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2018 Š PhotographizeMa g

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No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner.

ISSN 2576-2648

All images and text published in PhotographizeMag are the sole property of the featured authors and the subject copyright .

38

Photographize PO BOX 20658, 234 10th Ave New York City, NY 10011 United States


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33 who we are Photographize aims to become a virtual place based on the immediacy, where images are presented in their pure beauty and have the ability to capture and captivate the viewer. Since its launch in 2010, Photographize has covered the work of a variety of renowned artists from around the globe. We dedicate our space to all kinds of art regardless of technique or period, such as illustration, painting, digital art, photography, sculpture and video.

Join the next issue

55

23

13

53

79

FEATURED 03 23 37 55 81

Jose Navarro maria svarbova dawid planeta nate hill Fabio Giampietro

ARTICLES 33 Felix hernandez

Photographer Captures Small Toys With Big Imagination

53 david moreno

Drawing With Sculpture

79 hengki lee

Dreams and Poetry in Black & White

INTERVIEWS GRAPHIC ZONE 65 13 Michael Kenna 45 igor morski 91 HIGHLIGHTS 69 ben thomas

Photographize will be publishing 3 issues per year: January, May and September. Due to space constraints, we will only publish 2 artworks per artist. Depending on the content, the artist may be contacted for an exclusive interview or highlighted in coming issues. Deadlines: January Issue: December 10th May Issue: April 10th September Issue: Nov 10th

How to submit: 1 to 3 jpeg images - 900 pixels @ 72ppi Include your website or social media link in the comment

write to: submissions@photographize.co

Amazing Graphic design From Around The World

Curators’ choice

81

65

All images and text published in Photographize Magazine are the sole property of the featured authors and subject to copyright. No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner.

2018 © Photographize Magazine Cover : © Michael Kenna Thirty Bottles of Wine, Pietrantonj Cantina, Vittorito Abruzzo, Italy. 2016

ISSN 2576-2648

Founder, Chief Editor & Art Director: Andrea Costantini

Co-Owner, Editor and Web Administrator: Carla De La Matta


03

69

37

45

33 who we are Photographize aims to become a virtual place based on the immediacy, where images are presented in their pure beauty and have the ability to capture and captivate the viewer. Since its launch in 2010, Photographize has covered the work of a variety of renowned artists from around the globe. We dedicate our space to all kinds of art regardless of technique or period, such as illustration, painting, digital art, photography, sculpture and video.

Join the next issue

55

23

13

53

79

FEATURED 03 23 37 55 81

Jose Navarro maria svarbova dawid planeta nate hill Fabio Giampietro

ARTICLES 33 Felix hernandez

Photographer Captures Small Toys With Big Imagination

53 david moreno

Drawing With Sculpture

79 hengki lee

Dreams and Poetry in Black & White

INTERVIEWS GRAPHIC ZONE 65 13 Michael Kenna 45 igor morski 91 HIGHLIGHTS 69 ben thomas

Photographize will be publishing 3 issues per year: January, May and September. Due to space constraints, we will only publish 2 artworks per artist. Depending on the content, the artist may be contacted for an exclusive interview or highlighted in coming issues. Deadlines: January Issue: December 10th May Issue: April 10th September Issue: Nov 10th

How to submit: 1 to 3 jpeg images - 900 pixels @ 72ppi Include your website or social media link in the comment

write to: submissions@photographize.co

Amazing Graphic design From Around The World

Curators’ choice

81

65

All images and text published in Photographize Magazine are the sole property of the featured authors and subject to copyright. No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner.

2018 © Photographize Magazine Cover : © Michael Kenna Thirty Bottles of Wine, Pietrantonj Cantina, Vittorito Abruzzo, Italy. 2016

ISSN 2576-2648

Founder, Chief Editor & Art Director: Andrea Costantini

Co-Owner, Editor and Web Administrator: Carla De La Matta


SPAIN

03

Jose Navarro, instagrammer, graphic designer and visual artist based in northern Spain. Jose works as creative and art director at A&B. He creates playful and surreal manipulations by combining photos, blending them, and adding a warm color effect. To do this, he diverts objects, animals or food. And it must be said that the rendering is sometimes very amusing.

www.instagram.com/j.m.navarro

Chickenosaurus Rex Š Jose Navarro


SPAIN

03

Jose Navarro, instagrammer, graphic designer and visual artist based in northern Spain. Jose works as creative and art director at A&B. He creates playful and surreal manipulations by combining photos, blending them, and adding a warm color effect. To do this, he diverts objects, animals or food. And it must be said that the rendering is sometimes very amusing.

www.instagram.com/j.m.navarro

Chickenosaurus Rex Š Jose Navarro


05

06

Sphinx Š Jose Navarro

Paint it blonde Š Jose Navarro


05

06

Sphinx Š Jose Navarro

Paint it blonde Š Jose Navarro


07

08

Egg Car Š Jose Navarro

The nike trilogy 1/3 Š Jose Navarro


07

08

Egg Car Š Jose Navarro

The nike trilogy 1/3 Š Jose Navarro


09

10

© Francesco Vullo

Da Bomb © Jose Navarro

Weird beauty standards © Jose Navarro


09

10

© Francesco Vullo

Da Bomb © Jose Navarro

Weird beauty standards © Jose Navarro


12

Fake Blood Š Jose Navarro

Betrayal Š Jose Navarro


12

Fake Blood Š Jose Navarro

Betrayal Š Jose Navarro


UNITED KINGDOM

INTERVIEW WITH “I believe that we all have the simple responsibility to live to our highest potential. I bring this belief to my photography, and it has ensured that there is rarely a moment where I do not feel inspired and passionate.”

13

Michael Kenna was born in 1953, in Widnes, Lancashire, an industrial town in the north-west of England. He is one of the most influential landscape photographers of his generation, best known for his black & white landscapes. Often working at dawn or during the night, he has concentrated primarily on the interaction between the ephemeral atmospheric condition of the natural landscape, and human-made structures and sculptural mass. Today, Michael is represented by at least 20 galleries in Asia, Australia, Europe, and the United States with an average of 14 one-person shows each year. His work is in dozens of major permanent collections. Writers have described his photographs as romantic, surreal, haunting, and jewel-like. His work is also available to the public via several books containing an astonishing quantity of reproductions.

At present, with the use of digital edition, photographs sometimes become closer to paintings. We believe some of your works have this property. They have a dreamy look, reminiscent of some exquisite paints from the past. On the other hand, some paints can make the viewer think they are photographs. What are your thoughts about this? Do you believe there is a fundamental difference between painting and photography? What is the boundary between them?

explore if I chose to. However, the longer I live and the further I travel, the more I have come to some basic conclusions. I believe that we all have the simple, (and sometimes incredibly complicated), responsibility to live to our highest potential. I bring this belief to my photography, (as well as everything else I do), and it has ensured that there is rarely a moment where I do not feel inspired and passionate. Except, perhaps when I have do my taxes for the previous year...

I have no answers to this question, only thoughts. I suppose the fundamental boundary used to be that photography was tied to reality. In general, what was photographed, actually existed, so we had a natural tendency to believe what we saw. Of course, the digital revolution has changed all that. In my view, the boundaries are now blurred to the point where it is often not possible to know if a work of art is a painting or a photograph. We might therefore question whether it matters. Beauty is, after all, in the mind (and heart and soul...) of the beholder. Personally, I have found that a photograph made in a fraction of a second might move me more than a painting made over days and weeks. Yet, if I consider comparing, for example, a painting by Michelangelo, with a silver gelatin print, it seems to be act of futility. I believe one should relate and react to works of art on the basis that each work is unique. I dont think we need to make general rules.important points in my cell phone. I may turn them into reality later on. 'Lucid Dream' and 'Open Mind' series are examples of this process.

We admire Michael Kenna as a photographer. However, we also know about your background studies of art and a possible career as a painter. Have you ever thought what your life would be like as a painter?

All great photographers, like many outstanding representatives of other disciplines, have above an average commitment to their work and an undying belief in what they are doing. However, this might only come in periods of inspiration. Can you tell us where your passion comes from? What inspires Michael Kenna?

I am certain that life would be extremely fascinating if I had spent my time being a painter, or a musician, or a poet, or buddhist monk, or many other things. I have often wished that I had several clones so that I could experience other facets of the myriad of opportunities in this world. It takes years of concentrated study and application to be proficient in photography. Certainly the same is true in painting. I would love to have explored that avenue of creative expression. Maybe there is still time. Cartier Bresson spent many years of his later life drawing. But, as Geoffrey Chaucer famously wrote seven centuries ago: “Time and tide wait for no man.” I rather doubt that I will be the exception!

Life, and the constant awareness that it can be over in the blink of an eye, inspires Michael Kenna. Quite simply, I want to thoroughly embrace every second of my existence. I don’t pretend to understand what this life is about. There are innumerable philosophies and ideologies, and all kinds of perspectives and persuasions, that I could study and

14

www.michaelkenna.net Tearpot © Johnson Tsang


UNITED KINGDOM

INTERVIEW WITH “I believe that we all have the simple, responsibility to live to our highest potential. I bring this belief to my photography, and it has ensured that there is rarely a moment where I do not feel inspired and passionate.”

13

Michael Kenna was born in 1953, in Widnes, Lancashire, an industrial town in the north-west of England. He is one of the most influential landscape photographer of his generation, best known for his black & white landscapes. Often working at dawn or during the night, he has concentrated primarily on the interaction between the ephemeral atmospheric condition of the natural landscape, and human-made structures and sculptural mass. Today, Michael is represented by at least 20 galleries in Asia, Australia, Europe, and the United States with an average of 14 one-person shows each year. His work is in dozens of major permanent collections. Writers have described his photographs as romantic, surreal, haunting, and jewel-like. His work is also available to the public via several books containing an astonishing quantity of reproductions.

At present, with the use of digital edition, photographs sometimes become closer to paintings. We believe some of your works have this property. They have a dreamy look, reminiscent of some exquisite paints from the past. On the other hand, some paints can make the viewer think they are photographs. What are your thoughts about this? Do you believe there is a fundamental difference between painting and photography? What is the boundary between them?

explore if I chose to. However, the longer I live and the further I travel, the more I have come to some basic conclusions. I believe that we all have the simple, (and sometimes incredibly complicated), responsibility to live to our highest potential. I bring this belief to my photography, (as well as everything else I do), and it has ensured that there is rarely a moment where I do not feel inspired and passionate. Except, perhaps when I have do my taxes for the previous year...

I have no answers to this question, only thoughts. I suppose the fundamental boundary used to be that photography was tied to reality. In general, what was photographed, actually existed, so we had a natural tendency to believe what we saw. Of course, the digital revolution has changed all that. In my view, the boundaries are now blurred to the point where it is often not possible to know if a work of art is a painting or a photograph. We might therefore question whether it matters. Beauty is, after all, in the mind (and heart and soul...) of the beholder. Personally, I have found that a photograph made in a fraction of a second might move me more than a painting made over days and weeks. Yet, if I consider comparing, for example, a painting by Michelangelo, with a silver gelatin print, it seems to be act of futility. I believe one should relate and react to works of art on the basis that each work is unique. I dont think we need to make general rules.important points in my cell phone. I may turn them into reality later on. 'Lucid Dream' and 'Open Mind' series are examples of this process.

We admire Michael Kenna as a photographer. However, we also know about your background studies of art and a possible career as a painter. Have you ever thought what your life would be like as a painter?

All great photographers, like many outstanding representatives of other disciplines, have above an average commitment to their work and an undying belief in what they are doing. However, this might only come in periods of inspiration. Can you tell us where your passion comes from? What inspires Michael Kenna?

I am certain that life would be extremely fascinating if I had spent my time being a painter, or a musician, or a poet, or buddhist monk, or many other things. I have often wished that I had several clones so that I could experience other facets of the myriad of opportunities in this world. It takes years of concentrated study and application to be proficient in photography. Certainly the same is true in painting. I would love to have explored that avenue of creative expression. Maybe there is still time. Cartier Bresson spent many years of his later life drawing. But, as Geoffrey Chaucer famously wrote seven centuries ago: “Time and tide wait for no man.” I rather doubt that I will be the exception!

Life, and the constant awareness that it can be over in the blink of an eye, inspires Michael Kenna. Quite simply, I want to thoroughly embrace every second of my existence. I don’t pretend to understand what this life is about. There are innumerable philosophies and ideologies, and all kinds of perspectives and persuasions, that I could study and

14

www.michaelkenna.net Tearpot © Johnson Tsang


Many of your artistic works are shot in well-known places such as England, France and Italy to name a few. Do you believe famous places give an advantage to the photographs?

We love the works you did in Abruzzo, Italy. The medieval ruins, ancient villages and the countryside come alive in all of your captures. Can you tell us about your experience in this beautiful place? Would you consider another project in Italy?   I have photographed in Italy many times over many years and anticipate continuing to photograph and travel there for years to come. My first visit to Abruzzo was in November, 2015. I was so impressed that I returned for three more visits, each for about a week. Abruzzo seems to be relatively unknown compared to many other places I have visited in Italy. It is not packed with tourists which greatly helps me with the sort of unpopulated photographs that I prefer to make. Abruzzo’s landscape is incredibly diverse. Primo Levi has aptly described the region as “forte e gentile” (strong and gentle). In some places, the land is exceedingly wild and mountainous, whereas in others, it is domestic and pastoral. Hill towns, castles and churches proliferate. Vineyards and olive groves are ubiquitous. Eighty miles of Adriatic shoreline provide endless points of view. In my opinion, the most difficult part of photographing Abruzzo is choosing from its vast abundance of rich and diverse subject matter. One has to be patient to best enjoy the many facets of this splendid place.

I photograph whenever and wherever I can. You are quite correct in the observation that some photographs are made of famous places. Place recognition surely helps the images. However, if a place is well known, perhaps it is not so interesting for viewers. If a place is easily accessible, perhaps it has also been well photographed by others. There are advantages and disadvantages to photographing famous places. My conclusion is that it is not worth worrying about.

15

16

Safdar Jang, Study 1 Delhi, India, 2006 © Michael Kenna

Castle and Sky, Rocca Calascio, Abruzzo, Italy. 2016 © Michael Kenna

Campo San Vio Viewpoint, Grand Canal Venice, Italy. 2007 © Michael Kenna

Quixote's Giants, Study 2, Campo de Criptana La Mancha, Spain. 1996 © Michael Kenna

Thirty Bottles of Wine, Pietrantonj Cantina, Vittorito Abruzzo, Italy. 2016 © Michael Kenna

Approaching Clouds, Pizzoferato Abruzzo, Italy. 2016 © Michael Kenna

Gifted © Johnson Tsang


Many of your artistic works are shot in well-known places such as England, France and Italy to name a few. Do you believe famous places give an advantage to the photographs?

