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life in balance

redefine your thinking – one person can make a difference

I SSU E 9 Fe b r u a r y/ M a rc h 2010

des Inclu al & r u t a n nIc Orga IOn It Ib h x e guIde

& & 02 news 09 food 12 wellness 15 energy innovations wine saving

yoU r F r E E copy


02

news & previews

welcome Welcome to the new format of Life in Balance. After a year and a bit of spreading the news that one person can indeed make a difference, we decided to double our efforts and up the print run which means the size of the paper had to change. This means slightly shorter articles but the e-newsletter will be bringing you more in depth features and great give-aways so do sign up to receive a copy. In this issue we bring you an exclusive extract from Bending the curve – your Guide to Tackling climate change in Southern Africa which will give you vital information about ways to cut electricity consumption and help demystify the solar panel options out there. The centre-spread is dedicated to our lifestyle partner – The Natural and organic product Exhibition and this years’ show in cape Town is going to be an event not to be missed. Join us as we start the biggest consumer led movement to get rid of chemicals in our food and become conscious consumers who take responsibility for the products, goods and services we choose. The failure of the talks in copenhagen have not dimmed the light that is shining and it is up to each and every one of us to do what we can to take care of the planet, reduce consumption and support the fine entrepreneurs and farmers who refuse to give into the ‘old’ and dare I say ‘poisonous’ way of doing business. We can’t give up and we can’t be complacent any more. So here is to living a life in balance in 2010 and redefining what is acceptable and not. Enjoy the issue and as ever, we’d love to hear from you.

talking garbage makIng twIce the dIfference by mIchele beatham

The new academic year has begun and for thousands of schools around South Africa it means not only teaching and learning, but supplementing limited income. Most of us can remember the fun fairs, markets and cake sales of our youth, or as parents, the seemingly endless hours of organising, making, baking and selling. Innovative, time and energy-saving ideas were always welcome. One of these is recycling, and in particular cans, which are easy and relatively clean to recycle. Not only do schools earn an income from collection, Collect A Can runs a number of annual competitions for schools Publisher: Michael Beatham michael@lifeinbalance.co.za editor: Melissa Baird melissa@lifeinbalance.co.za assistant editor and subscriptions: Michele Beatham michele@lifeinbalance.co.za art director: Elinore de Lisle elinore@iafrica.com sub-editor: Jessica Ross Printing: GMAK printers printed on 100gsm triple green using biodegradable inks

cover photograph istockphoto.com © Life in Balance is published 10 times a year by phoenix Ink (pty) Ltd, 210 on Long Street, cape Town, South Africa. Tel: 021 481 1836

All rights reserved. reproduction in whole or in part without the prior written consent of the publishers is strictly prohibited. All prices correct at time of going to press, but subject to change. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for any unsolicited materials. It is assumed that any images taken from sources which are widely distributed, such as on the Internet, are in the public domain. However, since such images are passed freely between sources such as websites, the original source is not always possible to trace. It is possible that copyrighted material has ended up being treated as public domain as a result. If you see a graphic or image in this publication which is not public domain please contact phoenix Ink.

Please recycle

melissa@lifeinbalance.co.za

thanks to ouR distRiBution PaRtnERs...

as added incentive. Prizes totaling up to R250 000 are awarded for the most beverage cans collected within a certain time period, while October brings the annual attempt to break the Guinness World Record for the most cans collected in one month. In 2009 they beat their world record set in 2007 by 2.6%, collecting a massive 2,122,238 cans. The Can Craze competition invites learners to let their imaginations run wild by using cans to create anything from a pterodactyl to a turtle, a spaceship to Superman. A new competition this year is the Artistic Expression Competition. Learners who enjoy drawing or painting can create an artwork depicting “cans, in

perfect harmony with nature”, with lots of prizes up for grabs. We challenge all readers, including those without school going children, to adopt a school for 2010 (within their local community or even a disadvantaged one) and not only help clean up the world, but also those who will inherit the outcome of our choices today. Visit www.collectacan.co.za, email info@collectacan.co.za or phone 011 466 2939


news & innovations

news & innovations softener in pouches that can be refilled up to 10 times. Asda has said that the project engages customers by offering a great product that not only has a lower footprint, but also has a lower price tag. source: www.edie.net.

sa jOIns Irena

South Africa has signed up as a full member of the International renewable Energy Agency (IrENA), which focuses on global use of renewable energy. The agency provides practical advice and support for industrialized and developing nations. South Africa will benefit by accessing information technology and capacity building in the renewable energy field.

just five years. Sharply rising temperatures are to blame, and some regions have already recorded warming of 2.5°c, with a projected increase by more than 10°c if emissions continue to rise at current rates. source: www.guardian.co.uk new Plant sPecIes dIscOvered In afrIca

glass recyclIng On the rIse

weddIng cans

According to The Glass recycling company’s general manager, Shabeer Jhetam, local glass recycling figures have climbed from 148 000 tons to 244 845 tons of glass per year – a massive increase of over 65% in the short three year period since The Glass recycling company’s inception. www.theglassrecycling company.co.za

