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ISSN 2639-569X


stephanenavailles1967 who we are Photographize is beyond a Magazine! It’s a platform for Artists, Galleries and Creatives. Originated by Photographize, Monochrome Magazine dedicates its space to the passion for monochrome photography. The images chosen affect different kinds of photographic art and are united by a common denominator: black and white. Whether classic, dense and scratchy, painted with light or full of contrast, monochromatic represents the vibrating heart of Photographize Monochrome. Leafing through these pages you can feel the power of a kind of photography which discovers in the colorless color of black and white the charm of shapes and lines, the roundness of chiaroscuro, the roughness of grain, the suggestion of the scents of a darkroom. Founders | Editors in Chief Andrea Costantini & Carla De La Matta Writers Thomas Jukes

Submissions: www.photographize.co/submissions Info: info@photographize.co Sales and Advertising: sales@photographize.co All images and text published in Photographize are the sole property of the featured authors and subject to copyright. No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner.

Photographize

PO BOX 20658, 234 10th Ave New York City, NY 10011 United States

ISSN 2639-5703 - DIGITAL ISSN 2639-569X - PRINT www.photographize.co

2019 © Photographize Magazine Cover : © Jono Dry Art


stephanenavailles1967 who we are Photographize is beyond a Magazine! It’s a platform for Artists, Galleries and Creatives. Originated by Photographize, Monochrome Magazine dedicates its space to the passion for monochrome photography. The images chosen affect different kinds of photographic art and are united by a common denominator: black and white. Whether classic, dense and scratchy, painted with light or full of contrast, monochromatic represents the vibrating heart of Photographize Monochrome. Leafing through these pages you can feel the power of a kind of photography which discovers in the colorless color of black and white the charm of shapes and lines, the roundness of chiaroscuro, the roughness of grain, the suggestion of the scents of a darkroom. Founders | Editors in Chief Andrea Costantini & Carla De La Matta Writers Thomas Jukes

Submissions: www.photographize.co/submissions Info: info@photographize.co Sales and Advertising: sales@photographize.co All images and text published in Photographize are the sole property of the featured authors and subject to copyright. No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner.

Photographize

PO BOX 20658, 234 10th Ave New York City, NY 10011 United States

ISSN 2639-5703 - DIGITAL ISSN 2639-569X - PRINT www.photographize.co

2019 © Photographize Magazine Cover : © Jono Dry Art


www.artecopado.com Sabrina Guzman


www.artecopado.com Sabrina Guzman


www.gusfineart.es


www.gusfineart.es


heppa.nsaleh


heppa.nsaleh


13

29

19

75

65

FEATURED

39

51

81

13 Joxe Inazio Kuesta Garmendia 29 Paco Garzón 39 NATHAN WIRTH 45 RAPHAEL GUARINO 59 WOLF ADEMEIT 69 THOMAS HOLM 75 DANIEL GARAY ARANGO 89 AHMED THABET

89

INTERVIEW

19 OLIVIER ROBERT 51 JONO DRY ART 81 HENGKI KOENTJORO

ARTICLE

35 JULIAN LENNON 65 GREGORY COLBERT

HIGHLIGHTS

95 Curator’s choice 45

59

69

35


13

29

19

75

65

FEATURED

39

51

81

13 Joxe Inazio Kuesta Garmendia 29 Paco Garzón 39 NATHAN WIRTH 45 RAPHAEL GUARINO 59 WOLF ADEMEIT 69 THOMAS HOLM 75 DANIEL GARAY ARANGO 89 AHMED THABET

89

INTERVIEW

19 OLIVIER ROBERT 51 JONO DRY ART 81 HENGKI KOENTJORO

ARTICLE

35 JULIAN LENNON 65 GREGORY COLBERT

HIGHLIGHTS

95 Curator’s choice 45

59

69

35


SPAIN

Spain based photographer Joxe Inazio Kuesta Garmendia captures the daily life and culture of people around the world. An avid traveller, his soulful black and white photographs transport us to distant places like Papua New Guinea, India, Bangladesh, Benin or Ethiopia. Joxe Inazio is fascinated by people. Speaking about different photographic subjects, he says: “This reality can be a landscape for some, a portrait for others, a building for others, etc. In my case, the type of photography I do is street photography and documentary, and the main goal of almost all of them is the human being, and more specifically their glances.” Indeed, a masterful treatment of the eyes, as windows into the depths of our hearts, stands out in all of his works. With the raw emotions and poetry that are only possible in monochrome photography, Joxe Inazio takes us into a journey into the hidden secrets of human nature. www.1x.com/member/joxeinazio 13

► © Joxe Inazio Kuesta Garmendia

30 05


SPAIN

Black and white is a powerful and expressive medium and, one of the most difficult areas of photography to break into; an ever-increasing market in a world where social marketing can turn images, series and, photographers into instant hits. Spanish photographer and traveler, Joxe Inazio Kuesta Garmendia capture moments of the daily life of people and their humanist values from all around the world. He focuses on Papua New Guinea, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Benin, and some other places in Africa. Joxe Inazio has a large number of black and white photographs. In each of his images, he explores the interaction between people and their natural environment, resulting in impressive moments where the essence of each speaks by itself. www.1x.com/member/joxeinazio 13

► Š Joxe Inazio Kuesta Garmendia

30 05


► © Joxe Inazio Kuesta Garmendia 15

► © Joxe Inazio Kuesta Garmendia

16


► © Joxe Inazio Kuesta Garmendia 15

► © Joxe Inazio Kuesta Garmendia

16


► © Joxe Inazio Kuesta Garmendia 17

08 ► © Joxe Inazio Kuesta Garmendia


► © Joxe Inazio Kuesta Garmendia 17

08 ► © Joxe Inazio Kuesta Garmendia


belgium

INTERVIEW WITH

A very important present that I still keep with me. At the same time, I discovered Asia. This experience has drastically influenced my life. From then on, Asian culture and photography are closely linked. In 1994, I graduated from the Institute of Landscape Architecture in Belgium and the year after, I moved to Geneva (Switzerland) for my first job, where I still live. I started my photography business as a secondary occupation and got my first orders for magazines and media. Later, I bought a studio equipment and worked for models, producing mainly black and white portfolios for an agency. In 2004, I eventually decided to devote my time to personal photography projects about lakes and landscapes. From then on, I’ve spent my life traveling as much as possible, especially in Japan where I met my wife and where I found my main sources of inspiration.

Some projects offer me the opportunity to dive deeply in the simplicity of sceneries. For example, Winters and Waterscapes in Japan are two projects on which I work for more than a decade. These projects have an interesting evolution in the simplicity of sceneries and lights. The more it goes, the more I feel the need of showing almost nothing but what sound to me as the essence of the landscape. That’s maybe my definition of minimalism…

You define your style as minimalistic. When did you first realize your passion for it?

Olivier Robert is a professional photographer sharing his life between Europe and Japan. His approach is based on a minimalist expression for more than 25 years. Initiated very early to photography and darkroom process, he got his first camera at the age of 15. At that time, he also discovered Asia. This intense experience has drastically influenced his way of life and his vision of the world. From then on, photography, traditional Asian landscape painting, and philosophy have been closely linked.

Minimalism is a very trendy word in photography nowadays. When I arrived in Switzerland in 1995, I’ve immediately started a photography work about Lake Geneva. I didn’t expect it would become a long-term project. Around that time, I even didn’t know that ‘minimalism’ could be a style in photography. I don’t want to belong to a style since I like to feel free in my photography. But after so many years, I must admit that the vast majority of my photographs are based on a ‘pared-down’ vision of the world. So, I would say that they refer to a minimalistic style even if it wasn’t my intention in 1995. Before all, I want my photographs to be the result of a personal choice and not the result of a rule.

Olivier photographs have been frequently published and worldwide exhibited in galleries or museums. He is also a winner and finalist of multiple international photography awards.

That being said, I feel that many photographers are much more minimalist than I can be…

“I want my photographs to be the result of a personal choice and not the result of a rule. That being said, I feel that many photographers are much more minimalist than I can be”

Tell us briefly about yourself. What was your path to become a photographer? I was born in Belgium in 1970. Initiated very early to photography by my parents and relatives, I wanted to become a photo-reporter. Since it wasn’t possible around that time, I decided some years later to be a self-taught photographer. When I was a child, I lived within an artistic context. My parents were enthusiast photographers and my father was also a painter. Since the age of 8, and as long as I remember, I’ve been fascinated by the darkroom that we had in the cellar. Some years later, I started playing with their cameras. When I was 15, I got my first 35mm camera.

www.olivierrobert.net 19

Your images simplify the world without dismissing the complex beauty that lies beyond sight. As the saying goes:“less is more”. How did your style evolve through the years? I guess my work evolved more in terms of post-processing than in terms of personal expression. In addition and technically speaking, I tend to put much more time in my photography sessions than in the past and less time in post-processing.

Consequently, each photograph takes part in a series and doesn’t have its own existence anymore. As part of a project, each of these photographs has something to say, something to write in the story of the project from which it can’t be removed. This is a characteristic evolution of my work. 20


belgium

INTERVIEW WITH

A very important present that I still keep with me. At the same time, I discovered Asia. This experience has drastically influenced my life. From then on, Asian culture and photography are closely linked. In 1994, I graduated from the Institute of Landscape Architecture in Belgium and the year after, I moved to Geneva (Switzerland) for my first job, where I still live. I started my photography business as a secondary occupation and got my first orders for magazines and media. Later, I bought a studio equipment and worked for models, producing mainly black and white portfolios for an agency. In 2004, I eventually decided to devote my time to personal photography projects about lakes and landscapes. From then on, I’ve spent my life traveling as much as possible, especially in Japan where I met my wife and where I found my main sources of inspiration.

Some projects offer me the opportunity to dive deeply in the simplicity of sceneries. For example, Winters and Waterscapes in Japan are two projects on which I work for more than a decade. These projects have an interesting evolution in the simplicity of sceneries and lights. The more it goes, the more I feel the need of showing almost nothing but what sound to me as the essence of the landscape. That’s maybe my definition of minimalism…

You define your style as minimalistic. When did you first realize your passion for it?

Olivier Robert is a professional photographer sharing his life between Europe and Japan. His approach is based on a minimalist expression for more than 25 years. Initiated very early to photography and darkroom process, he got his first camera at the age of 15. At that time, he also discovered Asia. This intense experience has drastically influenced his way of life and his vision of the world. From then on, photography, traditional Asian landscape painting, and philosophy have been closely linked.

Minimalism is a very trendy word in photography nowadays. When I arrived in Switzerland in 1995, I’ve immediately started a photography work about Lake Geneva. I didn’t expect it would become a long-term project. Around that time, I even didn’t know that ‘minimalism’ could be a style in photography. I don’t want to belong to a style since I like to feel free in my photography. But after so many years, I must admit that the vast majority of my photographs are based on a ‘pared-down’ vision of the world. So, I would say that they refer to a minimalistic style even if it wasn’t my intention in 1995. Before all, I want my photographs to be the result of a personal choice and not the result of a rule.

Olivier photographs have been frequently published and worldwide exhibited in galleries or museums. He is also a winner and finalist of multiple international photography awards.

