is a natural thing and a gift that our universe gave only to the human species. It is a gift for all of us. People do it in many different fields. Science, technology, architecture, medicine, education, politics, sociology, ecology, written work, film making, performance art ... we wouldn't move on if we didn't have creative minds. We are all born to be creative. But not everyone is aware of it and uses it. I am just one of them who treasure this ability. The only thing left for me is how I am going to use this gift in the best way. I choose to share the goodness, love and joy to the world with my creations. I can't name an artist that had a tremendous influence on me. My mentor is inside me. If I may, I would say I admire and appreciate people who did great things for humanity, to help people with less power, to save our Mother Nature from man-made destruction, to care for all living beings, to fight for freedom, to embrace peace and to show great compassion to all beings. They are all our real teachers. We should always look up to them.

20

© Johnson Tsang

Our Mother Nature is another mentor for me, the most important one, which gave me the best lessons. Looking at the quiet starry night, I see no stars are misplaced. Looking at a tree, I see no good or bad leaves. Looking at a rocky beach, I see no right or wrong rocks. Looking at the wild world, I don't hate a lion for eating baby zebra. They're just doing what they really are. Looking at the human world, we're doing exactly what we are. I believe no two stars, trees, rocks, animals are symmetrical. They're all unique individuals doing what they are supposed to do, just like us. There is no right or wrong, good or bad, high or low. There is only how we choose to react, to love or not. Thankfully, we have many choices. Those choices will change us and create a new us.

The Guardian © Johnson Tsang


What do you dislike about the art world? I spent most of my time in creativity. I didn't study much about the art world. I know quite a little. For artists, I admire those who have great craftsmanship and really lay a hand on their artwork during the process. On the other hand, I also like all other artists who are passionate and truthful to art. Regarding the art world, frankly, there aren’t many things I hate or dislike. Even when I find something that I feel unpleasant about, that feeling wouldn't stay longer than a minute. Then I start to think about the positive reason why it happened to me and why I witnessed it. I can always find the answers, learn from it, and sometimes it even inspires me. It has become a hobby to discover the goodness in everything. Trust me, it's a gift indeed. We can’t hate something and learn from it at the same time. Like or dislike is just a kind of feeling for us to choose. I always choose the one that helps me grow. Please tell us about your future projects. What are your ambitions and goals for the coming years? 

21

Splash of Wonder © Johnson Tsang

What are the challenges that you encounter and the skills that they require? The first thing that comes to my mind is the limitation of space in Hong Kong, one of the most expensive cities in the world. It creates tons of problems in every process. Most local artists face the same problem of unaffordable space. A sculptor needs even more space. Practically, it limits the materials I can use and the size of my works. Fortunately, I still have free will. It can’t impose boundaries on my creativity. Furthermore, I find that limited space is actually good for me. Making smaller pieces means I can use lesser time to complete every piece. I can turn more of my ideas into reality, share more works with the world. Still, I deal with it with great joy.

I stopped doing art for more than four months due to the move of my workshop. Hopefully, I can start my creation in January 2018. Since there is a little more space here, I will try doing art with different media and techniques. 2018 will be a year of exploration, experimentation and an exciting year for me. Apart from this, I will continue my 'Lucid Dream' series. I am willing to keep doing this as one of my routines because there are unlimited resources of inspiration. Ambitions are unnecessary in my path. I don't have any specific item or position to pursue in this material world. I am not rich but I feel abundant. My goal is simple, to choose whatever I feel helps me create the best version of me till the end of this life. Life is a process of creation. I am aware that I can't direct it exactly the way I plan it to be. What I need to do is to keep myself undisturbed, live a tranquil life and listen to my inner guidance. Then life will bring me to where I’m supposed to be. Just like what I use to do.

Oops © Johnson Tsang

© Johnson Tsang


What do you dislike about the art world? I spent most of my time in creativity. I didn't study much about the art world. I know quite a little. For artists, I admire those who have great craftsmanship and really lay a hand on their artwork during the process. On the other hand, I also like all other artists who are passionate and truthful to art. Regarding the art world, frankly, there aren’t many things I hate or dislike. Even when I find something that I feel unpleasant about, that feeling wouldn't stay longer than a minute. Then I start to think about the positive reason why it happened to me and why I witnessed it. I can always find the answers, learn from it, and sometimes it even inspires me. It has become a hobby to discover the goodness in everything. Trust me, it's a gift indeed. We can’t hate something and learn from it at the same time. Like or dislike is just a kind of feeling for us to choose. I always choose the one that helps me grow. Please tell us about your future projects. What are your ambitions and goals for the coming years? 

21

Splash of Wonder © Johnson Tsang

What are the challenges that you encounter and the skills that they require? The first thing that comes to my mind is the limitation of space in Hong Kong, one of the most expensive cities in the world. It creates tons of problems in every process. Most local artists face the same problem of unaffordable space. A sculptor needs even more space. Practically, it limits the materials I can use and the size of my works. Fortunately, I still have free will. It can’t impose boundaries on my creativity. Furthermore, I find that limited space is actually good for me. Making smaller pieces means I can use lesser time to complete every piece. I can turn more of my ideas into reality, share more works with the world. Still, I deal with it with great joy.

I stopped doing art for more than four months due to the move of my workshop. Hopefully, I can start my creation in January 2018. Since there is a little more space here, I will try doing art with different media and techniques. 2018 will be a year of exploration, experimentation and an exciting year for me. Apart from this, I will continue my 'Lucid Dream' series. I am willing to keep doing this as one of my routines because there are unlimited resources of inspiration. Ambitions are unnecessary in my path. I don't have any specific item or position to pursue in this material world. I am not rich but I feel abundant. My goal is simple, to choose whatever I feel helps me create the best version of me till the end of this life. Life is a process of creation. I am aware that I can't direct it exactly the way I plan it to be. What I need to do is to keep myself undisturbed, live a tranquil life and listen to my inner guidance. Then life will bring me to where I’m supposed to be. Just like what I use to do.