An unconventional US couple planning an unconventional wedding (potluck food, homebrewed beer, handmade décor, etc.) are financing it in a unique and environmentally friendly way – by recycling 400 000 cans. At the time of writing they had only 88 440 to go. Follow Andrea and peter’s inspirational adventure at www.weddingcans.com or www.twitter.com/ weddingcans

washday sOlutIOn

Asda supermarket chain has started a trial, funded by the Waste and resources Action programme, where fabric softener is piped from a 1 000 litre reusable container. Shoppers buy concentrated

arctIc PermafrOst leakIng methane at recOrd levels

In a new study a massive spike in greenhouse gas emissions from Arctic permafrost has been recorded. Experts say methane emissions have risen by almost one-third in

East and tropical Southern Africa yielded the greatest number of new plant species in 2009, according to the royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. one of the two new species found in South Africa is an aquatic plant Isoetes eludens, found in temporary rock pools. The minute specimen was found by Kew director prof Stephen Hopper in Namaqualand. Sadly the plant may be at risk from climate change, as the temporary rock pools in which it thrives are in danger of drying up. View a full list at www.kew.org/science/ new-discoveries source: www.sagoodnews. co.za

recycling collection in late 2009 in the Waterval area. 20 000 tons of recyclable waste was collected within the first week of the project in November 2009. Not only has environmental waste been minimised in these suburbs, but the project has also increased jobs through the door-to-door education campaign. wInd Is cheaPest

Eddie o’connor, head of renewable energy company Mainstream renewable power, which is planning a r9.1 billion investment in wind farms in South Africa, stated that wind was the cheapest generating option for South Africa at present. This was in response to Eskom’s assertion that renewable energy was expensive and would require coal or nuclear back up. Doug Kuni, MD of SA Independent power producers Association said that a renewable energy project’s output over time is cheaper due to no primary fuel costs or carbon taxes. source: www.busrep.co.za

gauteng actIOn fOr gOIng clean and green

The city of Johannesburg piloted its free municipal

10th Birthday

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04

news & innovations

news & innovations In the bag

As part of their re-use and recycle ethos, Sandton city used the fabric advertising banners from previous promotions to create 1000 limited edition shopping bags. These trendy, ecofriendly, limited edition bags, in a range of colours and designs, were given away to shoppers spending r250 or more during the Sandton city Summer Sale in early February.

weigh 350g – down from the less environmentally friendly industry standard of 500g (and in a few cases as much as one kilogram). cork-sealed bottles have dropped from 570g to 460g. Add in the reduction in the carbon footprint and the wine industry has another winner.

sa wIne lOses weIght

As South African wine exports have increased in recent years, so have carbon emissions. Now, South African wine is about to become a lot lighter. From April 2010, red and white screw cap wine bottles will

sIgn uP fOr Our free e-newsletter. vIsIt www.lifeinbalance.co.za

ECO-BOUTIQUE HOTEL JOHANNESBURG

THE FAILUrE oF copENHAGEN DEMANDS A NEW INTErNATIoNAL ApproAcH To cLIMATE cHANGE by lance greylIng, mP

over the past ten years I have been involved in the international climate change negotiations. During this time I have learned not to hold high expectations for them as there has been a severe lack of political will in driving forward an agreement that could save the world from catastrophic climate change. I was hoping that the ascendancy of obama to the US presidency would finally break the global stalemate over climate change. Sadly I was proved wrong. The SA parliamentary delegation I attended in copenhagen was worse than anything I have seen before. Industrialised countries came to copenhagen with no intention of agreeing to the emission-reduction targets required by science. Instead they tried to find a convenient scapegoat for their own failure. Deals were made in back-rooms; pressure was applied to developing countries to soften

their moral standpoints and their media machines were working to pin this failure on anyone but themselves. A weak political statement was eventually presented by these powerful Heads of State in a take-it-or-leave-it fashion, and we emerged from copenhagen with the sad reality that at our present level of commitment the world is heading for a catastrophic warming of over 3.5°c. However, now is not the time to be pessimistic. The failure of copenhagen needs to galvanise all of us into action and find new ways of ensuring that the international community, the powerful nations, become more accountable to the growing movement of people around the world demanding a just solution to climate change. Lance is Chief Whip of the parliamentary caucus and the national Policy Convenor. Email: lance@id.org.za

corporATE HEroES cuttIng edge refrIgeratIOn

MELROSE JOHANNESBURG | 011 537 9797 | WWW.THEPEECH.CO.ZA

pick n pay has embarked on a project whereby ozonedepleting HcFc-based refrigeration will be replaced by energy-efficient German technology, the first of which features at its store in Strand, Western cape. This will result in an estimated annual direct emission of 2000 tons of co2 emissions being eliminated, with significant energy savings being realised through the more energy-efficient natural refrigerant-based plant.