That being said, I feel that many photographers are much more minimalist than I can be…

“I want my photographs to be the result of a personal choice and not the result of a rule. That being said, I feel that many photographers are much more minimalist than I can be”

Tell us briefly about yourself. What was your path to become a photographer? I was born in Belgium in 1970. Initiated very early to photography by my parents and relatives, I wanted to become a photo-reporter. Since it wasn’t possible around that time, I decided some years later to be a self-taught photographer. When I was a child, I lived within an artistic context. My parents were enthusiast photographers and my father was also a painter. Since the age of 8, and as long as I remember, I’ve been fascinated by the darkroom that we had in the cellar. Some years later, I started playing with their cameras. When I was 15, I got my first 35mm camera.

www.olivierrobert.net 19

Your images simplify the world without dismissing the complex beauty that lies beyond sight. As the saying goes:“less is more”. How did your style evolve through the years? I guess my work evolved more in terms of post-processing than in terms of personal expression. In addition and technically speaking, I tend to put much more time in my photography sessions than in the past and less time in post-processing.

Consequently, each photograph takes part in a series and doesn’t have its own existence anymore. As part of a project, each of these photographs has something to say, something to write in the story of the project from which it can’t be removed. This is a characteristic evolution of my work. 20


Safdar Jang, Study 1 Delhi, India, 2006 © Michael Kenna

Winter Pier, Lake Geneva, Switzerland ► © Olivier Robert

Tanajibu, Saga Pref., Japan 棚じぶ、佐賀県、日本 ► © Olivier Robert

Does the particular history of a place influence how you develop your work? You photographed many sites, in many countries, what are your favorites? Yes, for some projects. The reason for this is very simple. Apart from my landscape projects, my wife and I are also carrying out long-term work about the Buddhist art of statuary. We are both interested in a specific sect called Shingon which was introduced in Japan from China during the 9th Century. The historical researches about the spots and temples are inevitable and more than necessary. Over time, we got used to search intensively about documents, texts or any information that would help us find some representative pieces of art or hidden gems. Bit by bit, we met important people, monks or temple owners in Japan who offered us the privilege to shoot some rarely shown statues. Except for this work, the history of a place rarely influences my photography. Travels are very important to us. Among all the places we have visited, I can say that I rarely had a real chemistry at first glance. I need some time to fully appreciate and understand a place, a city or a country. I’ve been disappointed several times. Probably because I haven’t understood the context, the landscapes, etc. and I want to take a second chance visiting them again. My favorite countries are obviously Japan since I have a family connection to it and China for the reasons I’ve mentioned. In addition, I really liked shooting in Germany, UK, Taiwan, and Australia where I went a very long time ago. As for the cities, my favorites are Hong Kong and Singapore although I am not an architecture photographer at all. 21

Gifted © Johnson Tsang

Jixian Pavilion, West Lake, China ► © Olivier Robert


Safdar Jang, Study 1 Delhi, India, 2006 © Michael Kenna

Winter Pier, Lake Geneva, Switzerland ► © Olivier Robert

Tanajibu, Saga Pref., Japan 棚じぶ、佐賀県、日本 ► © Olivier Robert

Does the particular history of a place influence how you develop your work? You photographed many sites, in many countries, what are your favorites? Yes, for some projects. The reason for this is very simple. Apart from my landscape projects, my wife and I are also carrying out long-term work about the Buddhist art of statuary. We are both interested in a specific sect called Shingon which was introduced in Japan from China during the 9th Century. The historical researches about the spots and temples are inevitable and more than necessary. Over time, we got used to search intensively about documents, texts or any information that would help us find some representative pieces of art or hidden gems. Bit by bit, we met important people, monks or temple owners in Japan who offered us the privilege to shoot some rarely shown statues. Except for this work, the history of a place rarely influences my photography. Travels are very important to us. Among all the places we have visited, I can say that I rarely had a real chemistry at first glance. I need some time to fully appreciate and understand a place, a city or a country. I’ve been disappointed several times. Probably because I haven’t understood the context, the landscapes, etc. and I want to take a second chance visiting them again. My favorite countries are obviously Japan since I have a family connection to it and China for the reasons I’ve mentioned. In addition, I really liked shooting in Germany, UK, Taiwan, and Australia where I went a very long time ago. As for the cities, my favorites are Hong Kong and Singapore although I am not an architecture photographer at all. 21

Gifted © Johnson Tsang

Jixian Pavilion, West Lake, China ► © Olivier Robert


Is there a series or picture, in your entire production that has a special place in your heart or represents a milestone in your career? Yes, absolutely. The Chinese mountains series. As said, I’ve discovered the Asian culture when I was a teenager. This has particularly affected my vision of the world and the way I was enjoying the sceneries around me through my camera. Life went out, I grew up and some years later, I decided to devote my entire life to Japan where I started my photography projects around this country. But, the traditional Chinese landscape painting has always remained my first source of inspiration. I have kept in my mind these imaginary visions as a background of my work. Some years ago, I finally decided to photograph these landscapes in China in the order I discovered them in my collection of old books. A very personal approach that I’m carrying on with a Chinese friend who is helping me find my way in this wonderful country. I want this project to have an end but I still don’t know when precisely. Consequently, my portfolio about China has a specific and emotional place in my heart and will definitely be a milestone in my career. Mountain Tree, Huang Shan, China ► © Olivier Robert

Consequently, the countryside remained unspoiled and is a paradise for minimalism photography. Like others, this is what attracted me in this prefecture. I don’t know if my photographs are carrying a message. I think it’s up to each person to see what they want to see in a photograph. But definitely, my first series about Hokkaido was the beginning of my interest in simplicity. This is also the place where I started seeing the landscape in a bright light. The place where the sky and the snow are one, the place where each group of trees looks like jumping out of a painting. In other words, the place where poetry can be found in all things. More recently, I’ve discovered the Japanese cranes. These elegant birds are an important subject in the traditional painting in Asia and a major symbol in Japan. So, I’ve decided to devote a bit of my time to photography them even though I am not a wildlife photographer (and I don’t plan to be). Unlike my ‘winter’ project, this work was supposed to have an end. But, needless to say that I fell in love with these birds. An amazing experience that I want to repeat as many times as possible in the future. A different breath of air in the life of a landscape photographer…

The series Hokkaido is a fantastic example of your artwork. Please tell us more about these photographs and the message they carry. Thank you for your appreciation. It is a long story and a very important series for me. Although I really wanted to, it took years for me to visit Hokkaido for the first time in spite of my regular trips to Japan. My wife introduced me to Hokkaido for the first time. Around that time, depending on where you go on the island, it was quite adventurous. Nowadays, Hokkaido is a very popular destination among photographers. It has become a must-go-place which is on the bucket list of many landscape photographers. Even if Hokkaido is the second biggest island of Japan, its landscapes sound more European than Asian. But, since it is Japan, it seems that each tree, each fence or each twig has a spiritual value… The Hokkaido’s famous landscapes are actually man-made even if it looks natural for some sceneries. Regardless of this aspect, Hokkaido has remained the granary of Japan for centuries. Mountain Layers #6, Huang Shan, China ► © Olivier Robert

Torii, Japan 鳥居、日本 ► © Olivier Robert

Snow Fences #4, Hokkaido Pref., Japan 防雪柵#4、北海道、日本 ► © Olivier Robert

24


Is there a series or picture, in your entire production that has a special place in your heart or represents a milestone in your career? Yes, absolutely. The Chinese mountains series. As said, I’ve discovered the Asian culture when I was a teenager. This has particularly affected my vision of the world and the way I was enjoying the sceneries around me through my camera. Life went out, I grew up and some years later, I decided to devote my entire life to Japan where I started my photography projects around this country. But, the traditional Chinese landscape painting has always remained my first source of inspiration. I have kept in my mind these imaginary visions as a background of my work. Some years ago, I finally decided to photograph these landscapes in China in the order I discovered them in my collection of old books. A very personal approach that I’m carrying on with a Chinese friend who is helping me find my way in this wonderful country. I want this project to have an end but I still don’t know when precisely. Consequently, my portfolio about China has a specific and emotional place in my heart and will definitely be a milestone in my career. Mountain Tree, Huang Shan, China ► © Olivier Robert

Consequently, the countryside remained unspoiled and is a paradise for minimalism photography. Like others, this is what attracted me in this prefecture. I don’t know if my photographs are carrying a message. I think it’s up to each person to see what they want to see in a photograph. But definitely, my first series about Hokkaido was the beginning of my interest in simplicity. This is also the place where I started seeing the landscape in a bright light. The place where the sky and the snow are one, the place where each group of trees looks like jumping out of a painting. In other words, the place where poetry can be found in all things. More recently, I’ve discovered the Japanese cranes. These elegant birds are an important subject in the traditional painting in Asia and a major symbol in Japan. So, I’ve decided to devote a bit of my time to photography them even though I am not a wildlife photographer (and I don’t plan to be). Unlike my ‘winter’ project, this work was supposed to have an end. But, needless to say that I fell in love with these birds. An amazing experience that I want to repeat as many times as possible in the future. A different breath of air in the life of a landscape photographer…

The series Hokkaido is a fantastic example of your artwork. Please tell us more about these photographs and the message they carry. Thank you for your appreciation. It is a long story and a very important series for me. Although I really wanted to, it took years for me to visit Hokkaido for the first time in spite of my regular trips to Japan. My wife introduced me to Hokkaido for the first time. Around that time, depending on where you go on the island, it was quite adventurous. Nowadays, Hokkaido is a very popular destination among photographers. It has become a must-go-place which is on the bucket list of many landscape photographers. Even if Hokkaido is the second biggest island of Japan, its landscapes sound more European than Asian. But, since it is Japan, it seems that each tree, each fence or each twig has a spiritual value… The Hokkaido’s famous landscapes are actually man-made even if it looks natural for some sceneries. Regardless of this aspect, Hokkaido has remained the granary of Japan for centuries. Mountain Layers #6, Huang Shan, China ► © Olivier Robert

Torii, Japan 鳥居、日本 ► © Olivier Robert

Snow Fences #4, Hokkaido Pref., Japan 防雪柵#4、北海道、日本 ► © Olivier Robert

24


Do you imagine or ‘see’ a picture in your mind when you start working on a photograph? How long does it take you to complete one of your piece? Yes, I do imagine the photograph before shooting but I refuse to see a kind of final result in my mind. Because, if I try to get precisely what I have seen in my mind, most of the time disappointment is certain. Consequently, I rather try to concentrate on what scenery has to offer at that moment. I focus on what I feel according to my mood regardless or not the conditions are perfect. Back home, when it comes to start selecting and processing the photographs, I try to get the same feeling I had when I shot it. To this end, I like taking the time. I usually allow some weeks or months before working on photographs. This has only one purpose. I refuse to react with emotions linked to memories. Taking lots of time between the moment I shoot a photograph and the moment I process it, allow me to keep a distance with my direct emotions. To me, sadness, happiness, regrets or luck are non-productive emotions in post-processing. Once I can get rid of them, then I can start a more neutral selection according to what I really want to convey in the photograph and not to what it reminds me of. That’s probably the reason why I am never done with a series. It’s not rare to go for a second or third selection five years later or more… My ‘Winters in Japan’ series or my ‘Chinese mountains’ one are good examples.

