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The first compact mirrorless digital medium format camera

ISSN 2639-5673


who we are Photographize is beyond a Magazine! It’s a platform for artists, galleries and Creatives. We dedicate our space to all kinds of art regardless of technique or period, such as illustration, painting, digital art, photography, sculpture, and video. It aims to become a virtual place based on the immediacy, where the images are presented in their pure beauty and have the ability to capture and captivate the viewer. Founders | Editors in Chief Andrea Costantini & Carla De La Matta Writers Thomas Jukes

Submissions: www.photographize.co/submissions Info: info@photographize.co Sales and Advertising: sales@photographize.co All images and text published in Photographize are the sole property of the featured authors and subject to copyright. No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner.

Have a good journey towards a timeless Art. © Belong to the artist.

Photographize

712 H Street NE Suite 1360 Washington, DC 20002 United States

ISSN 2576-2648 - DIGITAL SSN 2639-5673 - PRINT www.photographize.co

2019 © Photographize Magazine Cover : © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

•Artem Rogowoi•


who we are Photographize is beyond a Magazine! It’s a platform for artists, galleries and Creatives. We dedicate our space to all kinds of art regardless of technique or period, such as illustration, painting, digital art, photography, sculpture, and video. It aims to become a virtual place based on the immediacy, where the images are presented in their pure beauty and have the ability to capture and captivate the viewer. Founders | Editors in Chief Andrea Costantini & Carla De La Matta Writers Thomas Jukes

Submissions: www.photographize.co/submissions Info: info@photographize.co Sales and Advertising: sales@photographize.co All images and text published in Photographize are the sole property of the featured authors and subject to copyright. No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner.

Have a good journey towards a timeless Art. © Belong to the artist.

Photographize

712 H Street NE Suite 1360 Washington, DC 20002 United States

ISSN 2576-2648 - DIGITAL SSN 2639-5673 - PRINT www.photographize.co

2019 © Photographize Magazine Cover : © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

•Artem Rogowoi•


w w w. a l sa f fa r s t u d i o s . c o m


w w w. a l sa f fa r s t u d i o s . c o m


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27

43

FEATURED

07

07 33 47 74 96

33

Circle Circle Math Justin Dingwall Minh T Kim Byungkwan Anja DiabatÈ

INTERVIEWS 68

84

96

17 Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk 57 Angelo Musco 84 Felix Hernandez

ARTICLEs

27 Ray Caesar 68 Philip Lück 92 GUS 106 Anyta Madrazo

MOFO DEZIN

43 Daria Zinovatnaya

HIGHLIGHTS

113 Curator’s choice

47

57

74

92

106


17

27

43

FEATURED

07

07 33 47 74 96

33

Circle Circle Math Justin Dingwall Minh T Kim Byungkwan Anja DiabatÈ

INTERVIEWS 68

84

96

17 Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk 57 Angelo Musco 84 Felix Hernandez

ARTICLEs

27 Ray Caesar 68 Philip Lück 92 GUS 106 Anyta Madrazo

MOFO DEZIN

43 Daria Zinovatnaya

HIGHLIGHTS

113 Curator’s choice

47

57

74

92

106


UNITED STATES

Graphic Designer Josh Herrington (aka Circle Circle Math Design) works with models and photographers to make reality his labored imagination. What he does is out of the box, he transforms beautiful and clean pictures into a mesmerizing process of creative destruction. It became his quiet rebellion against how he was told it needed to be. Josh is currently based in Austin, Texas. He comes from a background in photography, then soon, Josh entered the world of design on the branding side of the industry. His Circle Circle Math project was born out of frustration while he was making a logo repetitively. This process left him creatively unfulfilled. At that point, he decided that he would take time out of each day to himself and create something ugly, outside of a grid, and something that no safe brand would ever have in their right mind to hire him for. The process was freeing but allowed Josh to find his style where he focuses on the emotion of taking something beautiful and showing the other side to that coin - A mixing of faded photographic film colors with a vast of creative imagination - brings to live eerie faceless portraits reminiscent of long-forgotten nightmares. Most of his work comes from him clocking out for the day, putting on his favorite record, and just playing with it. Truly joy! "I need my own space to decompress, break all the rules, and just have fun. Glitch style really spoke to me" www.instagram.com/circlecirclemath 07

► © Circle Circle Math

The secure ground of home ► © Yvette Depaepe •


UNITED STATES

Graphic Designer Josh Herrington (aka Circle Circle Math Design) works with models and photographers to make reality his labored imagination. What he does is out of the box, he transforms beautiful and clean pictures into a mesmerizing process of creative destruction. It became his quiet rebellion against how he was told it needed to be. Josh is currently based in Austin, Texas. He comes from a background in photography, then soon, Josh entered the world of design on the branding side of the industry. His Circle Circle Math project was born out of frustration while he was making a logo repetitively. This process left him creatively unfulfilled. At that point, he decided that he would take time out of each day to himself and create something ugly, outside of a grid, and something that no safe brand would ever have in their right mind to hire him for. The process was freeing but allowed Josh to find his style where he focuses on the emotion of taking something beautiful and showing the other side to that coin - A mixing of faded photographic film colors with a vast of creative imagination - brings to live eerie faceless portraits reminiscent of long-forgotten nightmares. Most of his work comes from him clocking out for the day, putting on his favorite record, and just playing with it. Truly joy! "I need my own space to decompress, break all the rules, and just have fun. Glitch style really spoke to me" www.instagram.com/circlecirclemath 07

► © Circle Circle Math

The secure ground of home ► © Yvette Depaepe •


► © Circle Circle Math ► © Circle Circle Math


► © Circle Circle Math ► © Circle Circle Math


► © Circle Circle Math ► © Circle Circle Math


► © Circle Circle Math ► © Circle Circle Math


► © Circle Circle Math

► © Circle Circle Math


► © Circle Circle Math

► © Circle Circle Math


► © Circle Circle Math ► © Circle Circle Math


► © Circle Circle Math ► © Circle Circle Math


Netherlands

INTERVIEW WITH

Tell us about the development process that culminated in the artist you are today. From an early age, I drew and painted a lot, I was always busy creating. Sewing clothes, gluing boxes together to build a house, creating was just as important to me as it is now. I’m a graduated goldsmith, work in the multimedia design in the early days of the internet, and kept on being creative also while starting a family. After a few years, things changed in my personal life, a breakup, a new home, and a new life, physically I got some issues, and I gave up painting. At that point, I had to reinvent my life. Now almost 4 years ago I bought a camera and started experimenting with that, it wasn’t love at first sight, and I almost gave up photography. I followed a fine-art workshop, and that’s what really changed everything! All the things I’ve been doing fell in place. I could use a camera to paint, I could craft with a purpose, and I could be nerdy behind the computer to edit. That day I really found my passion. What is your main source of inspiration?

Gemmy is a Dutch artist. After she graduated as Goldsmith, she studied Multimedia design. In March 2016 photography changed her life. Attracted to the light, which was used by painters of the golden age. Her great passion for painting and drawing was refound in photography. She uses dark and light contrasts to create depth. Through layering colors and tones she creates soft and imperceptible transitions. Combined with the love for humans and animals and a strong creative urge, a nowadays portrait in the light of the past is born. Gemmy, born mid-seventies, is a mother of 5 kids, a 100% coffee addict, autodidact, a sensitive and caring artist, with a never-ending creative urge. And always patient to catch the ‘other side’ of a person.

www.gemmywoudbinnendijk.com 17

I’m fascinated by people, how they all have their unique expression and beauty. This, with the combination with my love for art and light usage - especially by the old masters - is my primary source of inspiration. You are a truly multifaceted individual, with a background in multimedia design. How does this diverse experience contribute to your art? I’m really happy that I can enjoy the making of, for example, costumes, crafting props or collecting and planning ideas for a shoot as much as the actual shoot itself. I think all these parts are things I’ve learned along the way and are now very valuable for making an artwork. Loliness ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

22


Netherlands

INTERVIEW WITH

Tell us about the development process that culminated in the artist you are today. From an early age, I drew and painted a lot, I was always busy creating. Sewing clothes, gluing boxes together to build a house, creating was just as important to me as it is now. I’m a graduated goldsmith, work in the multimedia design in the early days of the internet, and kept on being creative also while starting a family. After a few years, things changed in my personal life, a breakup, a new home, and a new life, physically I got some issues, and I gave up painting. At that point, I had to reinvent my life. Now almost 4 years ago I bought a camera and started experimenting with that, it wasn’t love at first sight, and I almost gave up photography. I followed a fine-art workshop, and that’s what really changed everything!

“The unique features for me in this kind of photography are the way you can tell a story with light, color, and lines. For me, the key to master it was and is all about my love and passion for making images/art” Gemmy is a Dutch artist. After she graduated as Goldsmith, she studied Multimedia design. In March 2016 photography changed her life. Attracted to the light, which was used by painters of the golden age. Her great passion for painting and drawing was refound in photography. She uses dark and light contrasts to create depth. Through layering colors and tones she creates soft and imperceptible transitions. Combined with the love for humans and animals and a strong creative urge, a nowadays portrait in the light of the past is born. Gemmy, born mid-seventies, is a mother of 5 kids, a 100% coffee addict, autodidact, a sensitive and caring artist, with a never-ending creative urge. And always patient to catch the ‘other side’ of a person.

www.gemmywoudbinnendijk.com 17

All the things I’ve been doing fell in place. I could use a camera to paint, I could craft with a purpose, and I could be nerdy behind the computer to edit. That day I really found my passion. What is your main source of inspiration? I’m fascinated by people, how they all have their unique expression and beauty. This, with the combination with my love for art and light usage - especially by the old masters - is my primary source of inspiration. You are a truly multifaceted individual, with a background in multimedia design. How does this diverse experience contribute to your art? I’m really happy that I can enjoy the making of, for example, costumes, crafting props or collecting and planning ideas for a shoot as much as the actual shoot itself. I think all these parts are things I’ve learned along the way and are now very valuable for making an artwork. Loliness ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

22


What are the technical challenges of this kind of photography and how did you overcome them?

In your “Expected Standards” personal project, you magically bring up this absurd pressure to fit within expected standards, forgetting that being ourselves is more important in this life. From the start to the end, how did you develop this idea? If possible tell us about the challenges and satisfactions that you encounter in the process.

The most important thing for me is the light. You really have to learn to take that seriously. This is the reason why I spend a lot of time getting it perfect in every shoot. On the contrary, when this is ready, the actual shooting doesn’t take that much time.

The idea for the project was something that was on my mind for a long time. Surrounded by teenagers (and adults) so obsessed with their looks, worries if they fit in. Also, the huge pressure that brings starting at a very young age. Everyone is daily surrounded by and confronted with the sometimes absurd pressure to fit within expected standards. Forgetting that being satisfied with who you are and finding your passion is way more important in this life. I was mesmerized by the intense beauty of Melanie Gaydos, she was for me the perfect ambassador for this project. It was in my head for a long time, so it was all visualized in front, but the actual shooting came a bit earlier and more unexpected than planned. Within a week I had to collect the props to build the set, arrange the costume, the planning (shortlist, etc) and finalize the ideas. It was hard-working, sleepless nights, and stressful, but it was magical to see everything in place that day and tell exactly the story I wanted.

Think ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

Rembrandt was without a doubt an early master of light and shadow in portrait painting. The edition of your images tends to have the same style. How do you achieve this similar style in photography? The base setup for all of my images is a Rembrandt light setup. I’m not comparing myself with Rembrandt, but I do like the drama in the usage of shadows and light from the old masters. The contrast between those two, in combination with layering thin layers of color, tells the story. Maybe that is a thing that is similar to old masters’ paintings. 19

Perspective ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

Figment alba ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk


What are the technical challenges of this kind of photography and how did you overcome them?

In your “Expected Standards” personal project, you magically bring up this absurd pressure to fit within expected standards, forgetting that being ourselves is more important in this life. From the start to the end, how did you develop this idea? If possible tell us about the challenges and satisfactions that you encounter in the process.

The most important thing for me is the light. You really have to learn to take that seriously. This is the reason why I spend a lot of time getting it perfect in every shoot. On the contrary, when this is ready, the actual shooting doesn’t take that much time.