eskOm Increases sOlar water heater rebate

Eskom has recently announced a substantial increase in solar water heater rebates, in some cases by as much as 120%, bringing it within reach of many more South Africans. The levels of rebate will now see consumers receiving cash rebates of between r2 100 and r12 500. Find more information on the scheme and a list of approved suppliers at www.eskom. co.za/dsm, or by calling Eskom’s solar help desk on 011 800 4744


CELEBRating stRidEs in sustainaBiLity Johnnie Walker®Celebrating strides annual awards is an initiative that recognises south african achievers who are making strides in their professions. the 12 nominees are separated into four categories; arts, design, environment and business, and from each category the winners will receive a bursary fund created in their name to help future achievers and give back to their communities. this year, Johnnie Walker® acknowledges three achievers making an environmental impact: Joe Matimba, Joanne Lee Rolt, and simon nicks are all celebrated for their environmentally conscious contribution to south africa.

Joe Matimba

is better known as “Mr. permaculture”, a nickname that he received from his work in training thousands of people how to use natural resources sustainably. Matimba established Sikhebe Natural Training centre in Northern KwaZulu Natal and he has organised 500 Arbour week events with Food & Trees for Africa, for whom he is now a senior permaculture project manager. Matimba believes that “the brilliance of an organisation

simon nicks has a great smile and winning ways.

like Food & Trees for Africa is its ability to bring people of different cultural groups together and encourage them to work together and focus on achieving one specific goal”.

simon nicks,

managing member of cNdV Africa, started his career as a housing activist, helping communities to resist forced removals. Now a successful planner and urban designer, Nicks designs places to live with minimal environmental impact.

He realised during his studies that the exclusion of poor communities from economic opportunities, coupled with an “unbridled and unthinking” use of natural resources, will be leaving a wasteland for future generations. He is currently working for a number of clients on land reform and upmarket residential, agricultural and ecological real estate projects.

Joanne Lee Rolt,

photographer and environmentalist, has been nominated

Joanne Lee Rolt knows where to point her camera.

Joe Matimba has got what it takes to succeed.

for the Environment Award in the celebrating Strides Awards 2010. rolt has overseen the planting of 350 000 trees, the training of 5 000 communitybased educators and she has co-ordinated workshops for over 20 000 people in South Africa. She runs Trees for Homes and Eduplant programmes, and has been involved in Food & Trees for

Africa. In her work she aims to address the problems of climate change and promote educated living through organic diets and improved quality of life. “I learn so much by listening to the community members, the learners and educators, I come into contact with and hope I can make a valuable impact on the lives of many more people in communities across South Africa. “ Other finalists include: aRts - Zulu literary star, renowned playwright, choreographer and entrepreneur, Welcome Msomi; the international acclaimed principal dancer and founder of ‘Dance for All’ and InSpIrAtions Dance Academies philip Boyd; and famous musician, anthropologist and musical activist, Johnny clegg. dEsign - Architect Mokena Makeka, a force behind the redesign of the cape Town station, jewellery designer Given Nkuna and ceramic designer, art gallery owner and creative force, Andile Dyalvan, whose love of ceramics was born from the river mud forms he created inspired by the Nguni cattle he herded for his father. BusinEss - Max Maisela, a fearless fighter for financial rights whose company NBc helps protect retirement rights for workers; Ernest Kekana a young pilot turned operator for one of Africa’s leading Aviation companies; and chicken Licken magnate, George Sombonos. For more information and to vote for your favourite south african achiever visit www.celebratingstrides.co.za

Not for Sale to Persons Under the Age of 18. Drink Responsibly.


06

design

Metal 2009 New Designer Search Every year, Carrol Boyes celebrates innovative design in The Carrol Boyes Metal New Designer Search. The 2009 leg, themed ‘Fruitful – Design beyond the bowl’, saw artistic creativity, design and African inspiration unite. With the lucrative title of Best New Designer, and a piece of R90 000 in prize money in sight, 182 aspiring product designers submitted their metal creations. The top prizes were awarded to Christiaan Van Aardt, Oupa Vusimusi Mokwena and Martin Doller for their Fruitful designs. Christiaan Van Aardt, a product designer from Stellenbosch, was awarded third prize and R15 000 for his design “bubbly”. Van Aardt took

1st prize: martin doller’s “ga-mi”

his inspiration from the image of droplets of water on leaves. “I wanted a design without the closed feeling of the normal bowl – allowing the circulation of air and light around the displayed fruit” he said. In second place, innovation meets tradition in a truly African design

from left: mokwena, doller and van aardt

3rd prize: christiaan van aardt’s “bubbly”