To me, working in black and white is fundamentally different from my short experience with colors. Color is nothing else than information of the photograph. Years ago, a Japanese calligraphy Master told me that for her, black and white is the ultimate simplification of the colors. I agree with that. I love thinking about her words when I’m photographing landscapes. From my first steps in photography, I’ve been particularly interested in highly contrasted photographs. As I said, I’ve been influenced by the Chinese traditional ink painting and the Japanese Sumi-e. Consequently, I’m always looking for specific lights that afford me to show the elements of the composition in high contrast. To this end, black and white is definitely the most impacting solution for me. Moreover, the quietness, the timelessness and the simplicity that I try to convey in my work require an important part of emptiness in the composition. This emptiness is more significant if it’s represented by white skies, bright water, etc. The color wouldn’t help me add any other emotion in my photographs. To depict the essence of scenery with light and shadows without seeking the colors information is my vision of photography.

Most people think of photography as capturing a moment. Do you agree with that? Technically speaking, it’s obviously true. We are all documenting our lives in a personal way. The question is to know what a moment is or how long a moment lasts? A moment is a space of time that we consider for its duration and for the events included. Since, slowness is the first characteristic of my photography, needless to say, that the ‘moment’ for me is always longer than a snapshot. I have been using long exposures techniques for many years. It has helped me convey the value of time in my photographs. It helps us reveal what we can’t see. It’s the privilege of photography to capture the motion of time and to print it. Movies can’t do that. How does working in black and white, rather than color, change what you look for? 25

Antelope Canyon, Arizona, USA ► © Olivier Robert

Basilica di San Giorgio Maggiore, Venice, Italy ► © Olivier Robert


Do you imagine or ‘see’ a picture in your mind when you start working on a photograph? How long does it take you to complete one of your piece? Yes, I do imagine the photograph before shooting but I refuse to see a kind of final result in my mind. Because, if I try to get precisely what I have seen in my mind, most of the time disappointment is certain. Consequently, I rather try to concentrate on what scenery has to offer at that moment. I focus on what I feel according to my mood regardless or not the conditions are perfect. Back home, when it comes to start selecting and processing the photographs, I try to get the same feeling I had when I shot it. To this end, I like taking the time. I usually allow some weeks or months before working on photographs. This has only one purpose. I refuse to react with emotions linked to memories. Taking lots of time between the moment I shoot a photograph and the moment I process it, allow me to keep a distance with my direct emotions. To me, sadness, happiness, regrets or luck are non-productive emotions in post-processing. Once I can get rid of them, then I can start a more neutral selection according to what I really want to convey in the photograph and not to what it reminds me of. That’s probably the reason why I am never done with a series. It’s not rare to go for a second or third selection five years later or more… My ‘Winters in Japan’ series or my ‘Chinese mountains’ one are good examples.

To me, working in black and white is fundamentally different from my short experience with colors. Color is nothing else than information of the photograph. Years ago, a Japanese calligraphy Master told me that for her, black and white is the ultimate simplification of the colors. I agree with that. I love thinking about her words when I’m photographing landscapes. From my first steps in photography, I’ve been particularly interested in highly contrasted photographs. As I said, I’ve been influenced by the Chinese traditional ink painting and the Japanese Sumi-e. Consequently, I’m always looking for specific lights that afford me to show the elements of the composition in high contrast. To this end, black and white is definitely the most impacting solution for me. Moreover, the quietness, the timelessness and the simplicity that I try to convey in my work require an important part of emptiness in the composition. This emptiness is more significant if it’s represented by white skies, bright water, etc. The color wouldn’t help me add any other emotion in my photographs. To depict the essence of scenery with light and shadows without seeking the colors information is my vision of photography.

Most people think of photography as capturing a moment. Do you agree with that? Technically speaking, it’s obviously true. We are all documenting our lives in a personal way. The question is to know what a moment is or how long a moment lasts? A moment is a space of time that we consider for its duration and for the events included. Since, slowness is the first characteristic of my photography, needless to say, that the ‘moment’ for me is always longer than a snapshot. I have been using long exposures techniques for many years. It has helped me convey the value of time in my photographs. It helps us reveal what we can’t see. It’s the privilege of photography to capture the motion of time and to print it. Movies can’t do that. How does working in black and white, rather than color, change what you look for? 25

Antelope Canyon, Arizona, USA ► © Olivier Robert

Basilica di San Giorgio Maggiore, Venice, Italy ► © Olivier Robert


What has been the biggest obstacle in your creative journey? How did you overcome it? Like many enthusiastic landscape photographers, I’ve devoted an important part of my life to photography. This is a very demanding activity that requires time, money, discipline and a good physical condition depending on where you want to go. Fortunately, physical activities and discipline are intensively part of my daily life. As for the money, I’ve always done my utmost to keep a well-balanced life with professional activity aside photography. Consequently, the time has probably been the biggest obstacle in my creative journey. To get enough time, that’s the biggest challenge. I still haven’t found the perfect solution… But since photography and travels are my first priorities for 25 years, my numerous jobs have always been the main obstacles. I resigned many times hoping to find a better way, sometimes without any alternative, crazy enough… Sometimes I succeeded, sometimes not. But I don’t have any regrets. I did what I had to do. It has never affected neither my motivation nor my inspiration. I could always face situations and will always do. Which artist/photographer inspired your art? Wang Wusheng is one of my Masters in photography, if not the first one. His work had an important part in the Chinese influence on my work. His photographs of the Yellow Mountain have been so inspiring. Unfortunately, Wang Wusheng passed away in 2018. I was photographing the Huang Shan Mountain when I heard this terrible news. It has affected me a lot since I was precisely on the mountain that made him famous. That’s why I dedicate my Huang Shan series to this great Master. Don Hong Oai is another great Chinese photographer who mastered the art of pictorialism. Among the Chinese painting Masters, I particularly love the works of Qi Baishi, Xia Gui. Other Masters of photography have also influenced my work. For example, Ansel Adams, Robert Doisneau, Edouard Boubat and Willy Ronis marked my teenage years Do you have any plans for exhibitions, books or any interesting projects coming? What are your plans for the future? Fortunately, I have many ones. I will have four exhibitions in 2019. Exhibitions are what I love about photography. Like the prints are for me the only real way to show a photograph, exhibitions are the only way to know whether your work has a meaning. It’s always a great moment to share your vision of the world with people in galleries and get their emotions in return. Yet, it takes lots of energy to prepare an exhibition and it’s very pricy as well… So, I’ve decided to concentrate on my production this year. Traveling, preparing new series, diving in my old collections of photographs is rather what I want to focus on for the moment. Aside, my wife and I are working on our second book about the Buddhist temples of the Shingon sect that we are photographing around Japan. The first one was released in 2015 and was dedicated to the pilgrimage around the Shikoku island. This work was rarely shown in exhibitions. It can be seen on my website. I’m also working on another book about our experiences as photographers in the 47 Japanese prefectures for the past 20 years. An interesting way to remember all the good moments we had and also the problems we ran into. But all things considered, I’ve always felt that being a photographer is a great privilege and a tremendous journey. I am glad I could share a part of it with you. Thank you for this interview. 27

Downpatrick Head, County Mayo, Ireland ► © Olivier Robert


What has been the biggest obstacle in your creative journey? How did you overcome it? Like many enthusiastic landscape photographers, I’ve devoted an important part of my life to photography. This is a very demanding activity that requires time, money, discipline and a good physical condition depending on where you want to go. Fortunately, physical activities and discipline are intensively part of my daily life. As for the money, I’ve always done my utmost to keep a well-balanced life with professional activity aside photography. Consequently, the time has probably been the biggest obstacle in my creative journey. To get enough time, that’s the biggest challenge. I still haven’t found the perfect solution… But since photography and travels are my first priorities for 25 years, my numerous jobs have always been the main obstacles. I resigned many times hoping to find a better way, sometimes without any alternative, crazy enough… Sometimes I succeeded, sometimes not. But I don’t have any regrets. I did what I had to do. It has never affected neither my motivation nor my inspiration. I could always face situations and will always do. Which artist/photographer inspired your art? Wang Wusheng is one of my Masters in photography, if not the first one. His work had an important part in the Chinese influence on my work. His photographs of the Yellow Mountain have been so inspiring. Unfortunately, Wang Wusheng passed away in 2018. I was photographing the Huang Shan Mountain when I heard this terrible news. It has affected me a lot since I was precisely on the mountain that made him famous. That’s why I dedicate my Huang Shan series to this great Master. Don Hong Oai is another great Chinese photographer who mastered the art of pictorialism. Among the Chinese painting Masters, I particularly love the works of Qi Baishi, Xia Gui. Other Masters of photography have also influenced my work. For example, Ansel Adams, Robert Doisneau, Edouard Boubat and Willy Ronis marked my teenage years Do you have any plans for exhibitions, books or any interesting projects coming? What are your plans for the future? Fortunately, I have many ones. I will have four exhibitions in 2019. Exhibitions are what I love about photography. Like the prints are for me the only real way to show a photograph, exhibitions are the only way to know whether your work has a meaning. It’s always a great moment to share your vision of the world with people in galleries and get their emotions in return. Yet, it takes lots of energy to prepare an exhibition and it’s very pricy as well… So, I’ve decided to concentrate on my production this year. Traveling, preparing new series, diving in my old collections of photographs is rather what I want to focus on for the moment. Aside, my wife and I are working on our second book about the Buddhist temples of the Shingon sect that we are photographing around Japan. The first one was released in 2015 and was dedicated to the pilgrimage around the Shikoku island. This work was rarely shown in exhibitions. It can be seen on my website. I’m also working on another book about our experiences as photographers in the 47 Japanese prefectures for the past 20 years. An interesting way to remember all the good moments we had and also the problems we ran into. But all things considered, I’ve always felt that being a photographer is a great privilege and a tremendous journey. I am glad I could share a part of it with you. Thank you for this interview. 27

Downpatrick Head, County Mayo, Ireland ► © Olivier Robert


SPAIN

Black and white photography is classic, just hearkening back to the early days of photography. It’s the way of capturing the distinct disparity between light and darkness in a way that color photography just can’t. Spanish photographer, Paco Garzón’s work is characterized by rich black and white tones, soft light and genuine expressions creative portraits. He has also a love for the outdoors, a passion that shows up in his work. His portrait work is characterized by maybe a thoughtful moment — rather than the traditional, smiling-at-the-camera poses, his subjects are often in studio backgrounds with stoic but genuine expressions. His work in each genre is impressive. While his work in the studio seems to require more preparation, his work outdoors seems to be more spontaneous. In both situations, the photographer shows different creative results. Not everything has to be dramatic when it comes to black and white, and Paco’s images are a good example of this fact.

www.instagram.com/pacogarzonphoto 29

"Life" ► © Paco Garzón


SPAIN

Black and white photography is classic, just hearkening back to the early days of photography. It’s the way of capturing the distinct disparity between light and darkness in a way that color photography just can’t. Spanish photographer, Paco Garzón’s work is characterized by rich black and white tones, soft light and genuine expressions creative portraits. He has also a love for the outdoors, a passion that shows up in his work. His portrait work is characterized by maybe a thoughtful moment — rather than the traditional, smiling-at-the-camera poses, his subjects are often in studio backgrounds with stoic but genuine expressions. His work in each genre is impressive. While his work in the studio seems to require more preparation, his work outdoors seems to be more spontaneous. In both situations, the photographer shows different creative results. Not everything has to be dramatic when it comes to black and white, and Paco’s images are a good example of this fact.

www.instagram.com/pacogarzonphoto 29

"Life" ► © Paco Garzón


Alzheimer ► © Paco Garzón

Alzheimer 2 ► © Paco Garzón Alzheimer 3 ► © Paco Garzón


Alzheimer ► © Paco Garzón

Alzheimer 2 ► © Paco Garzón Alzheimer 3 ► © Paco Garzón


Lost ► © Paco Garzón

Reflexes ► © Paco Garzón


Lost ► © Paco Garzón

Reflexes ► © Paco Garzón


ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

Julian Lennon:

The Many Faces of an Artist Julian Lennon is a truly multidimensional artist that goes far beyond the renowned, Grammy nominated musician who has created memorable hits that topped the charts around the world. Challenging the traditional boundaries, he ventured into new mediums of creative expression, including documentary film making, writing and photography.

inspired by the omnipresent scooters in Vietnam, but also reflects on the cycle of life. In Julian’s words: “There’s a Circle in our lives, that keeps going around, and with every revolution, there is something to be found. It’s the essence of the moment, it’s the understanding why, it’s the road to resolution, it’s the journey to the sky ‌â€?.