Oops © Johnson Tsang

© Johnson Tsang


FEATUREd

ARTIST

Marius Cinteză

ROMANIA

23

Author: Marius Cinteză www.mcinteza.1x.com www.facebook.com/marius.cinteza.7 www.instagram.com/mcinteza/


FEATUREd

ARTIST

Marius Cinteză

ROMANIA

23

Author: Marius Cinteză www.mcinteza.1x.com www.facebook.com/marius.cinteza.7 www.instagram.com/mcinteza/


NETHERLANDS

25

Reality doesn’t always present itself as it really is. Patricia van de Camp explores the relativity of reality and of beauty in particular. What happens when you remove beauty from reality? What if you leave out or add elements? It’s a classical view that one cannot add anything to pure beauty nor take away from it and not make things worse. Patricia explores this notion in her photography. She positions a wild animal in a dilapidated factory building or she digitally cuts the portraits she made into pieces and then re-assembles them in a special way. She takes beauty from reality and with her photos creates a new, thus far unknown beauty. In her search Patricia explores the boundaries. How far can one wander from the classical notion of beauty before it gets gaudy or seems forced? Her photos introduce people to a reality with a different notion of beauty. The technical element of her photos could not have been brought about without Patricia’s wide knowledge of photography and graphic design. Had she not been inspired by philosophy and psychology Patricia’s search would have stranded in a never-ending labyrinth. www.patriciavandecamp.nl © Patricia Van de Camp


NETHERLANDS

25

Reality doesn’t always present itself as it really is. Patricia van de Camp explores the relativity of reality and of beauty in particular. What happens when you remove beauty from reality? What if you leave out or add elements? It’s a classical view that one cannot add anything to pure beauty nor take away from it and not make things worse. Patricia explores this notion in her photography. She positions a wild animal in a dilapidated factory building or she digitally cuts the portraits she made into pieces and then re-assembles them in a special way. She takes beauty from reality and with her photos creates a new, thus far unknown beauty. In her search Patricia explores the boundaries. How far can one wander from the classical notion of beauty before it gets gaudy or seems forced? Her photos introduce people to a reality with a different notion of beauty. The technical element of her photos could not have been brought about without Patricia’s wide knowledge of photography and graphic design. Had she not been inspired by philosophy and psychology Patricia’s search would have stranded in a never-ending labyrinth. www.patriciavandecamp.nl © Patricia Van de Camp


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Š Patricia Van de Camp

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Š Patricia Van de Camp


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Š Patricia Van de Camp

13

Š Patricia Van de Camp


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Masquerade © Patricia Van de Camp © Philip McKay

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© Patricia Van de Camp


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Masquerade © Patricia Van de Camp © Philip McKay

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© Patricia Van de Camp


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© © Patricia Marcin Van de Sacha Camp

© Patricia Van de Camp


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© © Patricia Marcin Van de Sacha Camp

© Patricia Van de Camp


Š Patricia Van de Camp

Š Patricia Van de Camp


Š Patricia Van de Camp

Š Patricia Van de Camp


ARTICLE Cardboard worlds using an artist imagination INSPIRATION Author: Juhamatti Vadhersalo vahdersalo.com facebook.com/vahdersalo

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Creativity always finds its way. Finnish photographer Juhamatti Vadhersalo was desperate for shooting some pictures with no clear subject in sight. Fresh from a recent move, he suddenly discovered a treasure trove for his imagination in the form of some leftover boxes. He refurbished these materials to create models that he later photographed with real foregrounds. Digitally blending them with new backgrounds, the results are pure magic. Below you can witness the creative process leading to “Cloudmill”, “Letter to Pedro” and “Run out of my imagination”.

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ARTICLE Cardboard worlds using an artist imagination INSPIRATION Author: Juhamatti Vadhersalo vahdersalo.com facebook.com/vahdersalo

35

We’ve noticed that most of your artworks are made without adding color. However, you use color in many others. What can you tell us about the decision of including color into your works? How do you see the interaction between a plain artwork and one that use color in this society? When I create works in 'Imagine Nation', most of them are in white color. I would say it is a kind of light form. But it doesn't mean I have to follow these visions exactly. In fact, I sometimes introduce some changes. But, personally, I love white. It's the combination of all colors. I like its purity, innocence, calmness, peace, and I feel closer to where I’m supposed to be. If I could, I would use as few colors as possible. That's why I choose porcelain as my favourite material for my works.

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FEATUREd

ARTIST

Eleni Gemeni

Luxembourg

37

38

Author: Eleni Gemeni www.instagram.com/elengemlux

The peculiar Mr Pimrock © Eleni Gemeni

Beneath the protective wing © Eleni Gemeni


FEATUREd

ARTIST

Eleni Gemeni

Luxembourg

37

38

Author: Eleni Gemeni www.instagram.com/elengemlux

The peculiar Mr Pimrock © Eleni Gemeni

Beneath the protective wing © Eleni Gemeni


SCOTLAND

INTERVIEW WITH

Many of your artistic works are based on famous people portraits. We can recognize famous figures of our times but also historical ones. We notice you realized a portrait of Mao like Warhol did. Can we say that you place this part of your work in the Pop Art movement? What do you think? It could be Pop Art, but I think there are many movements inspiring every piece of art. Each of us knows only one point of view but the truth is that things are much more complicated and individual.

“I dislike any form of elitism, I dislike how fine art must fulfil a certain blinkered criteria”. 39

In your works made in 2014-2015: ”Liquid 01", "Liquid 02" or "Black Matter”, we can see a geometrical approach of your subject; a fascination for the shapes. Somehow it make us think about Victor Vasarely's work. Do you consider him as a reference? Thank you!, Op art is very inspiring for me, it always has been. I love the moire pattern references in Vasarely and Riley's work. It was a big influence for these works I made with CES in LA.