The idea for the project was something that was on my mind for a long time. Surrounded by teenagers (and adults) so obsessed with their looks, worries if they fit in. Also, the huge pressure that brings starting at a very young age. Everyone is daily surrounded by and confronted with the sometimes absurd pressure to fit within expected standards. Forgetting that being satisfied with who you are and finding your passion is way more important in this life. I was mesmerized by the intense beauty of Melanie Gaydos, she was for me the perfect ambassador for this project. It was in my head for a long time, so it was all visualized in front, but the actual shooting came a bit earlier and more unexpected than planned. Within a week I had to collect the props to build the set, arrange the costume, the planning (shortlist, etc) and finalize the ideas. It was hard-working, sleepless nights, and stressful, but it was magical to see everything in place that day and tell exactly the story I wanted.

Think ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

Rembrandt was without a doubt an early master of light and shadow in portrait painting. The edition of your images tends to have the same style. How do you achieve this similar style in photography? The base setup for all of my images is a Rembrandt light setup. I’m not comparing myself with Rembrandt, but I do like the drama in the usage of shadows and light from the old masters. The contrast between those two, in combination with layering thin layers of color, tells the story. Maybe that is a thing that is similar to old masters’ paintings. 19

Perspective ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

Figment alba ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk


Your commercial projects require an important photography production, including the use of assistants, models, etc. Some photographers find coordinating their work with many other persons challenging. How would you describe yourself in this role? Commercial projects are always about making a good plan. The more people on set, the more chaotic and complex things sometimes get. Everybody has their interests and priorities. This sometimes makes people forget that they are working in a group for the same goal. The crowdedness makes me sometimes spend time alone in the studio to just shoot some simple still lives, to destress and get zen again.

Tempus ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

As the expert you are, what are the unique features of this kind of photography and the keys to master it?

Treasure hunt ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

What is the secret for an image to become unforgettable?

The unique features for me in this kind of photography are the way you can tell a story with light, color, and lines. For me, the key to master it was and is all about my love and passion for making images/art.

I don’t know if I know the secret for an image to become unforgettable, but for me, an image has to stop me, has to make me wonder, make me curious, must be mysterious and give me the feeling I need to know more about it.

I’ve sacrificed a lot, almost entirely stepped out of my social life and dived in deep to make all the information that I could find my own.

What should we expect from Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk in the near future?

I spend 14 hours a day, seven days a week at this obsessive passion. Sometimes it’s hard, and a lot of struggling, but it does give me a fulfilling feeling being able to create, tell a story and share it with a lot of people.

I hope I can realize a few ideas I’m working on into personal projects in the near future and share the passion I have for the making of images. 22

The Escapist ► © Martin Stranka


Your commercial projects require an important photography production, including the use of assistants, models, etc. Some photographers find coordinating their work with many other persons challenging. How would you describe yourself in this role? Commercial projects are always about making a good plan. The more people on set, the more chaotic and complex things sometimes get. Everybody has their interests and priorities. This sometimes makes people forget that they are working in a group for the same goal. The crowdedness makes me sometimes spend time alone in the studio to just shoot some simple still lives, to destress and get zen again.

Tempus ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

As the expert you are, what are the unique features of this kind of photography and the keys to master it?

Treasure hunt ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

What is the secret for an image to become unforgettable?

The unique features for me in this kind of photography are the way you can tell a story with light, color, and lines. For me, the key to master it was and is all about my love and passion for making images/art.

I don’t know if I know the secret for an image to become unforgettable, but for me, an image has to stop me, has to make me wonder, make me curious, must be mysterious and give me the feeling I need to know more about it.

I’ve sacrificed a lot, almost entirely stepped out of my social life and dived in deep to make all the information that I could find my own.

What should we expect from Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk in the near future?

I spend 14 hours a day, seven days a week at this obsessive passion. Sometimes it’s hard, and a lot of struggling, but it does give me a fulfilling feeling being able to create, tell a story and share it with a lot of people.

I hope I can realize a few ideas I’m working on into personal projects in the near future and share the passion I have for the making of images. 22

The Escapist ► © Martin Stranka


Ruben ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

Aristocrats ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk


Ruben ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

Aristocrats ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk


25

Trapped ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

RubenWoud-Binnendijk ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk26 Aristocrats Thijs ►► ©© Gemmy Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk


25

Trapped ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk

RubenWoud-Binnendijk ► © Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk26 Aristocrats Thijs ►► ©© Gemmy Gemmy Woud-Binnendijk


Jean-Antoine Watteau (later claimed as his inspiration). However, this would be only a part truth, these old masters may have been an inspiration for the art style of the artist but that is where the similarities finish. The visions of tentacles and animalistic traits appear in many of the pieces by Caesar and alongside the influences and the period conveyed in the work, do draw the mind to the work of H. P Lovecraft. Now regarded as one of the most significant authors of the 20th Century, Lovecraft created fantastical horror fiction into which he wound themes on race, inherited guilt and the threat of a scientific era. Set against a back drop of a similar time period to that portrayed by Ceasar, we see humans with fish-like features and dark ancient gods with reaching tentacles much like the characters Caesar depicts with tentacles replacing legs, fingers and hands. They both draw upon the horror quality of a warped humanity.

ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

RAY CAESAR | Stepping into a haunted rabbit hole

www.raycaesar.com

by Thomas Jukes Much like judging a book by its cover, one should never take art at face value. It may be difficult to work past personal dislike or a lack of comprehension but to dig a little deeper reveals levels of detail and complexity that, while not immediately obvious, make a substantial change to the way we perceive the work. This could most certainly be applied to the work of Ray Caesar, a British born artist who creates fascinating 3D modelled characters within fairytale and dreamlike landscapes. Visiting the artist's website, it is clear that Ray has always had an incredibly vivid imagination

and art for storytelling. Unlike most ‘about’ pages, Caesar's page feels as if you are being given a real glimpse into the early life and mind of the artist. A mind which has always been, it would seem, working on a very different plane of existence to most of the people around him. To do what I said one must not, we would look at these images firstly from their face value as they certainly surface some interesting thoughts and feelings. The aesthetic of Caesar's work is predominately one of a fairy tale mixed with Victorian painting where the subjects are set before beach scenes or within elaborately

decorated interiors. This is mirrored in the incredibly white pallor of the girls that are depicted, which reminds the viewer of the time period where looking porcelain white was to show your higher class lifestyle away from the muck and mire of the working men and women. Alongside the features of the subjects are the clothing and attire which, for the most part, are period pieces. Long ballgowns and evening dresses as well as period underclothes and ruffles. With this description alone the reader could be easily mistaken for thinking that I was simply referring to works by the old masters such as Antony Van Dyck or Homecoming 48”x60” or 24”x42”

27

28


Jean-Antoine Watteau (later claimed as his inspiration). However, this would be only a part truth, these old masters may have been an inspiration for the art style of the artist but that is where the similarities finish. The visions of tentacles and animalistic traits appear in many of the pieces by Caesar and alongside the influences and the period conveyed in the work, do draw the mind to the work of H. P Lovecraft. Now regarded as one of the most significant authors of the 20th Century, Lovecraft created fantastical horror fiction into which he wound themes on race, inherited guilt and the threat of a scientific era. Set against a back drop of a similar time period to that portrayed by Ceasar, we see humans with fish-like features and dark ancient gods with reaching tentacles much like the characters Caesar depicts with tentacles replacing legs, fingers and hands. They both draw upon the horror quality of a warped humanity.

ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

RAY CAESAR | Stepping into a haunted rabbit hole

www.raycaesar.com

by Thomas Jukes Much like judging a book by its cover, one should never take art at face value. It may be difficult to work past personal dislike or a lack of comprehension but to dig a little deeper reveals levels of detail and complexity that, while not immediately obvious, make a substantial change to the way we perceive the work. This could most certainly be applied to the work of Ray Caesar, a British born artist who creates fascinating 3D modelled characters within fairytale and dreamlike landscapes. Visiting the artist's website, it is clear that Ray has always had an incredibly vivid imagination

and art for storytelling. Unlike most ‘about’ pages, Caesar's page feels as if you are being given a real glimpse into the early life and mind of the artist. A mind which has always been, it would seem, working on a very different plane of existence to most of the people around him. To do what I said one must not, we would look at these images firstly from their face value as they certainly surface some interesting thoughts and feelings. The aesthetic of Caesar's work is predominately one of a fairy tale mixed with Victorian painting where the subjects are set before beach scenes or within elaborately

decorated interiors. This is mirrored in the incredibly white pallor of the girls that are depicted, which reminds the viewer of the time period where looking porcelain white was to show your higher class lifestyle away from the muck and mire of the working men and women. Alongside the features of the subjects are the clothing and attire which, for the most part, are period pieces. Long ballgowns and evening dresses as well as period underclothes and ruffles. With this description alone the reader could be easily mistaken for thinking that I was simply referring to works by the old masters such as Antony Van Dyck or Homecoming 48”x60” or 24”x42”

27

28


This knowledge of the artist brings his work into a fresh light and the viewer can look with a different perspective. The deformities and abnormalities of the subjects point towards the surgical reconstructions or children suffering from diseases and perhaps the sexualization draws on witnessing the after-effects of abuse towards children. Having the childlike renditions in such provocative clothing and poses draws a sharp discussion point, that it is un-natural and grotesque to see sexuality in such seemingly young girls. An innocence that has been lost or stolen by the gaze or actions of others.

Swee Pea Print 30” x 34”

Throughout Caesar's work, there is an overwhelming disquiet coming across, everything is not as it would appear in these creations. The subjects that Ray Caesar forms appear as young girls but they are dressed as adults, often in adult situations or poses. In this, there is an underlying feeling of these subjects being oddly sexualised, to an extent that the viewer can feel uncomfortable viewing the images. Whilst not knowing the age of the characters that are modelled, they possess such childlike features and small forms that the viewer cannot escape the feeling that they are looking at children. Unsettled as such, the images could be seen as exploitative in nature. This, however, is where the adult life of the artist begins to reveal a deep and emotionally charged reasoning for the aesthetic of the pieces. From 1980 till 1997 Ray Caesar worked in the Art and Photography Department of The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. This job brought the artist face to face with instances of child abuse, child psychology, and surgical reconstruction, as well as animal research, all of which had a profound effect upon the artist. Being exposed to terminally ill children and being in a position to merely observe, whilst your job entails producing statistical data and technical diagrams of the medical equipment keeping the children alive, it is far more understandable how any human could be thusly affected. 29

Launderette print 34”x38”


This knowledge of the artist brings his work into a fresh light and the viewer can look with a different perspective. The deformities and abnormalities of the subjects point towards the surgical reconstructions or children suffering from diseases and perhaps the sexualization draws on witnessing the after-effects of abuse towards children. Having the childlike renditions in such provocative clothing and poses draws a sharp discussion point, that it is un-natural and grotesque to see sexuality in such seemingly young girls. An innocence that has been lost or stolen by the gaze or actions of others.

Swee Pea Print 30” x 34”

Throughout Caesar's work, there is an overwhelming disquiet coming across, everything is not as it would appear in these creations. The subjects that Ray Caesar forms appear as young girls but they are dressed as adults, often in adult situations or poses. In this, there is an underlying feeling of these subjects being oddly sexualised, to an extent that the viewer can feel uncomfortable viewing the images. Whilst not knowing the age of the characters that are modelled, they possess such childlike features and small forms that the viewer cannot escape the feeling that they are looking at children. Unsettled as such, the images could be seen as exploitative in nature. This, however, is where the adult life of the artist begins to reveal a deep and emotionally charged reasoning for the aesthetic of the pieces. From 1980 till 1997 Ray Caesar worked in the Art and Photography Department of The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. This job brought the artist face to face with instances of child abuse, child psychology, and surgical reconstruction, as well as animal research, all of which had a profound effect upon the artist. Being exposed to terminally ill children and being in a position to merely observe, whilst your job entails producing statistical data and technical diagrams of the medical equipment keeping the children alive, it is far more understandable how any human could be thusly affected. 29

Launderette print 34”x38”


The work of Ray Caesar will definitely divide opinion, on the surface the pieces are technically, incredibly impressive. To create such refined 3D forms side by side with the dreamlike backgrounds is truly amazing to see. Delve deeper into these pieces and they begin to show the disturbing and slightly sinister nature that runs as an undercurrent through the artists work. Questions are raised and debates form as to the what and why. One steps in the rabbit hole that is the mindscape of the artist and can easily become lost in seeking the knowledge to understand but like many works of great art that answer is never concrete. It sets thoughts running and captivates our inquisitive minds. “A little tainted, a little melancholy, a little funny, a little sad and a little taboo… I mix this with clocks and scissors and irons and knives and silk dresses hiding strange things underneath.” Ray Caesar

La Chambre 30”x30"