Over the past decade, Julian has become an acclaimed visual artist. His photographic work has been exhibited and praised throughout the US and Europe.

Julian is also a committed philanthropist. His White Feather Foundation has collaborated with clean water initiatives and health clinics in countries like Kenya and Ethiopia. This environmental and humanitarian activism is also reflected in his writer facet. His books aim to educate children about the environmental challenges we face and help them create a brighter future.

His “Timeless� collection, combines landscapes and intimate black and white photographs of U2. The unique combination of musician and photographer in Julian resonated to capture precious, elusive moments of the band members. The “Cycle� series transports us to the daily life on the shores of the South China Sea. The title was

   Â?    Â?Â?Â?ŠÂ?   



  ­  Â?    Â?Â?Â? 

Julian Lennon: one artist, one world to fight for, and an entire universe of creative possibilities.

www.julianlennon-photography.com www.instagram.com/julespicturepalace 35

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ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

Julian Lennon:

The Many Faces of an Artist Julian Lennon is a truly multidimensional artist that goes far beyond the renowned, Grammy nominated musician who has created memorable hits that topped the charts around the world. Challenging the traditional boundaries, he ventured into new mediums of creative expression, including documentary film making, writing and photography.

The title was inspired by the omnipresent scooters in Vietnam, but also reflects on the cycle of life. In Julian’s words: “There’s a Circle in our lives, that keeps going around, and with every revolution, there is something to be found. It’s the essence of the moment, it’s the understanding why, it’s the road to resolution, it’s the journey to the sky ‌â€?.

Over the past decade, Julian has become an acclaimed visual artist. His photographic work has been exhibited and praised throughout the US and Europe.

Julian is also a committed philanthropist. His White Feather Foundation has collaborated with clean water initiatives and health clinics in countries like Kenya and Ethiopia. This environmental and humanitarian activism is also reflected in his writer facet. His books aim to educate children about the environmental challenges we face and help them create a brighter future.

His “Timeless� collection, combines landscapes and intimate black and white photographs of U2. The unique combination of musician and photographer in Julian resonated to capture precious, elusive moments of the band members. The “Cycle� series transports us to the daily life on the shores of the South China Sea.

   Â?    Â?Â?Â?ŠÂ?   



  ­  Â?    Â?Â?Â? 

Julian Lennon: one artist, one world to fight for, and an entire universe of creative possibilities.

www.julianlennon-photography.com www.instagram.com/julespicturepalace 35

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UNITED states

Nathan Wirth is a self-learned photographer that uses a variety of techniques – including long exposure, infrared, intentional camera movement, and the occasional dip into compositing – to express his unending wonder for the fundamental fact of existence. In his work, he attempts to focus on the silence that we can sometimes perceive in between the incessant waves of sound that often dominate our perceptions of the world. Nathan earned both his Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in English Literature from San Francisco State University and brings a deep appreciation of poetry to his explorations of place (especially the sea). Poets such as George Oppen, Gary Snyder, Seamus Heaney, Robert Frost, Elizabeth Bishop, Mary Oliver, Lorine Niedecker, and George Mackay Brown have played a fundamental role in shaping his attention to the things and places that he photographs. Often returning to the same locations many times, Nathan seeks to explore the silence and the sublimity of those places. In addition to poetry, Nathan is profoundly influenced by the paintings of Caspar David Friedrich, Edward Hopper, Mark Rothko, and Camille Pissarro and the photography of Michael Kenna, Edward Weston, and Wright Morris. For the past few years, Nathan has been studying and integrating into his work Japanese traditions of Zen, rock gardens, and calligraphy– as well as the transience, impermanence, and imperfections of wabi-sabi. Nathan’s studies of calligraphy and Zen writings have led him to the practice of trying to achieve while working on his photography, a mind of no-mind (mu-shin no shin), a mind not preoccupied with emotions and thought, one that can as freely as possible, simply create. www.nlwirth.com/photography 39

► © Nathan Wirth DreamLand collection © Vassilis Tangoulis


UNITED states

Using a variety of techniques– including long exposure, infrared, intentional camera movement, and the occasional dip into compositing– Nathan Wirth, who was born and raised in San Francisco, is a self-learned photographer who seeks to express his unending wonder for the fundamental fact of existence. In his work, he attempts to focus on the silence that we can sometimes perceive in between the incessant waves of sound that often dominate our perceptions of the world. Nathan earned both his Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in English Literature from San Francisco State University and brings a deep appreciation of poetry to his explorations of place (especially the sea). Poets such as George Oppen, Gary Snyder, Seamus Heaney, Robert Frost, Elizabeth Bishop, Mary Oliver, Lorine Niedecker, and George Mackay Brown have played a fundamental role in shaping his attention to the things and places that he photographs. Often returning to the same locations many times, Nathan seeks to explore the silence and the sublimity of those places. In addition to poetry, Nathan is profoundly influenced by the paintings of Caspar David Friedrich, Edward Hopper, Mark Rothko, and Camille Pissarro and the photography of Michael Kenna, Edward Weston, and Wright Morris. www.nlwirth.com/photography 39

► © Nathan Wirth DreamLand collection © Vassilis Tangoulis


► © Nathan Wirth ► © Nathan Wirth

42


► © Nathan Wirth ► © Nathan Wirth

42


► © Nathan Wirth

For the past few years, Nathan has been studying and integrating into his work Japanese traditions of Zen, rock gardens, and calligraphy– as well as the transience, impermanence, and imperfections of wabi-sabi. Nathan’s studies of calligraphy and Zen writings have led him to the practice of trying to achieve while working on his photography, a mind of no-mind (mu-shin no shin), a mind not preoccupied with emotions and thought, one that can as freely as possible, simply create. 43

► © Nathan Wirth


► © Nathan Wirth

For the past few years, Nathan has been studying and integrating into his work Japanese traditions of Zen, rock gardens, and calligraphy– as well as the transience, impermanence, and imperfections of wabi-sabi. Nathan’s studies of calligraphy and Zen writings have led him to the practice of trying to achieve while working on his photography, a mind of no-mind (mu-shin no shin), a mind not preoccupied with emotions and thought, one that can as freely as possible, simply create. 43

► © Nathan Wirth


GERMANY

Black and white photography goes far beyond being just a single style or genre in photography and, instead, is the form of doing things in an elegant way because it avoids the distraction that color can create on an image. German Photographer Raphael Guarino is a talented black and white photographer based in Grafenauis. He is known for his exceptional work photographing portraits with a unique touch. He takes stunning portraits for different people and each photo tells a story. His use of intriguing light and unique poses is what helped his work gain exposure

www.instagram.com/raphael_guarino_bildermacher 45

► Š Raphael Guarino


GERMANY

Black and white photography goes far beyond being just a single style or genre in photography and, instead, is the form of doing things in an elegant way because it avoids the distraction that color can create on an image. German Photographer Raphael Guarino is a talented black and white photographer based in Grafenauis. He is known for his exceptional work photographing portraits with a unique touch. He takes stunning portraits for different people and each photo tells a story. His use of intriguing light and unique poses is what helped his work gain exposure

www.instagram.com/raphael_guarino_bildermacher 45

► Š Raphael Guarino


► © Raphael Guarino 47

► © Raphael Guarino 48


► © Raphael Guarino 47

► © Raphael Guarino 48


► © Raphael Guarino ► © Raphael Guarino 49

50


► © Raphael Guarino ► © Raphael Guarino 49

50


SOUTH AFRICA

INTERVIEW

WITH

When did you first realize your passion for art? I've always loved drawing and would spend a fair bit of time as a kid drawing cartoons with friends. When I was about 12 my mother showed me a book called "Anatomy for the Artist" with pencil illustrations of human anatomy. I think I fell involve with drawing when I started studying that book. Your work is stunning and your talent seems to be limitless. At the same time, you are a self-taught artist. How and where did you learn from? How long did it take you to perfect your craft? Thank you! I took art as a subject in high school, I learned a lot from my teachers, but I also was very competitive with my friends, we would try out do each other with art projects and the three of us pushed each other and taught each other. I don’t think I’m near perfecting my craft though. There is still a lifetime of things to learn. How did your style evolve through the years?

“I’d like to see myself become more relaxed though. I'd like to try to express the same things but with only keeping what’s important rather than conveying every detail” South African artist, Jono Dry, was born in Pretoria and raised in the beautiful seaside town of Hermanus, where he has lived, worked and exhibited for most of his young life. Entirely self-taught, Jono opens his imagination using the help of a pencil and paper. In his unique hyperrealism drawing style, Jono adds impressive attention to detail with a surrealist point of view—making his work both technically stunning as well as conceptually compelling. "I think being able to see how the work is created is important especially with hyper-realism. Often people don’t believe it's drawn and having a time-lapse of how its done goes a long way to showing just how much time goes into creating a work like this." Who is Jono Dry? Tell us briefly about yourself. I am 29 years old, I have been practicing pencil drawing professionally for the last 9 years and I now live and work in Cape Town.

www.jonodryart.com 51

I think I have become more polished, and more mature with my work. If I look back on old work the lack of subtlety stands out a lot to me. Technically I have slowly progressed but emotionally and conceptually the work has also slowly gotten a bit more sophisticated, at least for me. I’d like to see myself become more relaxed though. I'd like to try to express the same things but with only keeping what’s important rather than conveying every detail.