Lola Dupré is a collage artist and illustrator currently working between studios in Glasgow and North Ayrshire, Scotland. Working with paper and scissors her work references both the Dada aesthetic of the early 20th Century and the digital manipulations of the present day. Since 2000 Lola has lived and worked in Switzerland, France, Portugal, Spain, Ireland and now Scotland. Please briefly tell us about your background. Who is Lola Dupre? I left school young and went on an extended tour of countries, cities and art studios for a few years. My academic qualifications are therefore rather poor, but I have always enjoyed reading and learning about things through practice and experience. When I began seriously making collage it lead me equally to art and illustration. We admire the exquisite level of detail in all your works. Can you please briefly describe your creative process? Does it take long time from start to the end? Thank you, the details are often the most contorted areas. The detail can be interesting to produce, the most meditative part of the work. Time varies hugely between pieces - from one day to three months.

www.loladupre.com

© Lola Dupré


SCOTLAND

INTERVIEW WITH

Many of your artistic works are based on famous people portraits. We can recognize famous figures of our times but also historical ones. We notice you realized a portrait of Mao like Warhol did. Can we say that you place this part of your work in the Pop Art movement? What do you think? It could be Pop Art, but I think there are many movements inspiring every piece of art. Each of us knows only one point of view but the truth is that things are much more complicated and individual.

“I dislike any form of elitism, I dislike how fine art must fulfil a certain blinkered criteria”. 39

In your works made in 2014-2015: ”Liquid 01", "Liquid 02" or "Black Matter”, we can see a geometrical approach of your subject; a fascination for the shapes. Somehow it make us think about Victor Vasarely's work. Do you consider him as a reference? Thank you!, Op art is very inspiring for me, it always has been. I love the moire pattern references in Vasarely and Riley's work. It was a big influence for these works I made with CES in LA.

Lola Dupré is a collage artist and illustrator currently working between studios in Glasgow and North Ayrshire, Scotland. Working with paper and scissors her work references both the Dada aesthetic of the early 20th Century and the digital manipulations of the present day. Since 2000 Lola has lived and worked in Switzerland, France, Portugal, Spain, Ireland and now Scotland. Please briefly tell us about your background. Who is Lola Dupre? I left school young and went on an extended tour of countries, cities and art studios for a few years. My academic qualifications are therefore rather poor, but I have always enjoyed reading and learning about things through practice and experience. When I began seriously making collage it lead me equally to art and illustration. We admire the exquisite level of detail in all your works. Can you please briefly describe your creative process? Does it take long time from start to the end? Thank you, the details are often the most contorted areas. The detail can be interesting to produce, the most meditative part of the work. Time varies hugely between pieces - from one day to three months.

www.loladupre.com

© Lola Dupré


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© Lola Dupré

In some of your works we perceive allegorical messages. For example, we see this in your work with war planes mixed with penises. Also, some of your works are political and some others are about our entire society. Do you think any artistic work should contain a message? Do you look forward to transmit a message with your work? I think artistic works should contain as many messages as possible. I think messages are an essential thing in how dialogue forms and grows. I have my own ideas about politics and society, I don’t want to reveal them as such, just encourage dialogue or laughter. I look forward to the next piece of work more almost as soon as I start working.

© Lola Dupré


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© Lola Dupré

In some of your works we perceive allegorical messages. For example, we see this in your work with war planes mixed with penises. Also, some of your works are political and some others are about our entire society. Do you think any artistic work should contain a message? Do you look forward to transmit a message with your work? I think artistic works should contain as many messages as possible. I think messages are an essential thing in how dialogue forms and grows. I have my own ideas about politics and society, I don’t want to reveal them as such, just encourage dialogue or laughter. I look forward to the next piece of work more almost as soon as I start working.

© Lola Dupré


In most of your works we can see very original and almost expressionist elements (the girl with the triangle head, the cat with many eyes, etc). You could illustrate a Neil Gaiman's novel like Dave Mackean did. Would you like to work on narrative projects? Would love to. The lines between fine art and illustration sometimes infuriate me, lines are barriers, barriers are walls. What has been the biggest obstacle that you have encountered in your creative journey? The early years were the hardest, connecting with my first clients and collectors. I can’t think of obvious individual obstacles, I have never really found motivation a problem. What particular work in your entire production did you enjoy the most? None really, I usually just prefer the most recent things I made. What do you dislike about the art world? I dislike any form of elitism, I dislike how fine art must fulfill a certain blinkered criteria. I am all about the love and light, free expression and uncensored and unrestrained creativity. Often as an illustrator I receive more artistic encouragement and freedom than when I am working with a gallery. Can you tell us about your future projects and collaborations? What are your ambitions and goals for the next 1-5 years? A few photographer fashion collaborations coming up which always excite me. My plans remain the same, to produce interesting new visuals. I still love the creativity of collage, the process of cutting up images. I want to come up with new techniques and approaches to collage. And most importantly continue searching for the most beautiful things that I can make. My goal for next year is the same is my goal for 20 years in the future. All images and text published in PhotographizeMag are the sole property of the featured authors and the subject copyright. No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner. 2010-2017 © PhotographizeMag | all rights reserved

Vivien Leigh © Lola Dupré

© Lola Dupré

© Lola Dupré


In most of your works we can see very original and almost expressionist elements (the girl with the triangle head, the cat with many eyes, etc). You could illustrate a Neil Gaiman's novel like Dave Mackean did. Would you like to work on narrative projects? Would love to. The lines between fine art and illustration sometimes infuriate me, lines are barriers, barriers are walls. What has been the biggest obstacle that you have encountered in your creative journey? The early years were the hardest, connecting with my first clients and collectors. I can’t think of obvious individual obstacles, I have never really found motivation a problem. What particular work in your entire production did you enjoy the most? None really, I usually just prefer the most recent things I made. What do you dislike about the art world? I dislike any form of elitism, I dislike how fine art must fulfill a certain blinkered criteria. I am all about the love and light, free expression and uncensored and unrestrained creativity. Often as an illustrator I receive more artistic encouragement and freedom than when I am working with a gallery. Can you tell us about your future projects and collaborations? What are your ambitions and goals for the next 1-5 years? A few photographer fashion collaborations coming up which always excite me. My plans remain the same, to produce interesting new visuals. I still love the creativity of collage, the process of cutting up images. I want to come up with new techniques and approaches to collage. And most importantly continue searching for the most beautiful things that I can make. My goal for next year is the same is my goal for 20 years in the future. All images and text published in PhotographizeMag are the sole property of the featured authors and the subject copyright. No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner. 2010-2017 © PhotographizeMag | all rights reserved