2nd prize: Oupa vusimusi mokwena’s “the swivel tsonga”

called “The swivel Tsonga”. Oupa Vusimusi Mokwena was awarded R25 000 for his bowl design which resembles a peanut. “Peanuts are a favourite ingredient in many African dishes” says the designer. He was inspired by traditions of the Tsonga Tribe, and incorporated their use of serving bowls and recipes into his design. The Tsonga traditions of dance movements and energy are manifested in the “twist” element of the piece. Mokwena was also a finalist in Metal 2007, and currently runs his own company “Which Craft – design art and lifestyle”. Martin Doller took the prestigious first prize and R50 000. Doller is a 27 year old freelance industrial designer based in the Western Cape. A graduate from Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Doller has a good knowledge of prototype disciplines with a particular talent in concept

development and visualisation. “Ga-mi”, his winning piece, is a Japanese influenced design based on the aesthetics of Origami. The design is angular, without sharp edges, to prevent the bruising of the fruit, and has vertical slits for air circulation. It employs Doller’s eye for design and his knowledge of technology. “The origami design is a play on shadows, with the angular facets forming a geometric pattern in shades of white and grey. White powder coating of the bowl represents both paper and purity and cleanliness”, Doller explains. “It is an innovative yet functional piece of work that allows for ease of manufacturing”, says Boyes of the winning piece. With a new year brings a new theme, and the Metal 2010 New Designer Search is themed “Vase, a lifestyle”. For more information, and to view the 2009 winners and finalists, visit http://metal.carrolboyes.co.za


living

be-aware the coming of the ethical consumer

• If you’re not on Google, you don’t exist Are you techno-literate? • If it’s icky, I don’t want it How “green” are you? • If you’re not fair, I won’t play with you How do you treat staff? • If I won’t buy from you, I won’t work for you either You can’t wait until I am “grown up” before worrying about what I think of you!

dr graeme cOdrIngtOn, tOmOrrOwtOday

The pay off line from Nickelodeon’s series about Millennium Development Goals - “Because every minute of every day you are part of everybody” – immediately grabbed my then five year-old daughter Hannah’s attention. Thereafter, she used this phrase to express indignation to anything she found unacceptable. Whilst stuck behind a truck belching clouds of smoke, Hannah admonished the driver for “pollutioning” the air and shouted, “Don’t you know that every minute of every day you are part of everybody!” She then stunned me by asking, “Daddy, which company is that, cos I don’t think we should buy from

them anymore?” Hannah has since started a “Boycott List”, a list of companies our family may not use. When a company is added, we email them to explain why and how they can redeem themselves. The critical question your business faces today: “Are you on Hannah’s List?” Hannah’s peers are in the decade when a person’s value system is shaped. Sooner than you can imagine, they will interact with your company.

statements about how the world should work. This shift has been slowly emerging and the ethical consumer now exists. They are increasingly vocal and influential. Young people have grown up addicted to choice – they don’t have to buy from you.

the ethIcal cOnsumer

Hannah is typical of a new generation; those who understand they have a responsibility to use their purchasing power to make

07

Your youngest customers in 2020 are currently 10 yearsold, know what they want and have strong opinions about the world, and you! Who is your Hannah? Who’s eyes do you use to look at your company, brand, leadership, products – and your trucks?

hannah’s rules

Hannah also has a list of rules which represent the concerns of an entire generation. These include:

Dr Graeme Codrington is a trend analyst with TomorrowToday. Contact graeme@tomorrowtoday.uk.com

PARKER COTTAGE

At Parker we prove that timeless, luxurious accommodation can be green and foster an active concern for the society and the environment. Parker Cottage is the first green guesthouse in a listed building in Africa. Our rooms are distinctive and diverse: we promise an eclectic mix of design underpinned by grand Victorian opulence. We offer free WiFi, legendary breakfasts, secured parking. All rooms are en suite with either bath or shower rooms. We’re less than 5 minutes by car from the V&A Waterfront and less than 5 minutes on foot from trendy Kloof Street with its cafés, bars and boutiques. No 1 & 3 Carstens Street, Tamboerskloof, Cape Town. Phone: 021 424 6445. E-mail: info@parkercottage.co.za, www.parkercottage.co.za


08

travel

offbeat Ficksburg

the farmers in the area threw away and turned it into fabulous artifacts that visitors just have to take home with them. Old rusty baths have become sofas; beaten, broken tin hand basins are made into top hats with handcrafted metal roses and scrap metal is transformed into angels as icons of the grace with which they transformed themselves. The little town is on the Maloti route and Lesotho is its closest neighbour. Ficksburg produces most of South Africa’s cherry crop and has huge swaths of land planted with asparagus so it is a speciality dish served in many of the restaurants.