We love the works you did in Abruzzo, Italy. The medieval ruins, ancient villages and the countryside come alive in all of your captures. Can you tell us about your experience in this beautiful place? Would you consider another project in Italy?   I have photographed in Italy many times over many years and anticipate continuing to photograph and travel there for years to come. My first visit to Abruzzo was in November, 2015. I was so impressed that I returned for three more visits, each for about a week. Abruzzo seems to be relatively unknown compared to many other places I have visited in Italy. It is not packed with tourists which greatly helps me with the sort of unpopulated photographs that I prefer to make. Abruzzo’s landscape is incredibly diverse. Primo Levi has aptly described the region as “forte e gentile” (strong and gentle). In some places, the land is exceedingly wild and mountainous, whereas in others, it is domestic and pastoral. Hill towns, castles and churches proliferate. Vineyards and olive groves are ubiquitous. Eighty miles of Adriatic shoreline provide endless points of view. In my opinion, the most difficult part of photographing Abruzzo is choosing from its vast abundance of rich and diverse subject matter. One has to be patient to best enjoy the many facets of this splendid place.

I photograph whenever and wherever I can. You are quite correct in the observation that some photographs are made of famous places. Place recognition surely helps the images. However, if a place is well known, perhaps it is not so interesting for viewers. If a place is easily accessible, perhaps it has also been well photographed by others. There are advantages and disadvantages to photographing famous places. My conclusion is that it is not worth worrying about.

15

16

Safdar Jang, Study 1 Delhi, India, 2006 © Michael Kenna

Castle and Sky, Rocca Calascio, Abruzzo, Italy. 2016 © Michael Kenna

Campo San Vio Viewpoint, Grand Canal Venice, Italy. 2007 © Michael Kenna

Quixote's Giants, Study 2, Campo de Criptana La Mancha, Spain. 1996 © Michael Kenna

Thirty Bottles of Wine, Pietrantonj Cantina, Vittorito Abruzzo, Italy. 2016 © Michael Kenna

Approaching Clouds, Pizzoferato Abruzzo, Italy. 2016 © Michael Kenna

Gifted © Johnson Tsang


17 Desert Clouds, Study 2, Merzouga Morocco, 1996 © Michael Kenna

Photographs often contain multiple stories, emotions and feelings. Do you ever find yourself wondering how the world would look if it was a photograph? I suppose that I spend most of my time imagining the world as a photograph. It is not easy, or perhaps even possible, to have defined borders of when one is a photographer and when not. Part of my mind is constantly placing the world in rectangles, reducing it to black and white, and imagining it in two dimensions. I suppose that a musician must be constantly listening and composing, a poet constantly playing with words and sentences. As the Greek philosopher informed us some time ago: "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit."

We admire the exquisite level of detail in your works. What photography technique do you prefer or are more comfortable with? How important is the equipment? Hasselblad medium format cameras have been my chosen means of photographic expression for the past thirty years. I work with silver materials, film cameras and do all my own darkroom printing. I do not use the digital medium. The following may be a bit technical for some of your readers, but I’ll attempt to explain my usual working set-up for a typical photographic expedition. Normally, I take two camera bodies, two viewfinders (a metered pentaprism and a waist level), two film backs, five lenses, a hand-held meter (chiefly for night exposures), a light-weight graphite tripod with ball socket head, and many cable releases (as I tend to lose them in the dark). I average 10-15 rolls of film a day. Everything has to fit into a backpack (except the tripod) as I walk, often for hours, when photographing and need to be able to work in all conditions without worrying about the equipment. These cameras have become old friends, familiar and easy to be with. They are fully manual with no fancy bells or whistles. They can function in extreme weather conditions and are generally reliable. I get a decent medium sized negative which I can print whole frame or crop as required. Occasionally, I also use plastic Holga cameras which take the same film. These are comparatively light-weight and inexpensive. They are also quirky, whimsical and unpredictable - a few of the many reasons I love them. I am often pleasantly surprised by the unexpected results I get, as well as occasionally disappointed. Holgas, in my experience, have a habit of keeping you guessing - surprise and spontaneity are hallmarks of their images. Hasselblads and Holgas each have their pros and cons - I like both. Ultimately, I believe the type of equipment a photographer chooses is relatively unimportant compared to vision and point of view. If we again compare photography with painting, it is a bit like asking a painter about which paints, brushes and canvases they use.

Achieving such amount of exposure is like producing a live photograph. How do you prepare for this kind of captures? Do they require a long preparation? When I photograph I look for some sort of resonance, connection, spark of recognition. I try not to make conscious decisions about what I am looking for. I like what Garry Winogrand, a fascinating photographer, once wrote about “Photographing to see what something looks like photographed”. I don’t do any elaborate preparation before I go to a location. Essentially I walk, explore and photograph. I never know whether I will be in a location for minutes, hours or days. I have no idea ahead of time whether the exposures will be fractions of a second, a few minutes or many hours. Approaching subject matter for me is a bit like meeting a person and beginning a conversation. How does one know ahead of time where that will lead, what the subject matter will be, how intimate it will become, how long the potential relationship will last? Certainly, a sense of curiosity and a willingness to be patient to allow the subject matter to reveal itself are important elements in this process. Decisions about exposures are made when the subject is engaged. It should be noted that here have been many occasions when interesting images have appeared from what I had considered uninteresting places. The reverse has been equally true and relevant. One needs to fully accept that surprises sometimes happen and control over outcome is not always necessary or even desirable. Do you have any advice for someone that it is starting in the art world. What do you think is more important: studies or learning by experience? Do you believe there are certain academic degrees you need to become successful in this field? I think that academic degrees are useful if one wants to teach or work in academic circles. I haven’t personally found that any letters after my name has influenced my career. I do think that experience, on the other hand, is vitally important. I hesitate to give any advice to others. Photography is an extremely broad area. I have found my way, but I wouldn’t suggest that others follow. The techniques and practices of photography have become -

Eglise Abbatiale Mont St. Michel, France. 1998 © Michael Kenna

- so much more accessible in this digital era. There are more cameras, phones, computers and other digital recording devices coming to the market every day to help make images for us. Everybody is now a photographer. The competition is higher than ever. So, what differentiates one photographer from another? Why is one musician different from another? How does one writer seem to have something to say, a unique story to tell? What makes a dancer stand out above the rest? Nobody really knows and I have little wisdom for the new generation except general generic advice. I would advise anybody entering the photographic profession to be passionate about it, and to work to the absolute best of their ability. There is no substitute for practice and hard work. Be positive and open. Don’t try to be like somebody else, another photographer, for the sake of it. Learn from other photographers by all means, but think about what you enjoy and connect with what makes you an individual. Follow your own muse, find your own vision and voice, and have fun in the process. Time is fleeting, life is over before you know it. Appreciate every second of this amazing existence for we probably don’t get a second chance.


17 Desert Clouds, Study 2, Merzouga Morocco, 1996 © Michael Kenna

Photographs often contain multiple stories, emotions and feelings. Do you ever find yourself wondering how the world would look if it was a photograph? I suppose that I spend most of my time imagining the world as a photograph. It is not easy, or perhaps even possible, to have defined borders of when one is a photographer and when not. Part of my mind is constantly placing the world in rectangles, reducing it to black and white, and imagining it in two dimensions. I suppose that a musician must be constantly listening and composing, a poet constantly playing with words and sentences. As the Greek philosopher informed us some time ago: "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit."

We admire the exquisite level of detail in your works. What photography technique do you prefer or are more comfortable with? How important is the equipment? Hasselblad medium format cameras have been my chosen means of photographic expression for the past thirty years. I work with silver materials, film cameras and do all my own darkroom printing. I do not use the digital medium. The following may be a bit technical for some of your readers, but I’ll attempt to explain my usual working set-up for a typical photographic expedition. Normally, I take two camera bodies, two viewfinders (a metered pentaprism and a waist level), two film backs, five lenses, a hand-held meter (chiefly for night exposures), a light-weight graphite tripod with ball socket head, and many cable releases (as I tend to lose them in the dark). I average 10-15 rolls of film a day. Everything has to fit into a backpack (except the tripod) as I walk, often for hours, when photographing and need to be able to work in all conditions without worrying about the equipment. These cameras have become old friends, familiar and easy to be with. They are fully manual with no fancy bells or whistles. They can function in extreme weather conditions and are generally reliable. I get a decent medium sized negative which I can print whole frame or crop as required. Occasionally, I also use plastic Holga cameras which take the same film. These are comparatively light-weight and inexpensive. They are also quirky, whimsical and unpredictable - a few of the many reasons I love them. I am often pleasantly surprised by the unexpected results I get, as well as occasionally disappointed. Holgas, in my experience, have a habit of keeping you guessing - surprise and spontaneity are hallmarks of their images. Hasselblads and Holgas each have their pros and cons - I like both. Ultimately, I believe the type of equipment a photographer chooses is relatively unimportant compared to vision and point of view. If we again compare photography with painting, it is a bit like asking a painter about which paints, brushes and canvases they use.

Achieving such amount of exposure is like producing a live photograph. How do you prepare for this kind of captures? Do they require a long preparation? When I photograph I look for some sort of resonance, connection, spark of recognition. I try not to make conscious decisions about what I am looking for. I like what Garry Winogrand, a fascinating photographer, once wrote about “Photographing to see what something looks like photographed”. I don’t do any elaborate preparation before I go to a location. Essentially I walk, explore and photograph. I never know whether I will be in a location for minutes, hours or days. I have no idea ahead of time whether the exposures will be fractions of a second, a few minutes or many hours. Approaching subject matter for me is a bit like meeting a person and beginning a conversation. How does one know ahead of time where that will lead, what the subject matter will be, how intimate it will become, how long the potential relationship will last? Certainly, a sense of curiosity and a willingness to be patient to allow the subject matter to reveal itself are important elements in this process. Decisions about exposures are made when the subject is engaged. It should be noted that here have been many occasions when interesting images have appeared from what I had considered uninteresting places. The reverse has been equally true and relevant. One needs to fully accept that surprises sometimes happen and control over outcome is not always necessary or even desirable. Do you have any advice for someone that it is starting in the art world. What do you think is more important: studies or learning by experience? Do you believe there are certain academic degrees you need to become successful in this field? I think that academic degrees are useful if one wants to teach or work in academic circles. I haven’t personally found that any letters after my name has influenced my career. I do think that experience, on the other hand, is vitally important. I hesitate to give any advice to others. Photography is an extremely broad area. I have found -

Eglise Abbatiale Mont St. Michel, France. 1998 © Michael Kenna

- my way, but I wouldn’t suggest that others follow. The techniques and practices of photography have become - so much more accessible in this digital era. There are more cameras, phones, computers and other digital recording devices coming to the market every day to help make images for us. Everybody is now a photographer. The competition is higher than ever. So, what differentiates one photographer from another? Why is one musician different from another? How does one writer seem to have something to say, a unique story to tell? What makes a dancer stand out above the rest? Nobody really knows and I have little wisdom for the new generation except general generic advice. I would advise anybody entering the photographic profession to be passionate about it, and to work to the absolute best of their ability. There is no substitute for practice and hard work. Be positive and open. Don’t try to be like somebody else, another photographer, for the sake of it. Learn from other photographers by all means, but think about what you enjoy and connect with what makes you an individual. Follow your own muse, find your own vision and voice, and have fun in the process. Time is fleeting, life is over before you know it. Appreciate every second of this amazing existence for we probably don’t get a second chance.


What particular work in your entire production did you enjoy the most and why? This is impossible to answer. It is a bit like asking which of your children is your favorite! Let me say that no one project has been my favorite, so instead I will talk about one of many projects which I greatly enjoyed: JAPAN. My first trip there was in 1987, when I photographed the shrine and temple areas of Kyoto and Nara. I returned over the following several years for exhibitions, book signings and lectures, usually to Tokyo or to other metropolitan cities. However, my dream was to explore the landscape throughout Japan in Hokkaido, Honshu, Kyushu, Okinawa and Shikoku. This I began to do in 2000.

19

There is something mysterious and wonderfully alluring in the Japanese land. It is visually manifested in the omnipresent interactions between water and earth, and in the constantly changing seasons and skies. It can be felt in the engaging intimacy of scale in its terrain, and in the deep sense of history contained in its earth. There is reverence and honor towards the land, symbolized by the ubiquitous torii gates. The shrine is often an integrated part of the landscape, a place to rest and meditate, and perhaps to even escape for a few moments from the complications and noise of our fast-paced modern lives. Physically, Japan has similarities to my home country of England; relatively small, reserved, inhabited for centuries, surrounded by water, every patch of land and part of the sea-front containing a story. Japan is also a volatile place, sometimes unpredictable and potentially dangerous, with typhoons, earthquakes and tsunamis possible. It is a country where the land is alive and powerful, where the elements are strong. I believe that living in Japan accentuates an awareness of the fragility and beauty of our transient world. I have found Hokkaido in the North of Japan to be a particularly intriguing place - gently seductive, dangerously wild and hopelessly romantic. Visually, it has been a paradise on earth for me, a veritable winter wonderland. Surrounded by water and home to exquisite lakes, graceful mountains and countless majestic trees, photographic subject matter continues to be ubiquitous. Pier and Nakashima Islands Toya Lake, Hokkaido, Japan. 2002 © Michael Kenna

I feel the starkness of Hokkaido’s winters accentuates an awareness of one’s immediate environment. The reduction of sensory distractions, leafless trees, absence of color, eerie silences, demands a more concentrated and pure focus on the land. These conditions have been of the utmost importance in my ongoing creative process. Working and traveling around this island during the past fifteen years has been an astonishing experience, particularly during the winter months when the landscape becomes transformed by layers of snow and ice into a graphic sumi-e painting, a visual haiku. The simple outlines of a fence as it threads it’s way up a hillside, the musical characteristics of snow barriers arranged like an empty musical score awaiting our notes, the melancholic nature of sunflowers surrealistically posing in the snow, the lace-like tracery of freezing ice encasing a lighthouse on the Sea of Okhotsk - the list could go on of the exquisite phenomena awaiting our eyes on this abstract winter canvas. I have felt a powerful emotional response to Hokkaido and have derived enormous creative inspiration in the light and atmosphere of this special place. I feel very fortunate and blessed to have spent a part of my life in Japan, and in Hokkaido in particular. I greatly look forward to many, many more visits there in the future.

Torii, Study 2, Takaishima, Biwa Lake Honshu, Japan. 2007 © Michael Kenna

Rakans, Study 2, Unpenji, Kagawa Shikoku, Japan. 2003 © Michael Kenna Island Structure, Hotenohama Okinawa, Japan. 2002 © Michael Kenna

Forest Edge, Hokuto Hokkaido, Japan. 2004 © Michael Kenna

20


What particular work in your entire production did you enjoy the most and why? This is impossible to answer. It is a bit like asking which of your children is your favorite! Let me say that no one project has been my favorite, so instead I will talk about one of many projects which I greatly enjoyed: JAPAN. My first trip there was in 1987, when I photographed the shrine and temple areas of Kyoto and Nara. I returned over the following several years for exhibitions, book signings and lectures, usually to Tokyo or to other metropolitan cities. However, my dream was to explore the landscape throughout Japan in Hokkaido, Honshu, Kyushu, Okinawa and Shikoku. This I began to do in 2000.