The Crucible 16” x16” Girl in a Red Chaperone 20”x16"

We Three Kings 30”x30"


The work of Ray Caesar will definitely divide opinion, on the surface the pieces are technically, incredibly impressive. To create such refined 3D forms side by side with the dreamlike backgrounds is truly amazing to see. Delve deeper into these pieces and they begin to show the disturbing and slightly sinister nature that runs as an undercurrent through the artists work. Questions are raised and debates form as to the what and why. One steps in the rabbit hole that is the mindscape of the artist and can easily become lost in seeking the knowledge to understand but like many works of great art that answer is never concrete. It sets thoughts running and captivates our inquisitive minds. “A little tainted, a little melancholy, a little funny, a little sad and a little taboo… I mix this with clocks and scissors and irons and knives and silk dresses hiding strange things underneath.” Ray Caesar

La Chambre 30”x30"

The Crucible 16” x16” Girl in a Red Chaperone 20”x16"

We Three Kings 30”x30"


SOUTH AFRICA

Justin Dingwall is an acclaimed South African Photographer whose emotional portraits explore the boundless spectrum of human beauty. His images are a celebration of diversity and an invitation to rethink conventional beauty standards. His “Albus” series reflects on the often-taboo subject of albinism, as albinos are frequently discriminated and subject to superstition and violence throughout Africa. The series includes portraits of model Sanele Junior Xaba and model, lawyer and activist Thando Hopa, the first woman with albinism to appear in the cover of Vogue. Dingwall’s touching portraits not only capture the beauty of his models but also reflect their inner strength. His photographs include snakes, butterflies, and water to symbolize rebirth, metamorphosis, and fluidity. The series “A seat at the table” is a celebration of beauty in difference. Dingwall explores the aesthetics of vitiligo through soulful portraits of model Moostapha Saidi. Regarding these works, he says: “They are not about race or fashion, but about perception, and what we subjectively perceive as beautiful. I wanted to create a series of images that resonate with humanity and make people question what is beautiful”. www.justindingwall.com 33

► © Justin Dingwall


SOUTH AFRICA

Justin Dingwall is an acclaimed South African Photographer whose emotional portraits explore the boundless spectrum of human beauty. His images are a celebration of diversity and an invitation to rethink conventional beauty standards. His “Albus” series reflects on the often-taboo subject of albinism, as albinos are frequently discriminated and subject to superstition and violence throughout Africa. The series includes portraits of model Sanele Junior Xaba and model, lawyer and activist Thando Hopa, the first woman with albinism to appear in the cover of Vogue. Dingwall’s touching portraits not only capture the beauty of his models but also reflect their inner strength. His photographs include snakes, butterflies, and water to symbolize rebirth, metamorphosis, and fluidity. The series “A seat at the table” is a celebration of beauty in difference. Dingwall explores the aesthetics of vitiligo through soulful portraits of model Moostapha Saidi. Regarding these works, he says: “They are not about race or fashion, but about perception, and what we subjectively perceive as beautiful. I wanted to create a series of images that resonate with humanity and make people question what is beautiful”. www.justindingwall.com 33

► © Justin Dingwall


Albus Series ► © Justin Dingwall

In “Fly by night”, Dingwall wants the viewers to consider social issues like xenophobia, diaspora, and migration, in an effort to increase our awareness and change our perceptions. He beautifully uses the “black swan” metaphor, which symbolizes that knowledge comes with hindsight. It is based on an ancient that said that presumed black swans did not exist, but had to be rewritten after black swans were discovered in the wild. Dingwall’s extraordinary work has been recognized with multiple awards and exhibitions around the world. “To me, diversity is what makes humanity interesting and beautiful.” 35

Albus Series ► © Justin Dingwall

36


Albus Series ► © Justin Dingwall

In “Fly by night”, Dingwall wants the viewers to consider social issues like xenophobia, diaspora, and migration, in an effort to increase our awareness and change our perceptions. He beautifully uses the “black swan” metaphor, which symbolizes that knowledge comes with hindsight. It is based on an ancient that said that presumed black swans did not exist, but had to be rewritten after black swans were discovered in the wild. Dingwall’s extraordinary work has been recognized with multiple awards and exhibitions around the world. “To me, diversity is what makes humanity interesting and beautiful.” 35

Albus Series ► © Justin Dingwall

36


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A seat at the table ► © Justin Dingwall

A seat at the table ► © Justin Dingwall

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37

A seat at the table ► © Justin Dingwall

A seat at the table ► © Justin Dingwall

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A seat at the table ► © Justin Dingwall

Albus Series ► © Justin Dingwall

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39

A seat at the table ► © Justin Dingwall

Albus Series ► © Justin Dingwall

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Fly by night ► © Justin Dingwall

Fly by night ► © Justin Dingwall

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Fly by night ► © Justin Dingwall

Fly by night ► © Justin Dingwall

42


These bright and energetic backdrops gain a 3D quality in themselves which would initially seem to detract from the focus on the furniture but thanks to Daria’s exceptional aptitude for colour, shapes, and layout it creates an image which gives an atmosphere of 1950’s America and the “House of the Future�. These ‘show’ homes were the realm of pure science fiction and were a fantastic vision of what the future of the millennium would look like for the normal American family, full of the

RETRO MODERNIST DESIGN

ZINOVATNAYA

by Thomas Jukes

most space age aesthetics and with furniture to match. Looking at the scenes that Zinovatnaya creates for her pieces conjures images of these future homes and the thrill of household items that looked as if they had been designed by Martians. However, there are far more close to earth connections that are brought to mind. Think for a moment of Piet Mondrian, the Dutch painter

The realm of interior design is one of many faces and styles from your sleek minimalism through Scandinavian form and function right across to country home and period interiors. Much akin to fashion and its trends interior design has seen every conceivable genre through the

who was breaking the boundaries of painting as far back as the 1920’s with his now world-famous ‘Composition’ paintings. Vivid primary colour blocks sit alongside stark black lines much like the layout of Zinovatnaya’s furniture and the spaces it sits within.

course of centuries. Some stand the test of time, suiting certain period homes, while most have faded in and out of obscurity, seeing resurgences here and there whether one would find it agreeable or not. With the work of the Ukrainian interior designer Daria Zinovatnaya one would be forgiven for thinking that you had just stumbled onto the Instagram of clippings from a 60’s or 70’s design magazine with the rainbow of colours and space age forms that meet your eyes. Zinovatnaya bases her work primarily around colour and geometry, it’s safe to say that these elements are certainly the first things that strike you about the designs and interiors. Whilst creating both fantastically bold pieces of furniture as well as designing suites for hotels, restaurants, and apartments we can immediately see a creative mind at work that has an incredible grasp on both 3D shape and form but also colour theory, and the impact of contrasting and complementary colours within living spaces. It is impressive to see such beautifully wrought furniture on its own but with Zinovatnaya the setting for said furniture is just as important. The setting for the pieces plays with the forms and colour of the work making use of striking patterns juxtaposed against large scale shapes. 43

      ©   


These bright and energetic backdrops gain a 3D quality in themselves which would initially seem to detract from the focus on the furniture but thanks to Daria’s exceptional aptitude for colour, shapes, and layout it creates an image which gives an atmosphere of 1950’s America and the “House of the Future�. These ‘show’ homes were the realm of pure science fiction and were a fantastic vision of what the future of the millennium would look like for the normal American family, full of the

RETRO MODERNIST DESIGN

ZINOVATNAYA

by Thomas Jukes

most space age aesthetics and with furniture to match. Looking at the scenes that Zinovatnaya creates for her pieces conjures images of these future homes and the thrill of household items that looked as if they had been designed by Martians. However, there are far more close to earth connections that are brought to mind. Think for a moment of Piet Mondrian, the Dutch painter

The realm of interior design is one of many faces and styles from your sleek minimalism through Scandinavian form and function right across to country home and period interiors. Much akin to fashion and its trends interior design has seen every conceivable genre through the

who was breaking the boundaries of painting as far back as the 1920’s with his now world-famous ‘Composition’ paintings. Vivid primary colour blocks sit alongside stark black lines much like the layout of Zinovatnaya’s furniture and the spaces it sits within.

course of centuries. Some stand the test of time, suiting certain period homes, while most have faded in and out of obscurity, seeing resurgences here and there whether one would find it agreeable or not. With the work of the Ukrainian interior designer Daria Zinovatnaya one would be forgiven for thinking that you had just stumbled onto the Instagram of clippings from a 60’s or 70’s design magazine with the rainbow of colours and space age forms that meet your eyes. Zinovatnaya bases her work primarily around colour and geometry, it’s safe to say that these elements are certainly the first things that strike you about the designs and interiors. Whilst creating both fantastically bold pieces of furniture as well as designing suites for hotels, restaurants, and apartments we can immediately see a creative mind at work that has an incredible grasp on both 3D shape and form but also colour theory, and the impact of contrasting and complementary colours within living spaces. It is impressive to see such beautifully wrought furniture on its own but with Zinovatnaya the setting for said furniture is just as important. The setting for the pieces plays with the forms and colour of the work making use of striking patterns juxtaposed against large scale shapes. 43

      ©   


Both artists have a clear understanding of the importance of negative space working within a medium of strong and bold colour. Another artist that springs to mind is the pop artist Roy Lichtenstein who’s bold comic style paintings have made him such a famous name within the art world. Looking in particular at his work of the late 1980’s and into the 90’s when we begin to see an increasing amount of work revolving around interior spaces and the design/layout within. These lithographs from Lichtenstein show a number of similar elements to the patterns and designs found in the spaces of Zinovatnaya. It is refreshing to see an interior designer bold enough to use colour, not just a few pastel shades that we have seen so much of during the resurgence of the Scandinavian and country home aesthetic of the past few years. No, Zinovatnaya isn’t afraid to deal out a spirited range of colours in her interiors. ‘Circle’ is a particularly good example of the scale and diversity that comes out throughout her interiors, every inch of the space is carefully considered, despite the shear amount of colours and shapes used there is nothing that seems out of place. It is easy to look at this kind of interior and assume the designer has been given too much creative freedom and ended up going overboard. It is a space thinking differently. This is an interior that was not designed to coalesce as one room, this is an interior where areas become individual, a dining area wall can become a canvas where lighting, shape, and texture add another dimension to the experience of the space whilst complimenting the furniture used within. Adjoining this, another dining area that is beautifully contrasting to its neighbour, a sea of complementary colours conveyed through a wall of interlocking squares and rectangles plays against a dark ceiling dotted with gentle pink circles which are highlighted randomly across the room. Much like paintings these rooms are perfectly balanced so that the room flows with energy and no one area becomes too much of a focal point. Zinovatnaya’s interiors feel alive even without anyone in them, some would say that they are exuberant and the land of show homes but to me, they seem an invigorating spark in a sea of pastel blue and grey. Indeed her work was recently recognized by the RedDot group winning one of their converted awards in 2017 for her interior ‘Cherokee’. Sure they might not be to everyone’s taste but you certainly wouldn’t fail to smile if your house was a place of harmonious colour, vivid and exciting design and truly unique style. This is assuredly what you get with the design of Daria Zinovatnaya and I for one am all for my house becoming a place full of bold, bright and balanced brilliance. “Each of my clients is one way or another connected with creativity. they are those who are ready for experiments.” - Daria Zinovatnaya 45

46

Milk ► © Aaron Lacy


Both artists have a clear understanding of the importance of negative space working within a medium of strong and bold colour. Another artist that springs to mind is the pop artist Roy Lichtenstein who’s bold comic style paintings have made him such a famous name within the art world. Looking in particular at his work of the late 1980’s and into the 90’s when we begin to see an increasing amount of work revolving around interior spaces and the design/layout within. These lithographs from Lichtenstein show a number of similar elements to the patterns and designs found in the spaces of Zinovatnaya. It is refreshing to see an interior designer bold enough to use colour, not just a few pastel shades that we have seen so much of during the resurgence of the Scandinavian and country home aesthetic of the past few years. No, Zinovatnaya isn’t afraid to deal out a spirited range of colours in her interiors. ‘Circle’ is a particularly good example of the scale and diversity that comes out throughout her interiors, every inch of the space is carefully considered, despite the shear amount of colours and shapes used there is nothing that seems out of place. It is easy to look at this kind of interior and assume the designer has been given too much creative freedom and ended up going overboard. It is a space thinking differently. This is an interior that was not designed to coalesce as one room, this is an interior where areas become individual, a dining area wall can become a canvas where lighting, shape, and texture add another dimension to the experience of the space whilst complimenting the furniture used within. Adjoining this, another dining area that is beautifully contrasting to its neighbour, a sea of complementary colours conveyed through a wall of interlocking squares and rectangles plays against a dark ceiling dotted with gentle pink circles which are highlighted randomly across the room. Much like paintings these rooms are perfectly balanced so that the room flows with energy and no one area becomes too much of a focal point. Zinovatnaya’s interiors feel alive even without anyone in them, some would say that they are exuberant and the land of show homes but to me, they seem an invigorating spark in a sea of pastel blue and grey. Indeed her work was recently recognized by the RedDot group winning one of their converted awards in 2017 for her interior ‘Cherokee’. Sure they might not be to everyone’s taste but you certainly wouldn’t fail to smile if your house was a place of harmonious colour, vivid and exciting design and truly unique style. This is assuredly what you get with the design of Daria Zinovatnaya and I for one am all for my house becoming a place full of bold, bright and balanced brilliance. “Each of my clients is one way or another connected with creativity. they are those who are ready for experiments.” - Daria Zinovatnaya 45