Pupil ► © Jono Dry Art

You mainly work with graphite on paper and board. What are the challenges, unique features and advantages of this medium? I work exclusively on watercolor paper now, a big challenge was finding the right paper for the kind of work I wanted to do. Getting very dark tones in graphite is very tricky. It can be very reflective and unforgiving with showing streaks in the paper if you press too hard. But on the positive, it’s a beautiful medium for subtle textures and details. It can be forgiving with erasing and highlighting if you draw with easing in mind. Creation (Escher Tribute) ► © Jono Dry Art

52


SOUTH AFRICA

INTERVIEW

WITH

When did you first realize your passion for art? I've always loved drawing and would spend a fair bit of time as a kid drawing cartoons with friends. When I was about 12 my mother showed me a book called "Anatomy for the Artist" with pencil illustrations of human anatomy. I think I fell involve with drawing when I started studying that book. Your work is stunning and your talent seems to be limitless. At the same time, you are a self-taught artist. How and where did you learn from? How long did it take you to perfect your craft? Thank you! I took art as a subject in high school, I learned a lot from my teachers, but I also was very competitive with my friends, we would try out do each other with art projects and the three of us pushed each other and taught each other. I don’t think I’m near perfecting my craft though. There is still a lifetime of things to learn. How did your style evolve through the years?

“I’d like to see myself become more relaxed though. I'd like to try to express the same things but with only keeping what’s important rather than conveying every detail” South African artist, Jono Dry, was born in Pretoria and raised in the beautiful seaside town of Hermanus, where he has lived, worked and exhibited for most of his young life. Entirely self-taught, Jono opens his imagination using the help of a pencil and paper. In his unique hyperrealism drawing style, Jono adds impressive attention to detail with a surrealist point of view—making his work both technically stunning as well as conceptually compelling. "I think being able to see how the work is created is important especially with hyper-realism. Often people don’t believe it's drawn and having a time-lapse of how its done goes a long way to showing just how much time goes into creating a work like this." Who is Jono Dry? Tell us briefly about yourself. I am 29 years old, I have been practicing pencil drawing professionally for the last 9 years and I now live and work in Cape Town.

www.jonodryart.com 51

I think I have become more polished, and more mature with my work. If I look back on old work the lack of subtlety stands out a lot to me. Technically I have slowly progressed but emotionally and conceptually the work has also slowly gotten a bit more sophisticated, at least for me. I’d like to see myself become more relaxed though. I'd like to try to express the same things but with only keeping what’s important rather than conveying every detail.

Pupil ► © Jono Dry Art

You mainly work with graphite on paper and board. What are the challenges, unique features and advantages of this medium? I work exclusively on watercolor paper now, a big challenge was finding the right paper for the kind of work I wanted to do. Getting very dark tones in graphite is very tricky. It can be very reflective and unforgiving with showing streaks in the paper if you press too hard. But on the positive, it’s a beautiful medium for subtle textures and details. It can be forgiving with erasing and highlighting if you draw with easing in mind. Creation (Escher Tribute) ► © Jono Dry Art

52


The pitfalls of graphite can also become the features, the reflectiveness can be something you use when you want to express details in very dark tones. The work reacts strongly to light and so you can play with what the viewer see’s when they look at the work from different angles.

The realistic details in your work, ranging from human muscles to water in motion, are spectacular. How do you create an image? Do you use live models, reference images or is everything in your mind?

Your art erases the boundaries between hyperrealism and surrealism. You are visual alchemist creating a new reality with your mind and bare hands. What are the limits?

I work with models first, taking many reference images to try and fall into the planning I had in mind. Then depending on the features of the drawing, I'll try to get all my props into the studio and get my lighting to match my model before I compose the final composition and work from that as the photo reference.

That's exactly why I wanted to break out of the hyper-realism and move more into surrealism. The only boundary is that it's 2 dimensional. But as far as concepts for images, there are no limits. This can also be a bit crippling when I'm trying to think of something to draw with no real boundaries.

Porcelain ► © Klaus Kampert •

31 To

Be Tamed ► © Jono Dry Art

Handel ► © Jono Dry Art


The pitfalls of graphite can also become the features, the reflectiveness can be something you use when you want to express details in very dark tones. The work reacts strongly to light and so you can play with what the viewer see’s when they look at the work from different angles.

The realistic details in your work, ranging from human muscles to water in motion, are spectacular. How do you create an image? Do you use live models, reference images or is everything in your mind?

Your art erases the boundaries between hyperrealism and surrealism. You are visual alchemist creating a new reality with your mind and bare hands. What are the limits?

I work with models first, taking many reference images to try and fall into the planning I had in mind. Then depending on the features of the drawing, I'll try to get all my props into the studio and get my lighting to match my model before I compose the final composition and work from that as the photo reference.

That's exactly why I wanted to break out of the hyper-realism and move more into surrealism. The only boundary is that it's 2 dimensional. But as far as concepts for images, there are no limits. This can also be a bit crippling when I'm trying to think of something to draw with no real boundaries.

Porcelain ► © Klaus Kampert •

31 To

Be Tamed ► © Jono Dry Art

Handel ► © Jono Dry Art


Briefly guide us to your creative process, from conceiving an idea to the finalized drawing. I begin by planning my work, it takes so long to complete a drawing that I have to be completely sure that I am happy with what I am working on. The planning process includes taking loads of references photos in my studio or out on location. I hire models to help me figure out the poses and lighting I want to use in the work as well as a growing collection of props that are recurring in my work and create a bit of a visual vocabulary. I then start on the physical side of the artwork, cutting a large piece of paper off the roll, using gum tape and water to stretch it and get it flat. I use a grid for my outline sketch. On these large drawings, making a mistake here can cost me days of work, so once my outline is perfect (depending on the drawing) I'll black out the background with a heavy layer of graphite and take care not to dirty the areas that will need details. From here I'll pay attention to lighting and shadows, working over the whole drawing fixing any errors that don’t feel right to my eye. Each new texture I encounter has its own way of being solved and often it’s an experiment to try to see how best to get the pencil to represent that texture. Sometimes I’m lucky and it works out easily, other times I have to redraw a few times before I find a way to represent the texture I’m going for. It sometimes takes months to finish a drawing and I go through a whole array of emotions towards the work. I fall in love with it and resent it a few times over. Sometimes I abandon it for a couple of months if it drains me too much and takes it out again when I have built up my confidence again.

Ritual ► © Jono Dry Art

Iris ► © Jono Dry Art

How long does it take you to complete one of your works? Lately, I have been enjoying working very large, at 164cm x 114cm. It takes anywhere from 2 weeks to 2 months to plan a drawing and then another 2 months to actually draw it. It's hard to put into a box like that, though because of some times through planning one drawing I end up with 2 or 3 concepts I can draw from. 55

Prey ► © Jono Dry Art

Augmented Family ► © Jono Dry Art

34 I am ► © Jono Dry Art


Briefly guide us to your creative process, from conceiving an idea to the finalized drawing. I begin by planning my work, it takes so long to complete a drawing that I have to be completely sure that I am happy with what I am working on. The planning process includes taking loads of references photos in my studio or out on location. I hire models to help me figure out the poses and lighting I want to use in the work as well as a growing collection of props that are recurring in my work and create a bit of a visual vocabulary. I then start on the physical side of the artwork, cutting a large piece of paper off the roll, using gum tape and water to stretch it and get it flat. I use a grid for my outline sketch. On these large drawings, making a mistake here can cost me days of work, so once my outline is perfect (depending on the drawing) I'll black out the background with a heavy layer of graphite and take care not to dirty the areas that will need details. From here I'll pay attention to lighting and shadows, working over the whole drawing fixing any errors that don’t feel right to my eye. Each new texture I encounter has its own way of being solved and often it’s an experiment to try to see how best to get the pencil to represent that texture. Sometimes I’m lucky and it works out easily, other times I have to redraw a few times before I find a way to represent the texture I’m going for. It sometimes takes months to finish a drawing and I go through a whole array of emotions towards the work. I fall in love with it and resent it a few times over. Sometimes I abandon it for a couple of months if it drains me too much and takes it out again when I have built up my confidence again.

Ritual ► © Jono Dry Art

Iris ► © Jono Dry Art

How long does it take you to complete one of your works? Lately, I have been enjoying working very large, at 164cm x 114cm. It takes anywhere from 2 weeks to 2 months to plan a drawing and then another 2 months to actually draw it. It's hard to put into a box like that, though because of some times through planning one drawing I end up with 2 or 3 concepts I can draw from. 55

Prey ► © Jono Dry Art

Augmented Family ► © Jono Dry Art

34 I am ► © Jono Dry Art


These days, social media provides an unparalleled opportunity for artists to connect to their audiences. You often post beautiful behind the scenes time lapses of your work in progress. What is the feedback from your followers? The feedback is amazing, I think being able to see how the work is created is important especially with hyper-realism. Often people don’t believe it's drawn and having a time-lapse of how its done goes a long way to showing just how much time goes into creating a work like this. I'm then bombarded with questions on why I'm doing certain things, like wetting my paper before I work etc.

Guardian ► © Jono Dry Art

What does the future have in store for Jono Dry? I'm not sure, I have my own goals in mind, but in my limited experience, things can change so easily and its best to just go with the flow. No matter what I will just enjoy learning as much as I can. I will be creating things as long as I live and whatever happens around that is anyone guesses. Venus ► © Jono Dry Art 57

58


These days, social media provides an unparalleled opportunity for artists to connect to their audiences. You often post beautiful behind the scenes time lapses of your work in progress. What is the feedback from your followers? The feedback is amazing, I think being able to see how the work is created is important especially with hyper-realism. Often people don’t believe it's drawn and having a time-lapse of how its done goes a long way to showing just how much time goes into creating a work like this. I'm then bombarded with questions on why I'm doing certain things, like wetting my paper before I work etc.

Guardian ► © Jono Dry Art

What does the future have in store for Jono Dry? I'm not sure, I have my own goals in mind, but in my limited experience, things can change so easily and its best to just go with the flow. No matter what I will just enjoy learning as much as I can. I will be creating things as long as I live and whatever happens around that is anyone guesses. Venus ► © Jono Dry Art 57

58


GERMANY

Wolf Ademeit, born 1954, lives in Duisburg, Germany. He prefers calling himself a hobbyist, though his professional life has been always closely connected with this field – he owns an advertising agency and a photo studio. Wolf Ademeit first took interest in photography when studying lithographer's craft and it's been his passion since, for more than 30 years now. It's Ademeit's distinctive approach that makes his works stand out of a long row of ever trendy black and white photography adepts or, speaking of his most known series, animalist masters A signature feature of his work is his “hobbyist” choice to capture expressive portraits of zoo animals. Rather than focusing on wildlife in their naturally beautiful habitats, Ademeit finds charm and personality in the facial expressions of his subjects alone. Call it 'animal portraits', if you wish. More than simply keeping a visual record, the photographer provides an artistic portrayal that is often reserved for human portraiture. According to Wolf : "Only a few photographers use the photography of animals in zoos as an art form. I think this is a missed opportunity… With my pictures, I would like to move the photography of these animals in the focus of art photography and show photos which are not only purely documentary." www.wolfademeit.de 59