19

There is something mysterious and wonderfully alluring in the Japanese land. It is visually manifested in the omnipresent interactions between water and earth, and in the constantly changing seasons and skies. It can be felt in the engaging intimacy of scale in its terrain, and in the deep sense of history contained in its earth. There is reverence and honor towards the land, symbolized by the ubiquitous torii gates. The shrine is often an integrated part of the landscape, a place to rest and meditate, and perhaps to even escape for a few moments from the complications and noise of our fast-paced modern lives. Physically, Japan has similarities to my home country of England; relatively small, reserved, inhabited for centuries, surrounded by water, every patch of land and part of the sea-front containing a story. Japan is also a volatile place, sometimes unpredictable and potentially dangerous, with typhoons, earthquakes and tsunamis possible. It is a country where the land is alive and powerful, where the elements are strong. I believe that living in Japan accentuates an awareness of the fragility and beauty of our transient world. I have found Hokkaido in the North of Japan to be a particularly intriguing place - gently seductive, dangerously wild and hopelessly romantic. Visually, it has been a paradise on earth for me, a veritable winter wonderland. Surrounded by water and home to exquisite lakes, graceful mountains and countless majestic trees, photographic subject matter continues to be ubiquitous. Pier and Nakashima Islands Toya Lake, Hokkaido, Japan. 2002 © Michael Kenna

I feel the starkness of Hokkaido’s winters accentuates an awareness of one’s immediate environment. The reduction of sensory distractions, leafless trees, absence of color, eerie silences, demands a more concentrated and pure focus on the land. These conditions have been of the utmost importance in my ongoing creative process. Working and traveling around this island during the past fifteen years has been an astonishing experience, particularly during the winter months when the landscape becomes transformed by layers of snow and ice into a graphic sumi-e painting, a visual haiku. The simple outlines of a fence as it threads it’s way up a hillside, the musical characteristics of snow barriers arranged like an empty musical score awaiting our notes, the melancholic nature of sunflowers surrealistically posing in the snow, the lace-like tracery of freezing ice encasing a lighthouse on the Sea of Okhotsk - the list could go on of the exquisite phenomena awaiting our eyes on this abstract winter canvas. I have felt a powerful emotional response to Hokkaido and have derived enormous creative inspiration in the light and atmosphere of this special place. I feel very fortunate and blessed to have spent a part of my life in Japan, and in Hokkaido in particular. I greatly look forward to many, many more visits there in the future.

Torii, Study 2, Takaishima, Biwa Lake Honshu, Japan. 2007 © Michael Kenna

Rakans, Study 2, Unpenji, Kagawa Shikoku, Japan. 2003 © Michael Kenna Island Structure, Hotenohama Okinawa, Japan. 2002 © Michael Kenna

Forest Edge, Hokuto Hokkaido, Japan. 2004 © Michael Kenna

20


Which of your photographic series has had the most impact on you and why?

What interests you the most in the work of other photographers?

There seems to be an infinite amount of photographic possibilities in this world of ours. Decisions and choices have to be made as to what is meaningful and personally significant. I find that my interest in memories, time and change often dictate what attracts me to photograph.

I have been influenced by many photographers, too many to list! I come out of a European tradition and my early masters were Eugene Atget. Bill Brandt, Mario Giacomelli and Josef Sudek, amongst others. These photographic giants, along with the Americans: Ansel Adams, Ruth Bernhard, Harry Callahan, Alfred Steiglitz, etc., have greatly influenced the way that I see and photograph. I suppose they are all romantics at heart, particularly the Europeans, all concerned with photographing a feeling as much as documenting external reality. Eugene Atget inspired me to photograph the Le Notre Gardens in and around Paris. His dedication to photographing Paris all his life taught me that nothing is ever the same, the same subject matter can be photographed in different ways and in different conditions.

I sometimes think we choose some projects and others choose us. Probably the most memorable photographs I have made would be on the World War Two Nazi Concentration Camps in Europe. When I made these photographs between 1988-2000 I felt that I was in the right place at the right time with the appropriate training and vision. I didn’t feel that I had much of a choice. When I began to photograph this subject matter, the division between East and West was crumbling. I had access to Concentration Camps in Poland, Latvia, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, etc., which previously were very difficult to reach.

21 Railway Lines and Entry Building Birkenau, Poland, 1992 © Michael Kenna

Splash of Wonder © Johnson Tsang

Bill Brandt took me back to the industrial towns in the North West of England - he showed me that beauty is very much in the mind of the beholder. I would go on to photographing power stations and factory interiors. His sense of drama, even melodrama, his use of atmosphere, his willingness to completely change reality into an abstract and graphic print, all helped my own vision. Mario Giacomelli’s sense of powerful two dimensional abstraction and design also profoundly affected me. Here was somebody who would use a thick marking pen to fill in black lines on the photographic print. I loved his liberation from the traditional “fine art photographic print.” Josef Sudek taught me that light can also emanate from within the subject matter rather than only illuminate the exterior. His images reminded me of infra-red studies. His commitment to photograph only Prague was also instructive. With all these photographers

These camps were potent with atmosphere and remnants of the past. I felt that I had to take advantage of the situation and photograph all that I could find before these places changed. I was not Jewish, I had no immediate connection to the camps, so perhaps I could see them differently. I photographed these locations with humbleness, respect and sadness for what had happened. I photographed in the same style that I photograph other subject matter. I felt that I should work to the best of my ability and do what I could to help keep the memory alive. For over ten years I searched out and explored all the camps I could. I then donated all the material, including the copyright to the negatives, to the French Ministry of Culture so that they could publish and exhibit the images. This project was my personal contribution to the Holocaust memory.

Camp Buildings, Auschwitz, Poland, 1998 © Michael Kenna

Chrysler Building, Study 4, New York New York, USA. 2010 © Michael Kenna

What has been the biggest obstacle in your creative journey? How did you deal with it? Time has been, and remains, the biggest obstacle in my creative journey. There has never been enough of it. I have tried to be as efficient as possible, but I am always frustrated that I never have enough time to do everything that I want to. Hence my desire to have a few clones to assist me!

I actively searched out places they photographed, their camera angles and techniques. I’m a great believer in the saying attributed to Isaac Newton: “If I have achieved anything it is by standing on the shoulders of giants”. Oops © Johnson Tsang

22


Which of your photographic series has had the most impact on you and why?

What interests you the most in the work of other photographers?

There seems to be an infinite amount of photographic possibilities in this world of ours. Decisions and choices have to be made as to what is meaningful and personally significant. I find that my interest in memories, time and change often dictate what attracts me to photograph.

I have been influenced by many photographers, too many to list! I come out of a European tradition and my early masters were Eugene Atget. Bill Brandt, Mario Giacomelli and Josef Sudek, amongst others. These photographic giants, along with the Americans: Ansel Adams, Ruth Bernhard, Harry Callahan, Alfred Steiglitz, etc., have greatly influenced the way that I see and photograph. I suppose they are all romantics at heart, particularly the Europeans, all concerned with photographing a feeling as much as documenting external reality. Eugene Atget inspired me to photograph the Le Notre Gardens in and around Paris. His dedication to photographing Paris all his life taught me that nothing is ever the same, the same subject matter can be photographed in different ways and in different conditions.

I sometimes think we choose some projects and others choose us. Probably the most memorable photographs I have made would be on the World War Two Nazi Concentration Camps in Europe. When I made these photographs between 1988-2000 I felt that I was in the right place at the right time with the appropriate training and vision. I didn’t feel that I had much of a choice. When I began to photograph this subject matter, the division between East and West was crumbling. I had access to Concentration Camps in Poland, Latvia, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, etc., which previously were very difficult to reach.

21 Railway Lines and Entry Building Birkenau, Poland, 1992 © Michael Kenna

Splash of Wonder © Johnson Tsang

These camps were potent with atmosphere and remnants of the past. I felt that I had to take advantage of the situation and photograph all that I could find before these places changed. I was not Jewish, I had no immediate connection to the camps, so perhaps I could see them differently. I photographed these locations with humbleness, respect and sadness for what had happened. I photographed in the same style that I photograph other subject matter. I felt that I should work to the best of my ability and do what I could to help keep the memory alive. For over ten years I searched out and explored all the camps I could. I then donated all the material, including the copyright to the negatives, to the French Ministry of Culture so that they could publish and exhibit the images. This project was my personal contribution to the Holocaust memory.

Camp Buildings, Auschwitz, Poland, 1998 © Michael Kenna

Chrysler Building, Study 4, New York New York, USA. 2010 © Michael Kenna

What has been the biggest obstacle in your creative journey? How did you deal with it? Time has been, and remains, the biggest obstacle in my creative journey. There has never been enough of it. I have tried to be as efficient as possible, but I am always frustrated that I never have enough time to do everything that I want to. Hence my desire to have a few clones to assist me!

Bill Brandt took me back to the industrial towns in the North West of England - he showed me that beauty is very much in the mind of the beholder. I would go on to photographing power stations and factory interiors. His sense of drama, even melodrama, his use of atmosphere, his willingness to completely change reality into an abstract and graphic print, all helped my own vision. Mario Giacomelli’s sense of powerful two dimensional abstraction and design also profoundly affected me. Here was somebody who would use a thick marking pen to fill in black lines on the photographic print. I loved his liberation from the traditional “fine art photographic print.” Josef Sudek taught me that light can also emanate from within the subject matter rather than only illuminate the exterior. His images reminded me of infra-red studies. His commitment to photograph only Prague was also instructive. With all these photographers I actively searched out places they photographed, their camera angles and techniques. I’m a great believer in the saying attributed to Isaac Newton: “If I have achieved Oops © Johnson Tsang anything it is by standing on the shoulders of giants”.

22


SLOVAKIA

Maria Svarbova was born in 1988 and currently lives in Slovakia. Despite studying restoration and archeology, her preferred artistic medium is photography. Since 2010, the immediacy of Maria’s photographic instinct continues to garner international acclaim and is setting new precedents in photographic expression. The recipient of several prestigious awards, her solo and group exhibitions have placed her among the vanguard of her contemporaries, attracting features in Vogue, Forbes, The Guardian, and publications around the world; her work is frequently in the limelight of social media. Maria’s reputation also earned her a commission for a billboard-sized promotion on the massive Taipei 101 tower, in Taiwan. The human body throughout her oeuvre is more or less a peripheral afterthought, often portrayed as aloof and demure rather than substantive. Carefully composed figures create thematic, dream-like scenes with ordinary objects. Her images hold a silent tension that hint at emergent possibilities under the lilt of clean and smooth surfaces. www.mariasvarbova.com

© Maria Svarbova

23

Maria’s distinctive style departs from traditional portraiture and focuses on experimentation with space, color and atmosphere. Taking an interest in Socialist era architecture and public spaces, Maria transforms each scene with a modern freshness that highlights the depth and range of her creative palette.


SLOVAKIA

Maria Svarbova was born in 1988 and currently lives in Slovakia. Despite studying restoration and archeology, her preferred artistic medium is photography. Since 2010, the immediacy of Maria’s photographic instinct continues to garner international acclaim and is setting new precedents in photographic expression. The recipient of several prestigious awards, her solo and group exhibitions have placed her among the vanguard of her contemporaries, attracting features in Vogue, Forbes, The Guardian, and publications around the world; her work is frequently in the limelight of social media. Maria’s reputation also earned her a commission for a billboard-sized promotion on the massive Taipei 101 tower, in Taiwan. The human body throughout her oeuvre is more or less a peripheral afterthought, often portrayed as aloof and demure rather than substantive. Carefully composed figures create thematic, dream-like scenes with ordinary objects. Her images hold a silent tension that hint at emergent possibilities under the lilt of clean and smooth surfaces. www.mariasvarbova.com

© Maria Svarbova

23

Maria’s distinctive style departs from traditional portraiture and focuses on experimentation with space, color and atmosphere. Taking an interest in Socialist era architecture and public spaces, Maria transforms each scene with a modern freshness that highlights the depth and range of her creative palette.


There is often a sense of cool detachment and liminality in Maria’s work. Routine actions such as exercise, doctor appointments, and domestic tasks are reframed with a visual purity that is soothing and symmetrical and at times reverberant with an ethereal stillness. The overall effect evokes a contemplative silence in an extended moment of promise and awareness—a quality difficult to achieve in the rapid pace of modern life. Maria’s postmodern vision boldly articulates a dialog that compels the viewer to respond to the mystery, loneliness, and isolation of the human experience. Nevertheless, deeply embedded within the aqueous pastels, Maria’s compositions hold to a celebratory elegance that transforms the viewer’s gaze into an enduring reverence for life’s simple beauty.

25

Swimming Pool © Maria Svarbova

Swimming Pool © Maria Svarbova


There is often a sense of cool detachment and liminality in Maria’s work. Routine actions such as exercise, doctor appointments, and domestic tasks are reframed with a visual purity that is soothing and symmetrical and at times reverberant with an ethereal stillness. The overall effect evokes a contemplative silence in an extended moment of promise and awareness—a quality difficult to achieve in the rapid pace of modern life. Maria’s postmodern vision boldly articulates a dialog that compels the viewer to respond to the mystery, loneliness, and isolation of the human experience. Nevertheless, deeply embedded within the aqueous pastels, Maria’s compositions hold to a celebratory elegance that transforms the viewer’s gaze into an enduring reverence for life’s simple beauty.

25

Swimming Pool © Maria Svarbova

Swimming Pool © Maria Svarbova


59

Steel Fog, New York © John Kosmopoulos Swimming Pool © Maria Svarbova

28

Swimming Pool © Maria Svarbova


59

Steel Fog, New York © John Kosmopoulos Swimming Pool © Maria Svarbova

28

Swimming Pool © Maria Svarbova


29

30

Plastic World Š Maria Svarbova

Plastic World Š Maria Svarbova


29

30

Plastic World Š Maria Svarbova

Plastic World Š Maria Svarbova


31

Skogafoss, Iceland © John Kosmopoulos

Human Space © Maria Svarbova

Human Space © Maria Svarbova


31

Skogafoss, Iceland © John Kosmopoulos

Human Space © Maria Svarbova

Human Space © Maria Svarbova


ARTICLE

Photographer Captures Small Toys With Big Imagination INSPIRATION Author: Felix Hernandez

hernandezdreamphography.com facebook.com/HernandezDreamphography

33

Felix Hernandez is a Mexican photographer and digital artist that creates miniature worlds in which iconic scale cars are the protagonists. In this article, Felix explains in detail the creative process behind these projects.

Inspiration Almost three years ago the Retouching Academy Founder, Julia Kuzmenko McKim invited me to contribute an article to the Retouched Magazine. She wanted something a little different from what she would typically publish, which would usually be in the beauty photography and retouching field of the industry. Back then I was doing creative photography and digital manipulation for commercial and personal projects. This meant that my photographic work was always different, changing with every new project that came into my hands. With Julia asking me to do something different, it had to be not only different from what she and her audience were used to, but it also had to be different from what I was usually doing. Doing something new is always a challenge and even more so if it is to be published by one of the best-known beauty photographers in the world. But I have always loved that feeling of taking a leap of faith mixed with a little bit of courage and just seeing what comes out of it.