46

Milk ► © Aaron Lacy


UNITED STATES

Minh T. is a photographer and art director based in California. He was born in Vietnam, grew up new Washington D.C. and finally settled in Los Angeles. His minimalistic photography draws inspiration from nature, architecture and perspective. Minh masterfully combines light, geometry and mood to create images of stunning simplicity and beauty. His works often include solo human figures within an architectural image. Living in Los Angeles, where movies are made, Minh also wants to develop a story in his mind while shooting. He likes to have a sense of escapism and fantasy. The person in the shots is a character in his movie. Minh has become a highly influential photographer, with a massive following in social media. His creations have been covered in multiple international publications and commissioned by numerous leading brands. “My signature style is about purity, contemplation, and timelessness. Once you distill a scene to the essential elements, you can find beauty in light, geometry, or mood.” www.thismintymoment.com 47

Fall layers ► © Minh T


UNITED STATES

Minh T. is a photographer and art director based in California. He was born in Vietnam, grew up new Washington D.C. and finally settled in Los Angeles. His minimalistic photography draws inspiration from nature, architecture and perspective. Minh masterfully combines light, geometry and mood to create images of stunning simplicity and beauty. His works often include solo human figures within an architectural image. Living in Los Angeles, where movies are made, Minh also wants to develop a story in his mind while shooting. He likes to have a sense of escapism and fantasy. The person in the shots is a character in his movie. Minh has become a highly influential photographer, with a massive following in social media. His creations have been covered in multiple international publications and commissioned by numerous leading brands. “My signature style is about purity, contemplation, and timelessness. Once you distill a scene to the essential elements, you can find beauty in light, geometry, or mood.” www.thismintymoment.com 47

Fall layers ► © Minh T


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Both Tea 36" Worlds x 48" ► ©acrylic Ceciliain onParedes canvas ► © Minh T The spaces between

Enjoy the journey, because the destination is a mirage ► © Minh T

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49

Both Tea 36" Worlds x 48" ► ©acrylic Ceciliain onParedes canvas ► © Minh T The spaces between

Enjoy the journey, because the destination is a mirage ► © Minh T

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51

A Bold Slant in Geometry ► © Minh T

Afternoon origami ► © Minh T

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51

A Bold Slant in Geometry ► © Minh T

Afternoon origami ► © Minh T

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53

54

The white scalloped walls

► © Minh T

Eavesdropping on a conversation ► © Minh T


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54

The white scalloped walls

► © Minh T

Eavesdropping on a conversation ► © Minh T


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There are no ordinary moments ► © Minh T

City of stars...are you shining just for me? ► © Minh T

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55

There are no ordinary moments ► © Minh T

City of stars...are you shining just for me? ► © Minh T

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ITALY

INTERVIEW WITH

Your style stands out for its absolute originality. How did your artistic language evolve from your beginnings to the present? First, thank you for the compliment. One of the key factors of my work has been the social aspect and the growth of photo shoots from a few bodies to large groups. There are energy and interconnection that materializes at large photo shoots and while that energy may have been unexpected at first, it has become an integral part of my process. The large numbers of models give me the raw materials to keep expanding my work and more freedom to explore new ideas. I have been writing a story with images over the past 11 years and this growth with the models impacts the work from the photo shoot through to the construction of the pieces. What is the importance of life, its origin and its cycles in your work?

Turning reality upside down and creating works that run counter to preconceived ideas are part of Angelo Musco’s artistic strategies. Living structures (i.e.: nests, amniotic sacs, eggs) both literally and figuratively stir a depth of emotion closely related to Musco’s personal experience of a delayed and traumatic birth–one which left both physical and subconscious scars. The human body is the artist’s medium. He melds bodies like hundreds of brush strokes, creating large compositions that are re-workings of nature’s structures. Born in Naples (Italy) in 1973, Musco’s studies alternated between the Academia Delle Belle Arti of Naples and the University of Fine Arts in Granada, Spain. Musco visited New York City a few times for artistic research and moved to the U.S. December 8, 1997, which holds symbolic significance–on the Italian calendar it was the day of the Immaculate Conception. Musco’s difficult birth, confinement, subterranean worlds, and natural architecture are recurring themes in his work. The human body progressively dominates his work, weaving and connecting masses of nudes to create constructions that are literal or symbolic representations of eggs, nests, amniotic liquid and other inspirations from the miracle of procreation. Musco’s investigation into the power of aggregations found in nature has fueled his most recent works. His visionary translation of such aggregation on a massive scale is not only visible in his work but is also palpable during his photo shoots. Though currently based in New York, Angelo’s work has been executed state-side and internationally, staging his shoots from London, to Buenos Aires from the Red Woods CA to such exotic locations as Baku and Istanbul. His work, approaching epic proportions, has been displayed throughout the world, including Art Basel and the Venice Biennale.

The work is part autobiographical and part inspiration from historical, natural and mythological concepts. The cycles of my own life, conscious or unconsciously, find their way into the work.

I am currently working on a huge piece that is more personal than anything before and for the first time, I will actually step into the work. A few weeks ago I worked with one of my assistants who I deeply trust and at the end of the shoot I was exhausted but also felt a renewed connection to the process. How does your own birth experience influence your art? I experienced a traumatic birth that left both physical and emotional scars on my body. A lifetime filled with physical therapy is a constant reminder of my own body’s limitations and so, in looking for freedom from those limitations I gravitate towards and focus on the human body. Over the past two years, I committed to breaking away from the thoughts that were limiting me, and despite a freak accident that broke my right humerus bone a year ago, I have a completely new relationship with my own physical self and have greater freedom and acceptance of my own body.

Ala ► © Angelo Musco

www.angelomusco.com 57

22


ITALY

INTERVIEW WITH I grew up in Naples, Italy, which is rich in natural saturated colors as well as darker shadowed tones - not to mention the subterranean parts of the city. I do feel that influences my sober choices of tones, color, and light. Turning reality upside down and creating works that run counter to preconceived ideas are part of Angelo Musco’s artistic strategies. Living structures (i.e.: nests, amniotic sacs, eggs) both literally and figuratively stir a depth of emotion closely related to Musco’s personal experience of a delayed and traumatic birth–one which left both physical and subconscious scars. The human body is the artist’s medium. He melds bodies like hundreds of brush strokes, creating large compositions that are re-workings of nature’s structures. Born in Naples (Italy) in 1973, Musco’s studies alternated between the Academia Delle Belle Arti of Naples and the University of Fine Arts in Granada, Spain. Musco visited New York City a few times for artistic research and moved to the U.S. December 8, 1997, which holds symbolic significance–on the Italian calendar it was the day of the Immaculate Conception. Musco’s difficult birth, confinement, subterranean worlds, and natural architecture are recurring themes in his work. The human body progressively dominates his work, weaving and connecting masses of nudes to create constructions that are literal or symbolic representations of eggs, nests, amniotic liquid and other inspirations from the miracle of procreation. Musco’s investigation into the power of aggregations found in nature has fueled his most recent works. His visionary translation of such aggregation on a massive scale is not only visible in his work but is also palpable during his photo shoots. Though currently based in New York, Angelo’s work has been executed state-side and internationally, staging his shoots from London, to Buenos Aires from the Red Woods CA to such exotic locations as Baku and Istanbul. His work, approaching epic proportions, has been displayed throughout the world, including Art Basel and the Venice Biennale.

Your style stands out for its absolute originality. How did your artistic language evolve from your beginnings to the present? First, thank you for the compliment. One of the key factors of my work has been the social aspect and the growth of photo shoots from a few bodies to large groups. There are energy and interconnection that materializes at large photo shoots and while that energy may have been unexpected at first, it has become an integral part of my process. The large numbers of models give me the raw materials to keep expanding my work and more freedom to explore new ideas. I have been writing a story with images over the past 11 years and this growth with the models impacts the work from the photo shoot through to the construction of the pieces. What is the importance of life, its origin and its cycles in your work? The work is part autobiographical and part inspiration from historical, natural and mythological concepts. The cycles of my own life, conscious or unconsciously, find their way into the work.

I am currently working on a huge piece that is more personal than anything before and for the first time, I will actually step into the work. A few weeks ago I worked with one of my assistants who I deeply trust and at the end of the shoot I was exhausted but also felt a renewed connection to the process. How does your own birth experience influence your art? I experienced a traumatic birth that left both physical and emotional scars on my body. A lifetime filled with physical therapy is a constant reminder of my own body’s limitations and so, in looking for freedom from those limitations I gravitate towards and focus on the human body. Over the past two years, I committed to breaking away from the thoughts that were limiting me, and despite a freak accident that broke my right humerus bone a year ago, I have a completely new relationship with my own physical self and have greater freedom and acceptance of my own body.

Ala ► © Angelo Musco

www.angelomusco.com 57

22


What is the meaning and challenges of “using the human body as your paintbrush”? Due to my limited physicality, I became fascinated with the strength of the human body, which led to the use of the body whether in installation, video or photo images. The challenge of using the nude form may appear limiting but it actually has forced more creative approaches to realize the work I want to create.

Ova ► © Angelo Musco

Details

26

The Escapist ► © Martin Stranka


What is the meaning and challenges of “using the human body as your paintbrush”? Due to my limited physicality, I became fascinated with the strength of the human body, which led to the use of the body whether in installation, video or photo images. The challenge of using the nude form may appear limiting but it actually has forced more creative approaches to realize the work I want to create.

Ova ► © Angelo Musco

Details

26

The Escapist ► © Martin Stranka


You create a new reality by combining thousands of human bodies. Your works reveal new surprises at every magnification scale. In a metaphor of nature, complexity emerges from simple elementary building blocks. How are they connected in your art? I have always played with the power of aggregation and as a result, the picture can be appreciated at face value as a single image or explored deeply which is another whole journey for the viewer to follow. The viewer who goes deeper will understand that unlike most photos taken from a single perspective, my work is created like a drawing so nothing is out of focus. Each inch is in focus. There is something classical about this approach but it is up to the viewer to discover both the complexity and simplicity of the work. Ova ► Š Angelo Musco

The logistic of photographing a large number of models is also challenging. Please guide us through the process that takes from the inception of an idea to the final image. If an idea keeps coming back to me, then I start researching it further to see if there are more layers to the concept, and if the theme connects to the ongoing story I am telling with images. Understanding the final image informs the type of photo shoot needed to capture the images to build the piece. I start breaking down the final image into smaller parts, building blocks that I can form with the models during a photo shoot and then it becomes like a multi-layered puzzle that I weave and construct. I use all body types and while I do a lot of planning and preparation before a photo shoot there is always an organic element that happens unique to the group of people who volunteer at any one-photo shoot. Details


You create a new reality by combining thousands of human bodies. Your works reveal new surprises at every magnification scale. In a metaphor of nature, complexity emerges from simple elementary building blocks. How are they connected in your art? I have always played with the power of aggregation and as a result, the picture can be appreciated at face value as a single image or explored deeply which is another whole journey for the viewer to follow. The viewer who goes deeper will understand that unlike most photos taken from a single perspective, my work is created like a drawing so nothing is out of focus. Each inch is in focus. There is something classical about this approach but it is up to the viewer to discover both the complexity and simplicity of the work. Ova ► Š Angelo Musco

The logistic of photographing a large number of models is also challenging. Please guide us through the process that takes from the inception of an idea to the final image. If an idea keeps coming back to me, then I start researching it further to see if there are more layers to the concept, and if the theme connects to the ongoing story I am telling with images. Understanding the final image informs the type of photo shoot needed to capture the images to build the piece. I start breaking down the final image into smaller parts, building blocks that I can form with the models during a photo shoot and then it becomes like a multi-layered puzzle that I weave and construct. I use all body types and while I do a lot of planning and preparation before a photo shoot there is always an organic element that happens unique to the group of people who volunteer at any one-photo shoot. Details


There is usually a mix of people who have posed with me before, people who have worked with other artists and then people who are curious and have never posed nude before. Again, it makes for a special chemistry and a very unfettered human experience for the volunteers. The goal at a photo shoot is to capture as many different images as possible and then those images go into my sizable archive of single and group pictures that are cleaned up, cataloged and then woven together to create one of my works. While many works demand unique shapes, movement and attitude require their own photo shoots, I utilize images from past photo shoots as well so each work feels like a historical journal as I revisit old friends and past photo shoots.