Vivien Leigh © Lola Dupré

© Lola Dupré

© Lola Dupré


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David Bowie © Lola Dupré

© Lola Dupré

© Lola Dupré

John French © Lola Dupré


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David Bowie © Lola Dupré

© Lola Dupré

© Lola Dupré

John French © Lola Dupré


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© Lola Dupré

© Lola Dupré

Andreas Feininger

© Lola Dupré

© Lola Dupré


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© Lola Dupré

© Lola Dupré

Andreas Feininger

© Lola Dupré

© Lola Dupré


GRAPHIC ZONE

Author: @stromwallrich

Author: @tendtotravel

Author: @klhrdesign

Author: @kerbyrosanes

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50


GRAPHIC ZONE

Author: @stromwallrich

Author: @tendtotravel

Author: @klhrdesign

Author: @kerbyrosanes

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50


Author: @vectorbynikola

GRAPHIC ZONE

Author: @fugstrator

Amazing Graphic Design from Around the World

51 Author: @patriksvensson_

Author: @stugraphics

Author: @johnholcroftillustration

Author: @glennztees

Author: @gebelia


Author: @vectorbynikola

GRAPHIC ZONE

Author: @fugstrator

Amazing Graphic Design from Around the World

51 Author: @patriksvensson_

Author: @stugraphics

Author: @johnholcroftillustration

Author: @glennztees

Author: @gebelia


GRAPHIC ZONE Amazing Graphic Design from Around the World

Author: @paulfuentes_design

Author: @monlee1213


GRAPHIC ZONE Amazing Graphic Design from Around the World

Author: @paulfuentes_design

Author: @monlee1213


CANADA

55

John Kosmopoulos is a multiple international award-winning photographer based in Toronto who embodies an “eclectic aesthetic fine art” (EAFA) philosophy of photography. He specializes in black and white, infrared and “muted color metallics” photography. His work has been published and exhibited in several interviews, magazines, promotions, galleries, billboards and film. As an educator in both psychology and photography, he also conducts workshops around the world. John is always in search of an artistic enlightenment through the practice of an insightful imagination to fulfill his photographic vision as an artist. His signature images capture the complexity of beauty across multiple subjects and translate them back to the viewer with a felt aesthetic and visual sophistication that is symbolic, thematic and cinematic. www.silverzenphotography.com

Lionheart - Richard I Statue British Parliament Buildings © John Kosmopoulos


CANADA

55

John Kosmopoulos is a multiple international award-winning photographer based in Toronto who embodies an “eclectic aesthetic fine art” (EAFA) philosophy of photography. He specializes in black and white, infrared and “muted color metallics” photography. His work has been published and exhibited in several interviews, magazines, promotions, galleries, billboards and film. As an educator in both psychology and photography, he also conducts workshops around the world. John is always in search of an artistic enlightenment through the practice of an insightful imagination to fulfill his photographic vision as an artist. His signature images capture the complexity of beauty across multiple subjects and translate them back to the viewer with a felt aesthetic and visual sophistication that is symbolic, thematic and cinematic. www.silverzenphotography.com

Lionheart - Richard I Statue British Parliament Buildings © John Kosmopoulos


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New Olympus - New York City © John Kosmopoulos

© Marcin Sacha

NDNY, New York © John Kosmopoulos


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New Olympus - New York City © John Kosmopoulos

© Marcin Sacha

NDNY, New York © John Kosmopoulos


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Manhattan Bridge, New York © John Kosmopoulos

Steel Fog, New York © John Kosmopoulos


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Manhattan Bridge, New York © John Kosmopoulos

Steel Fog, New York © John Kosmopoulos


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The King's Speech Tempodrom, Berlin © John Kosmopoulos

WTC • Dubai, UAE © John Kosmopoulos


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The King's Speech Tempodrom, Berlin © John Kosmopoulos

WTC • Dubai, UAE © John Kosmopoulos


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Skogafoss, Iceland © John Kosmopoulos

The Elemental-Rain of Light, Iceland © John Kosmopoulos


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Skogafoss, Iceland © John Kosmopoulos

The Elemental-Rain of Light, Iceland © John Kosmopoulos


Aidan Sartin Conte, an Italian photographer based in Washington DC, and Carla DLM, a surreal photographer based in New York City, decided to combine their creative powers, giving life to two extraordinary series of artworks called “Suburban Reminiscences” and “Capture”.

ARTICLE FINE ART

What happens when two talented artists collaborate? 65

Collaboration is not so common in the artistic world. However, when two artists full of creativity, knowledge and experience interact, the results of this collision of ideas can be pure magic. Blending the different perspective can demand weeks of elaborate discussions or materialize almost without thinking. Trust, complicity and respect for the other artist’s work is a must. Sometimes it is hard to believe that it is possible for two individuals with independent artistic views to interact constructively. Can they create something interesting and unique, something out of the box, something brilliant and inspiring? Absolutely yes. Walt Disney and Salvador Dali, Andy Warhol and Jean Michel Basquiat, are just a couple of examples with amazing outcomes.

“Suburban Reminiscences” is the unique result of Aidan and Carla’s combined visions. This is a perfect example in which two artists contribute their distinctive personal styles. Aidan’s works are full of fantasy. He creates surreal worlds mixed with architecture, objects and animals. On the other hand, Carla transforms the architecture around us using her abstract imagination. She turns regular images into dreams that only exist in her mind. In this series, the two artists temporarily become a single creative mind. “Capture”, instead, is a beautiful series that was created spontaneously, without any prior planning. Here we can see Aidan’s eye and Carla’s processing. In this series Aidan takes the pictures and Carla transforms them using her signature style. This is a different kind of fusion, in which Aidan becomes the eye, and Carla turns into the mind or soul. The pictures in this series were taken throughout Italy, but the idea is to extend the concept to cities in Spain, USA and beyond. Aidan and Carla, now Diptych, plan to continue working together.

66

Suburban and Capture are just the beginning of more exciting projects to come. Stay alert to what these two brilliant artists have in store for us.


Aidan Sartin Conte, an Italian photographer based in Washington DC, and Carla DLM, a surreal photographer based in New York City, decided to combine their creative powers, giving life to two extraordinary series of artworks called “Suburban Reminiscences” and “Capture”.