So for that project I wanted to tell a story through an image while documenting the process with a “BTS” video of me doing things I have never done before. I challenged myself to do something simple, something that can be within everyone’s reach, yet compelling enough for the eye and imagination of the viewers. I thought that a cool way to tell a story would be doing it without having to spend too much, and not even going out to a location. In the end, creativity has a lot to do with doing the most that you can with very little. I looked around, searching for something: an object, an idea, a concept I could use for the task. And there it was on one of my office’s shelves: this little red car, a scale model of a Fiat Cinquecento that caught my attention and imagination. The car by itself was an amazing character. It had a great personality and a melancholic feeling. It had enough appealing characteristics to tell a story, a simple tale of what could happen inside that car.

“The Love Car” that changed my life So having the general concept resolved, I gave myself the task of creating as much as I could in-camera and trying to transform that tiny car into a real one, at least for the viewer’s eyes. Through the creative process, I learned a ton of new techniques, and that’s the cool thing about doing something you have never done before. For instance, understanding how our brain perceives scale, and with that knowledge, how you can fool the eye!

But, long story short, I created just one image and a “BTS” video. When it was published, it exceeded my wildest expectations. Soon, just 2 or 3 days after the publication, my Facebook feed, inbox, e-mail, phone, etc, went crazy with all kinds of media requests wanting to know more about this kind of work. It was not only the media but also potential clients, big clients, who wanted projects for their brands. Remember that it was my first project of that kind. I surely was not the first one doing something like that, but it was the first one for me and done my way. Three years ago my whole life changed, almost in every aspect: my work changed, my clients changed and my income changed. Suddenly, I was traveling to Copenhagen, Colombia, New York, Chicago, Dubai, Italy, Bermuda, China, etc. I was giving conferences and workshops, judging big contests, doing interviews, productions, you name it! I was meeting fantastic people, hanging out with amazing and talented artists, some of them were (and still are) people that I had followed and admired for so many years! Telling you that my dream came true sounds worn-out, but it is nothing but the truth. But here is a thing, after all, I look back at that image (the original “Love Car”), and it doesn’t satisfy me at all. It never did. And I don’t know if that’s good or bad, but it pushes me every day to improve in every way I can. Whether it’s in the pre-production, or the photographic aspect, or the post-production, I’m always trying to take things a little further, trying new things, new ways and not worrying about failure or what others may think or say. In the end, that’s what took me to this point in my life.

Julia recently contacted me again, asking if I wanted to do a new project. So I thought this would be the perfect opportunity to redeem myself and I produced a new “Love Car.” I applied some of the new stuff I have learned in these years and the results, once again, did not satisfy me and I think they never will. But, I see evolution in my work, and that’s okay with me. I’m hoping that in three more years, I will try it again and see that my work is still evolving. I know many things will change, but what will not is the passion for creating, and that’s what “The Love Car” represents for me. fantastic people, hanging out with amazing and talented artists, some of them were (and still are) people that I had followed and admired for so many years! Telling you that my dream came true sounds worn-out, but it is nothing but the truth. But here is a thing, after all, I look back at that image (the original “Love Car”), and it doesn’t satisfy me at all. It never did. And I don’t know if that’s good or bad, but it pushes me every day to improve in every way I can. Whether it’s in the pre-production, or the photographic aspect, or the post-production, I’m always trying to take things a little further, trying new things, new ways and not worrying about failure or what others may think or say. In the end, that’s what took me to this point in my life. Julia recently contacted me again, asking if I wanted to do a new project. So I thought this would be the perfect opportunity to redeem myself and I produced a new “Love Car.” I applied some of the new stuff I have learned in these years and the results, once again, did not satisfy me and I think they never will. But, I see evolution in my work, and that’s okay with me.

I’m hoping that in three more years, I will try it again and see that my work is still evolving. I know many things will change, but what will not is the passion for creating, and that’s what “The Love Car” represents for me.

These days, I find myself doing this kind of photography with a lens that is normally used for landscape and architecture photography: a 24mm Tilt-Shift lens has all of the characteristics that I was looking for.

Pre-Production

Of course my lighting setups and in-camera composition have improved throughout the years and now I normally just take 3 to 5 shots for compositing the final image, regardless of where it was photographed – at the studio or on-location. Two shots are of the model and the scene, focusing on two different focal planes to achieve great depth of field.

When I started out, I would just use the scale models right out of their boxes. That was fine, but if I wanted to do something a little bit different and tell my own stories, I had to personalize my characters in the way I wanted them to be captured for a portrait. I’m far from being an expert, but two years ago I started to customize my models and to build more complex scenes. I learnt some basic modeling techniques and tried things on my own. Now I find myself dedicating more and more time to the pre-production stage than any other area: creating landscapes, weathering and customizing the models, adding electronics, etc.

Production I learnt some new things about optics and how we can play with the perception of scale. Through the years I experimented with different lenses, figuring out which one would give me the best results. For example, we can use a mix of minimal focus distance to be close enough to the scale models, but wide enough to have them completely in-frame. But we must also be aware of the distortion that this could imply, etc.

One shot highlights the headlights of the scale cars. This shot depends on what I am using to imitate them: studio flashes, light painting, natural light or, in this case, real lights inside the car (a LED light circuit I built inside the scale car). One more shot will be the background if I’m not on-location or, as in this project, I will use part of a stock image. The last shot is for some in-camera effects or, again, a stock image if it’s something I can find, such as the handprint on the window.

Post-Production My post-production has become easier and more straightforward. I do the most that I can in-camera so I’m left with little work in post, but not because it is less enjoyable or not important. Basic Camera Raw adjustments, placing backgrounds, color matching and color grading are some of the tasks that follow. I think I have been getting better in simplifying the steps of a composite.

34


ARTICLE

Photographer Captures Small Toys With Big Imagination INSPIRATION Author: Felix Hernandez

hernandezdreamphography.com facebook.com/HernandezDreamphography

33

Felix Hernandez is a Mexican photographer and digital artist that creates miniature worlds in which iconic scale cars are the protagonists. In this article, Felix explains in detail the creative process behind these projects.

Inspiration Almost three years ago the Retouching Academy Founder, Julia Kuzmenko McKim invited me to contribute an article to the Retouched Magazine. She wanted something a little different from what she would typically publish, which would usually be in the beauty photography and retouching field of the industry. Back then I was doing creative photography and digital manipulation for commercial and personal projects. This meant that my photographic work was always different, changing with every new project that came into my hands. With Julia asking me to do something different, it had to be not only different from what she and her audience were used to, but it also had to be different from what I was usually doing. Doing something new is always a challenge and even more so if it is to be published by one of the best-known beauty photographers in the world. But I have always loved that feeling of taking a leap of faith mixed with a little bit of courage and just seeing what comes out of it.

So for that project I wanted to tell a story through an image while documenting the process with a “BTS” video of me doing things I have never done before. I challenged myself to do something simple, something that can be within everyone’s reach, yet compelling enough for the eye and imagination of the viewers. I thought that a cool way to tell a story would be doing it without having to spend too much, and not even going out to a location. In the end, creativity has a lot to do with doing the most that you can with very little. I looked around, searching for something: an object, an idea, a concept I could use for the task. And there it was on one of my office’s shelves: this little red car, a scale model of a Fiat Cinquecento that caught my attention and imagination. The car by itself was an amazing character. It had a great personality and a melancholic feeling. It had enough appealing characteristics to tell a story, a simple tale of what could happen inside that car.

“The Love Car” that changed my life So having the general concept resolved, I gave myself the task of creating as much as I could in-camera and trying to transform that tiny car into a real one, at least for the viewer’s eyes. Through the creative process, I learned a ton of new techniques, and that’s the cool thing about doing something you have never done before. For instance, understanding how our brain perceives scale, and with that knowledge, how you can fool the eye!

But, long story short, I created just one image and a “BTS” video. When it was published, it exceeded my wildest expectations. Soon, just 2 or 3 days after the publication, my Facebook feed, inbox, e-mail, phone, etc, went crazy with all kinds of media requests wanting to know more about this kind of work. It was not only the media but also potential clients, big clients, who wanted projects for their brands. Remember that it was my first project of that kind. I surely was not the first one doing something like that, but it was the first one for me and done my way. Three years ago my whole life changed, almost in every aspect: my work changed, my clients changed and my income changed. Suddenly, I was traveling to Copenhagen, Colombia, New York, Chicago, Dubai, Italy, Bermuda, China, etc. I was giving conferences and workshops, judging big contests, doing interviews, productions, you name it! I was meeting fantastic people, hanging out with amazing and talented artists, some of them were (and still are) people that I had followed and admired for so many years! Telling you that my dream came true sounds worn-out, but it is nothing but the truth. But here is a thing, after all, I look back at that image (the original “Love Car”), and it doesn’t satisfy me at all. It never did. And I don’t know if that’s good or bad, but it pushes me every day to improve in every way I can. Whether it’s in the pre-production, or the photographic aspect, or the post-production, I’m always trying to take things a little further, trying new things, new ways and not worrying about failure or what others may think or say. In the end, that’s what took me to this point in my life.

Julia recently contacted me again, asking if I wanted to do a new project. So I thought this would be the perfect opportunity to redeem myself and I produced a new “Love Car.” I applied some of the new stuff I have learned in these years and the results, once again, did not satisfy me and I think they never will. But, I see evolution in my work, and that’s okay with me. I’m hoping that in three more years, I will try it again and see that my work is still evolving. I know many things will change, but what will not is the passion for creating, and that’s what “The Love Car” represents for me. fantastic people, hanging out with amazing and talented artists, some of them were (and still are) people that I had followed and admired for so many years! Telling you that my dream came true sounds worn-out, but it is nothing but the truth. But here is a thing, after all, I look back at that image (the original “Love Car”), and it doesn’t satisfy me at all. It never did. And I don’t know if that’s good or bad, but it pushes me every day to improve in every way I can. Whether it’s in the pre-production, or the photographic aspect, or the post-production, I’m always trying to take things a little further, trying new things, new ways and not worrying about failure or what others may think or say. In the end, that’s what took me to this point in my life. Julia recently contacted me again, asking if I wanted to do a new project. So I thought this would be the perfect opportunity to redeem myself and I produced a new “Love Car.” I applied some of the new stuff I have learned in these years and the results, once again, did not satisfy me and I think they never will. But, I see evolution in my work, and that’s okay with me.

I’m hoping that in three more years, I will try it again and see that my work is still evolving. I know many things will change, but what will not is the passion for creating, and that’s what “The Love Car” represents for me.

These days, I find myself doing this kind of photography with a lens that is normally used for landscape and architecture photography: a 24mm Tilt-Shift lens has all of the characteristics that I was looking for.

Pre-Production

Of course my lighting setups and in-camera composition have improved throughout the years and now I normally just take 3 to 5 shots for compositing the final image, regardless of where it was photographed – at the studio or on-location. Two shots are of the model and the scene, focusing on two different focal planes to achieve great depth of field.

When I started out, I would just use the scale models right out of their boxes. That was fine, but if I wanted to do something a little bit different and tell my own stories, I had to personalize my characters in the way I wanted them to be captured for a portrait. I’m far from being an expert, but two years ago I started to customize my models and to build more complex scenes. I learnt some basic modeling techniques and tried things on my own. Now I find myself dedicating more and more time to the pre-production stage than any other area: creating landscapes, weathering and customizing the models, adding electronics, etc.

Production I learnt some new things about optics and how we can play with the perception of scale. Through the years I experimented with different lenses, figuring out which one would give me the best results. For example, we can use a mix of minimal focus distance to be close enough to the scale models, but wide enough to have them completely in-frame. But we must also be aware of the distortion that this could imply, etc.

One shot highlights the headlights of the scale cars. This shot depends on what I am using to imitate them: studio flashes, light painting, natural light or, in this case, real lights inside the car (a LED light circuit I built inside the scale car). One more shot will be the background if I’m not on-location or, as in this project, I will use part of a stock image. The last shot is for some in-camera effects or, again, a stock image if it’s something I can find, such as the handprint on the window.

Post-Production My post-production has become easier and more straightforward. I do the most that I can in-camera so I’m left with little work in post, but not because it is less enjoyable or not important. Basic Camera Raw adjustments, placing backgrounds, color matching and color grading are some of the tasks that follow. I think I have been getting better in simplifying the steps of a composite.

34


Photoshop is my way to go, and I just love and enjoy using it as part of my creative process.

Conclusion

35

I always say that photography is not portraying what exists in front of you, but portraying what exists inside of you. So for me photography, digital manipulation, crafts, etc are only disciplines, techniques at the service of creation. They allow me to bring my ideas, thoughts and dreams to life. Who would have thought that doing that one photo of a little red car would have unleashed all of the great things that have happened in my life! Never underestimate the power of your dreams, but to make them happen, you will need to take risks and take that leap of faith.

Gear & Software • Canon 5D MIII • Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II Ultra-Wide Tilt-Shift Manual Focus Lens • Manfrotto Tripod / Ball Head • 2 Einstein Studio Flashes with Westcott 7’ Parabolic Umbrellas / with diffusers • 1 Bowens Studio Flash with a Bowens Strip Softbox. • Photoshop CC • Nik Software Collection / Color Effects

36


Photoshop is my way to go, and I just love and enjoy using it as part of my creative process.

Conclusion

35

I always say that photography is not portraying what exists in front of you, but portraying what exists inside of you. So for me photography, digital manipulation, crafts, etc are only disciplines, techniques at the service of creation. They allow me to bring my ideas, thoughts and dreams to life. Who would have thought that doing that one photo of a little red car would have unleashed all of the great things that have happened in my life! Never underestimate the power of your dreams, but to make them happen, you will need to take risks and take that leap of faith.

Gear & Software • Canon 5D MIII • Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II Ultra-Wide Tilt-Shift Manual Focus Lens • Manfrotto Tripod / Ball Head • 2 Einstein Studio Flashes with Westcott 7’ Parabolic Umbrellas / with diffusers • 1 Bowens Studio Flash with a Bowens Strip Softbox. • Photoshop CC • Nik Software Collection / Color Effects

36


POLAND

37

“All acts of creation begin in your mind. It’s not a matter of skills or technical abilities, it’s using your mind to create the idea which then expands through your body to materialize in the outside world. Your mind and your body are the first two things you have to take care of in order to create something great.” Dawid Planeta is a concept photographer and illustrator from Poland. He came to this realization while working on “Mini People”, his most recent series. It made him realize the power of art and creation. All of this was thanks to an unpleasant circumstance: he faced 'the black dog’ - depression. It’s not an easy condition to deal with. When one's depressed, nothing seems to have a purpose. Nothing is exciting. Decided to change this, art became his way out. He tried to stop thinking about depression as a weakness and turn it into something brilliant. He started creating dark, mysterious and frightening images originating deep inside his mind. The recurring motif in his work is a small human figure lost in a dark jungle, facing huge creatures. Working on them and contemplating the final effect helped him grow his awareness of who he is and what he’s afraid of. It helped him see his emotions and confront them. It helped him get out of the jungle.