► © Wolf Ademeit


GERMANY

Wolf Ademeit, born 1954, lives in Duisburg, Germany. The author prefers calling himself a hobbyist, though his professional life has been always closely connected with this field – he owns an advertising agency and a photo studio. Wolf Ademeit first took interest in photography when studying lithographer's craft and it's been his passion since, for more than 30 years now. It's Ademeit's distinctive approach that makes his works stand out of a long row of ever trendy black and white photography adepts or, speaking of his most known series, animalist masters. Unique of the author is his 'hobbyist' choice to capture expressive portraits of zoo animals. Rather than focusing on wildlife in their naturally beautiful habitats, Ademeit finds charm and personality in the facial expressions of his subjects alone. Call it 'animal portraits', if you wish. More than simply keeping a visual record, the photographer provides an artistic portrayal that is often reserved for human portraiture. Says the author: "Only a few photographers use the photography of animals in zoos as an art form. I think this is a missed opportunity… With my pictures, I would like to move the photography of these animals in the focus of art photography and show photos which are not only purely documentary." www.wolfademeit.de 59

► © Wolf Ademeit


► © Wolf Ademeit

Ademeit's incredibly artistic collection of images offers a wide range of emotions, capturing every grimace, ferocious roar, tender kiss, and a twinkle in the varied creatures' eyes, each caught within a second of the animal's position he sought for. No wonder his highly acclaimed Animals series took 10 years to finish, patience is a part of the author's talent and mastership. 61

► © Wolf Ademeit

62


► © Wolf Ademeit

Ademeit's incredibly artistic collection of images offers a wide range of emotions, capturing every grimace, ferocious roar, tender kiss, and a twinkle in the varied creatures' eyes, each caught within a second of the animal's position he sought for. No wonder his highly acclaimed Animals series took 10 years to finish, patience is a part of the author's talent and mastership. 61

► © Wolf Ademeit

62


► © Wolf Ademeit

63

► © Wolf Ademeit

64


► © Wolf Ademeit

63

► © Wolf Ademeit

64


They hold such power over the viewer that to the modern eye we cannot believe that these images are not staged with tame animals. However, Gregory Colbert will attest to the fact that his journey has not been without its dangers and consequences, “I have been tusked by an elephant, almost eaten by a sperm whale, knocked off my feet by a rhinoceros, embraced by a jaguar…” Colbert’s imagery is technically beautiful, from the view of a photographer the compositions of the stills are truly wonderful, allowing for the subjects to hold the viewer's attention in perfect balance between the animal and the human, whilst using the negative space around the subject to create a somewhat dreamlike atmosphere. However, Colbert’s work is not simply beautiful because of its pure aesthetic properties. It vividly portrays the artist’s intentions. We see the reverence shown to the animals by their human counterparts but at the same time, we see the animals respect and connection with the human. The image of the small boy reading to the elephant evokes many emotions in the viewer. An immediate impact of scale through the positioning of the subjects and the composition chosen for the picture bring up a sense of warning. On the other hand, we can see the relaxed nature of both subjects and begin to understand that both are comfortable in one another’s presence. The intricate and majestic features of the elephant show us the face of a benign and thoughtful creature. It’s wonderfully textured skin is juxtaposed with the smooth features of the young boy, giving the viewer a sense of time and wisdom. The skin is also seemingly mirrored in the shifting patterns of the sand, conveying that the changing of the natural world links all our subjects. The elephant almost seems to be watching the small boy, bringing up visions of fantastical children’s stories much like those in Rudyard Kipling’s ‘The Jungle Book’. These stories, however, are based on an element of truth. Taking a look at ancient cultures, which most importantly still exist in our world today. India and Sri Lanka come to mind. In both, we see animals at the intrinsic heart of culture and religion.

ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

GREGORY COLBERT | Ashes & Snow

www.gregorycolbert.com

by Thomas Jukes This Canadian born photographer and filmmaker first came to prominence in 1992 attracting worldwide acclaim with his debut exhibition in Switzerland. What followed after 1992 shows the measure of Gregory Colbert as much more than a visionary photographer and filmmaker. With the art worlds eye now firmly fixed on his undoubted talents, he did not stop to bask in the glow or soak in the praise that was following his debut, he simply disappeared. Completely off the grid. He dedicated the next 10 years of his life to his real joy, to document and convey beautiful and mystical interactions between humans and animals. 65

Gregory Colbert saw the modern view of animals and nature as very ‘human-centric’ focusing on the need to understand, track and document the very physical attributes of the world's animals. Colbert aims with his work Ashes & Snow to try to help us re-discover not only the physical but also the spiritual connection that humans once had with all animals on our planet. The human race has begun to drift away from nature and the understanding that we are inherently linked to it. With the knowledge that the further we see ourselves as apart from nature, the closer we get to losing the wonderful

creatures that we share the world with. With this loose comes the damage to the balance of our plant, something that will be felt by every human being. Gregory Colbert uses his skills and knowledge through this exhibition to take us back to our ancient ancestors and their admiration and devotion to nature. To capture with his photographs and films the essence that was laid down in charcoal and ochre over 35,000 years ago on the cave walls of our earliest places of rest and contemplation. The interactions captured in the exhibition are seemingly magical even mystical to behold.


They hold such power over the viewer that to the modern eye we cannot believe that these images are not staged with tame animals. However, Gregory Colbert will attest to the fact that his journey has not been without its dangers and consequences, “I have been tusked by an elephant, almost eaten by a sperm whale, knocked off my feet by a rhinoceros, embraced by a jaguar…” Colbert’s imagery is technically beautiful, from the view of a photographer the compositions of the stills are truly wonderful, allowing for the subjects to hold the viewer's attention in perfect balance between the animal and the human, whilst using the negative space around the subject to create a somewhat dreamlike atmosphere. However, Colbert’s work is not simply beautiful because of its pure aesthetic properties. It vividly portrays the artist’s intentions. We see the reverence shown to the animals by their human counterparts but at the same time, we see the animals respect and connection with the human. The image of the small boy reading to the elephant evokes many emotions in the viewer. An immediate impact of scale through the positioning of the subjects and the composition chosen for the picture bring up a sense of warning. On the other hand, we can see the relaxed nature of both subjects and begin to understand that both are comfortable in one another’s presence. The intricate and majestic features of the elephant show us the face of a benign and thoughtful creature. It’s wonderfully textured skin is juxtaposed with the smooth features of the young boy, giving the viewer a sense of time and wisdom. The skin is also seemingly mirrored in the shifting patterns of the sand, conveying that the changing of the natural world links all our subjects. The elephant almost seems to be watching the small boy, bringing up visions of fantastical children’s stories much like those in Rudyard Kipling’s ‘The Jungle Book’. These stories, however, are based on an element of truth. Taking a look at ancient cultures, which most importantly still exist in our world today. India and Sri Lanka come to mind. In both, we see animals at the intrinsic heart of culture and religion.

ARTICLE

INSPIRATION

GREGORY COLBERT | Ashes & Snow

www.gregorycolbert.com

by Thomas Jukes This Canadian born photographer and filmmaker first came to prominence in 1992 attracting worldwide acclaim with his debut exhibition in Switzerland. What followed after 1992 shows the measure of Gregory Colbert as much more than a visionary photographer and filmmaker. With the art worlds eye now firmly fixed on his undoubted talents, he did not stop to bask in the glow or soak in the praise that was following his debut, he simply disappeared. Completely off the grid. He dedicated the next 10 years of his life to his real joy, to document and convey beautiful and mystical interactions between humans and animals. 65

Gregory Colbert saw the modern view of animals and nature as very ‘human-centric’ focusing on the need to understand, track and document the very physical attributes of the world's animals. Colbert aims with his work Ashes & Snow to try to help us re-discover not only the physical but also the spiritual connection that humans once had with all animals on our planet. The human race has begun to drift away from nature and the understanding that we are inherently linked to it. With the knowledge that the further we see ourselves as apart from nature, the closer we get to losing the wonderful

creatures that we share the world with. With this loose comes the damage to the balance of our plant, something that will be felt by every human being. Gregory Colbert uses his skills and knowledge through this exhibition to take us back to our ancient ancestors and their admiration and devotion to nature. To capture with his photographs and films the essence that was laid down in charcoal and ochre over 35,000 years ago on the cave walls of our earliest places of rest and contemplation. The interactions captured in the exhibition are seemingly magical even mystical to behold.


Showing a relationship with animals that Gregory Colbert is keen to portray in his work. That of a true and meaningful connection and understanding of the importance of these animals not only in our lives, but the lives of our ancestors, and the fact that this relationship is beneficial to both parties. Colbert himself references the Australian Aboriginals spiritual understanding of the importance and depth of native creatures shown in their paintings of these animals. Stating: “they were not interested in merely painting the contours of their bodies. They also focused equally on the animal’s interior dream life”. When the exhibition Ashes & Snow opened in the Arsenale in Venice, Italy in 2002 Colbert again stepped into the spotlight of the world and was welcomed back as “a new master’ (Photo Magazine) and praise from all across the world with Vanity Fair naming him in their “Best of the Best”. Since the first showing, the exhibition restarted its journey with The Nomadic Museum which became the traveling home of the exhibition. First showing in New York in 2005 it has traveled across the globe with an apparent lack of final destination. So far it has attracted an audience of over 10 67

million people globally, cementing it as the most viewed exhibition by any living artist in history. Gregory Colbert’s work is astounding. The outstanding visuals both still and moving perfectly match the intention and passion of the artist. The subject is one that should be close to ever human, now more than ever, as we see more animals becoming extinct due to our single-minded nature. We need to reconnect to what makes this world so diverse and beautiful; we all need to see more like Gregory Colbert. “An elephant with his trunk raised is a ladder to the stars. A breaching whale is a ladder to the bottom of the sea. My films are a ladder to my dreams.” 68


Showing a relationship with animals that Gregory Colbert is keen to portray in his work. That of a true and meaningful connection and understanding of the importance of these animals not only in our lives, but the lives of our ancestors, and the fact that this relationship is beneficial to both parties. Colbert himself references the Australian Aboriginals spiritual understanding of the importance and depth of native creatures shown in their paintings of these animals. Stating: “they were not interested in merely painting the contours of their bodies. They also focused equally on the animal’s interior dream life”. When the exhibition Ashes & Snow opened in the Arsenale in Venice, Italy in 2002 Colbert again stepped into the spotlight of the world and was welcomed back as “a new master’ (Photo Magazine) and praise from all across the world with Vanity Fair naming him in their “Best of the Best”. Since the first showing, the exhibition restarted its journey with The Nomadic Museum which became the traveling home of the exhibition. First showing in New York in 2005 it has traveled across the globe with an apparent lack of final destination. So far it has attracted an audience of over 10 67

million people globally, cementing it as the most viewed exhibition by any living artist in history. Gregory Colbert’s work is astounding. The outstanding visuals both still and moving perfectly match the intention and passion of the artist. The subject is one that should be close to ever human, now more than ever, as we see more animals becoming extinct due to our single-minded nature. We need to reconnect to what makes this world so diverse and beautiful; we all need to see more like Gregory Colbert. “An elephant with his trunk raised is a ladder to the stars. A breaching whale is a ladder to the bottom of the sea. My films are a ladder to my dreams.” 68


DENMARK

Fine Art Photographer, Thomas Holm, used to shoot commercial jobs and Ad-campaigns back in the day, some of which has aired in all of North America, some in Europe, and even one in Asia. Thomas is striving to make beautiful pictures, images that evoke emotion and touch people in a deeper way. He is currently interested in nude photography from an art perspective as well as portrait and dance. His nude photographs remain tasteful and they are designed to make you think about intimacy in the digital age.