How long does it take to create one of these wonderful works? Usually, the first artwork in a series takes 6-12 months depending on the size and then the related pieces in a series usually take a little less time. Sometimes I’ll plan photo shoots in other countries, and then it is back to the studio for 8-10 hour days of retouching, constructing and finally what we call ‘beautification’, the final step before completion to make sure everything is harmonious. Right now I am working on a large work that is proving to be very challenging, so it may take two years before it is completed.

Aves (detail) ► © Angelo Musco

28 Chrysalis ► © Angelo Musco


There is usually a mix of people who have posed with me before, people who have worked with other artists and then people who are curious and have never posed nude before. Again, it makes for a special chemistry and a very unfettered human experience for the volunteers. The goal at a photo shoot is to capture as many different images as possible and then those images go into my sizable archive of single and group pictures that are cleaned up, cataloged and then woven together to create one of my works. While many works demand unique shapes, movement and attitude require their own photo shoots, I utilize images from past photo shoots as well so each work feels like a historical journal as I revisit old friends and past photo shoots.

How long does it take to create one of these wonderful works? Usually, the first artwork in a series takes 6-12 months depending on the size and then the related pieces in a series usually take a little less time. Sometimes I’ll plan photo shoots in other countries, and then it is back to the studio for 8-10 hour days of retouching, constructing and finally what we call ‘beautification’, the final step before completion to make sure everything is harmonious. Right now I am working on a large work that is proving to be very challenging, so it may take two years before it is completed.

Aves (detail) ► © Angelo Musco

28 Chrysalis ► © Angelo Musco


Your treatment and coloring of the nude bodies remind us of classical sculptures. Is there a connection? I grew up in Naples, Italy, which is rich in natural saturated colors as well as darker shadowed tones - not to mention the subterranean parts of the city. I do feel that influences my sober choices of tones, color, and light. My background is that of a classically trained painter so I bring that knowledge and understand the language of tone to everything I do. For me, the tone equals the emotion of the piece and I don’t want many tones competing with the movement, bodies, and expression of the work. Most of my big pieces are monochromatic with one or two tones that veil the emotion. Where do you find your inspiration? I think my inspiration comes from the world around me, my interaction with the world and the ongoing exploration of my earliest experiences and memories. At times though I need to detach from the noise of reality and our urban lifestyle. Removing the noise and finding the silence that leads me to a closer relationship with Nature. I find peace in the Red Woods of California, the deserts of Utah and New Mexico and the mountains and forests of the Northeast United States. I love the city but I also need to have access to Nature regularly. You were born in Naples and relocated to New York City. What is the significance of these two cities for your life and art? Interestingly both Naples and New York City are on the 41st Parallel so I believe the energy and light are the same. The Baroque structures, colors, and chaos of Naples informed my early life but NYC is where I decided to build my own nest. I feel the city breaths life into my work and allowed me to evolve. I think you know when you are in the right place and I felt that when my travels first brought me to New York. I look at it as if Naples gave me my life and New York City sustains it. 65

Emmy-award-winning director Robert Jason became fascinated with your art and produced a documentary, Conception, about how the events in your life influenced your work. What were the salient points of this experience? We had an amazing collaboration and I believe we inspired each other over the two years it took to realize the documentary. There were many challenges from funding to the logistics of filming in five different countries, but it really was about believing in telling my story and not taking shortcuts or giving up when the signs all said this could never be produced. At times it can feel like everything is work, work, work but putting together the documentary brought light to delicate moments that I had forgotten, and allowed me to re-estimate and appreciate so many sweet moments of my life and career. All your models are volunteers. What is the role of the Internet and social media in reaching them and coordinating your photo shoots? The Internet and Social Media have allowed me to cross borders and collaborate and find new friends and colleagues all over the world. It has helped my work become more inclusive and inspired me to see beyond my own cultural experience. There will be months of preparation for a photo shoot and when the shoot is in another country I have to connect with people and communities on a virtual level because I will only arrive a few days before the shoot. I like to have direct communication with the models via news updates and detailed emails that inform them about all the details and what we are working on, the dynamics of the piece so they are very connected to the project. When I invest this time it helps the models on the day of the photo shoot and using the Internet makes it all so much simpler.

What are the next challenges in your future? Almost two years ago I started questioning a lot of things both personally and professionally. As I was trying to figure things out I traveled and found quiet places and through this process, a new piece started taking shape in my head. As I went deeper I realized I needed to be honest and take all the scares of my life and put them together in one place. This felt intensely personal so I decided again to be completely honest when I would step into the piece. A first for me, and now we are in full production and I hope to finish next year. This new work is very complicated and challenging and one of the main differences with earlier work is many of the models and main muses will not only be of a size that they are recognizable but they will be people from my own history telling our story with their movements and expressions. When I started reaching out to people who have affected my life: friends, lovers, family, exes, I was so encouraged by their support and willingness to participate. The working title is The Land Of Scars. In Egyptian mythology there is a story where a person’s heart is weighed against a feather upon their death and if the heart is heavier than the feather they are not allowed into a heavenly garden. I am fascinated with the idea of those people with a heavy heart and I am in the process of considering the heaviness in my own heart. A heavy heart can be like stone and this new work’s structure will be like a massive rock showing many layers and stratifications that represent both the history and the memories of my life. ► Tehom/Musco


Your treatment and coloring of the nude bodies remind us of classical sculptures. Is there a connection? I grew up in Naples, Italy, which is rich in natural saturated colors as well as darker shadowed tones - not to mention the subterranean parts of the city. I do feel that influences my sober choices of tones, color, and light. My background is that of a classically trained painter so I bring that knowledge and understand the language of tone to everything I do. For me, the tone equals the emotion of the piece and I don’t want many tones competing with the movement, bodies, and expression of the work. Most of my big pieces are monochromatic with one or two tones that veil the emotion. Where do you find your inspiration? I think my inspiration comes from the world around me, my interaction with the world and the ongoing exploration of my earliest experiences and memories. At times though I need to detach from the noise of reality and our urban lifestyle. Removing the noise and finding the silence that leads me to a closer relationship with Nature. I find peace in the Red Woods of California, the deserts of Utah and New Mexico and the mountains and forests of the Northeast United States. I love the city but I also need to have access to Nature regularly. You were born in Naples and relocated to New York City. What is the significance of these two cities for your life and art? Interestingly both Naples and New York City are on the 41st Parallel so I believe the energy and light are the same. The Baroque structures, colors, and chaos of Naples informed my early life but NYC is where I decided to build my own nest. I feel the city breaths life into my work and allowed me to evolve. I think you know when you are in the right place and I felt that when my travels first brought me to New York. I look at it as if Naples gave me my life and New York City sustains it. 65

Emmy-award-winning director Robert Jason became fascinated with your art and produced a documentary, Conception, about how the events in your life influenced your work. What were the salient points of this experience? We had an amazing collaboration and I believe we inspired each other over the two years it took to realize the documentary. There were many challenges from funding to the logistics of filming in five different countries, but it really was about believing in telling my story and not taking shortcuts or giving up when the signs all said this could never be produced. At times it can feel like everything is work, work, work but putting together the documentary brought light to delicate moments that I had forgotten, and allowed me to re-estimate and appreciate so many sweet moments of my life and career. All your models are volunteers. What is the role of the Internet and social media in reaching them and coordinating your photo shoots? The Internet and Social Media have allowed me to cross borders and collaborate and find new friends and colleagues all over the world. It has helped my work become more inclusive and inspired me to see beyond my own cultural experience. There will be months of preparation for a photo shoot and when the shoot is in another country I have to connect with people and communities on a virtual level because I will only arrive a few days before the shoot. I like to have direct communication with the models via news updates and detailed emails that inform them about all the details and what we are working on, the dynamics of the piece so they are very connected to the project. When I invest this time it helps the models on the day of the photo shoot and using the Internet makes it all so much simpler.

What are the next challenges in your future? Almost two years ago I started questioning a lot of things both personally and professionally. As I was trying to figure things out I traveled and found quiet places and through this process, a new piece started taking shape in my head. As I went deeper I realized I needed to be honest and take all the scares of my life and put them together in one place. This felt intensely personal so I decided again to be completely honest when I would step into the piece. A first for me, and now we are in full production and I hope to finish next year. This new work is very complicated and challenging and one of the main differences with earlier work is many of the models and main muses will not only be of a size that they are recognizable but they will be people from my own history telling our story with their movements and expressions. When I started reaching out to people who have affected my life: friends, lovers, family, exes, I was so encouraged by their support and willingness to participate. The working title is The Land Of Scars. In Egyptian mythology there is a story where a person’s heart is weighed against a feather upon their death and if the heart is heavier than the feather they are not allowed into a heavenly garden. I am fascinated with the idea of those people with a heavy heart and I am in the process of considering the heaviness in my own heart. A heavy heart can be like stone and this new work’s structure will be like a massive rock showing many layers and stratifications that represent both the history and the memories of my life. ► Tehom/Musco


35


35


colors play a pivotal role in his works and can often change the whole atmosphere of a piece. From bright vibrant blues, deep impactful purples to soft and muted pink and beige. Whilst the shapes that float in front share similarities throughout the pieces, the background transforms the feeling. From something akin to childlike making one think of the building blocks that children play with, to a quality that one could expect to see in a trendy interior design environment. It should be noted with this point that Philip Lück does a very good job of keeping his work on-trend as it were. The colors used throughout his portfolio are not just well-chosen for their aesthetic influence on his renders but they also keep up well with current trending colors in the design industry.

ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

Philip Lück | Reality Reshaped

www.instagram.com/philiplueck

by Thomas Jukes Beautifully rendered forms float and twist in a void, colours compliment and contrast the shapes as exquisite textures create depth and add a tactile feel to these swirling masses. Philip Lück, or better known by his Instagram handle, “philiplueck”, is a German artist working in the medium of 3D computergenerated imagery. Currently working freelance within the world of 3D & Motion Design these impressive works are gaining a surely deserved following online, including a successful Patreon page in which interested parties can support the artist and gain access to everything from 3D models and textures, to animation 69

loops and video tutorials on how the artist achieves his fantastic outcomes. Working with the Cinema4D R20 software and rendering with Octane as well as postproduction work in the Adobe Suite. There is certainly a lot of hours and skill that go into the work of Philip Lück. Technically these pieces are incredible, the viewer could easily be mistaken for thinking they were looking at a piece of physical sculpture, that I suppose is a discussion that will divide opinions. Can digital 3D work ever be considered as sculpture? An idea I will put to you the reader for personal

exploration with friends or colleagues. There are shared decisions and considerations between digital creations and physical sculpture though, that being a point of the artist choosing: color, form, texture or elements that either complement or conflict with each other. Concepts that Philip Lück tackles incredibly well, leading to 3D shapes and forms that the viewer wants to touch and explore in the same way a physical sculpture invites all the senses when viewed. The artist's understanding of color theory is plain to see in his abstractions. Background


colors play a pivotal role in his works and can often change the whole atmosphere of a piece. From bright vibrant blues, deep impactful purples to soft and muted pink and beige. Whilst the shapes that float in front share similarities throughout the pieces, the background transforms the feeling. From something akin to childlike making one think of the building blocks that children play with, to a quality that one could expect to see in a trendy interior design environment. It should be noted with this point that Philip Lück does a very good job of keeping his work on-trend as it were. The colors used throughout his portfolio are not just well-chosen for their aesthetic influence on his renders but they also keep up well with current trending colors in the design industry.

ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

Philip Lück | Reality Reshaped

www.instagram.com/philiplueck

by Thomas Jukes Beautifully rendered forms float and twist in a void, colours compliment and contrast the shapes as exquisite textures create depth and add a tactile feel to these swirling masses. Philip Lück, or better known by his Instagram handle, “philiplueck”, is a German artist working in the medium of 3D computergenerated imagery. Currently working freelance within the world of 3D & Motion Design these impressive works are gaining a surely deserved following online, including a successful Patreon page in which interested parties can support the artist and gain access to everything from 3D models and textures, to animation 69

loops and video tutorials on how the artist achieves his fantastic outcomes. Working with the Cinema4D R20 software and rendering with Octane as well as postproduction work in the Adobe Suite. There is certainly a lot of hours and skill that go into the work of Philip Lück. Technically these pieces are incredible, the viewer could easily be mistaken for thinking they were looking at a piece of physical sculpture, that I suppose is a discussion that will divide opinions. Can digital 3D work ever be considered as sculpture? An idea I will put to you the reader for personal

exploration with friends or colleagues. There are shared decisions and considerations between digital creations and physical sculpture though, that being a point of the artist choosing: color, form, texture or elements that either complement or conflict with each other. Concepts that Philip Lück tackles incredibly well, leading to 3D shapes and forms that the viewer wants to touch and explore in the same way a physical sculpture invites all the senses when viewed. The artist's understanding of color theory is plain to see in his abstractions. Background


To speak nothing of the artists' motion graphics for which is freelancing at the current time would be an unfortunate undertaking. The recent viral video phenomenon under the tags of, “most satisfying thing to watch!” and “most satisfying video in the world” has seen a rise in interest for the viewing of videos with no other purpose than to transfix the viewer with wonderfully seamless motion. Whether that be the skilled hands of a worker completing a task or repetition of a simple object motion it has seen many forms. Philip Lück takes this format of animation loops and raises it to the standard of art, beautiful in their aesthetic both visually and in motion, they really seem like watching an M.C. Esher picture coming to life. The similarity between the artists extends to the repeating of pattern and the seeming impossibility of the image before us. An object in motion that is just so perfectly balanced and in time that it doesn’t strike one as being natural. The animation skill of Lück and his attention to detail when it comes to physics makes the videos appear instinctive.

A predominant feature of many of Philip Lück’s renders is the inclusion of real world objects, a seemingly limitless imagination sees all kinds of objects making their way into his abstractions, washings machines, glasses, animal skulls, they’ve all been touched by the artist's mind. Unlike his full abstractions which are simply about form, color and texture his works with recognizable objects turn to abstracting the purpose of said objects. Clocks become dumbbells, a turntable begins a new life as a gas hob and a car wheel takes on the life of the Apple pinwheel. Many of these abstractions invite an air of humor and serve the viewer as a brief and unexpected departure from the norm. Some of his more recent pieces do appear to have some semblance of added meaning to them, however. A can of diet coke sits on a set of bathroom scales, the two objects seem randomly placed under a guise of color combination. Perhaps a message on the dangers of addictive unnatural products on our bodily health. An Instagram like icon lies precariously on the footplate of a bear trap. A quest for likes and Internet adoration is a dangerous path to follow, a deadly implement is lovingly rendered with a fantastical iridescent hue over a baby pink background. It’s almost like the artist is trying to portray the wonderfully perception of digital social life with the threat still perfectly obvious but simply beautified as well. 71


To speak nothing of the artists' motion graphics for which is freelancing at the current time would be an unfortunate undertaking. The recent viral video phenomenon under the tags of, “most satisfying thing to watch!” and “most satisfying video in the world” has seen a rise in interest for the viewing of videos with no other purpose than to transfix the viewer with wonderfully seamless motion. Whether that be the skilled hands of a worker completing a task or repetition of a simple object motion it has seen many forms. Philip Lück takes this format of animation loops and raises it to the standard of art, beautiful in their aesthetic both visually and in motion, they really seem like watching an M.C. Esher picture coming to life. The similarity between the artists extends to the repeating of pattern and the seeming impossibility of the image before us. An object in motion that is just so perfectly balanced and in time that it doesn’t strike one as being natural. The animation skill of Lück and his attention to detail when it comes to physics makes the videos appear instinctive.

A predominant feature of many of Philip Lück’s renders is the inclusion of real world objects, a seemingly limitless imagination sees all kinds of objects making their way into his abstractions, washings machines, glasses, animal skulls, they’ve all been touched by the artist's mind. Unlike his full abstractions which are simply about form, color and texture his works with recognizable objects turn to abstracting the purpose of said objects. Clocks become dumbbells, a turntable begins a new life as a gas hob and a car wheel takes on the life of the Apple pinwheel. Many of these abstractions invite an air of humor and serve the viewer as a brief and unexpected departure from the norm. Some of his more recent pieces do appear to have some semblance of added meaning to them, however. A can of diet coke sits on a set of bathroom scales, the two objects seem randomly placed under a guise of color combination. Perhaps a message on the dangers of addictive unnatural products on our bodily health. An Instagram like icon lies precariously on the footplate of a bear trap. A quest for likes and Internet adoration is a dangerous path to follow, a deadly implement is lovingly rendered with a fantastical iridescent hue over a baby pink background. It’s almost like the artist is trying to portray the wonderfully perception of digital social life with the threat still perfectly obvious but simply beautified as well. 71


What is so refreshing about the work and character of Philip Lück is that all his work and skill has been self-taught. All of this started in 2015 with his overwhelming interest in computer-generated imagery and the self-induced challenge of creating a piece every day for two consecutive years. It is truly inspirational to see an artist grow into such a proficient and loved creator simply from a personal drive and an unflappable love for exploring a medium. I do not doubt that Philip Lück will keep wowing us with his stunning 3D art, keep an eye out as I think this talent will surely be picked up. If you want to check out his work head over to his Instagram page or give his website a look, I warn you, you may be there for some time! “Working with bold colors and graphics compositions, I challenge myself to turn every project into visually pleasing and exciting outcomes…” Philip Lück

73


What is so refreshing about the work and character of Philip Lück is that all his work and skill has been self-taught. All of this started in 2015 with his overwhelming interest in computer-generated imagery and the self-induced challenge of creating a piece every day for two consecutive years. It is truly inspirational to see an artist grow into such a proficient and loved creator simply from a personal drive and an unflappable love for exploring a medium. I do not doubt that Philip Lück will keep wowing us with his stunning 3D art, keep an eye out as I think this talent will surely be picked up. If you want to check out his work head over to his Instagram page or give his website a look, I warn you, you may be there for some time! “Working with bold colors and graphics compositions, I challenge myself to turn every project into visually pleasing and exciting outcomes…” Philip Lück

73


South Korea

Kim Byungkwan is a Seoul (Korea)-based painter. He studied fine art at university and the drawing became one of the most important parts of his work. His drawings and paintings are atypical, which makes his works unique. They are not a simple line drawing, but a reaction of the body to objects. It means that the same body would be expressed differently depending on factors such as time or the environment. The artist thinks that variations on the same object are the most important factors across his paintings. He recognizes the fact that drawings by body-reaction would be unstable, however, this is what he is looking for. His attitude towards his works would be always a rejection of perfection. For him, painting is a record of an imperfect relationship. In the end, this ultimate personal record creates a map, which would be our world whether it is real or virtual.

www.kimbyungkwan.com 75

OUTSIDER 03 Oil on linen 65.1x50cm ► Š Kim Byungkwan


South Korea

Kim Byungkwan is a Seoul (Korea)-based painter. He studied fine art at university and the drawing became one of the most important parts of his work. His drawings and paintings are atypical, which makes his works unique. They are not a simple line drawing, but a reaction of the body to objects. It means that the same body would be expressed differently depending on factors such as time or the environment. The artist thinks that variations on the same object are the most important factors across his paintings. He recognizes the fact that drawings by body-reaction would be unstable, however, this is what he is looking for. His attitude towards his works would be always a rejection of perfection. For him, painting is a record of an imperfect relationship. In the end, this ultimate personal record creates a map, which would be our world whether it is real or virtual.

www.kimbyungkwan.com 75

OUTSIDER 03 Oil on linen 65.1x50cm ► Š Kim Byungkwan


DECONSTRUCTING ICONS

Face Madness #06 109x79cm Acrylic on paper ► © Kim Byungkwan

For Kim Byungkwan, mass media is substantiated around us. Mass media has dominated the world for a long time, even there’re criticisms, blandishment, and obedience to it. For him ‘Mickey mouse’ is not just a ‘cartoon character’ anymore. What does it mean to draw ‘Mickey mouse’ to the painter? This paint was created with a model that characterizes 'Mickey Mouse’ (DH015). Byungkwan KIM has chosen a model and had a photoshoot of her costumed as a Mickey Mouse. Mickey's costumed girl would be the 1st transformation, and painting would be the 2nd transformation from the original icon. The purpose of these transformations is ‘contaminating original information’, ‘distortion’, ‘deflection’ and so on. Icons are something that completes their definition to be very solid. The artist thinks that one goal of painting would be deconstructing them. Deconstructing objects is not an act of destruction or rejection of them. It’s an orientation to find a different way of a deflection of our habits of watching things. But this game is all about the shape of the original icon. 77

The Great Mimicry #02 Acrylic on canvas 90.9x72.7cm ► © Kim Byungkwan

Like you can escape only if there is a jail. So, his painting should be figurative. These methods affect all of his works. There is no specific meaning when he drew ‘Wonder women’ or ‘Marilyn Monroe’. Two floating images from the Internet that have lost their origin and they became a different thing by the painter. For Kim Byungkwan, ‘Painting’ means ‘something painted’. This proposition contains the meaning of ‘not defined’, which could be the main subject of his painting. His paintings are constructed by deflection without a pre-design. He doesn't use any base sketch for this purpose. He finishes his work when he gets a visual meaning from accidental events of painting or erasing. Ironically, these events are not unique but relics formed by mass media from his childhood. He confessed that there is no more new source and what he wants to do is what creates something by mixing his relics, by his inexact and imperfect movements. 78


DECONSTRUCTING ICONS

Face Madness #06 109x79cm Acrylic on paper ► © Kim Byungkwan

For Kim Byungkwan, mass media is substantiated around us. Mass media has dominated the world for a long time, even there’re criticisms, blandishment, and obedience to it. For him ‘Mickey mouse’ is not just a ‘cartoon character’ anymore. What does it mean to draw ‘Mickey mouse’ to the painter? This paint was created with a model that characterizes 'Mickey Mouse’ (DH015). Byungkwan KIM has chosen a model and had a photoshoot of her costumed as a Mickey Mouse. Mickey's costumed girl would be the 1st transformation, and painting would be the 2nd transformation from the original icon. The purpose of these transformations is ‘contaminating original information’, ‘distortion’, ‘deflection’ and so on. Icons are something that completes their definition to be very solid. The artist thinks that one goal of painting would be deconstructing them. Deconstructing objects is not an act of destruction or rejection of them. It’s an orientation to find a different way of a deflection of our habits of watching things. But this game is all about the shape of the original icon. 77

The Great Mimicry #02 Acrylic on canvas 90.9x72.7cm ► © Kim Byungkwan

Like you can escape only if there is a jail. So, his painting should be figurative. These methods affect all of his works. There is no specific meaning when he drew ‘Wonder women’ or ‘Marilyn Monroe’. Two floating images from the Internet that have lost their origin and they became a different thing by the painter. For Kim Byungkwan, ‘Painting’ means ‘something painted’. This proposition contains the meaning of ‘not defined’, which could be the main subject of his painting. His paintings are constructed by deflection without a pre-design. He doesn't use any base sketch for this purpose. He finishes his work when he gets a visual meaning from accidental events of painting or erasing. Ironically, these events are not unique but relics formed by mass media from his childhood. He confessed that there is no more new source and what he wants to do is what creates something by mixing his relics, by his inexact and imperfect movements. 78