by melIssa baIrd

As quaint shops in country towns go, this one will knock your socks off. Die Blik Plek takes centre stage in South Africa’s cherry capital, Ficksburg, and the women who own it have some powerful stories to tell. Ansie Fourie and Sandra are living testaments to the fact that great adversity can lead to unbelievable success. Ansie’s enthusiasm is infectious and she tells her story with humour and reverence for the second chance she was given after losing everything. She laughs and says “I went from welfare to welder” . She and her partner in the business, Sandra, began using the scrap metal that

Die Blik Plek 81 McCabe Street, Ficksburg 051 933 2245 Email: dieblikplek@iafrica. com · www.ficksburg.org.za www.cherryfestival.co.za

WWooFing your way around the world There’s a traveller in each of us. Distant lands and adventure beckon, from Australia to America, Iceland to Ireland, the Bahamas to Belgium. The more adventurous may consider Peru or Palestine, Mongolia or Morocco. How about Slovakia, Serbia or even South Africa? But how does one manage the expense of getting to these exotic locations?

Try volunteering. WWOOF – World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms was founded in the UK in 1971 and has grown to encompass almost every country on the planet. The online network connects hosts with potential volunteers and publishes lists of organic farms and smallholdings that welcome volunteer help at certain times of the year.

BIOWASH Southern Africa www.biowash.co.za www.biowashball.co.za 021 976 0728 Visit us at 083 414 5566 Stand D10

Our future is in our hands!!!

The diversity of hosts provides opportunities for a wide variety of people with different skill sets who want to work in gardens, on nature trails, with animals, or even cook and apprentice artists. Volunteers do not pay for their stay and live as part of the host family with all accommodation and food expenses covered. All that is required is a genuine interest

in learning about organic food production, country living or ecologically sound lifestyles and a willingness to help their hosts with daily tasks for an agreed number of hours. In return they travel to places they may not have dreamed of before and learn more about life in different lands in a sustainable way. To find out more, visit www.wwoof.org

DISCOVER THE NEW TASTE OF PREMIUM Jack Black Brewers Reserve, a smooth lager developed from a classic American recipe. Our Master Brewer uses only the finest natural ingredients to craft this refreshing and flavourful beer.  Jack Black is proudly brewed locally in our small batch microbrewery, right here in the Western Cape.

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food

food for thought by ben getz Of urban harvest

next Issue c

OntaIn fOO er grOw d Ing

• Never step on edible garden beds. Design the garden so that you can reach all areas of your garden beds from clearly defined pathways and/ or stepping-stones without ever having to step on the carefully prepared soil. sOIl management

In recent years South Africa has seen a growing trend towards healthier, more sustainable lifestyles. Options such as home recycling collections and increasing availability of natural and organic products in stores and via home delivery means people are able to make informed choices for a healthier environment and society. The Urban Harvest offers a complete and holistic approach towards sustainable and healthy living at home. Imagine eating the freshest, healthiest homegrown food every day while reducing your carbon footprint and saving money. Whether you have a garden, balcony or stoep you can transform it, using ecological and/or Permaculture principles, into a beautiful, edible garden that will nourish you and your family, body and soul. Broccoli, beetroot, carrots, rocket, beans, salads

and so much more await you in your own ‘backyard’ whatever the size! This is the “Urban Harvest” concept. Empowered urban individuals, communities and schools can harvest affordable, organic produce on their doorsteps as and when they need it. Harvesting fresh produce from your own garden and eating it within minutes is entirely satisfying, without compromise, and so easy. If growing your own food is on your 2010 to-do list, here are six tips to get you started: IntellIgent desIgn

• Situate your edible garden eco-logically. Ideally your garden should get plenty of morning sun, be sheltered from harsh winds, be close to your kitchen and near a water source. • Make sure the beds are level; this will conserve water and nutrients in your system.

• Cover the soil with mulch. Straw, wood chips, dried grass and dried leaves are examples of good, available mulch you could use to cover your soil wherever it is exposed. • Make your own compost and apply it regularly. • Start an earthworm farm. Earthworms will process your food scraps into the highest quality compost and also provide you with an organic liquid fertilizer with which to feed your plants.

09

seasonally speaking Eating produce in season is healthier and less expensive, but do we, in the age of the global village, even know what is in and what’s not?

need helP grOwIng yOur Own fOOd?

FEBRuaRy Veggies: Asparagus, beans, beetroot, sweet peppers, carrots, cabbage, courgettes, cucumber, brinjal, garlic, lettuce, mielies, mushrooms, onion, potatoes, pumpkin, radishes, spinach, squash, sweet potatoes, tomatoes and turnips. Fruit: Apples, figs, nectarines, peaches, pears, plums, pomegranates, bananas, lemons, mangoes, melons, pineapples, grapes, sweet melon, watermelon, granadillas and berries.