www.instagram.com/thomasholmphoto 69

► Š Thomas Holm


DENMARK

Fine Art Photographer, Thomas Holm, used to shoot commercial jobs and Ad-campaigns back in the day, some of which has aired in all of North America, some in Europe, and even one in Asia. Thomas is striving to make beautiful pictures, images that evoke emotion and touch people in a deeper way. He is currently interested in nude photography from an art perspective as well as portrait and dance. His nude photographs remain tasteful and they are designed to make you think about intimacy in the digital age.

www.instagram.com/thomasholmphoto 69

► Š Thomas Holm


► © Thomas Holm

► © Thomas Holm 71

72


► © Thomas Holm

► © Thomas Holm 71

72


73

► © Thomas Holm

► © Thomas Holm

74


73

► © Thomas Holm

► © Thomas Holm

74


COLOMBIA

Daniel Garay Arango is a Colombian artist who specializes in architectural photography. His masterpieces deconstruct architecture in a unique interplay between light and shadows. Daniel is in a permanent quest for the unknown, escaping everyday routine. By using black and white and imagination as his main tools, he takes the city to a whole new level and meaning, revealing what always hides in plain sight. Daniel described his work as an exercise in patient observation. Exploiting architecture as the main language, he wants his photographs to be timeless. There is no day or age. Instead, there’s light, texture and shapes.

www.garayarango.com 75

GRVTY2No.5 ► © Daniel Garay Arango


COLOMBIA

Daniel Garay Arango is a Colombian artist who specializes in architectural photography. His masterpieces deconstruct architecture in a unique interplay between light and shadows. Daniel is in a permanent quest for the unknown, escaping everyday routine. By using black and white and imagination as his main tools, he takes the city to a whole new level and meaning, revealing what always hides in plain sight. Daniel described his work as an exercise in patient observation. Exploiting architecture as the main language, he wants his photographs to be timeless. There is no day or age. Instead, there’s light, texture and shapes.

www.garayarango.com 75

GRVTY2No.5 ► © Daniel Garay Arango


77

GRVTY2No.1 ► © Daniel Garay Arango GRVTY No.3 © Daniel Garay Arango


77

GRVTY2No.1 ► © Daniel Garay Arango GRVTY No.3 © Daniel Garay Arango


79

HavanaStandsNo.4 (House163) © Daniel Garay Arango

HavanaStandsNo.1 © Daniel Garay Arango

80


79

HavanaStandsNo.4 (House163) © Daniel Garay Arango

HavanaStandsNo.1 © Daniel Garay Arango

80


Indonesia

INTERVIEW WITH

Please briefly tell us about the process of developing your personal style and its evolution. I have many idols in photography. The two most influential figures for me are Ansel Adams and Michael Kenna. In the beginning, I tried hard to mimic their style. After a time, you begin to break some rules in order to create your own style. It is not an overnight process; it takes time to maturely develop your own style.

You mentioned that your photographic work explores the borders between light and shadow - Yin and Yang. Do you look forward to transmit a message with your creative process? Yes, as much as I can, but it all depends on what Nature has to offer. I never search for specific things when photographing. I just take advantage of every situation offered to me by Mother Nature. We find your series of artworks “Altitude” fascinating. Was it difficult to elaborate this series? Please tell us more about it. The most important factor was to wake up very early in the morning. The mist blankets the earth, adding the mystic and mystery of the overall atmosphere and nuance. Most of my photographs were taken before 8 am and after 5 pm.

“I never search for specific things when photographing; I just take advantage of every situation offered to me by Mother Nature” Hengki Koentjoro’s fine art photography goes far beyond the perfect light and shadow drawings of black and white. A native Indonesian, he summits the peaks of the mountains of Java, where the air grows thin. The images he returns with are wide expanses and atmospheric, dense moments. Koentjoro is essentially both an ardent observer and fascinating sculptor of nature. He learned his craft at the Brooks Institute for Photography in Santa Barbara, California. For him, to see and feel nature is both freeing and inspirational. In order to translate a landscape directly into black and white, he lets his imagination run wild, slipping into surprising artistic roles. Thus he looks as if through the eyes of a Buddhist monk across the rainforests of Java from the temple site of Borobudur. Or composes a landscape drama of clouds and mountaintops, in which the spacious depths seems to be skillfully set in relation to concretely represented forms and proximities. The perspectives he employs in his images overwhelm time and again. Clouds and mountain-crests appear so high yet so near as if the sky plays by different rules in Indonesia. Koentjoro lists Michael Kenna as his greatest role model; like Kenna, he has a fine sense for monochromatic tones and fosters subject-oriented minimalism. His style thus appears astoundingly certain and rich in form. Shot in a dense, lively atmosphere and exaggerated through a narrative or visual drama, Koentjoro transforms fleeting snapshots of nature into lengthy moments of timeless, natural beauty.

www.hengki-koentjoro.com 81

► © Hengki Koentjoro

We admire the exquisite level of detail in all your works. Where does your inspiration come from? It’s in the details! Details can capture the attention of the viewer. I think they are the difference between a good photo and an excellent one. They are subtle but they add up. Details are the elements that stick with the viewers for a long time. Free Play ► © Hengki Koentjoro 82


Indonesia

INTERVIEW WITH

Please briefly tell us about the process of developing your personal style and its evolution. I have many idols in photography. The two most influential figures for me are Ansel Adams and Michael Kenna. In the beginning, I tried hard to mimic their style. After a time, you begin to break some rules in order to create your own style. It is not an overnight process; it takes time to maturely develop your own style.

You mentioned that your photographic work explores the borders between light and shadow - Yin and Yang. Do you look forward to transmit a message with your creative process? Yes, as much as I can, but it all depends on what Nature has to offer. I never search for specific things when photographing. I just take advantage of every situation offered to me by Mother Nature. We find your series of artworks “Altitude” fascinating. Was it difficult to elaborate this series? Please tell us more about it. The most important factor was to wake up very early in the morning. The mist blankets the earth, adding the mystic and mystery of the overall atmosphere and nuance. Most of my photographs were taken before 8 am and after 5 pm.

“I never search for specific things when photographing; I just take advantage of every situation offered to me by Mother Nature” Hengki Koentjoro’s fine art photography goes far beyond the perfect light and shadow drawings of black and white. A native Indonesian, he summits the peaks of the mountains of Java, where the air grows thin. The images he returns with are wide expanses and atmospheric, dense moments. Koentjoro is essentially both an ardent observer and fascinating sculptor of nature. He learned his craft at the Brooks Institute for Photography in Santa Barbara, California. For him, to see and feel nature is both freeing and inspirational. In order to translate a landscape directly into black and white, he lets his imagination run wild, slipping into surprising artistic roles. Thus he looks as if through the eyes of a Buddhist monk across the rainforests of Java from the temple site of Borobudur. Or composes a landscape drama of clouds and mountaintops, in which the spacious depths seems to be skillfully set in relation to concretely represented forms and proximities. The perspectives he employs in his images overwhelm time and again. Clouds and mountain-crests appear so high yet so near as if the sky plays by different rules in Indonesia. Koentjoro lists Michael Kenna as his greatest role model; like Kenna, he has a fine sense for monochromatic tones and fosters subject-oriented minimalism. His style thus appears astoundingly certain and rich in form. Shot in a dense, lively atmosphere and exaggerated through a narrative or visual drama, Koentjoro transforms fleeting snapshots of nature into lengthy moments of timeless, natural beauty.

www.hengki-koentjoro.com 81

► © Hengki Koentjoro

We admire the exquisite level of detail in all your works. Where does your inspiration come from? It’s in the details! Details can capture the attention of the viewer. I think they are the difference between a good photo and an excellent one. They are subtle but they add up. Details are the elements that stick with the viewers for a long time. Free Play ► © Hengki Koentjoro 82


While you are out shooting, can you tell us what are the main challenges you have experienced? To get there is the most challenging aspect of my photography. You have to track and climb the mountain. There is a big effort to get to your spot and the rest is easy once you are there. What has been the biggest satisfaction that you experienced in your photographic career? You get the chance to express your soul, you communicate visually with the audience. My rule of thumb is that if a viewer look at my photos for at least 5 seconds then I’m happy.

Wave ► © Hengki Koentjoro

Waterscape ► © Hengki Koentjoro

No matter what you are photographing, you always use excellent composition. Of all your series, which one is your favorite on and why? I have no favorite because each situation demands a different approach to the composition. But, most of the composition is inspired by my idol Michael Kenna. He has a keen ability to position the subject in a perfect location, thus accentuating the overall mood of the image. You are a well-known figure in this field and an inspiration for many young artists. Were you influenced and inspired by other artists at the early stages of your career? Yes, Ansel Adams for taking me to the journey of perfect tonality in black and white and Michael Kenna for the art of composition. Tonality and composition are the two most important elements in my style of photography.

84


While you are out shooting, can you tell us what are the main challenges you have experienced? To get there is the most challenging aspect of my photography. You have to track and climb the mountain. There is a big effort to get to your spot and the rest is easy once you are there. What has been the biggest satisfaction that you experienced in your photographic career? You get the chance to express your soul, you communicate visually with the audience. My rule of thumb is that if a viewer look at my photos for at least 5 seconds then I’m happy.

Wave ► © Hengki Koentjoro

Waterscape ► © Hengki Koentjoro

No matter what you are photographing, you always use excellent composition. Of all your series, which one is your favorite on and why? I have no favorite because each situation demands a different approach to the composition. But, most of the composition is inspired by my idol Michael Kenna. He has a keen ability to position the subject in a perfect location, thus accentuating the overall mood of the image. You are a well-known figure in this field and an inspiration for many young artists. Were you influenced and inspired by other artists at the early stages of your career? Yes, Ansel Adams for taking me to the journey of perfect tonality in black and white and Michael Kenna for the art of composition. Tonality and composition are the two most important elements in my style of photography.