ARTICLE FINE ART

What happens when two talented artists collaborate? 65

Collaboration is not so common in the artistic world. However, when two artists full of creativity, knowledge and experience interact, the results of this collision of ideas can be pure magic. Blending the different perspective can demand weeks of elaborate discussions or materialize almost without thinking. Trust, complicity and respect for the other artist’s work is a must. Sometimes it is hard to believe that it is possible for two individuals with independent artistic views to interact constructively. Can they create something interesting and unique, something out of the box, something brilliant and inspiring? Absolutely yes. Walt Disney and Salvador Dali, Andy Warhol and Jean Michel Basquiat, are just a couple of examples with amazing outcomes.

“Suburban Reminiscences” is the unique result of Aidan and Carla’s combined visions. This is a perfect example in which two artists contribute their distinctive personal styles. Aidan’s works are full of fantasy. He creates surreal worlds mixed with architecture, objects and animals. On the other hand, Carla transforms the architecture around us using her abstract imagination. She turns regular images into dreams that only exist in her mind. In this series, the two artists temporarily become a single creative mind. “Capture”, instead, is a beautiful series that was created spontaneously, without any prior planning. Here we can see Aidan’s eye and Carla’s processing. In this series Aidan takes the pictures and Carla transforms them using her signature style. This is a different kind of fusion, in which Aidan becomes the eye, and Carla turns into the mind or soul. The pictures in this series were taken throughout Italy, but the idea is to extend the concept to cities in Spain, USA and beyond. Aidan and Carla, now Diptych, plan to continue working together.

66

Suburban and Capture are just the beginning of more exciting projects to come. Stay alert to what these two brilliant artists have in store for us.


FEATUREd

ARTIST

Petri Damstén finland

Author: Petri Damstén www.petridamsten.com www.facebook.com/pdamsten www.instagram.com/pdamsten www.youtube.com/pdamsten

67

Encounter © Petri Damstén

The day I met death © Petri Damstén


FEATUREd

ARTIST

Petri Damstén finland

Author: Petri Damstén www.petridamsten.com www.facebook.com/pdamsten www.instagram.com/pdamsten www.youtube.com/pdamsten

67

Encounter © Petri Damstén

The day I met death © Petri Damstén


CZECH REPUBLIC

INTERVIEW WITH “These moments when the ideas are born are also the happiest ones because I start building my worlds. Also these moments when I sit at the table, draw and laugh loudly are priceless ”. 69

Czech photographer Bára Prášilová has created a signature style that merges absurd humor, alarming beauty, playfulness, mild cruelty and her persistent passion for perfection. Her visual world consists of imaginary memories of what never happened and explorations of what could have happened if we dropped the habit of drawing our own limits. Her exquisite work has been recognized with numerous awards and exhibitions in the Czech Republic and abroad. Please briefly tell us about you. I’m a photographer and art director based in Prague, Czech Republic. My work remains on the borderline of commercial and fine art photography. I enjoy combining absurd humor, alarming beauty, playfulness, mild cruelty as well as my persistent passion for perfection. I very often build my own props which I later combine with the advantages of digital photography in post production. You often mention that your visual world consists of imaginary memories that never happened. Can you tell us more about these visions, how do they come to your mind? I already agreed with many theories solving the question of how some visions come to the mind. And I actually don't know how it works. In my case it probably is a combination of unconscious and the way my brain processes it. I tend to believe in the unbelievable and that is why I got an access to the places in my my mind where boundaries don’t exist.

www.baraprasilova.com

In some of your works we perceive a dose of humor. Some of them are indeed quite playful. Examples that come to our mind are your work “oh, these summer days…” and the campaign you made for Vavavoom perfumery. Do you think an artistic work should transmit a message? Do you look for this? I love humor, it literally saves my boring life! Making jokes even, the silly ones, is absolutely essential for me. Fortunately when I feel sorry for myself I’m not creative and thanks god I have no need to transmit any messages . And of course I feel happy when my work resonates with someone’s mind or heart. It means then that I’m not alone here.

Company Vavavoo Perfumery Credits: Photography/Art Direction - © Bara Prasilova Model - May Matkova Hair/Make-Up - Lucie Janku

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CZECH REPUBLIC

INTERVIEW WITH “These moments when the ideas are born are also the happiest ones because I start building my worlds. Also these moments when I sit at the table, draw and laugh loudly are priceless ”. 69

Czech photographer Bára Prášilová has created a signature style that merges absurd humor, alarming beauty, playfulness, mild cruelty and her persistent passion for perfection. Her visual world consists of imaginary memories of what never happened and explorations of what could have happened if we dropped the habit of drawing our own limits. Her exquisite work has been recognized with numerous awards and exhibitions in the Czech Republic and abroad. Please briefly tell us about you. I’m a photographer and art director based in Prague, Czech Republic. My work remains on the borderline of commercial and fine art photography. I enjoy combining absurd humor, alarming beauty, playfulness, mild cruelty as well as my persistent passion for perfection. I very often build my own props which I later combine with the advantages of digital photography in post production. You often mention that your visual world consists of imaginary memories that never happened. Can you tell us more about these visions, how do they come to your mind? I already agreed with many theories solving the question of how some visions come to the mind. And I actually don't know how it works. In my case it probably is a combination of unconscious and the way my brain processes it. I tend to believe in the unbelievable and that is why I got an access to the places in my my mind where boundaries don’t exist.

www.baraprasilova.com

In some of your works we perceive a dose of humor. Some of them are indeed quite playful. Examples that come to our mind are your work “oh, these summer days…” and the campaign you made for Vavavoom perfumery. Do you think an artistic work should transmit a message? Do you look for this? I love humor, it literally saves my boring life! Making jokes even, the silly ones, is absolutely essential for me. Fortunately when I feel sorry for myself I’m not creative and thanks god I have no need to transmit any messages . And of course I feel happy when my work resonates with someone’s mind or heart. It means then that I’m not alone here.

Company Vavavoo Perfumery Credits: Photography/Art Direction - © Bara Prasilova Model - May Matkova Hair/Make-Up - Lucie Janku

70


We have noticed that you put your ideas on paper before working on the final piece. How does this fit into your creative process? I love playing safe, I never improvise and I also have a bad memory. That’s why I sketch out all of my ideas before I start shooting. And it is also a way to present my ideas to a client or my team. This process is also very challenging for me because it forces me to calm down and to focus. These moments when the ideas are born are also the happiest ones because I start building my worlds. Also these moments when I sit at the table, draw and laugh loudly are priceless. Is there any famous designer that you haven’t worked with yet in your future wish list? Many of them! But now I would love to work for Disney!