Companies like Urban Harvest in Cape Town can support you with design, set-up, maintenance services and courses that will result in a selfsufficient edible gardens. For a free quote contact Urban Harvest (CT) on 072 475 2977, info@ urbanharvest.co.za or visit www.urbanharvest.co.za Gauteng readers can try Caro Sebacha 082 817 4450 from Room to Grow: www.room-to-grow.co.za

MaRCh Veggies: Green beans, beetroot, brinjal, cabbage, peppers, carrots, celery, chives, courgettes, cucumber, leeks, garlic, lettuce, mielies, mushrooms, onions, potatoes, pumpkin, radishes, spinach, sweet potatoes, tomatoes and turnips. Fruit: Apples, bananas, figs, peaches, pears, plums, pomegranates, lemons, mangos, pineapple, grapes, sweet melon (spanspek) and watermelon.


10

event

it’s showtime!

Get your walking shoes on and arrive early to be able to truly savour the incredible offerings brought to you at the Natural and Organic Products Exhibition. The handy floorplan will help you navigate your way around and in between listening to fascinating talks from specialists in their field and sampling the finest organic honey, wine and food, you can also meet exciting entrepreneurs and discover new inventions in energy and water saving. As a seasoned show goer I know it helps to have some pointers to help you on your way. Firstly visit

the Life in Balance stand where you can sign up for the first consumer led natural and organic association and enter a lucky draw to win great product hampers. Water scarcity and filtering devices are top of the list and if you are interested in how to transform existing water features to use less chemicals then e-clear will be your answer. It uses pure oxygen instead of chlorine or salt to sanitise water. The costs and adverse affects of chlorine and salt chlorination on your pocket, health and the environment, are cause to look at viable alternatives and these systems are so good that hotels and gyms around the world have been using them. As the water is free from chemicals you can backwash your pool water directly into your garden.

The water is so clean you can drink it so imagine how beautiful it is to swim in? In the Wellness arena you can experience wonderful new ways to de-stress. BodyTalk is receiving worldwide acclaim for its simplicity and effectiveness as a natural healthcare system. It basically helps your cells communicate better and this helps overall healing. There is a special show offer to enable you to experience the remarkable effects of the healing. And after a hectic day how about chilling out by meditating?

Transcendental Meditation is the world’s most scientifically proven method of stress reduction and selfdevelopment. For those of you crying, “give us proof” there have been over 600 research studies, half of which have been published in peerreviewed scientific and medical journals. So this works. Plus it only takes a few minutes each day to begin experiencing the benefits.

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natural & organic products exhibition 19 feb, ctIcc

exhibitors African organics B26 Aroma Soothz- Delo F20 Avondale Bio-Logic and organic Wines G20 Earth Warrior/Eco Tees B8 Bean There coffee company E12 Big Tree Neutraceutical D28 Biodelta c25 Bio-Energy B6 Biowash Southern Africa D10 Ecologics@Bloublommetjies G12 Blue Sky organics G14 Body Talk B22 Bottle craft SA G17 Brewers & Union F11 By Nature c12a cape of Good Hope SpcA B16 china Herb F38 coirtex B7 complete yoga Magazine G9 conscious Spaces B24 crede Natural oils F19 curls/congrebase (pty) Ltd c31 De Vine oils E13 Dugro D24 Earthsap G5 Eat Smart organics A27 E-clear 100% chlorine-free B2 Ecozone B15 Enchantrix D6 Esse organic Skin care B28 FoodState B20 Forest creations c6 Fry Group Foods E35 Giodano Hair Design c33 Go Natural E27 Green power Solar Systems c7 Greenfields Renewable Energy C15 Growing Stacks - Greens@Home G2 Growing paper E31 Harrewyn organics c23 Healthy choc SA/ Worthwhile Luxury D2 Heart 104.9 FM B11 Hills Solar D5 Hotelstuff c5 iLanga Heat Solar power c11 Intaka Nutri E14 K-9 pet Food B4 Kalyan Herbal c16 Karabo Initiative (M power Menstrual cup) B27 Keim-Livos SA B1 Kigelia cosmetics F25 Kima Global publisher D26 Kitz Air Purifiers C29 Laharna Farm F15

Life in Balance G4 M power Mentrual cup B25 Manuka Honey G3 Marina Skin care F30 Milk & Honey Natural Skin care c1 Mother Nature products E2d My Green Lunch Box/ organix SA E2a My T chai E19 National Enzyme company c21 Natural pack F32 NEo Trading F22 New Age portraits D3a odyssey Simply Green E7 org de rac Wines F35

organic Home/organic Aqua B10 organic prana E2 pesto princess F21 phyto Trade Africa F27 pick n pay D3 power rosh Trading 241/ Seasons Ayurveda G7 powerplastics D4 probac (Soft chemical Laboratories) E3 pronature paints D16 pure Beginnings F24 reel Gardening D1 repello products E11 reyneke organic G19 SA Natural products F4 Safeage G1 Sappi Fine paper D8 Seed E29 Soaring Free Superfoods D22 Soil F28 Soil for Life B23 Sojourney publications G8 Solarzone B5 Soma Whole Life Elements D15 Sought After Seedlings c12b Sprouts Alkaline Food G11 Stegi EcoNappy D3c Stem Tech/ Impact Health Solutions B21