84


Congratulations for being one of the Hasselblad Ambassadors. Can you tell us about this experience and what opportunities you expect it will bring to you in the future? Many opportunities. Hasselblad is a medium format camera with a sensor so much bigger than the regular DSLR, which means that it produces better dynamic range, richer color gamut, smoother gradation and the ability to blow up a much bigger print better than any DSLR. They provided me with the X1D camera and I love it so much. It’s just the beginning, I’m looking forward to next year. What are your ambitions and goals for the coming years? At the moment I’m concentrating more on exhibitions to reach a bigger audience and, along the way, I would really love to print my fourth solo book in the future. Another wish is to have a photo tour or workshop in my native country, Indonesia. 85

Detach ► © Hengki Koentjoro

20 Detach ► © Hengki Koentjoro


Congratulations for being one of the Hasselblad Ambassadors. Can you tell us about this experience and what opportunities you expect it will bring to you in the future? Many opportunities. Hasselblad is a medium format camera with a sensor so much bigger than the regular DSLR, which means that it produces better dynamic range, richer color gamut, smoother gradation and the ability to blow up a much bigger print better than any DSLR. They provided me with the X1D camera and I love it so much. It’s just the beginning, I’m looking forward to next year. What are your ambitions and goals for the coming years? At the moment I’m concentrating more on exhibitions to reach a bigger audience and, along the way, I would really love to print my fourth solo book in the future. Another wish is to have a photo tour or workshop in my native country, Indonesia. 85

Detach ► © Hengki Koentjoro

20 Detach ► © Hengki Koentjoro


Noir ► © Hengki Koentjoro

20 ► © Hengki Koentjoro


Noir ► © Hengki Koentjoro

20 ► © Hengki Koentjoro


KUWAIT

Ahmed Thabet, an Egyptian fine art photographer based in Kuwait, is widely known for his black and white architectural photography. He started in the photography world only a few years ago. Since then, photography has become his passion and one of the best parts of his life. For Ahmed, photography provides a way to express his feelings and thoughts, to communicate with the outside world. In addition to his architecture captures, his artwork covers a wide range of styles. He experiments with landscapes, seascapes, macro and, wildlife photography. He also explores a broad range of techniques and tools. Ahmed’s artwork has been published in various magazines and has been recognized with several international awards. www.instagram.com/ahmedsaeedth 89

Lego ► © Ahmed Thabet


KUWAIT

Ahmed Thabet, an Egyptian fine art photographer based in Kuwait, is widely known for his black and white architectural photography. He started in the photography world only few years ago. Since then, photography has become his passion and one of the best parts of his life. For Ahmed, photography provides a way to express his feelings and thoughts, to communicate with the outside world. In addition to his architecture captures, his artwork covers a wide range of styles. He experiments with landscapes, seascapes, macro and, wildlife photography. He also explores a broad range of techniques and tools. Ahmed’s artwork has been published in various magazines and has been recognized with several international awards. www.instagram.com/ahmedsaeedth 89

Lego ► © Ahmed Thabet


Pentagons ► © Ahmed Thabet

Petronas ► © Ahmed Thabet

92


Pentagons ► © Ahmed Thabet

Petronas ► © Ahmed Thabet

92


Waves ► © Ahmed Thabet

93

72 Scimitar ► © Ahmed Thabet


Waves ► © Ahmed Thabet

93

72 Scimitar ► © Ahmed Thabet


Highlights Daniel Castonguay Canada

Author: Daniel Castonguay

www.photographize.co/danielcastonguay www.facebook.com/daniel.castonguay.165 www.instagram.com/daniel.castonguay.165

95

Rendez vous ► © Daniel Castonguay

Les talons hauts ► © Daniel Castonguay

96


Highlights Daniel Castonguay Canada

Author: Daniel Castonguay

www.photographize.co/danielcastonguay www.facebook.com/daniel.castonguay.165 www.instagram.com/daniel.castonguay.165

95

Rendez vous ► © Daniel Castonguay

Les talons hauts ► © Daniel Castonguay

96


Highlights Vangelis Kalos Norway

Author: Vangelis Kalos

www.vangeliskalos.com www.facebook.com/VangelisKalosPhotographer/ www.instagram.com/vangeliskalos

► © Vangelis Kalos 97

► © Vangelis Kalos

98


Highlights Vangelis Kalos Norway

Author: Vangelis Kalos

www.vangeliskalos.com www.facebook.com/VangelisKalosPhotographer/ www.instagram.com/vangeliskalos

► © Vangelis Kalos 97

► © Vangelis Kalos

98


Highlights Shirren Lim malaysia

Author: Shirren Lim

www.flickr.com/photos/shirrenlim www.facebook.com/shirrenlim www.instagram.com/shirrenlim/

Hazim ► © Shirren Lim 99

[the] Camel Polo Player ► © Shirren Lim 100


Highlights Shirren Lim malaysia

Author: Shirren Lim

www.flickr.com/photos/shirrenlim www.facebook.com/shirrenlim www.instagram.com/shirrenlim/

Hazim ► © Shirren Lim 99

[the] Camel Polo Player ► © Shirren Lim 100


Highlights Mario Haberl Austria

Author: Mario Haberl

www.facebook.com/MarioHaberlMelancholyART www.instagram.com/mario.haberl

The Protective Hands of Our Mother ► © Mario Haberl

101

The Sound of The Autumn Forest ► © Mario Haberl

102


Highlights Mario Haberl Austria

Author: Mario Haberl

www.facebook.com/MarioHaberlMelancholyART www.instagram.com/mario.haberl

The Protective Hands of Our Mother ► © Mario Haberl

101

The Sound of The Autumn Forest ► © Mario Haberl

102


Highlights Giorgio Bormida ITALY

Author: Giorgio Bormida

www.giorgiobormida.com www.facebook.com/Giorgio-Bormida-1411763135787718

www.instagram.com/giorgio_bormida

Ghosts 28 ► © Giorgio Bormida 103

Portraits VIII

► © Giorgio Bormida


Highlights Giorgio Bormida ITALY

Author: Giorgio Bormida

www.giorgiobormida.com www.facebook.com/Giorgio-Bormida-1411763135787718

www.instagram.com/giorgio_bormida

Ghosts 28 ► © Giorgio Bormida 103

Portraits VIII

► © Giorgio Bormida


Highlights Yves Papageno France

Author: Yves Papageno

www.500px.com/yvespapageno www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100010567412293

www.instagram.com/yvespapageno

Nina ► © Yves Papageno 105

Murmure ► © Yves Papageno


Highlights Yves Papageno France

Author: Yves Papageno

www.500px.com/yvespapageno www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100010567412293

www.instagram.com/yvespapageno

Nina ► © Yves Papageno 105

Murmure ► © Yves Papageno


Highlights Hector Riveros GERMANY

Author: Hector Riveros

www.lowgravityph.com

www.instagram.com/lowgravityph

► Hector Riveros ► Hector Riveros 107

108


Highlights Hector Riveros GERMANY

Author: Hector Riveros

www.lowgravityph.com

www.instagram.com/lowgravityph

► Hector Riveros ► Hector Riveros 107

108


Highlights

Giuseppina Paolantonio

Author: Giuseppina Paolantonio

ITALY

www.giuseppinapaolantonio.myportfolio.com www.facebook.com/giuseppina.paolantonio

Wavering ► © Giuseppina Paolantonio Expecting ► © Giuseppina Paolantonio

109

110


Highlights

Giuseppina Paolantonio

Author: Giuseppina Paolantonio

ITALY

www.giuseppinapaolantonio.myportfolio.com www.facebook.com/giuseppina.paolantonio

Wavering ► © Giuseppina Paolantonio Expecting ► © Giuseppina Paolantonio

109

110


Highlights Kostas Tsanakas germany

Author: Kostas Tsanakas

www.facebook.com/kostas.tsanakas.1

www.instagram.com/kostas_tsanakas

Staring at the Sea ► © Kostas Tsanakas

111

Winter Landscape with Church ► © Kostas Tsanakas

112


Highlights Kostas Tsanakas germany

Author: Kostas Tsanakas

www.facebook.com/kostas.tsanakas.1

www.instagram.com/kostas_tsanakas

Staring at the Sea ► © Kostas Tsanakas

111

Winter Landscape with Church ► © Kostas Tsanakas

112


Highlights

Stéphane Navailles FRANCE

Author: Stéphane Navailles

www.facebook.com/stephanenavailles1967

PSX ► © Stéphane Navailles 113

Atmosphérique ► © Stéphane Navailles

114


Highlights

Stéphane Navailles FRANCE

Author: Stéphane Navailles

www.facebook.com/stephanenavailles1967

PSX ► © Stéphane Navailles 113

Atmosphérique ► © Stéphane Navailles

114


Highlights Heppa Ahmed France

► © Heppa Ahmed

Author: Heppa Ahmed

www.facebook.com/heppa.ahmed.10

www.instagram.com/heppa.nsaleh

► © Heppa Ahmed


Highlights Heppa Ahmed France

► © Heppa Ahmed

Author: Heppa Ahmed

www.facebook.com/heppa.ahmed.10

www.instagram.com/heppa.nsaleh

► © Heppa Ahmed


Highlights Laura Malaterra ITALY

Author: Laura Malaterra

www.lauramalaterra.it

Snowfall ► © Laura Malaterra

Umbrellas ► © Laura Malaterra

118


Highlights Laura Malaterra ITALY

Author: Laura Malaterra

www.lauramalaterra.it

Snowfall ► © Laura Malaterra

Umbrellas ► © Laura Malaterra

118


Highlights

Francisco Ángel Molina spain

Author: Francisco Ángel Molina

www.franciscoangelfoto.com

Root ► © Francisco Ángel Molina 119

Toxic ► © Francisco Ángel Molina


Highlights

Francisco Ángel Molina spain

Author: Francisco Ángel Molina

www.franciscoangelfoto.com

Root ► © Francisco Ángel Molina 119

Toxic ► © Francisco Ángel Molina


Highlights Michael Nguyen GERMANY

Author: Michael Nguyen

www.nguyensminiaturen.de www.facebook.com/michael.nguyen.muc www.ello.co/nguyensminiaturen

121

Separated ► © Michael Nguyen

Nightwalk ► © Michael Nguyen

122


Highlights Michael Nguyen GERMANY

Author: Michael Nguyen

www.nguyensminiaturen.de www.facebook.com/michael.nguyen.muc www.ello.co/nguyensminiaturen

121

Separated ► © Michael Nguyen

Nightwalk ► © Michael Nguyen

122


Highlights Sabrina Guzman ARGENTINA

Author: Sabrina Guzman

www.artecopado.com www.facebook.com/rtecopado

www.instagram.com/solneptuno

► © Sabrina Guzman

123

► © Sabrina Guzman

124


Highlights Sabrina Guzman ARGENTINA

Author: Sabrina Guzman

www.artecopado.com www.facebook.com/rtecopado

www.instagram.com/solneptuno

► © Sabrina Guzman

123

► © Sabrina Guzman

124


Highlights

Alexander L. Newman UNITED STATES

Author: Alexander L. Newman

www.zenartphotography.com

An Eye On The Light ► © Alexander L. Newman 125

Dragonfly ► © Alexander L. Newman

126


Highlights

Alexander L. Newman UNITED STATES

Author: Alexander L. Newman

www.zenartphotography.com

An Eye On The Light ► © Alexander L. Newman 125

Dragonfly ► © Alexander L. Newman

126


Highlights Vlad Antonov Russia

Author: Vlad Antonov

www.vladantonov.ru www.instagram.com/vladantonov_art

► © Vlad Antonov 127

► © Vlad Antonov 128


Highlights Vlad Antonov Russia

Author: Vlad Antonov

www.vladantonov.ru www.instagram.com/vladantonov_art

► © Vlad Antonov 127

► © Vlad Antonov 128


Highlights

Silvia Sofía Carrasco Santos MEXICO

Author: Silvia Sofía Carrasco Santos

www.500px.com/sil99sofi www.instagram.com/anima.fragili

129

► © Silvia Sofía Carrasco Santos


Highlights

Silvia Sofía Carrasco Santos MEXICO

Author: Silvia Sofía Carrasco Santos

www.500px.com/sil99sofi www.instagram.com/anima.fragili

129

► © Silvia Sofía Carrasco Santos


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Photographize Monochrome | Issue 02 | March 2019  

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