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Concept/photography/postproduction - © Bara Prasilova Client – Helena Darbujanova Designer Model - Zofie Darbujanova Hair&make-up - Eva Svobodová Jumpsuit - Milina Havrlantová

We love how your imagination stands out in your creations. Tell us what work did you enjoy most doing and why? Any anecdotes you want to share with us? Thank you! I actually enjoy every photoshoot and what I really like is doing all the strange things, like for example putting a flower between a buttocks or sitting a robot on a horse. Yeah, this is my world and I love it! Your projects require an important photography production, including the use of assistants, make up & hair artist, models, etc. Can you tell us what, if any, are the challenges of working in such an environment? Some photographers find coordinating their work with many other persons challenging. How would you describe yourself in this role? Concept/photography/postproduction - © Bara Prasilova Client – Helena Darbujanova Designer Model - Zofie Darbujanova Hair&make-up - Eva Svobodová Jumpsuit - Milina Havrlantová

While shooting my brain works in a different regime in order to save energy to be highly creative. So it is quite challenging for me to respect that. Concept/photography/postproduction - © Bara Prasilova Client – Helena Darbujanova Designer Model - Zofie Darbujanova Hair&make-up - Eva Svobodová Jumpsuit - Milina Havrlantová


We have noticed that you put your ideas on paper before working on the final piece. How does this fit into your creative process? I love playing safe, I never improvise and I also have a bad memory. That’s why I sketch out all of my ideas before I start shooting. And it is also a way to present my ideas to a client or my team. This process is also very challenging for me because it forces me to calm down and to focus. These moments when the ideas are born are also the happiest ones because I start building my worlds. Also these moments when I sit at the table, draw and laugh loudly are priceless. Is there any famous designer that you haven’t worked with yet in your future wish list? Many of them! But now I would love to work for Disney!

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Concept/photography/postproduction - © Bara Prasilova Client – Helena Darbujanova Designer Model - Zofie Darbujanova Hair&make-up - Eva Svobodová Jumpsuit - Milina Havrlantová

We love how your imagination stands out in your creations. Tell us what work did you enjoy most doing and why? Any anecdotes you want to share with us? Thank you! I actually enjoy every photoshoot and what I really like is doing all the strange things, like for example putting a flower between a buttocks or sitting a robot on a horse. Yeah, this is my world and I love it! Your projects require an important photography production, including the use of assistants, make up & hair artist, models, etc. Can you tell us what, if any, are the challenges of working in such an environment? Some photographers find coordinating their work with many other persons challenging. How would you describe yourself in this role? Concept/photography/postproduction - © Bara Prasilova Client – Helena Darbujanova Designer Model - Zofie Darbujanova Hair&make-up - Eva Svobodová Jumpsuit - Milina Havrlantová

While shooting my brain works in a different regime in order to save energy to be highly creative. So it is quite challenging for me to respect that. Concept/photography/postproduction - © Bara Prasilova Client – Helena Darbujanova Designer Model - Zofie Darbujanova Hair&make-up - Eva Svobodová Jumpsuit - Milina Havrlantová


What has been the biggest satisfaction that you have encountered in your photographic career? When I was dreaming about being a part of the Hasselblad family 20 years back and when I become Hasselblad ambassador 1 year ago. What do you like about the art world ? That I can be part of it. What is next for Bara Prasilova? Are you going to be part of any art fair or exhibition in 2018? I decided not to talk about my plans too much but my next step is definitely publishing a book in 2018. Air Force © Bara Prasilova

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Evolve - © Bara Prasilova

Air Force © Bara Prasilova


What has been the biggest satisfaction that you have encountered in your photographic career? When I was dreaming about being a part of the Hasselblad family 20 years back and when I become Hasselblad ambassador 1 year ago. What do you like about the art world ? That I can be part of it. What is next for Bara Prasilova? Are you going to be part of any art fair or exhibition in 2018? I decided not to talk about my plans too much but my next step is definitely publishing a book in 2018. Air Force © Bara Prasilova

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Evolve - © Bara Prasilova

Air Force © Bara Prasilova


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Concept/photography/postproduction - © Bara Prasilova Assistant Photographer - Ondřej Janů Client – Zuzana Kubíčková Fashion Designer Model - Vanda Knapková & Barbora Vojířová Hair&make-up - Eva Svobodová Postproduction - Petra Vokjan

Evolve - © Bara Prasilova

Concept/photography/postproduction - © Bara Prasilova Assistant Photographer - Ondřej Janů Client – Zuzana Kubíčková Fashion Designer Model - Vanda Knapková & Barbora Vojířová Hair&make-up - Eva Svobodová Postproduction - Petra Vokjan


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Concept/photography/postproduction - © Bara Prasilova Assistant Photographer - Ondřej Janů Client – Zuzana Kubíčková Fashion Designer Model - Vanda Knapková & Barbora Vojířová Hair&make-up - Eva Svobodová Postproduction - Petra Vokjan

Evolve - © Bara Prasilova

Concept/photography/postproduction - © Bara Prasilova Assistant Photographer - Ondřej Janů Client – Zuzana Kubíčková Fashion Designer Model - Vanda Knapková & Barbora Vojířová Hair&make-up - Eva Svobodová Postproduction - Petra Vokjan


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Katherine Young is a fine art photographer currently based in London. Her interest in photography dates from an early age, but it has only been in the last four years that Katherine took her hobby more seriously. As a self-taught photographer, Katherine started with travel photography, concentrating on urban landscapes and people, aiming to capture the essence of the places she visited. Inspired by the contemporary architecture of Singapore, Katherine focused her attention on cityscapes and architecture, often using HDR photography to emphasize the vibrance and beauty of the city. Katherine’s real passion is black-and-white photography as she feels that monochromatic images have a surreal and timeless quality which leaves a striking impact on the viewer. Without the distraction of color, the photograph looks cleaner and reveals the very soul of the subject. Katherine believes that contemporary architecture, with its straight lines, dramatic angles and polished surfaces, is particularly well suited to her style of photography and enables her to fully express her vision. She is fascinated by the way 'light illuminates and shadow defines' such structures and brings them to life. www.katherineyoungphotography.com