© Dawid Planeta

www.minipeople.tumblr.com © Patricia Van de Camp


POLAND

37

“All acts of creation begin in your mind. It’s not a matter of skills or technical abilities, it’s using your mind to create the idea which then expands through your body to materialize in the outside world. Your mind and your body are the first two things you have to take care of in order to create something great.” Dawid Planeta is a concept photographer and illustrator from Poland He came to this realization while working on “Mini People”, his most recent series. It made him realize the power of art and creation. All of this was thanks to an unpleasant circumstance: he faced 'the black dog’ - depression. It’s not an easy condition to deal with. When one's depressed, nothing seems to have a purpose. Nothing is exciting. Decided to change this, art became his way out. He tried to stop thinking about depression as a weakness and turn it into something brilliant. He started creating dark, mysterious and frightening images originating deep inside his mind. The recurring motif in his work is a small human figure lost in a dark jungle, facing huge creatures. Working on them and contemplating the final effect helped him grow his awareness of who he is and what he’s afraid of. It helped him see his emotions and confront them. It helped him get out of the jungle.

© Dawid Planeta

www.minipeople.tumblr.com © Patricia Van de Camp


40

Guidance © Dawid Planeta

The Spirit © Dawid Planeta

© Patricia Van de Camp

13

© Patricia Van de Camp

Treasure © Dawid Planeta


40

Guidance © Dawid Planeta

The Spirit © Dawid Planeta

© Patricia Van de Camp

13

© Patricia Van de Camp

Treasure © Dawid Planeta


29

Masquerade © Patricia Van de Camp © Philip McKay

Things That Never Were © Dawid Planeta

The Spirit © Dawid Planeta


29

Masquerade © Patricia Van de Camp © Philip McKay

Things That Never Were © Dawid Planeta

The Spirit © Dawid Planeta


43

44

© Marcin Sacha

Deep forest © Dawid Planeta

Nature of a Day © Dawid Planeta


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44

© Marcin Sacha

Deep forest © Dawid Planeta

Nature of a Day © Dawid Planeta


POLAND

INTERVIEW WITH “I am very fascinated by the phenomenon of the world, I am fascinated by nature in all its amazing complexity. Probably if not for my aversion to mathematics in school times, I would be a theoretical physicist today”. 45

Polish graphic designer, illustrator and set designer. Presently, he focuses on mixed media graphic art, based maInly on photo manipulation, drawing, recently also 3D. Igor Morski graduated with honors from the Interior Architecture and Industrial Design Faculty at the State Higher School of Fine Art in Poznań (now the University of Arts). In the late 80’s and early 90’s he worked for public broadcasting company Polish Television creating set design for TV theatre, culture and commentary shows.

??

Please briefly tell us about you. I’ve been working as a graphic illustrator for more than 30 years. I mainly deal with photo manipulation, 3D and digital painting. Surrealism that you can see in many of my works came to me in some way by accident. It was the result of cooperation with one of the leading Polish weekly at that time. When I started that cooperation, the assumption of the magazine was to make photo manipulation a peculiar identification mark. At that time the awareness of the photoshop manipulation was low, so many of the effects of computer processing were taken by people seriously, which had its power by the way. The necessity of building a symbolic message has made the surrealistic value useful to the matter of realistic photo manipulation. With time, I liked this way of art and it became the feature of my illustrations. Because of what I do, I am also condemned to a certain stylistic variety. On the the one hand, cooperation with opinion weeklies pushes me towards narrative stories, and on the other hand working for magazines like Focus with scientific topics, forces me to have a certain view, and generate images not so much narrative as realistically reflecting various visions, objects, etc.

www.igor.morski.pl

© Igor Morski


POLAND

INTERVIEW WITH “I am very fascinated by the phenomenon of the world, I am fascinated by nature in all its amazing complexity. Probably if not for my aversion to mathematics in school times, I would be a theoretical physicist today”. 45

Polish graphic designer, illustrator and set designer. Presently, he focuses on mixed media graphic art, based manly on photo manipulation, drawing, recently also 3D. Igor Morski graduated with honors from the Interior Architecture and Industrial Design Faculty at the State Higher School of Fine Art in Poznań (now the University of Arts). In the late 80’s and early 90’s he worked for public broadcasting company Polish Television creating set design for TV theatre, culture and commentary shows.

??

Please briefly tell us about you. I’ve been working as a graphic illustrator for more than 30 years. I mainly deal with photo manipulation, 3D and digital painting. Surrealism that you can see in many of my works came to me in some way by accident. It was the result of cooperation with one of the leading Polish weekly at that time. When I started that cooperation, the assumption of the magazine was to make photo manipulation a peculiar identification mark. At that time the awareness of the photoshop manipulation was low, so many of the effects of computer processing were taken by people seriously, which had its power by the way. The necessity of building a symbolic message has made the surrealistic value useful to the matter of realistic photo manipulation. With time, I liked this way of art and it became the feature of my illustrations. Because of what I do, I am also condemned to a certain stylistic variety. On the the one hand, cooperation with opinion weeklies pushes me towards narrative stories, and on the other hand working for magazines like Focus with scientific topics, forces me to have a certain view, and generate images not so much narrative as realistically reflecting various visions, objects, etc.

www.igor.morski.pl

© Igor Morski


What originally made you want to become a graphic designer/illustrator?

In a previous interview you mentioned that your surrealism appeared a little bit by accident. Can you tell us more about this?

Choosing my career path was accidental in a huge way. I graduated from university of design and by profession I am a interior designer, with a focus on exhibition. It had a certain professional effect for me, because during the first decade of my professional career I worked in as a scene designer in television and theatre. At the same time, however, I always dealt with graphics, making posters. The proposal for illustrating for the weekly was just a proposal made at one of the banquets at first but all in all, it had a great effect for me - of course in a positive way.

I mentioned about it before. I may only add that my first illustrations were made partly using traditional methods. It was drawing that was essential, not photography. You have created digital works for many companies. Can you tell us what, if any, are the challenges of working in such an environment? I try to be as much flexible as I can and adjust my skills to needs what makes it hard to define my own style. Sometimes it relates more to my intellectual sphere than imaging itself. But I must confess that I really like to identify with the message of the work and to a large extent I reject propositions which I disagree fundamentally with. Extreme reactions do not suit me, so I avoid the press presenting extreme views, regardless of its color. I am a man of the middle and my mind follows rationalism, descriptions of reality that are as true as possible. So I have a reluctant attitude to various religions.

71 © Igor Morski

You create incredible digital artworks. Your work reflects our current reality, with a surreal sense of black humor, mixed with a provocative message. What does your works reflects? Is there a message you want to convey?

Concept/photography/postproduction - © Bara Prasilova Client – Helena Darbujanova Designer Model - Zofie Darbujanova Hair&make-up - Eva Svobodová Jumpsuit - Milina Havrlantová

Well, yes, that’s true. My works’ character was determined by challenges I had to face. They were mostly related to the subject matter. The time of my greatest illustrative activity is the period of serious socioeconomic changes in Poland connected with systemic transformation, after the fall of communism. The time is extremely interesting as new ideas were formed. But it was also a time of serious tensions, mental changes, meeting the unknown. Commenting on political events often required a strong, earthy language, but also a dose of humor. In addition there’s my imagination and many funny connotations.

© Igor Morski

You have created more than 1000 illustrations. Can you tell us which of your creation(s) you are most proud of or excited about? It is hard to say because there are several different levels of satisfaction. One type is related to illustrating important content, where satisfaction is a derivative of the impact on people, another kind of satisfaction is in my case due to the fact that something has succeeded and I am pleased with it as a creator. Although I admit that it is not so frequent. I'm definitely more auto critical. In your 3D artworks you expertly craft incredibly realistic details. Without revealing your secrets, can you describe the typical process? How long does it take? Regardless of what I do, I rather work quickly. Years of work have trained me in the mechanism of estimating time needs. I can efficiently determine how much time I will take. And usually I'm not mistaken in it, although there are exceptions. It happens that the job that seemed to be simple to do surprises. Unfortunately, I can not afford slow carving, usually because I have short, or even very short terms. For a weekly opinion, usually no more than a day. 3D sometimes needs more time but it has one great feature that once created objects can be used virtually indefinitely, and the library of such objects is constantly growing. © Igor Morski

© Igor Morski

48


What originally made you want to become a graphic designer/illustrator?

In a previous interview you mentioned that your surrealism appeared a little bit by accident. Can you tell us more about this?

Choosing my career path was accidental in a huge way. I graduated from university of design and by profession I am a interior designer, with a focus on exhibition. It had a certain professional effect for me, because during the first decade of my professional career I worked in as a scene designer in television and theatre. At the same time, however, I always dealt with graphics, making posters. The proposal for illustrating for the weekly was just a proposal made at one of the banquets at first but all in all, it had a great effect for me - of course in a positive way.

I mentioned about it before. I may only add that my first illustrations were made partly using traditional methods. It was drawing that was essential, not photography. You have created digital works for many companies. Can you tell us what, if any, are the challenges of working in such an environment? I try to be as much flexible as I can and adjust my skills to needs what makes it hard to define my own style. Sometimes it relates more to my intellectual sphere than imaging itself. But I must confess that I really like to identify with the message of the work and to a large extent I reject propositions which I disagree fundamentally with. Extreme reactions do not suit me, so I avoid the press presenting extreme views, regardless of its color. I am a man of the middle and my mind follows rationalism, descriptions of reality that are as true as possible. So I have a reluctant attitude to various religions.

71 © Igor Morski

You create incredible digital artworks. Your work reflects our current reality, with a surreal sense of black humor, mixed with a provocative message. What does your works reflects? Is there a message you want to convey?

Concept/photography/postproduction - © Bara Prasilova Client – Helena Darbujanova Designer Model - Zofie Darbujanova Hair&make-up - Eva Svobodová Jumpsuit - Milina Havrlantová

Well, yes, that’s true. My works’ character was determined by challenges I had to face. They were mostly related to the subject matter. The time of my greatest illustrative activity is the period of serious socioeconomic changes in Poland connected with systemic transformation, after the fall of communism. The time is extremely interesting as new ideas were formed. But it was also a time of serious tensions, mental changes, meeting the unknown. Commenting on political events often required a strong, earthy language, but also a dose of humor. In addition there’s my imagination and many funny connotations.

© Igor Morski

You have created more than 1000 illustrations. Can you tell us which of your creation(s) you are most proud of or excited about? It is hard to say because there are several different levels of satisfaction. One type is related to illustrating important content, where satisfaction is a derivative of the impact on people, another kind of satisfaction is in my case due to the fact that something has succeeded and I am pleased with it as a creator. Although I admit that it is not so frequent. I'm definitely more auto critical. In your 3D artworks you expertly craft incredibly realistic details. Without revealing your secrets, can you describe the typical process? How long does it take? Regardless of what I do, I rather work quickly. Years of work have trained me in the mechanism of estimating time needs. I can efficiently determine how much time I will take. And usually I'm not mistaken in it, although there are exceptions. It happens that the job that seemed to be simple to do surprises. Unfortunately, I can not afford slow carving, usually because I have short, or even very short terms. For a weekly opinion, usually no more than a day. 3D sometimes needs more time but it has one great feature that once created objects can be used virtually indefinitely, and the library of such objects is constantly growing. © Igor Morski

© Igor Morski

48


When you are working on one of your illustrations—how much of it is instinctual versus planned? For me, the idea usually arises very quickly, although there are difficult-to-illustrate themes, where it is difficult to build a readable symbol. Such topics are tiring. I have several ideas on one topic and then it is difficult to decide.

We admire the artworks you made for “Wprost” magazine, dedicated to social and economic issues. Do you believe we live in a surreal world? Does our current society affect art movements?

© Igor Morski

Do we live in a surreal world?I don’t think so although it happens that sometimes we perceive it in that way. The world is by no means what we see it and our tendency is to look for orders and rules. For these, however, in practice the complexity is extremely difficult. We are subjected to various illusions concerning many things, and sometimes one moment makes them break like soap bubbles. For example, until recently I thought that the Polish society is attached to a set of values such as freedom. However, after experiencing the last few years, I do not think so. On the other hand, I saw a society that is not mature enough in terms of what democracy is. And what is most surprising, contrary to its own experience in history, extremely easy to manipulate. I can even say that well-conducted propaganda was able to remodel this society completely, even plow it, turning the proportions of views on various issues. Unfortunately, these are regressive changes. What is the influence of societies on art? I think it's total. As in nature, specific environments generate specific beings.

© Igor Morski Evolve - © Bara Prasilova

50


When you are working on one of your illustrations—how much of it is instinctual versus planned? For me, the idea usually arises very quickly, although there are difficult-to-illustrate themes, where it is difficult to build a readable symbol. Such topics are tiring. I have several ideas on one topic and then it is difficult to decide.

We admire the artworks you made for “Wprost” magazine, dedicated to social and economic issues. Do you believe we live in a surreal world? Does our current society affect art movements?

© Igor Morski

Do we live in a surreal world?I don’t think so although it happens that sometimes we perceive it in that way. The world is by no means what we see it and our tendency is to look for orders and rules. For these, however, in practice the complexity is extremely difficult. We are subjected to various illusions concerning many things, and sometimes one moment makes them break like soap bubbles. For example, until recently I thought that the Polish society is attached to a set of values such as freedom. However, after experiencing the last few years, I do not think so. On the other hand, I saw a society that is not mature enough in terms of what democracy is. And what is most surprising, contrary to its own experience in history, extremely easy to manipulate. I can even say that well-conducted propaganda was able to remodel this society completely, even plow it, turning the proportions of views on various issues. Unfortunately, these are regressive changes. What is the influence of societies on art? I think it's total. As in nature, specific environments generate specific beings.

© Igor Morski Evolve - © Bara Prasilova

50


51

We noticed that you are a fan of theoretical physics and cosmology. Modern physics is full of mind-blowing ideas that can certainly push our imagination to the limit: extra dimensions, the multiverse and a pervasive use of geometry, to name a few. Do any of these ideas make it to your works?

Can you tell us what are the greatest satisfactions you have encountered in your creative journey?

Yes. I am very fascinated by the phenomenon of the world, I am fascinated by nature in all its amazing complexity. Probably if not for my aversion to mathematics in school times, I would be a theoretical physicist today. I have a very deep awareness of our perceptual limitations, which are on the one hand a derivative of the receptor's limitedness, and, on the other hand, of the captivity of a specific cognitive anthropomorphism. I understand it as a limited ability to go beyond the point of view of my own experiences. I will use an example. We see the light and think that it is an objective state. The world is filled with brightness and its opposition is darkness. This has its specific implications, for example in beliefs. However, there is no light. That is, there is a specific wave phenomenon corpuscular, but it does not generate any brightness, because this is an interpretation of this phenomenon, which the brain does. Many species of bats are almost or completely blind to light, and they see reality using sonar. However, we have every right to believe that the reflected signals of the animal see in the image of the sun, that its brain, like ours, that interprets the wave so that this interpretation allows them to orient in the environment. Many scientists even suspect that the subtleties of textures can be seen by bats as colors. This, however, exceeds the imagination of the majority. It is difficult for people to understand the implications of the relativity theory because they contradict our intuitions acquired on the shelf of Newtonian interactions and scales. My imagination, supported by a certain knowledge, makes me imagine that in a world of hidden dimensions, bent spaces, a movement that can simultaneously take place in all directions, the relativism of space and matter Concept/photography/postproduction - © Bara Prasilova time, the galaxy, remote for billions of years, may be Assistant Photographer - Ondřej Janů Client – Zuzana Kubíčková Fashion Designer contained inKnapková my little finger, along with an unimaginable Model - Vanda & Barbora Vojířová Hair&make-up - Eva Svobodová amount of similar beings. Can you find these ideas in my Postproduction - Petra Vokjan works? Some yes.