Step Forward SA E25 Sweet-A-Vita c18 Talbourne organics D17 Eskom c10 The House of Aloes/Alcare F17 The Natural Aloe company E23 The property Magazine c13 Natural Medicine Magazine D32 The South African Association for Nutritional Therapy (SAANT) G15 Thermguard B12 THINK! Shoes D19 Tierhoek organic E1 Tones platinum (pty) Ltd E10 Totally Wild F23 Transcendental Meditation F1 Tsakani Silk c2 Turkish Spirit (TIA Turkspirit) c17 Universal Vision E21 Urban Harvest D20 Van Dyck carpets F2 Vital Health Foods F31 Vondi’s Holistic pet Nutrition B14 Waverley Hills organic Wines and olives E37 Wellness Warehouse c8 Wholistic Lifestyle SA D30 Wild olive F36 Women Watch Bangladesh c20 ZK Healthcare D9

the womens show exhibitors 00Heavenily Limousines A56 A Taste of Thai E24 Abani Enterprise & rotim Boutiques Fabrics & Ladies Tailors B44 African Extracts F50 All 4 Women E51 Amazing Vouchers E53 Animal rescue organisation D38 Anzio Gifts D56a Arniston Bay F40 Aromatic Apothecary D23 Bayer Healthcare D50 Bindi by Balu G25 Bob Martin c45 Bonitas H4 Bravo Agents D60 Break-Free A42 Bride & co / Eurosuit c50 Dentyne / cadbury E47 cape Fertility clinic c34 cazabella D21 charmaine’s printing Works E16 charmed B41 classic Arts And crafts A46 continetal oil Mills G29 curves For Women F46 Destiny Magazine E22 Dhaka Jamdhni Weaving Factory B48 Division 3 G30 Downings Marquee Hiring (peggy’s place) D68 Easi Slim D29 Epromo (Miracle Shammy) c32 Estie Malan photography D53 Exotic perfume F44 Eyecandy Brow Bar B31 Facial Delight D52 Feel Good Health D36

Fiat B40a Fifth Avenue collection E48 Fitflop B29 Go Focus remedial centres E45 Healthway c24 International Hair Extensions F56 ITTADI Handicraft and New Sumatra B40 J Good-In E18 Jagadi Haute couture F70 Jaxxy Fun Wear B35 Jeanne Wassenaar G22 Knorr D31 Larry Soffer D55 Lay’s Beauty G23 Lazzlar hair products/ Elchim SA c40 Le carre promotions D58 Le fem provocateur c41 Life Force Financial Services B40b Linde collection E63 Lipstickspin c41 Little pink Book A59 Lucente A43 Me Time retreats and coaching G21 Miglio E49 Mosumi Fashion & World organization and rural life development A51 Move-Eez B46 My Wage c51 Namibian Tourism D42 NIA G27 Ntinga Wines E41 NWJ Fine Jewellery E42 olivelli Bridal Evening Design F58 pet Alive c39 planet Fitness D25 play 4 U Entertainment E46

pleasures Silver Jewellery & Giftware c30 premier cosmetics by Dead Sea c42 pretty powerful c53 prophuzion Laboratories A41 rFB / Victoria Jackson F54 rickety Bridge Wine Estate D49 riverside Estate E50 ryan Wesley professional E59 Sam olivier Wedding couture E67 Sanlam A39 Satiskin (Amka) c28 Shammy Fashion & Handicraft A49 Sh’zen pty Ltd c26 Sivanna-Beauty Skin and Handcare D34 Soliette D57 Sound print B60 Spa Notions (pty) Ltd E18 Starlight cruises c47 Swedish Spike Mat/ Quality Wellness products B33 The Brow Expert F45 The cookie Book: Unvelling the Women’s Secret D59 The Fairy Factory E71 The Fairy Shop c71 The Hydro at Stellenbosch F48 The Muse c57 TLc Wellbeing Durbanvile E39c Tria Aqua E20 Tua Viso Non-Surgical Face Lift D54 U’r A GEM D61 Welmoed Wines F64 Wham patches A45 Wheat Women’s Fund E20a Whimsical cupcakes F37a X-Tec Trading c35 ZaraZoo photography B58


This is your floor plan to help you navigate your way around the shows. remember your ticket gets you access to both the Natural and organic products Exhibition and the Women’s Show, which is right next door.