Eternity Š Katherine Young


UNITED KINGDOM

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Katherine Young is a fine art photographer currently based in London. Her interest in photography dates from an early age, but it has only been in the last four years that Katherine took her hobby more seriously. As a self-taught photographer, Katherine started with travel photography, concentrating on urban landscapes and people, aiming to capture the essence of the places she visited. Inspired by the contemporary architecture of Singapore, Katherine focused her attention on cityscapes and architecture, often using HDR photography to emphasize the vibrance and beauty of the city. Katherine’s real passion is black-and-white photography as she feels that monochromatic images have a surreal and timeless quality which leaves a striking impact on the viewer. Without the distraction of color, the photograph looks cleaner and reveals the very soul of the subject. Katherine believes that contemporary architecture, with its straight lines, dramatic angles and polished surfaces, is particularly well suited to her style of photography and enables her to fully express her vision. She is fascinated by the way 'light illuminates and shadow defines' such structures and brings them to life. www.katherineyoungphotography.com

Eternity Š Katherine Young


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Illumination, Part I © Katherine Young

Illumination, Part II © Katherine Young


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Illumination, Part I © Katherine Young

Illumination, Part II © Katherine Young


Illumination, Part I Š Katherine Young

Illumination, Part I Š Katherine Young


Illumination, Part I Š Katherine Young

Illumination, Part I Š Katherine Young


Opus, part I Š Katherine Young

Convergence Š Katherine Young


Opus, part I Š Katherine Young

Convergence Š Katherine Young


Echo, part I © Katherine Young

Sounds of Silence, part I © Katherine Young


Echo, part I © Katherine Young

Sounds of Silence, part I © Katherine Young


FEATUREd

ARTIST

Eric Sánchez Vázquez

Author: Eric Sánchez Vázquez

www.facebook.com/ericsanchezfoto www.instagram.com/ericsanchezfoto

Author: Miriam Sánchez M.

www.flickr.com/photos/destellosderecuerdos www.facebook.com/Miriamsanchez.photography www.instagram.com/miriam.sm

MEXICO

Miriam Sánchez M SPAIN

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© Miriam Sánchez M.

Paisaje de Cuerpos © Eric Sánchez Vázquez


FEATUREd

ARTIST

Eric Sánchez Vázquez

Author: Eric Sánchez Vázquez

www.facebook.com/ericsanchezfoto www.instagram.com/ericsanchezfoto

Author: Miriam Sánchez M.

www.flickr.com/photos/destellosderecuerdos www.facebook.com/Miriamsanchez.photography www.instagram.com/miriam.sm

MEXICO

Miriam Sánchez M SPAIN

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© Miriam Sánchez M.

Paisaje de Cuerpos © Eric Sánchez Vázquez


FRANCE

INTERVIEW WITH

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“I often think about Gauguin's trip to find another world, there is a bit of that. I love ethnic groups in harmony with nature such as Mentawai men-flowers” Patrick Gonzales is an artist based in Dijon, France. His artistic journey started at an early age, evolving from music to the visual arts. He explored drawing, art history and painting for 20 years and developed his own style. Patrick says “The visual arts have always been for me a way to express myself better than speech or writing, a medium to realize my intuitions”. Please briefly tell us about you. I am an artist living and working in Dijon, France. I became interested in art at adolescence; drawing, studying art history and then painting for about 20 years. In 1998 I studied graphic design and discovered digital. What where the main factors behind your decision of following a creative career? What do you find most gratifying about it? The visual arts have always been for me a way to express myself better than speech or writing, a medium to realize my intuitions. I started with music and finally chose the visual arts. It was in me, certainly while looking at art or reading artist biographies, which spoke to me and allowed me to find the way to go. The most rewarding things are the great freedom, to escape the conventions and the recognition of my collectors.

www.patrickgonzales.net


FRANCE

INTERVIEW WITH

89

“I often think about Gauguin's trip to find another world, there is a bit of that. I love ethnic groups in harmony with nature such as Mentawai men-flowers” Patrick Gonzales is an artist based in Dijon, France. His artistic journey started at an early age, evolving from music to the visual arts. He explored drawing, art history and painting for 20 years and developed his own style. Patrick says “The visual arts have always been for me a way to express myself better than speech or writing, a medium to realize my intuitions”. Please briefly tell us about you. I am an artist living and working in Dijon, France. I became interested in art at adolescence; drawing, studying art history and then painting for about 20 years. In 1998 I studied graphic design and discovered digital. What where the main factors behind your decision of following a creative career? What do you find most gratifying about it? The visual arts have always been for me a way to express myself better than speech or writing, a medium to realize my intuitions. I started with music and finally chose the visual arts. It was in me, certainly while looking at art or reading artist biographies, which spoke to me and allowed me to find the way to go. The most rewarding things are the great freedom, to escape the conventions and the recognition of my collectors.

www.patrickgonzales.net


How would you describe your style? I have different periods in my work. For my latest series I would be rather classic and surrealist. My work lies between painting and photography, two mediums that have often been opposed or challenged each other through history. I feel close to the pictorial photographers of the beginning of photography, a sequel of them.

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Your work blends fantasy and a dreamy look. It also makes us feel a sense of the past. Is there a story behind your works? Do they try to document something? It's a kind of lost world, the story remains to be created by the viewers with their experience. I do not give something definite, there must always be some mystery, it must remain intriguing in time. That's my reaction, my relationship to the world today

Tell us about the process of developing your personal style and its evolution. Please also tell us a about the process behind your art works.

You combine photography and digital painting. What kind of world are you trying to depict through your art?

My latest series is a vague memory of my childhood, a return to the sources when I lived in the countryside, close to nature. I also admire the forests of Douanier Rousseau and his naivety, which transmit a feeling of abandonment of today’s society in opposition to nature. The interdependence between man and nature is the driving force of my work.

Characters in the real or the imaginary world, the harmony with nature and the sensitive cohabitate together. I often think about Gauguin's trip to find another world, there is a bit of that. I love ethnic groups in harmony with nature such as Mentawai men-flowers. .