What advice would you give to a young artist?

Evolve - © Bara Prasilova

© Igor Morski

The easiest way is to tell about my dream. I would like to enter the lists, for example. So I am waiting for an invitation from, let’ s say, New Yorker hahahah.

I think that wise advice for young people is that they should follow their passions. This is, of course, a truism, but in my life the happiest people I've ever met are those who have been passionate throughout their lives. Those who could make passion in their professions, or set them on very important places in life. Are there any future projects you would like to share with us? Exactly. ;)

© Igor Morski


51

We noticed that you are a fan of theoretical physics and cosmology. Modern physics is full of mind-blowing ideas that can certainly push our imagination to the limit: extra dimensions, the multiverse and a pervasive use of geometry, to name a few. Do any of these ideas make it to your works?

Can you tell us what are the greatest satisfactions you have encountered in your creative journey?

Yes. I am very fascinated by the phenomenon of the world, I am fascinated by nature in all its amazing complexity. Probably if not for my aversion to mathematics in school times, I would be a theoretical physicist today. I have a very deep awareness of our perceptual limitations, which are on the one hand a derivative of the receptor's limitedness, and, on the other hand, of the captivity of a specific cognitive anthropomorphism. I understand it as a limited ability to go beyond the point of view of my own experiences. I will use an example. We see the light and think that it is an objective state. The world is filled with brightness and its opposition is darkness. This has its specific implications, for example in beliefs. However, there is no light. That is, there is a specific wave phenomenon corpuscular, but it does not generate any brightness, because this is an interpretation of this phenomenon, which the brain does. Many species of bats are almost or completely blind to light, and they see reality using sonar. However, we have every right to believe that the reflected signals of the animal see in the image of the sun, that its brain, like ours, that interprets the wave so that this interpretation allows them to orient in the environment. Many scientists even suspect that the subtleties of textures can be seen by bats as colors. This, however, exceeds the imagination of the majority. It is difficult for people to understand the implications of the relativity theory because they contradict our intuitions acquired on the shelf of Newtonian interactions and scales. My imagination, supported by a certain knowledge, makes me imagine that in a world of hidden dimensions, bent spaces, a movement that can simultaneously take place in all directions, the relativism of space and matter Concept/photography/postproduction - © Bara Prasilova time, the galaxy, remote for billions of years, may be Assistant Photographer - Ondřej Janů Client – Zuzana Kubíčková Fashion Designer contained inKnapková my little finger, along with an unimaginable Model - Vanda & Barbora Vojířová Hair&make-up - Eva Svobodová amount of similar beings. Can you find these ideas in my Postproduction - Petra Vokjan works? Some yes.

What advice would you give to a young artist?

Evolve - © Bara Prasilova

© Igor Morski

The easiest way is to tell about my dream. I would like to enter the lists, for example. So I am waiting for an invitation from, let’ s say, New Yorker hahahah.

I think that wise advice for young people is that they should follow their passions. This is, of course, a truism, but in my life the happiest people I've ever met are those who have been passionate throughout their lives. Those who could make passion in their professions, or set them on very important places in life. Are there any future projects you would like to share with us? Exactly. ;)

© Igor Morski


ARTICLE Drawing with Sculpture INSPIRATION Author: David Moreno

www.behance.net/DeMoreno davidmoreno_art

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Barcelona based artist David Moreno creates architectural sculptures that challenge our senses and perception of space. He describes his work as “drawing with sculpture�. Combining steel rods and piano wire, his sculptures resemble free-hand sketches floating in mid air. If you ever wondered what would happen to a drawing that magically leaves the page and adventures into the third dimension, Moreno has the answer.

54


ARTICLE Drawing with Sculpture INSPIRATION Author: David Moreno

www.behance.net/DeMoreno davidmoreno_art

53

Barcelona based artist David Moreno creates architectural sculptures that challenge our senses and perception of space. He describes his work as “drawing with sculpture�. Combining steel rods and piano wire, his sculptures resemble free-hand sketches floating in mid air. If you ever wondered what would happen to a drawing that magically leaves the page and adventures into the third dimension, Moreno has the answer.

54


AUSTRALIA

55

Twisted Landscapes is a series of images created by talented Australian artist Nate Hill. By using the powerful tool of photo manipulation Hill creats a fascinating and surreal world. Twisted photographs expose a subject to powerful nature and impose a mysterious atmosphere around it. Nate Hill is a photographer and digital artist from Melbourne, Australia. Nate took the long way around to finding his calling as an artist. He went from a Visual Arts degree, to playing in various bands, to teaching. While teaching he worked on some part time photography coupled with being a stay at home Dad. Now he is finding his groove with a mix of photography, photo manipulation and digital art. His work largely plays on taking something of this world and turning it into something otherworldly. Nate’s most widely shared work is his ongoing series titled ‘Twisted Landscapes’ in which he manipulates his photos into surreal swirls that reveal imaginary portholes into alternate worlds. His work is largely influenced by music and has found working with bands on imagery to accompany their music is his great passion.

www.instagram.com/natehill

Skyfall 2 © Nate Hill


AUSTRALIA

55

Twisted Landscapes are series of images created by talented Australian artist – Nate Hill. By using the powerful tool of photo manipulation Hill is creating a fascinating and surreal world. Twisted photographs are exposing a subject to powerful nature and imposing a mysterious atmosphere around it. Nate Hill is a photographer and digital artist from Melbourne, Australia. Nate took the long way around to finding his calling as an artist. He went from a Visual Arts degree, to playing in various bands, to teaching. While teaching he worked on some part time photography coupled with being a stay at home Dad. Now he is finding his groove with a mix of photography, photo manipulation and digital art. His work largely plays on taking something of this world and turning it into something otherworldly. Nate’s most widely shared work is his ongoing series titled ‘Twisted Landscapes’ in which he manipulates his photos into surreal swirls that reveal imaginary portholes into alternate worlds. His work is largely influenced by music and has found working with bands on imagery to accompany their music is his great passion.

www.instagram.com/natehill

Skyfall 2 © Nate Hill


57

Stroll On © Nate Hill

Nothing Easy © Nate Hill © Marcin Sacha


57

Stroll On © Nate Hill

Nothing Easy © Nate Hill © Marcin Sacha


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60

Manhattan Bridge, New York © John Kosmopoulos

Steel Fog, New York © John Kosmopoulos

© Nate Hill

Meet me in outer space © Nate Hill


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Manhattan Bridge, New York © John Kosmopoulos

Steel Fog, New York © John Kosmopoulos

© Nate Hill

Meet me in outer space © Nate Hill


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The King's Speech Tempodrom, Berlin © John Kosmopoulos

Bay of Dreams © Nate Hill

In This World © Nate Hill


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The King's Speech Tempodrom, Berlin © John Kosmopoulos

Bay of Dreams © Nate Hill

In This World © Nate Hill


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Š Nate Hill

Paradise Š Nate Hill


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Š Nate Hill

Paradise Š Nate Hill


GRAPHIC ZONE @gregorydarroll

@gurdevsr44

@isteef

@limhengswee

@themukulnegi

@klhrdesign

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66

@kerbyrosanes

@feliciachiao

@tomwilltell

@chubasco.toons

@aniketrakhunde20

@ar.creative

@jmann.design

@suckertom

@maniknratan

@alexmdc

@johnholcroftillustration

@4ndreadesantis

@mariussperlich

@rohandahotre


GRAPHIC ZONE @gregorydarroll

@gurdevsr44

@isteef

@limhengswee

@themukulnegi

@klhrdesign

65

66

@kerbyrosanes

@feliciachiao

@tomwilltell

@chubasco.toons

@aniketrakhunde20

@ar.creative

@jmann.design

@suckertom

@maniknratan

@alexmdc

@johnholcroftillustration

@4ndreadesantis

@mariussperlich

@rohandahotre


GRAPHIC ZONE Amazing Graphic Design from Around the World

@iconeo

@graphiclord

@dan_cretu

@minzo.king

@flyingmouse365

@fra_vullo

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@copenhagenposter

@naolito

@fugstrator

@zahersara

@justinpoulsenphoto

@lisa_lloydpaper

@j.m.navarro

@stromwallrich

@kouzou_sakai_illustration

@joeyguidone

@happyimpulse

@gebelia

@aravisdolmenna

@alfredbasha


GRAPHIC ZONE Amazing Graphic Design from Around the World

@iconeo

@graphiclord

@dan_cretu

@minzo.king

@flyingmouse365

@fra_vullo

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@copenhagenposter

@naolito

@fugstrator

@zahersara

@justinpoulsenphoto

@lisa_lloydpaper

@j.m.navarro

@stromwallrich

@kouzou_sakai_illustration

@joeyguidone

@happyimpulse

@gebelia

@aravisdolmenna

@alfredbasha


AUSTRALIA

INTERVIEW WITH

Please briefly tell us about you. Im an artist mostly concentrating on the still image, based in Melbourne, Australia. Urban landscapes and their interaction with society are central themes in your work. What do you want your photographs to reflect about this dynamics? Is there a message you want to convey? How do your works achieve this? My work aims to understand how both subtle and obvious these differences are from country to country and even city to city. Place design is often a historical reflection of a particular society but interestingly can be used as a compass to point society into a certain direction as well. The methods and techniques achieve this are a central theme to my work.

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“I think being resilient and open to change are the best things to strive for to keep you moving forward. Persistence is key” Ben's work has centered around the cities and urban spaces that we live in. His "Cityshrinker" series was internationally acclaimed and considered to be one of the pioneering projects exploring the now popular tilt-shift technique. Most recently Ben has developed his latest series “Chroma” , “Chroma II” AND “ChroMA III”, a further deconstruction of cities and urban areas with a primary focus of the use of colour and flatness that poses questions of how society defines the places in which we live. Ben is a Hasselblad Master 2018 and has recently completed campaigns/assignments for The New Yorker Magazine, Sony, Cake, Singapore Airlines, Penguin Books and Chronicle Books.

www.benthomas.co

Receiving Chroma series © Ben Thomas

Crown Chroma II series © Ben Thomas


AUSTRALIA

INTERVIEW WITH

Please briefly tell us about you. Im an artist mostly concentrating on the still image, based in Melbourne, Australia. Urban landscapes and their interaction with society are central themes in your work. What do you want your photographs to reflect about this dynamics? Is there a message you want to convey? How do your works achieve this? My work aims to understand how both subtle and obvious these differences are from country to country and even city to city. Place design is often a historical reflection of a particular society but interestingly can be used as a compass to point society into a certain direction as well. The methods and techniques achieve this are a central theme to my work.

69

“I think being resilient and open to change are the best things to strive for to keep you moving forward. Persistence is key” Ben's work has centered around the cities and urban spaces that we live in. His "Cityshrinker" series was internationally acclaimed and considered to be one of the pioneering projects exploring the now popular tilt-shift technique. Most recently Ben has developed his latest series “Chroma” , “Chroma II” AND “ChroMA III”, a further deconstruction of cities and urban areas with a primary focus of the use of colour and flatness that poses questions of how society defines the places in which we live. Ben is a Hasselblad Master 2018 and has recently completed campaigns/assignments for The New Yorker Magazine, Sony, Cake, Singapore Airlines, Penguin Books and Chronicle Books.

www.benthomas.co

Receiving Chroma series © Ben Thomas

Crown Chroma II series © Ben Thomas


In your series “Cityshrinker” you succeed in “miniaturizing” real cities. The results are fascinating and force viewers to rethink whether they looking at actual scenes or models. How did you come up with this concept? What are the main technical and visual ingredients to achieve this effect? Does this series have a special meaning for you? I was pretty early to the game as far as tilt shift 'miniaturisation' was concerned but certainly not the first. I had seen some work by Olivo Barbieri that I was fascinated by. The whole project started as a personal challenge to see how much further the technique could be pushed. It was a great series to start my photography career, I learnt a lot while being lucky enough to get some great exposure. It set me on the path I'm on now and will always hold a dear place. We admire how your artworks based on street views. Can you tell us more about the series Chroma, Chroma II and Chroma III. Do you think Chroma IV could be a possibility?

??

??

After spending a number of years working on Cityshrinker I felt as though I had said all that I could on the subject matter. I put down my camera for a year while I developed the concept of Chroma. It wasn’t only the narrative that I wanted to build but the entire shooting and post process from the ground up. Its been a magnificent subject to explore and yes, I feel like there is more to be done.

Cityshrinker series © Ben Thomas

In a previous interview you mentioned that you started to think about photography around 2005. Do you regard yourself as a full time photographer now? Not really, I like to be working on different things to keep sanity in check. I like the freedom that comes with not relying on any one particular gig to keep things moving. Right now I have a great balance.

Your use of textures, light and colour in these series stands out and is very distinctive. What is the effect that it achieves? I have a very deliberate process for shooting these images, the weather conditions play a large role, sunny harsh light often feature. From there work through a treatment of the images that flatten/tonally adjust in a particular fashion to present what you see. Nathan’s, Coney Island Chroma II series © Ben Thomas

© Lola Dupré


In your series “Cityshrinker” you succeed in “miniaturizing” real cities. The results are fascinating and force viewers to rethink whether they looking at actual scenes or models. How did you come up with this concept? What are the main technical and visual ingredients to achieve this effect? Does this series have a special meaning for you? I was pretty early to the game as far as tilt shift 'miniaturisation' was concerned but certainly not the first. I had seen some work by Olivo Barbieri that I was fascinated by. The whole project started as a personal challenge to see how much further the technique could be pushed. It was a great series to start my photography career, I learnt a lot while being lucky enough to get some great exposure. It set me on the path I'm on now and will always hold a dear place. We admire how your artworks based on street views. Can you tell us more about the series Chroma, Chroma II and Chroma III. Do you think Chroma IV could be a possibility?

??

??

After spending a number of years working on Cityshrinker I felt as though I had said all that I could on the subject matter. I put down my camera for a year while I developed the concept of Chroma. It wasn’t only the narrative that I wanted to build but the entire shooting and post process from the ground up. Its been a magnificent subject to explore and yes, I feel like there is more to be done.

Cityshrinker series © Ben Thomas

In a previous interview you mentioned that you started to think about photography around 2005. Do you regard yourself as a full time photographer now? Not really, I like to be working on different things to keep sanity in check. I like the freedom that comes with not relying on any one particular gig to keep things moving. Right now I have a great balance.

Your use of textures, light and colour in these series stands out and is very distinctive. What is the effect that it achieves? I have a very deliberate process for shooting these images, the weather conditions play a large role, sunny harsh light often feature. From there work through a treatment of the images that flatten/tonally adjust in a particular fashion to present what you see. Nathan’s, Coney Island Chroma II series © Ben Thomas

© Lola Dupré


The Chroma series have their antithesis in Anti-Chroma. What are you looking for in this contrasting approach? Thats right. I still consider Anti-Chroma to be more of a testing ground than a stand alone series in itself. I do however like the polarisation of the two concepts. I expect to have more on this in the coming months. When you are out shooting—how much of it is instinctual versus planned? It's a mix of the two. I still very much enjoy the process of walking out the door unsure of what I will come back with but time is not always available to do this, particularly as I am doing more commission work where timelines are tight.