79

Untitled #001 Acrylic on paper 78.8x109 cm ► © Kim Byungkwan

Untitled #004 Acrylic on paper 78.8x109 cm ► © Kim Byungkwan

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79

Untitled #001 Acrylic on paper 78.8x109 cm ► © Kim Byungkwan

Untitled #004 Acrylic on paper 78.8x109 cm ► © Kim Byungkwan

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81

X-report oldstar #06 Acrylic on canvas 90.9x72.7cm ► © Kim Byungkwan

Ghost Backup #00 Acrylic on canvas 53x45.5cm ► © Kim Byungkwan

82


81

X-report oldstar #06 Acrylic on canvas 90.9x72.7cm ► © Kim Byungkwan

Ghost Backup #00 Acrylic on canvas 53x45.5cm ► © Kim Byungkwan

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83

X-report #14 Acrylic on canvas 73x60.6cm ► © Kim Byungkwan

DH015 Acrylic on canvas 90.9x72.7cm ► © Kim Byungkwan

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83

X-report #14 Acrylic on canvas 73x60.6cm ► © Kim Byungkwan

DH015 Acrylic on canvas 90.9x72.7cm ► © Kim Byungkwan

84


MEXICO

INTERVIEW WITH

Working in his studio or at location, FELIX HERNANDEZ mixes crafts, on-camera effects and digital art to accomplish unique images and bring his scale models to life. This has brought him during these years various invitations to impart conferences and workshops and to do commercial projects in many places like; Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Dubai, China, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Denmark, New York, Chicago, UK, Italy, and of course, all around Mexico. How did you discover your passion for art? I don’t know exactly at which point of my life I discovered my passion for art. But I do know that since I was a little boy (around 5 years old) I loved to create. Back then you could find me building stuff with “Tente” (I kind of Lego), or making posters with plasticine, or playing with my Playmobil creating my own stories and worlds. Time went by and in my youth, I liked to draw, design and build simple wooden stuff. I guess I have always liked to create things. Also, I have always liked to create stories in my mind. When the time arrived for college, I applied for the career of Industrial Design, but for some reason, I ended in Graphic Design. While studying Graphic Design I had my first encounter with photography. Back in the days where it was “analogue”. (We used film, no digital). Also, we didn’t use computers, so pretty much, everything was done using your “hands". I think the mix of all that helped me to become in what I’m now - as a professional and as a person.

www.hernandezdreamphography.com 85

Fix It! ► © Felix Hernandez

22


MEXICO

INTERVIEW WITH

“I grew up in the ’70s and ’80s. Many of these characters, movies, and series influenced me and in the way, I tell stories. I Take some of those iconic characters and reinterpreted them with my own vision” Working in his studio or at location, FELIX HERNANDEZ mixes crafts, on-camera effects and digital art to accomplish unique images and bring his scale models to life. This has brought him during these years various invitations to impart conferences and workshops and to do commercial projects in many places like; Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Dubai, China, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Denmark, New York, Chicago, UK, Italy, and of course, all around Mexico. How did you discover your passion for art? I don’t know exactly at which point of my life I discovered my passion for art. But I do know that since I was a little boy (around 5 years old) I loved to create. Back then you could find me building stuff with “Tente” (I kind of Lego), or making posters with plasticine, or playing with my Playmobil creating my own stories and worlds. Time went by and in my youth, I liked to draw, design and build simple wooden stuff. I guess I have always liked to create things. Also, I have always liked to create stories in my mind. When the time arrived for college, I applied for the career of Industrial Design, but for some reason, I ended in Graphic Design. While studying Graphic Design I had my first encounter with photography. Back in the days where it was “analogue”. (We used film, no digital). Also, we didn’t use computers, so pretty much, everything was done using your “hands". I think the mix of all that helped me to become in what I’m now - as a professional and as a person.

www.hernandezdreamphography.com 85

Fix It! ► © Felix Hernandez

22


What is “Dreamphography”?

Tell us about the process that leads to your unique style, which often mixes extremely realistic miniature worlds with an incredible imagination.

Dreamphography is the “name” for the “recent” work I’m doing. The mix of many passions and disciplines all at the service of creation: photography, digital art, creating concept art and crafts. Normally I’m inspired by my own dreams, so Dreamphography would be the process of “portraying what exists in me”.

Everything starts with an idea. Normally I grab a general idea from my dreams. Then I start to shape that idea to create a concept. When I have the concept done, I start planning how I will approach it; which parts are going to be done in scale, which is going to be digital, the practical or digital effects, the lighting design, etc. Once I have decided how I’m going to approach the concept, I start working on the models and dioramas, which is the most time-consuming part, however, is the one I most enjoy.

What inspires you? Almost everything and that’s a blessing and a curse. A blessing because there is always something I want to create. And a curse because I will not have time (in my lifetime) to create everything I want too.

When the complete set is ready I take it into my studio and make the lighting design and some test shots: Trying with different lenses, angles, lighting setups, effects, etc. After that, I shoot for the final images. Once I have the photos, I go into post-production. Normally this is a mix of different software like Photoshop, Capture One, Helicon, etc.

Inspiration comes from movies, books, music, food, situations, fear, other artists, etc. Normally I take those “inspirations” into my dreams (literally while I’m sleeping) and they get mixed with who I really am Dreams are a great source to produce ideas, some are crazy and you’ll have to re-interpret them in a way that could be more understandable for the viewers. “Dreams” are like a blender, where you mix reality with fantasy, but most important, they reveal who you are. This is important for an artist. The work you create has to have something of you in it. That’s what will make it different from the work of others. Abducted ► © Felix Hernandez

Safdar Jang, Study 1 Delhi, India, 2006 © Michael Kenna

Of course, I have to say that I’m not the first or the only one making this kind of work. Many of the greatest movie scenes that I love have been done with these techniques. Even today, with all the CG. For example Starwars, Blade Runner 2049, BTTF, Pan’s Labyrinth, etc. I put into every image I create my “style” which is different from the others. It's about the composition, the way of lighting, etc. But most important; the stories I have to tell. The concept is what will make your work ‘unique”. The concept will also affect the way you do things, which will become in “Your Style”. Heartbreak ► © Felix Hernandez


What is “Dreamphography”?

Tell us about the process that leads to your unique style, which often mixes extremely realistic miniature worlds with an incredible imagination.

Dreamphography is the “name” for the “recent” work I’m doing. The mix of many passions and disciplines all at the service of creation: photography, digital art, creating concept art and crafts. Normally I’m inspired by my own dreams, so Dreamphography would be the process of “portraying what exists in me”.

Everything starts with an idea. Normally I grab a general idea from my dreams. Then I start to shape that idea to create a concept. When I have the concept done, I start planning how I will approach it; which parts are going to be done in scale, which is going to be digital, the practical or digital effects, the lighting design, etc. Once I have decided how I’m going to approach the concept, I start working on the models and dioramas, which is the most time-consuming part, however, is the one I most enjoy.

What inspires you? Almost everything and that’s a blessing and a curse. A blessing because there is always something I want to create. And a curse because I will not have time (in my lifetime) to create everything I want too.

When the complete set is ready I take it into my studio and make the lighting design and some test shots: Trying with different lenses, angles, lighting setups, effects, etc. After that, I shoot for the final images. Once I have the photos, I go into post-production. Normally this is a mix of different software like Photoshop, Capture One, Helicon, etc.

Inspiration comes from movies, books, music, food, situations, fear, other artists, etc. Normally I take those “inspirations” into my dreams (literally while I’m sleeping) and they get mixed with who I really am Dreams are a great source to produce ideas, some are crazy and you’ll have to re-interpret them in a way that could be more understandable for the viewers. “Dreams” are like a blender, where you mix reality with fantasy, but most important, they reveal who you are. This is important for an artist. The work you create has to have something of you in it. That’s what will make it different from the work of others. Abducted ► © Felix Hernandez

Safdar Jang, Study 1 Delhi, India, 2006 © Michael Kenna

Of course, I have to say that I’m not the first or the only one making this kind of work. Many of the greatest movie scenes that I love have been done with these techniques. Even today, with all the CG. For example Starwars, Blade Runner 2049, BTTF, Pan’s Labyrinth, etc. I put into every image I create my “style” which is different from the others. It's about the composition, the way of lighting, etc. But most important; the stories I have to tell. The concept is what will make your work ‘unique”. The concept will also affect the way you do things, which will become in “Your Style”. Heartbreak ► © Felix Hernandez


Your creations combine a broad range of crafts and techniques, such as aging materials to achieve incredibly realistic looks. Do you invent your own techniques? If so, how do you conceive them? The techniques and processes for creating the scale models and dioramas are really diverse. I have learned a lot from other artists, but there is not a recipe, just guides, tips, and tricks. You have to take all that information and start doing it, and while you are doing it, you will find your own way of doing things. Trial and error is the best way of learning. What is the role or digital edition in your works? Digital art is part of my process, just because I enjoy it as well. At present, I try to do more in-camera, but digital manipulation is really important for the kind of work I do. Some things would be just “impossible” to create the way you want them without digital art or in some cases, they would be extremely expensive. I think that the best results come from the mix of disciplines and techniques. The Ecto 1 ► © Felix Hernandez

You often incorporate beloved cultural icons, such as Star Wars, Ghostbusters, The Dukes of Hazzard and Back to the Future into your creations, giving them a whole new life. Tell us a bit about this facet of your work. I grew up in the ’70s and ’80s. Many of these characters, movies, and series influenced me and in the way, I tell stories. I Take some of those iconic characters and reinterpreted them with my own vision. Also, many of my images that aren’t created based directly on an IP are influenced by all these movies and characters I grew up with. You have also ventured into stop motion animation. What are the challenges and new creative opportunities of this technique? This is something very recent. I have just started to play around with motion, so there is a whole “new world” to discover!. A lot of new “challenges” or opportunities for telling more complex stories. Hypnagogia ► © Andrea Torres Balaguer Bear With Me ► © Martin Stranka

Red Cross ► © Felix Hernandez The Escapist ► © Martin Stranka


Your creations combine a broad range of crafts and techniques, such as aging materials to achieve incredibly realistic looks. Do you invent your own techniques? If so, how do you conceive them? The techniques and processes for creating the scale models and dioramas are really diverse. I have learned a lot from other artists, but there is not a recipe, just guides, tips, and tricks. You have to take all that information and start doing it, and while you are doing it, you will find your own way of doing things. Trial and error is the best way of learning. What is the role or digital edition in your works? Digital art is part of my process, just because I enjoy it as well. At present, I try to do more in-camera, but digital manipulation is really important for the kind of work I do. Some things would be just “impossible” to create the way you want them without digital art or in some cases, they would be extremely expensive. I think that the best results come from the mix of disciplines and techniques. The Ecto 1 ► © Felix Hernandez

You often incorporate beloved cultural icons, such as Star Wars, Ghostbusters, The Dukes of Hazzard and Back to the Future into your creations, giving them a whole new life. Tell us a bit about this facet of your work. I grew up in the ’70s and ’80s. Many of these characters, movies, and series influenced me and in the way, I tell stories. I Take some of those iconic characters and reinterpreted them with my own vision. Also, many of my images that aren’t created based directly on an IP are influenced by all these movies and characters I grew up with. You have also ventured into stop motion animation. What are the challenges and new creative opportunities of this technique? This is something very recent. I have just started to play around with motion, so there is a whole “new world” to discover!. A lot of new “challenges” or opportunities for telling more complex stories. Hypnagogia ► © Andrea Torres Balaguer Bear With Me ► © Martin Stranka

Red Cross ► © Felix Hernandez The Escapist ► © Martin Stranka


You tour the world giving conferences and workshops. What is the importance of divulgation in the life of an artist? Most of what I know today is thanks to people that shared their knowledge with me and that had inspired me to follow my passion. So I try to do the same with others. I have found that the more you share the more you receive. Sharing your knowledge and experiences with others is not only gratifying but it’s also a great way to learn!. From a commercial point of view, it’s also part of the way a make a living and a great way to meet new places and people. What exciting new project should we expect from you in the future? I have many personal and commercial projects going on which involves some collaborations with other artists I admire, and my incursion in the stop motion world is just the tip of the iceberg that will lead me to tell better and more complete stories. Inner Journey ► © Felix Hernandez

Back to the Future ► © Felix Hernandez


You tour the world giving conferences and workshops. What is the importance of divulgation in the life of an artist? Most of what I know today is thanks to people that shared their knowledge with me and that had inspired me to follow my passion. So I try to do the same with others. I have found that the more you share the more you receive. Sharing your knowledge and experiences with others is not only gratifying but it’s also a great way to learn!. From a commercial point of view, it’s also part of the way a make a living and a great way to meet new places and people. What exciting new project should we expect from you in the future? I have many personal and commercial projects going on which involves some collaborations with other artists I admire, and my incursion in the stop motion world is just the tip of the iceberg that will lead me to tell better and more complete stories. Inner Journey ► © Felix Hernandez

Back to the Future ► © Felix Hernandez


ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

GUS | Concept Art World

www.gusfineart.es

by Photographize Conceptual artists have paved a new era of digital art to lead creative teams and inspire the next generation of artists. Thoughtful and contemplative, viewing Gus artworks is like a meditation. Gus is a Fine Art Photographer from a small village in the north of Spain. The most unique aspect of his work is the variety. His artworks depict subjects that feel like they are fading in front of the viewer’s eye. The surreal quality of his work augments his technical ability and leads the viewers to a new appreciation of a place that might not exist. This imaginative world stood with equal 93

weight as a reality – with its endless mystery and revelation. Gus compassionate artworks are inspired by ideas he carries in his mind. He captures the essence of the transient nature of life. Most of Gus' works carry soft touches of color that give his creations a dreamlike quality. Combining a variety of photographic techniques, especially multiple and long exposure, the artist takes us into a magical journey into the depths of his imagination. Using an age-old natural technique, mixed with nowadays photographs, his images are multi-layered, simply executed,

and visually delightful. Soft touches of color give his creations a dreamlike atmosphere. He often incorporates people into his works, since he considers that human beings are a fundamental part of our environment. These ethereal subjects seem to fade into thin air in front of the viewer’s eye. Endowed with a thoughtful and contemplative aura, standing in from of his photographs is like a meditation. Gus started sharing his photographs in 2018. Since then, he has been on a steeply rising trajectory and has received worldwide recognition and international awards. He has been published in several magazines, also been invited to several international exhibitions.