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© Johnson Tsang

© Patrick Gonzales

© Patrick Gonzales


How would you describe your style? I have different periods in my work. For my latest series I would be rather classic and surrealist. My work lies between painting and photography, two mediums that have often been opposed or challenged each other through history. I feel close to the pictorial photographers of the beginning of photography, a sequel of them.

91

Your work blends fantasy and a dreamy look. It also makes us feel a sense of the past. Is there a story behind your works? Do they try to document something? It's a kind of lost world, the story remains to be created by the viewers with their experience. I do not give something definite, there must always be some mystery, it must remain intriguing in time. That's my reaction, my relationship to the world today

Tell us about the process of developing your personal style and its evolution. Please also tell us a about the process behind your art works.

You combine photography and digital painting. What kind of world are you trying to depict through your art?

My latest series is a vague memory of my childhood, a return to the sources when I lived in the countryside, close to nature. I also admire the forests of Douanier Rousseau and his naivety, which transmit a feeling of abandonment of today’s society in opposition to nature. The interdependence between man and nature is the driving force of my work.

Characters in the real or the imaginary world, the harmony with nature and the sensitive cohabitate together. I often think about Gauguin's trip to find another world, there is a bit of that. I love ethnic groups in harmony with nature such as Mentawai men-flowers. .

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© Johnson Tsang

© Patrick Gonzales

© Patrick Gonzales


In your opinion, what is the impact of digital art/photography in current art? What do you think is its future? Digital art is a revolution. It is still in its infancy. Of course it will not replace painting or photography, it is a new medium, new possibilities for expression. I think that the technique will become more and more simplified, less stressful. Eventually it will concern, almost, only the idea. How do you balance digital vs. traditional art when creating your artworks? There are the same rules of composition, light and harmony, so the traditional art I used to do is useful for my new works.

Š Patrick Gonzales

Š Patrick Gonzales

Why do you prefer to work mostly in monochrome instead of in color? Images focus more on shapes, composition, lights and shadows. The atmosphere that emerges fits me more. It is a creative expression that shows a message without effect, a vision that is not that of reality, but a detachment. What do you expect for coming years in your artistic career? Â I am lucky to live from my work today, I sell and exhibit all over the world and I have important projects waiting. In coming years I expect to become even more visible and to find new possibilities to advance with my work.


In your opinion, what is the impact of digital art/photography in current art? What do you think is its future? Digital art is a revolution. It is still in its infancy. Of course it will not replace painting or photography, it is a new medium, new possibilities for expression. I think that the technique will become more and more simplified, less stressful. Eventually it will concern, almost, only the idea. How do you balance digital vs. traditional art when creating your artworks? There are the same rules of composition, light and harmony, so the traditional art I used to do is useful for my new works.

Š Patrick Gonzales

Š Patrick Gonzales

Why do you prefer to work mostly in monochrome instead of in color? Images focus more on shapes, composition, lights and shadows. The atmosphere that emerges fits me more. It is a creative expression that shows a message without effect, a vision that is not that of reality, but a detachment. What do you expect for coming years in your artistic career? Â I am lucky to live from my work today, I sell and exhibit all over the world and I have important projects waiting. In coming years I expect to become even more visible and to find new possibilities to advance with my work.


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96 © Patrick Gonzales

© Patrick Gonzales

© Patrick Gonzales


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96 © Patrick Gonzales

© Patrick Gonzales

© Patrick Gonzales


ITALY

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Giovanni Cassarà was born in 1975 in Partinico, Sicily. He currently works at the lower secondary school of Cinisi, a small town very close to Palermo. Giovanni was attracted to art at a very young age. He enrolled at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Palermo, where he studied painting, sculpture and photography. He completed his studies and graduated with honors in 1999, with a thesis on engraving and printing techniques. After the period of military service in 2001, Giovanni moved to Milan, where he worked as a teacher of Art and Photography. This period was for him an excellent source of experience, he significantly improved the technical aspect of photographic composition. Since 2009, his photographic vision is directed towards landscape photography. He experiments with slow shutter speeds and the use of monochrome. www.instagram.com/giovannicassara © Giovanni Cassarà


ITALY

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Giovanni Cassarà was born in 1975 in Partinico, Sicily. He currently works at the lower secondary school of Cinisi, a small town very close to Palermo. Giovanni was attracted to art at a very young age. He enrolled at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Palermo, where he studied painting, sculpture and photography. He completed his studies and graduated with honors in 1999, with a thesis on engraving and printing techniques. After the period of military service in 2001, Giovanni moved to Milan, where he worked as a teacher of Art and Photography. This period was for him an excellent source of experience, he significantly improved the technical aspect of photographic composition. Since 2009, his photographic vision is directed towards landscape photography. He experiments with slow shutter speeds and the use of monochrome. www.instagram.com/giovannicassara © Giovanni Cassarà


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© Giovanni Cassarà

© Giovanni Cassarà


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100

© Giovanni Cassarà

© Giovanni Cassarà


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© Giovanni Cassarà


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© Giovanni Cassarà


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© Giovanni Cassarà

© Giovanni Cassarà

© Giovanni Cassarà


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© Giovanni Cassarà

© Giovanni Cassarà

© Giovanni Cassarà


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© Giovanni Cassarà

© Giovanni Cassarà


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© Giovanni Cassarà

© Giovanni Cassarà


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© Giovanni Cassarà


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© Giovanni Cassarà


mofo_dezin


Highlights Mohammad Rahman AUSTRALIA

Author: Mohammad Rahman

www.mohammad-rahman.com

ta s t e H U N T E R S

food lovers

www.forksnroses.co ► © Mohammad Rahman 113


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Profile for Photographize Magazine

Photographize Magazine | Issue 37 |January 2018  

In this Issue: HIGHLIGHTS: Francesco Vullo, Patricia Van de Camp, John Kosmopoulos, Ktherine Young, Giovanni Cassará. INTERVIEWS: Tsang John...

Photographize Magazine | Issue 37 |January 2018  

In this Issue: HIGHLIGHTS: Francesco Vullo, Patricia Van de Camp, John Kosmopoulos, Ktherine Young, Giovanni Cassará. INTERVIEWS: Tsang John...