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Can you tell us what are the main challenges you have encountered in your photography journey? Its really difficult to be a successful photographer in 2018. The market is moving quickly and the technology is moving even quicker (there was no instagram and tilt shift settings on phones when I started as an example). I think being resilient and open to change are the best things to strive for to keep you moving forward. Persistence is key. Congratulations for being one of the winners of the Hasselblad Masters Award 2018. Can you tell us about this experience and what opportunities you expect it will bring to you in the future? Thank you! It's a really exciting time right now, its a huge honour to be associated with the awards. Right now I'm preparing a new body of work with Hasselblad which I will be shooting in the next couple of weeks as part of the Hasselblad Masters. The works will be released as part of the Hasselblad Masters book at Photokina in September 2018.   Chroma Luma series © Ben Thomas

© Lola Dupré


The Chroma series have their antithesis in Anti-Chroma. What are you looking for in this contrasting approach? Thats right. I still consider Anti-Chroma to be more of a testing ground than a stand alone series in itself. I do however like the polarisation of the two concepts. I expect to have more on this in the coming months. When you are out shooting—how much of it is instinctual versus planned? It's a mix of the two. I still very much enjoy the process of walking out the door unsure of what I will come back with but time is not always available to do this, particularly as I am doing more commission work where timelines are tight.

73

Can you tell us what are the main challenges you have encountered in your photography journey? Its really difficult to be a successful photographer in 2018. The market is moving quickly and the technology is moving even quicker (there was no instagram and tilt shift settings on phones when I started as an example). I think being resilient and open to change are the best things to strive for to keep you moving forward. Persistence is key. Congratulations for being one of the winners of the Hasselblad Masters Award 2018. Can you tell us about this experience and what opportunities you expect it will bring to you in the future? Thank you! It's a really exciting time right now, its a huge honour to be associated with the awards. Right now I'm preparing a new body of work with Hasselblad which I will be shooting in the next couple of weeks as part of the Hasselblad Masters. The works will be released as part of the Hasselblad Masters book at Photokina in September 2018.   Chroma Luma series © Ben Thomas

© Lola Dupré


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Searching For Something That's Not Real Chroma series © Ben Thomas

© Lola Dupré

Tones Chroma II series © Ben Thomas


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Searching For Something That's Not Real Chroma series © Ben Thomas

© Lola Dupré

Tones Chroma II series © Ben Thomas


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Chroma II series Š Ben Thomas

Elements Chroma series Š Ben Thomas


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Chroma II series Š Ben Thomas

Elements Chroma series Š Ben Thomas


ARTICLE Dreams and Poetry in Black & White INSPIRATION Author: Hengki Lee

www.photographize.co/hengkilee www.facebook.com/HengkiLeePhotography

hengki_lee

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“In my eyes, black and white images often evoke loneliness and mysterious feelings”. Hengki Lee is an award-winning photographer from Jakarta, Indonesia. He is widely known for his dreamy unfocused black and white photography. His works display a unique style, where a dramatic distortion surrounds his subjects. Hengki loves to read and write poetry, which is his main inspiration during the creative process. Choosing silhouettes and unfocused photography allows him to create an undefined story, since the details in the frame are unclear except for the subject’s gesture and composition. It’s a symbolic way to tell a story, just like poetry.

??


ARTICLE Dreams and Poetry in Black & White INSPIRATION Author: Hengki Lee

www.photographize.co/hengkilee www.facebook.com/HengkiLeePhotography

hengki_lee

79

“In my eyes, black and white images often evoke loneliness and mysterious feelings”. Hengki Lee is an award-winning photographer from Jakarta, Indonesia. He is widely known for his dreamy unfocused black and white photography. His works display a unique style, where a dramatic distortion surrounds his subjects. Hengki loves to read and write poetry, which is his main inspiration during the creative process. Choosing silhouettes and unfocused photography allows him to create an undefined story, since the details in the frame are unclear except for the subject’s gesture and composition. It’s a symbolic way to tell a story, just like poetry.

??


ITALY

81

Fabio Giampietro is one of the most sought-after young Italian painters of the moment. The central characters in his works are the city and its skyscrapers, status symbols of the XX century. The world through which Giampietro guides everyone who wants to experience the vertigo, the bravery, the unusual, is a raised trip among the metropolis' arteries, into a body made of concrete that daily throbs and tells the story of who walks and lives down to earth but thinks and dreams above the line. Through his unique technique (he paints subtracting the color from the canvas) he expresses a powerful and intense figurative painting. His work has been widely acclaimed around the world, with exhibitions in Venice, Milan, Bologna, Padua, Berlin, Paris, Istanbul and Shanghai. Eternity Š Katherine Young

24H MONTMARTRE Š Fabio Giampietro

www.fabiogiampietro.com


ITALY

81

Fabio Giampietro is one of the most sought-after young Italian painters of the moment. The central characters in his works are the city and its skyscrapers, status symbols of the XX century. The world through which Giampietro guides everyone who wants to experience the vertigo, the bravery, the unusual, is a raised trip among the metropolis' arteries, into a body made of concrete that daily throbs and tells the story of who walks and lives down to earth but thinks and dreams above the line. Through his unique technique (he paints subtracting the color from the canvas) he expresses a powerful and intense figurative painting. His work has been widely acclaimed around the world, with exhibitions in Venice, Milan, Bologna, Padua, Berlin, Paris, Istanbul and Shanghai. Eternity Š Katherine Young

24H MONTMARTRE Š Fabio Giampietro

www.fabiogiampietro.com


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Illumination, Part I © Katherine Young

METROMORPHOSYS © Fabio Giampietro

MILANO CENTRALE © Fabio Giampietro


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Illumination, Part I © Katherine Young

METROMORPHOSYS © Fabio Giampietro

MILANO CENTRALE © Fabio Giampietro


VERTIGO © Fabio Giampietro METROMORPHOSYS © Fabio Giampietro


VERTIGO © Fabio Giampietro METROMORPHOSYS © Fabio Giampietro


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Opus, part I © Katherine Young

Convergence © Katherine Young

THE DOWNWARD © Fabio Giampietro

METROMORPHOSYS © Fabio Giampietro


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Opus, part I © Katherine Young

Convergence © Katherine Young

THE DOWNWARD © Fabio Giampietro

METROMORPHOSYS © Fabio Giampietro


© Fabio Giampietro

TWO © Fabio Giampietro


© Fabio Giampietro

TWO © Fabio Giampietro


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Natália Mansano

www.nataliamansano.com www.facebook.com/nataliamansanophotofactoryluxstudio www.instagram.com/liber_sum

Natália Mansano

Switzerland

91

92

© Natália Mansano

© Natália Mansano


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Natália Mansano

www.nataliamansano.com www.facebook.com/nataliamansanophotofactoryluxstudio www.instagram.com/liber_sum

Natália Mansano

Switzerland

91

92

© Natália Mansano

© Natália Mansano


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Kovalev Ivan

www.1x.com/member/ivankovale www.facebook.com/easeofsoul

www.instagram.com/foto_ivankovale

Kovalev Ivan

russia

93

Make-up artist: Jully Valerie www.facebook.com/JullyValerie www.instagram.com/@jully_valerie www.vk.com/jully_valerie

??

Endangered Species Š Kovalev Ivan

Who am I? Š Kovalev Ivan


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Kovalev Ivan

www.1x.com/member/ivankovale www.facebook.com/easeofsoul

www.instagram.com/foto_ivankovale

Kovalev Ivan

russia

93

Make-up artist: Jully Valerie www.facebook.com/JullyValerie www.instagram.com/@jully_valerie www.vk.com/jully_valerie

??

Endangered Species Š Kovalev Ivan

Who am I? Š Kovalev Ivan


Highlights ARTIST

Omar Shehabi

Author: Mam'AT Nathalie AT

www.mamatphotos.weebly.com www.facebook.com/MamatPhotos

www.instagram.com/mamatphotos

bulgaria

Mam'AT Nathalie AT France

Author: Omar Shehabi

95

www.facebook.com/lazyvisuals

www.instagram.com/lazyvisuals_

??

Vagues de nuages Š Mam'AT Nathalie AT

Time Š Omar Shehabi


Highlights ARTIST

Omar Shehabi

Author: Mam'AT Nathalie AT

www.mamatphotos.weebly.com www.facebook.com/MamatPhotos

www.instagram.com/mamatphotos

bulgaria

Mam'AT Nathalie AT France

Author: Omar Shehabi

95

www.facebook.com/lazyvisuals

www.instagram.com/lazyvisuals_

??

Vagues de nuages Š Mam'AT Nathalie AT

Time Š Omar Shehabi


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Marco Maljaars

www.flickr.com/photos/148104733@N06 https://bit.ly/2KiWGM1

Marco Maljaars Netherlands

97

98

Light Behind The Hills Š Marco Maljaars

Cloud Maker Š Marco Maljaars


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Marco Maljaars

www.flickr.com/photos/148104733@N06 https://bit.ly/2KiWGM1

Marco Maljaars Netherlands

97

98

Light Behind The Hills Š Marco Maljaars

Cloud Maker Š Marco Maljaars


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Aria Sard-Salek

www.facebook.com/snow.photography.innsbruck www.instagram.com/aria.sadr.salek

Aria Sard-Salek

Austria

99

100

EXIT THROUGH THE LIGHT (NATIONAL SOCIALISM DOCUMENTATION CENTRE / NAZISM MUSEUM - CAVE & PRISON) © Aria Sard-Salek

LOOKING THROUGH THE GLASS (GRANDFATHER) © Aria Sard-Salek


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Aria Sard-Salek

www.facebook.com/snow.photography.innsbruck www.instagram.com/aria.sadr.salek

Aria Sard-Salek

Austria

99

100

EXIT THROUGH THE LIGHT (NATIONAL SOCIALISM DOCUMENTATION CENTRE / NAZISM MUSEUM - CAVE & PRISON) © Aria Sard-Salek

LOOKING THROUGH THE GLASS (GRANDFATHER) © Aria Sard-Salek


Highlights ARTIST

Shervin Khan Mohammadi

Author: Shervin Khan Mohammadi www.instagram.com/shervinkhanmohammadi

Author: Józefina Litwin

www.jozefinalitwin.wixsite.com/malarstwo www.facebook.com/by.jozefina.litwin www.instagram.com/by.jozefina.litwin

Iran

poland

101

??

Lost in space © Shervin Khan Mohammadi

I Will Name You The Fear © Józefina Litwin


Highlights ARTIST

Shervin Khan Mohammadi

Author: Shervin Khan Mohammadi www.instagram.com/shervinkhanmohammadi

Author: Józefina Litwin

www.jozefinalitwin.wixsite.com/malarstwo www.facebook.com/by.jozefina.litwin www.instagram.com/by.jozefina.litwin

Iran

poland

101

??

Lost in space © Shervin Khan Mohammadi

I Will Name You The Fear © Józefina Litwin


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Cristian Townsend

www.cristian-townsend.squarespace.com www.instagram.com/oswaldfitchjapan

Cristian Townsend japan

103

??

he Indoctrination of Miss Muffet Š Cristian Townsend Models: Guiggles, Masaaki aka Blue Dragon. Danielle Eri

Bedtime Stories Š Cristian Townsend Models: Guiggles & Rose, Masaaki aka Blue Dragon


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Cristian Townsend

www.cristian-townsend.squarespace.com www.instagram.com/oswaldfitchjapan

Cristian Townsend japan

103

??

he Indoctrination of Miss Muffet Š Cristian Townsend Models: Guiggles, Masaaki aka Blue Dragon. Danielle Eri

Bedtime Stories Š Cristian Townsend Models: Guiggles & Rose, Masaaki aka Blue Dragon


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Muriel Vekemans

www.murielvekemans.jimdo.com

Kerstin Niemöller

GERMANY

Muriel Vekemans Belgium

Author: Kerstin Niemöller / KNFotos

105

www.knfotos.com www.facebook.com/kerstin.niemoller.1

www.instagram.com/kerstin_niemoeller

??

Water in jars © Muriel Vekemans

Seelenstriptease © Kerstin Niemöller / KNFotos


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Muriel Vekemans

www.murielvekemans.jimdo.com

Kerstin Niemöller

GERMANY

Muriel Vekemans Belgium

Author: Kerstin Niemöller / KNFotos

105

www.knfotos.com www.facebook.com/kerstin.niemoller.1

www.instagram.com/kerstin_niemoeller

??

Water in jars © Muriel Vekemans

Seelenstriptease © Kerstin Niemöller / KNFotos


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Maria Oliveira

www.maria-oliveira.com www.instagram.com/mariaoliveiradiz

Maria Oliveira

UNITED STATES

107

108

Face to Face Š Maria Oliveira

Freedom Š Maria Oliveira


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Maria Oliveira

www.maria-oliveira.com www.instagram.com/mariaoliveiradiz

Maria Oliveira

UNITED STATES

107

108

Face to Face Š Maria Oliveira

Freedom Š Maria Oliveira


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Bruno Mercier

www.brunomercier.fr www.facebook.com/Bruno.Mercier.photographe www.instagram.com/brunomercier.fr

Bruno Mercier FRANCE

109

110

Metamorphose Series Š Bruno Mercier

Metamorphose Series Š Bruno Mercier


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Bruno Mercier

www.brunomercier.fr www.facebook.com/Bruno.Mercier.photographe www.instagram.com/brunomercier.fr

Bruno Mercier FRANCE

109

110

Metamorphose Series Š Bruno Mercier

Metamorphose Series Š Bruno Mercier


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Saskia Boelsums

www.saskiaboelsums.nl www.facebook.com/saskia.boelsums

www.instagram.com/saskiaboelsums

Saskia Boelsums Netherlands

111

112

© Saskia Boelsums

© Saskia Boelsums


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Saskia Boelsums

www.saskiaboelsums.nl www.facebook.com/saskia.boelsums

www.instagram.com/saskiaboelsums

Saskia Boelsums Netherlands

111

112

© Saskia Boelsums

© Saskia Boelsums


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Piotr Putko

www.facebook.com/piotrputkophotography www.instagram.com/piotrputko

Author: Paolo Corradini

www.paolocorradini.it

www.instagram.com/pablitoc16

Piotr Putko poland

Paolo Corradini

italy

113

??

Misty Trees Š Piotr Putko

I believe I can fly Š Paolo Corradini


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Piotr Putko

www.facebook.com/piotrputkophotography www.instagram.com/piotrputko

Author: Paolo Corradini

www.paolocorradini.it

www.instagram.com/pablitoc16

Piotr Putko poland

Paolo Corradini

italy

113

??