City Sunset ► © Gus


ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

GUS | Concept Art World

www.gusfineart.es

by Photographize Conceptual artists have paved a new era of digital art to lead creative teams and inspire the next generation of artists. Thoughtful and contemplative, viewing Gus artworks is like a meditation. Gus is a Fine Art Photographer from a small village in the north of Spain. The most unique aspect of his work is the variety. His artworks depict subjects that feel like they are fading in front of the viewer’s eye. The surreal quality of his work augments his technical ability and leads the viewers to a new appreciation of a place that might not exist. This imaginative world stood with equal 93

weight as a reality – with its endless mystery and revelation. Gus compassionate artworks are inspired by ideas he carries in his mind. He captures the essence of the transient nature of life. Most of Gus' works carry soft touches of color that give his creations a dreamlike quality. Combining a variety of photographic techniques, especially multiple and long exposure, the artist takes us into a magical journey into the depths of his imagination. Using an age-old natural technique, mixed with nowadays photographs, his images are multi-layered, simply executed,

and visually delightful. Soft touches of color give his creations a dreamlike atmosphere. He often incorporates people into his works, since he considers that human beings are a fundamental part of our environment. These ethereal subjects seem to fade into thin air in front of the viewer’s eye. Endowed with a thoughtful and contemplative aura, standing in from of his photographs is like a meditation. Gus started sharing his photographs in 2018. Since then, he has been on a steeply rising trajectory and has received worldwide recognition and international awards. He has been published in several magazines, also been invited to several international exhibitions.

City Sunset ► © Gus


Alone in night ► © Gus

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S´Escorxador ► © Gus

Rain ► © Gus

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Morning Sun ► © Gus


Alone in night ► © Gus

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S´Escorxador ► © Gus

Rain ► © Gus

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Morning Sun ► © Gus


GERMANY

Anja Diabaté is a professional photographer based in Hamburg, Germany. She uses Fine Art Photography to transform her concepts and ideas into unique artworks. Her strength and power is the transformation of her ideas and creativity into extremely expressive and soulful photos. Anja’s portraits are anything but ordinary. They’re sprinkled with magic. Each of her photographs tells a unique story, her aim is always to inspire a viewer to get into depth and reflection. Her highest self-requirement is to create multiple photos from a single original, but without ever losing the cohesion to the embedding series. Some of her series are self-portraits, but most are portraits created using her two sons as models. The ornate face paintings and make-up are all created and performed by Anja herself. Each series installation and setup are designed such that there is no need for a photomontage as post-processing. Anja's nature is to deeply dive into her creativity, to create something completely new and to fully enjoy all this. It is the highest representation of her self. “Each of my artwork represents a definite concept and encourages the viewer starting to create their own story in their mind” www.photographize.co/anjadiabate 97

The Little Peacock part II ► © Anja Diabaté DreamLand collection © Vassilis Tangoulis


GERMANY

Anja Diabaté is a professional photographer based in Hamburg, Germany. She uses Fine Art Photography to transform her concepts and ideas into unique artworks. Her strength and power is the transformation of her ideas and creativity into extremely expressive and soulful photos. Anja’s portraits are anything but ordinary. They’re sprinkled with magic. Each of her photographs tells a unique story, her aim is always to inspire a viewer to get into depth and reflection. Her highest self-requirement is to create multiple photos from a single original, but without ever losing the cohesion to the embedding series. Some of her series are self-portraits, but most are portraits created using her two sons as models. The ornate face paintings and make-up are all created and performed by Anja herself. Each series installation and setup are designed such that there is no need for a photomontage as post-processing. Anja's nature is to deeply dive into her creativity, to create something completely new and to fully enjoy all this. It is the highest representation of her self. “Each of my artwork represents a definite concept and encourages the viewer starting to create their own story in their mind” www.photographize.co/anjadiabate 97

The Little Peacock part II ► © Anja Diabaté DreamLand collection © Vassilis Tangoulis


The Young Lion ► © Anja Diabaté The Little Peacock part II ► © Anja Diabaté

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The Young Lion ► © Anja Diabaté The Little Peacock part II ► © Anja Diabaté

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100


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The Little Peacock part II ► © Anja Diabaté

The Little Peacock part II ► © Anja Diabaté

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The Little Peacock part II ► © Anja Diabaté

The Little Peacock part II ► © Anja Diabaté

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The Little Peacock part II ► © Anja Diabaté

The Little Peacock part II ► © Anja Diabaté

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The Little Peacock part II ► © Anja Diabaté

The Little Peacock part II ► © Anja Diabaté

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The Little Peacock part II ► © Anja Diabaté

Bird of Paradise ► © Anja Diabaté

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The Little Peacock part II ► © Anja Diabaté

Bird of Paradise ► © Anja Diabaté

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ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

www.anytamadrazof.wixsite.com/anytamadrazo

ANYTA MADRAZO | An Intimate Journey into her Inner World by Photographize Spanish photographer Anyta Madrazo creates inspiring self-portraits that take us into a thrilling journey of self-discovery. Anyta started portraying herself thirteen years ago and has not stopped ever since. Her massive portfolio is organized into various “Crisis” series, which display an impressive range of styles and moods. Her creations flow from contemplative monochrome to playful color, from spontaneous captures to theatrically staged compositions. The multifaceted artist unravels in front of our eyes, one shot at a time. 107

Her work emerges from the synergy of three recurring elements in her life: freedom, emotions and fantasy. Anyta believes in unleashing our emotions, in lifting our feet from the ground to face our daily challenges through the prism of imagination. She considers inner chaos is a powerful learning tool. Photography is her instrument to concentrate these emotions and give birth to new beauty.

the more anxious we grow for the next piece of the puzzle. In her words: “Self-portrait gives me the perfect chance to turn the world I know upside down and do whatever I want with it, an essential game for me.”

Anyta’s photographs transmit an inevitable feeling of a trip, an exploration, of surprises waiting to be discovered. The more we see,

“Portraying myself has been the best way of getting to know who I am and not getting lost in the way.”

Anyta’s works has been exhibited and published internationally. She also shares her passion for photography in technical and creative workshops around Madrid.


ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

www.anytamadrazof.wixsite.com/anytamadrazo

ANYTA MADRAZO | An Intimate Journey into her Inner World by Photographize Spanish photographer Anyta Madrazo creates inspiring self-portraits that take us into a thrilling journey of self-discovery. Anyta started portraying herself thirteen years ago and has not stopped ever since. Her massive portfolio is organized into various “Crisis” series, which display an impressive range of styles and moods. Her creations flow from contemplative monochrome to playful color, from spontaneous captures to theatrically staged compositions. The multifaceted artist unravels in front of our eyes, one shot at a time. 107

Her work emerges from the synergy of three recurring elements in her life: freedom, emotions and fantasy. Anyta believes in unleashing our emotions, in lifting our feet from the ground to face our daily challenges through the prism of imagination. She considers inner chaos is a powerful learning tool. Photography is her instrument to concentrate these emotions and give birth to new beauty.

the more anxious we grow for the next piece of the puzzle. In her words: “Self-portrait gives me the perfect chance to turn the world I know upside down and do whatever I want with it, an essential game for me.”

Anyta’s photographs transmit an inevitable feeling of a trip, an exploration, of surprises waiting to be discovered. The more we see,

“Portraying myself has been the best way of getting to know who I am and not getting lost in the way.”

Anyta’s works has been exhibited and published internationally. She also shares her passion for photography in technical and creative workshops around Madrid.


► © Anyta Madrazo


► © Anyta Madrazo


Highlights Antonio Salaverry BRAZIL

Author: Antonio Salaverry

www.antoniosalaverry.com

www.instagram.com/antoniosalaverry

► © Antonio Salaverry ► © Antonio Salaverry 111

Crossing ► © Marek Juras

112


Highlights Antonio Salaverry BRAZIL

Author: Antonio Salaverry

www.antoniosalaverry.com

www.instagram.com/antoniosalaverry

► © Antonio Salaverry ► © Antonio Salaverry 111

Crossing ► © Marek Juras

112


Highlights Charlene Planche FRANCE

Author: Charlene Planche

www.charleneplanche.com www.instagram.com/charlene_.pl

Headless ► © Charlene Planche 114

The Book of Magic ► © Charlene Planche


Highlights Charlene Planche FRANCE

Author: Charlene Planche

www.charleneplanche.com www.instagram.com/charlene_.pl

Headless ► © Charlene Planche 114

The Book of Magic ► © Charlene Planche


Highlights Daniel Castonguay CANADA

Author: Daniel Castonguay

www.dancastudios.com www.instagram.com/daniel.castonguay.165 www.facebook.com/daniel.castonguay.165

Le Parc Des Braves ► © Daniel Castonguay

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The Stride ► © Daniel Castonguay

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Highlights Daniel Castonguay CANADA

Author: Daniel Castonguay

www.dancastudios.com www.instagram.com/daniel.castonguay.165 www.facebook.com/daniel.castonguay.165

Le Parc Des Braves ► © Daniel Castonguay

115

The Stride ► © Daniel Castonguay

116


Highlights Ben Daure

UNITED KINGDOM

Author: Ben Daure

www.bendaurephotography.com www.instagram.com/bendaure

► © Ben Daure 117

► © Ben Daure 118


Highlights Ben Daure

UNITED KINGDOM

Author: Ben Daure

www.bendaurephotography.com www.instagram.com/bendaure

► © Ben Daure 117

► © Ben Daure 118


Highlights Valentino Lanzarini

Author: Valentino Lanzarini

ITALY

Batman ► © Valentino Lanzarini 119

www.facebook.com/lanzarinivalentino

Monument ► © Valentino Lanzarini 119


Highlights Valentino Lanzarini

Author: Valentino Lanzarini

ITALY

Batman ► © Valentino Lanzarini 119

www.facebook.com/lanzarinivalentino

Monument ► © Valentino Lanzarini 120


Highlights Nadia Droulia GREECE

► © Nadia Droulia 121

Author: Nadia Droulia

www.facebook.com/nadia.droulia

► © Nadia Droulia 122


Highlights Nadia Droulia GREECE

► © Nadia Droulia 121

Author: Nadia Droulia

www.facebook.com/nadia.droulia

► © Nadia Droulia 122


Highlights Mirka D.R. ITALY

Author: Mirka D.R.

www.instagram.com/mirkadrphoto

123

Mano ► © Mirka D.R.

Iconic Blue ► © Mirka D.R. A Whale's Tale ► © Mirka D.R.


Highlights Mirka D.R. ITALY

Author: Mirka D.R.

www.instagram.com/mirkadrphoto

123

Mano ► © Mirka D.R.

Iconic Blue ► © Mirka D.R. A Whale's Tale ► © Mirka D.R.


Highlights Raqee S. Najmuldeen MALAYSIA

► © Raqee S. Najmuldeen 125

Author: Raqee S. Najmuldeen

www.instagram.com/raqee_najm

► © Raqee S. Najmuldeen

126


Highlights Raqee S. Najmuldeen MALAYSIA

► © Raqee S. Najmuldeen 125

Author: Raqee S. Najmuldeen

www.instagram.com/raqee_najm

► © Raqee S. Najmuldeen

126


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A L E X A N D R I A

ISSN 2639-5673

• Jeremy Mann NYC 40, 48x48 Oil on Panel •

Profile for Photographize Magazine

Photographize | Issue 42 | September 2019