Misty Trees Š Piotr Putko

I believe I can fly Š Paolo Corradini


Highlights ARTIST

Heinz Innerhofer

Italy

Author: Heinz Innerhofer

115

www.h-innerhofer.com www.facebook.com/heinz.innerhofer

116

Milano Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II © Heinz Innerhofer

Bruneck Paul Von Sternbach 3 © Heinz Innerhofer


Highlights ARTIST

Heinz Innerhofer

Italy

Author: Heinz Innerhofer

115

www.h-innerhofer.com www.facebook.com/heinz.innerhofer

116

Milano Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II © Heinz Innerhofer

Bruneck Paul Von Sternbach 3 © Heinz Innerhofer


Highlights ARTIST

Mila Ivke

Author: Mila Ivke

www.milaivke.com

www.instagram.com/milaivke

Author: Emmanuel Bretón

www.youpic.com/photographer/ebreton www.facebook.com/ebreton www.instagram.com/ebreton

spain

Emmanuel Bretón Dominican Republic

117

??

Spaceship no. 1 © Mila Ivke

© Emmanuel Bretón


Highlights ARTIST

Mila Ivke

Author: Mila Ivke

www.milaivke.com

www.instagram.com/milaivke

Author: Emmanuel Bretón

www.youpic.com/photographer/ebreton www.facebook.com/ebreton www.instagram.com/ebreton

spain

Emmanuel Bretón Dominican Republic

117

??

Spaceship no. 1 © Mila Ivke

© Emmanuel Bretón


Highlights ARTIST

Vicky Martin United kingdom

Author: Vicky Martin

119

www.vickymartinphoto.co.uk www.instagram.com/vickymartinphoto

120

Blush © Vicky Martin

La Souris Femelle © Vicky Martin


Highlights ARTIST

Vicky Martin United kingdom

Author: Vicky Martin

119

www.vickymartinphoto.co.uk www.instagram.com/vickymartinphoto

120

Blush © Vicky Martin

La Souris Femelle © Vicky Martin


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Merethe Wessel-Berg

www.mwb.no www.facebook.com/merethewesselbergphotography

Merethe Wessel-Berg

Norway

121

122

Rain, Oslo Š Merethe Wessel-Berg

Rain, Oslo Š Merethe Wessel-Berg


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Merethe Wessel-Berg

www.mwb.no www.facebook.com/merethewesselbergphotography

Merethe Wessel-Berg

Norway

121

122

Rain, Oslo Š Merethe Wessel-Berg

Rain, Oslo Š Merethe Wessel-Berg


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Axel Brand

www.facebook.com/AxelBrandPhotography www.instagram.com/axl_brand

Author: Alexander Nikolov

www.facebook.com/al.nikoloff

www.instagram.com/al.nikoloff

Alex Brand

Germany

Alexander Nikolov

Bulgaria

123

??

Somewhere in my mind © Alexander Nikolov

© Alex Brand


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Axel Brand

www.facebook.com/AxelBrandPhotography www.instagram.com/axl_brand

Author: Alexander Nikolov

www.facebook.com/al.nikoloff

www.instagram.com/al.nikoloff

Alex Brand

Germany

Alexander Nikolov

Bulgaria

123

??

Somewhere in my mind © Alexander Nikolov

© Alex Brand


Highlights ARTIST

Panos Vassilopoulos greece

Author: Panos Vassilopoulos

125

www.panosvisualmedia.com

www.facebook.com/panos.vassilopoulos.drummer

??

Ote Building Š Panos Vassilopoulos

Impossible Frame Š Panos Vassilopoulos


Highlights ARTIST

Panos Vassilopoulos greece

Author: Panos Vassilopoulos

125

www.panosvisualmedia.com

www.facebook.com/panos.vassilopoulos.drummer

??

Ote Building Š Panos Vassilopoulos

Impossible Frame Š Panos Vassilopoulos


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Reginar Photography

www.reginar.photography www.facebook.com/reginarphotography

www.instagram.com/reginarphotography

Reginar Photography Netherlands

127

128

Tilt Shift

Cameleon Š Reginar Photography

Š Reginar Photography


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Reginar Photography

www.reginar.photography www.facebook.com/reginarphotography

www.instagram.com/reginarphotography

Reginar Photography Netherlands

127

128

Tilt Shift

Cameleon Š Reginar Photography

Š Reginar Photography


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Kaushik Dolui

Author: Goutam Chatterjee

www.facebook.com/kaushik.dolui

www.facebook.com/goutam.chatterjee.908

www.instagram.com/kaushikdolui

www.instagram.com/goutamchat10

Goutam Chatterjee

india

Kaushik Dolui

india

129

??

Broken Music © Goutam Chatterjee

© Kaushik Dolui


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Kaushik Dolui

Author: Goutam Chatterjee

www.facebook.com/kaushik.dolui

www.facebook.com/goutam.chatterjee.908

www.instagram.com/kaushikdolui

www.instagram.com/goutamchat10

Goutam Chatterjee

india

Kaushik Dolui

india

129

??

Broken Music © Goutam Chatterjee

© Kaushik Dolui


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Emel Karakozak

http://artgalerimbebek.com/sergi/sanatci/25 https://bit.ly/2IEfOH5 www.instagram.com/emelkarakozak

Emel Karakozak Turkey

131

132

Budding 6 Š Emel Karakozak

Budding 7 Š Emel Karakozak


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Emel Karakozak

http://artgalerimbebek.com/sergi/sanatci/25 https://bit.ly/2IEfOH5 www.instagram.com/emelkarakozak

Emel Karakozak Turkey

131

132

Budding 6 Š Emel Karakozak

Budding 7 Š Emel Karakozak


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Jean Christophe Cros

www.jeanchristophecros.fr

www.instagram.com/ttttt0t0r0

Author: Eduardo Asenjo Matus

www.flickr.com/photos/el_kraken

www.instagram.com/eduardo.asenjo.matus

Jean Christophe Cros FRANCE

Eduardo Asenjo Matus CHILE

133

??

The sound of your voice © Eduardo Asenjo Matus

Accostage en bord de lèvres © Jean Christophe Cros


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Jean Christophe Cros

www.jeanchristophecros.fr

www.instagram.com/ttttt0t0r0

Author: Eduardo Asenjo Matus

www.flickr.com/photos/el_kraken

www.instagram.com/eduardo.asenjo.matus

Jean Christophe Cros FRANCE

Eduardo Asenjo Matus CHILE

133

??

The sound of your voice © Eduardo Asenjo Matus

Accostage en bord de lèvres © Jean Christophe Cros


Highlights ARTIST

Isabel Martín

SPAIN

Author: Isabel Martín

135

https://bit.ly/2rIU9Eb

136

www.instagram.com/isabel_martin_fotografia

© Isabel Martín

© Isabel Martín


Highlights ARTIST

Isabel Martín

España

Author: Isabel Martín

135

https://bit.ly/2rIU9Eb

136

www.instagram.com/isabel_martin_fotografia

© Isabel Martín

© Isabel Martín


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Natalie Sartisson

www.nataliesartisson.com www.facebook.com/artsartisson

www.instagram.com/artsartisson

Natalie Sartisson

canada

137

138

Gravitation Š Natalie Sartisson

Doors Š Natalie Sartisson


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Natalie Sartisson

www.nataliesartisson.com www.facebook.com/artsartisson

www.instagram.com/artsartisson

Natalie Sartisson

canada

137

138

Gravitation Š Natalie Sartisson

Doors Š Natalie Sartisson


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Javier Roldan Perez

www.jrph.com.au www.facebook.com/javierroldan.net www.instagram.com/javierroldanp/

Javier Roldan Perez

australia

139

140

Gift Š Javier Roldan Perez

All My Life Š Javier Roldan Perez


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Javier Roldan Perez

www.jrph.com.au www.facebook.com/javierroldan.net www.instagram.com/javierroldanp/

Javier Roldan Perez

australia

139

140

Gift Š Javier Roldan Perez

All My Life Š Javier Roldan Perez


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Daniel Castonguay

www.photographize.co/danielcastonguay www.facebook.com/daniel.castonguay.165

Daniel Castonguay

CANADA

141

??

Laurier Ave © Daniel Castonguay

Gone Home © Daniel Castonguay


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Daniel Castonguay

www.photographize.co/danielcastonguay www.facebook.com/daniel.castonguay.165

Daniel Castonguay

CANADA

141

??

Laurier Ave © Daniel Castonguay

Gone Home © Daniel Castonguay


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Mihai Florea

www.mihai-florea.pixels.com www.facebook.com/mihai.florea.98 www.instagram.com/mihaiflorea67

Mihai Florea

Australia

143

144

Ripples © Mihai Florea

Genie © Mihai Florea


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Mihai Florea

www.mihai-florea.pixels.com www.facebook.com/mihai.florea.98 www.instagram.com/mihaiflorea67

Mihai Florea

Australia

143

144

Ripples © Mihai Florea

Genie © Mihai Florea


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Nicole Marchant

www.behance.net/nicolemarchant www.flickr.com/photos/nicole-m www.facebook.com/nicopma www.instagram.com/nico.pma

Nicole Marchant Chile

145

??

Parálisis del sueño © Nicole Marchant

Calma © Nicole Marchant


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Nicole Marchant

www.behance.net/nicolemarchant www.flickr.com/photos/nicole-m www.facebook.com/nicopma www.instagram.com/nico.pma

Nicole Marchant Chile

145

??

Parálisis del sueño © Nicole Marchant

Calma © Nicole Marchant


Highlights ARTIST

AL7HD Amine Lahmer

Author: AL7HD Amine Lahmer

www.al7hd.com www.facebook.com/AL7HDEditings www.instagram.com/al7_hd

Tunisia

Armin Bigdeli iran

147

Author: Armin Bigdeli

www.facebook.com/armin.bigdeli

www.instagram.com/armin.bigdeli

No Chance © AL7HD Amine Lahmer

Gravity © Armin Bigdeli

??


Highlights ARTIST

AL7HD Amine Lahmer

Author: AL7HD Amine Lahmer

www.al7hd.com www.facebook.com/AL7HDEditings www.instagram.com/al7_hd

Tunisia

Armin Bigdeli iran

147

Author: Armin Bigdeli

www.facebook.com/armin.bigdeli

www.instagram.com/armin.bigdeli

No Chance © AL7HD Amine Lahmer

Gravity © Armin Bigdeli

??


Highlights ARTIST

Fang Tong

Author: Fang Tong

www.fangtongphotography.com www.facebook.com/fangtongfineartphoto

Author: Mirek Szymanski

www.facebook.com/miroslaw.szymanski.5 www.instagram.com/mirek_szymanski

www.instagram.com/fang

canada

Mirek Szymanski poland

149

??

What the corpse's extinct eye see? Š Mirek Szymanski

Soap Opera Š Fang Tong


Highlights ARTIST

Fang Tong

Author: Fang Tong

www.fangtongphotography.com www.facebook.com/fangtongfineartphoto

Author: Mirek Szymanski

www.facebook.com/miroslaw.szymanski.5 www.instagram.com/mirek_szymanski

www.instagram.com/fang

canada

Mirek Szymanski poland

149

??

What the corpse's extinct eye see? Š Mirek Szymanski

Soap Opera Š Fang Tong


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Ole Marius Joergensen

www.olemariusphotography.com/biography

Ole Marius Joergensen

Norway

151

??

Somethings Wrong © Ole Marius Joergensen

The House © Ole Marius Joergensen


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Ole Marius Joergensen

www.olemariusphotography.com/biography

Ole Marius Joergensen

Norway

151

??

Somethings Wrong © Ole Marius Joergensen

The House © Ole Marius Joergensen


Highlights

Author: Tex Schneider

ARTIST

www.facebook.com/Tex-Schneider-Photography-1421512094812384 www.instagram.com/tex.schneider.photography

Tex Schneider

united states

153

154

Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles © Tex Schneider

Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles © Tex Schneider


Highlights

Author: Tex Schneider

ARTIST

www.facebook.com/Tex-Schneider-Photography-1421512094812384 www.instagram.com/tex.schneider.photography

Tex Schneider

united states

153

154

Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles © Tex Schneider

Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles © Tex Schneider


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Kuki Walsch

www.ndmagazine.net/photographer/kuki-walsch www.camerapixo.com/photographers/kuki-walsch www.facebook.com/kuki.walsch

Kuki Walsch

Austria

155

??

Street Vision, Budapest © Kuki Walsch

Street Imagery #3, Budapest © Kuki Walsch


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Kuki Walsch

www.ndmagazine.net/photographer/kuki-walsch www.camerapixo.com/photographers/kuki-walsch www.facebook.com/kuki.walsch

Kuki Walsch

Austria

155

??

Street Vision, Budapest © Kuki Walsch

Street Imagery #3, Budapest © Kuki Walsch


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Eleni Gemeni www.instagram.com/elengemlux

Eleni Gemeni

Luxembourg

157

158

Transformation in progress Š Eleni Gemeni

Transmutation in progress Š Eleni Gemeni


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Eleni Gemeni www.instagram.com/elengemlux

Eleni Gemeni

Luxembourg

157

158

Transformation in progress Š Eleni Gemeni

Transmutation in progress Š Eleni Gemeni


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Asdrúbal Salazar S.

www.flickr.com/people/azzahr

Asdrúbal Salazar S.

venezuela

159

??

© Asdrúbal Salazar S.

© Asdrúbal Salazar S.


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Asdrúbal Salazar S.

www.flickr.com/people/azzahr

Asdrúbal Salazar S.

venezuela

159

??

© Asdrúbal Salazar S.

© Asdrúbal Salazar S.


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Paul Suciu

www.paulsuciu.com

www.instagram.com/rain.is.poetry

Paul Suciu

romania

161

162

Im Only Happy When It Rains © Paul Suciu

Old Style Man © Paul Suciu


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Paul Suciu

www.paulsuciu.com

www.instagram.com/rain.is.poetry

Paul Suciu

romania

161

162

Im Only Happy When It Rains © Paul Suciu

Old Style Man © Paul Suciu


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Martina Dimunová

www.facebook.com/mdimun04 www.instagram.com/mdimun

Martina Dimunová

Czech republic

163

??

Warm Up © Martina Dimunová

One © Martina Dimunová


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Martina Dimunová

www.facebook.com/mdimun04 www.instagram.com/mdimun

Martina Dimunová

Czech republic

163

??

Warm Up © Martina Dimunová

One © Martina Dimunová


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Matjaz Martincic

www.matjazmartincic.com www.facebook.com/matjaz.martincic

Matjaz Martincic

Slovenia

165

166

Š Matjaz Martincic

Š Matjaz Martincic


Highlights ARTIST

Author: Matjaz Martincic

www.matjazmartincic.com www.facebook.com/matjaz.martincic

Matjaz Martincic

Slovenia

165

166

Š Matjaz Martincic

Š Matjaz Martincic


Highlights ARTIST

Author: László Vidók

www.flickr.com/photos/79796690@N05

www.facebook.com/laszlovidokphotography

László Vidók

Hungary

167

??

© László Vidók

© László Vidók


Highlights ARTIST

Author: László Vidók

www.flickr.com/photos/79796690@N05

www.facebook.com/laszlovidokphotography

László Vidók

Hungary

167

??

© László Vidók

© László Vidók


mofo_dezin


Highlights Mohammad Rahman AUSTRALIA

Author: Mohammad Rahman

www.mohammad-rahman.com

ta s t e H U N T E R S

food lovers

www.forksnroses.co ► © Mohammad Rahman 113


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Photographize Magazine | Issue 38 |May 2018