19 - 21 February 2010 Cape Town International Convention Centre Hall 1, 2, 3 & 4

Hall 2

FH Floor Loading 1,5 Tons /m²

SAFeAGE G1 Emergency Exit

Loading Bay

Organic CafŽ Maharish i Vedic F1

Brewer's & Union F11

Laharna Farm F15

Emergency Exit

Kapruka Virgin Coconut Oil F6

Repello SA E11

Aroma Soothz F20

F14

Divine Oils E13

My T Chai E19

E15

Earthsap G5

Complete Yoga G9

PRT G7

Sprouts

Life in Balance/ N&O G4

Alcare F17

CredŽ Natural Oils F19

NEO Trading F22

Pure Beginnings F24

Universal Vision E21

Natraloe E23

Sojourney G8

SodashiG 10

Totally Wild F23

Kigelia Cosmetics F25

Go Natural E27

Phytotrad

Marina Skincare F30

Soil F28 Step Forward E25

Bloublomme tjieskloof G12

SEED E29

Natu

Growing Paper E31

P

E2b

New Age Portraits D3a

Enchantri x D6

E2c

D3b

Biowash Southern Africa D10

Stegi D3c

Plastics Federation D12

Hills Solar D5

Women Watch E4b

E8

ZK Healthcare D9

Justin Roffey D13

Documentar y Film Fest D7

Envirotou ch D16 Green Fields Energy C15

Soaring Free D22

D20

S

Dugro D24

D3 Pick n Pay

Power Plastics D4

Milk & Honey C1

My Green Lunch Box

Qlink D18 (was

Organic Prana E2

BABY PAVILION

Healthy Choc SA D2

Reel Gardenin

ENTRANCE do NOT block

Probac E3

Department of Agriculture F10 (was B19)

Greens @Home G2

Turkish Spirit C17

FH

Simply Green & Odyssey E7

Mother Nature Products E2d

Tierhoek Organic E1

Van Dyck F2 SA Natural Prod F4

Manuka Honey G3

SAFeAGE Wall G1a

Pesto Princess F21

FH

Storage

Storage

Emergency Exit

Hall 1

SAPPI D8 Green Power C7

iLanga Heat C11

The Property Magazine C13

Harrewyn Organics C23

National Enzyme Co. C21

Biodelta C25

SPCA B3 (was A2)

Keim B1 (was A1)

E-Clear B2

Eskom Solar C10

Vondi's B7 (was A10)

K9 Pet Food B4 (was A3) Bio-Energy B6

Wellness Warehouse C8

Baby Trendsetter B8

Heart 104.9 FM B11

Organic Home B10 (was A7)

Therm Guard B12 (was A9)

Coirtex B14 (was B10)

Sought After Seedlings C12 b

Urban Harvest C6a (was B4)

By Nature C12a

Forest Creations C6

Blue Rain Creations B13

GREEN HOME EXHIBITION Solarzone B5

EXIT May NOT be blocked

Tsakani Silk C2

Hotelstuff C5

C14 Eco-Lounge B16

FoodState B20

S

B19

Ecozone B15

Body Talk SA Conscious Spaces B22 B24

African Organics B26

E

E O

STORAGE 1 FH

Emergenc y Exit

FH

FH

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AYURVEDA

Visit our stall and book 3 BodyTalk sessions for just R600, exclusive to Expo visitors.

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021-703 7082 • 082 447 6081 info@forestcreations.co.za www.forestcreations.co.za


natural & organic products exhibition 19 feb, ctIcc 19 - 21 February 2010 Cape Town International Convention Centre Hall 1, 2, 3 & 4

happy pets

Hall 3

Hall 2

The pet food industry is dominated DRESSING RO Loading Bay by large multi-nationals with massive Storage advertising budgets, Bottle but questionable LIFESTYLE Craft G17 Seating STAGE ingredients. We can feed our pets real Sprouts G11 meat and veggies and Vondis Holistic Pet G Landbouw Nutrition iseekblad leading the way and becoming G16 more and more popular with conscious Seating Vital Health Foods pet lovers. They are actively involved in F31 Phytotrade F27 educating the public about the nutritional F our cats and dogs, and have had needs of Naturalmajor Pack success in curing the many common Company of F32 Wine People F40 ailments and sickness that ails our pets. Gene Pro E33 They are firm believers in a chemical free enviroment and have a range of remedies, E shampoos and flea repellents that are totally Destin Tones Intaka J Good-In Mores Magazi Platinum E8 D20A on E20 natural. www.vondis.co.za Stand no. A10 Nutri E14 E18 E10 E22

Repello SA E11

Emergency Exit

Aroma Soothz F20

F14

Divine Oils E13

My T Chai E19

E15

Alcare F17

CredŽ Natural Oils F19

NEO Trading F22

Universal Vision E21

Sojourney G8

SodashiG 10

Totally Wild F23

Kigelia Cosmetics F25

Step Forward E25

Natraloe E23

Go Natural E27

SEED E29

D3 Pick n Pay

E2b

New Age Portraits D3a

E2c

D3b

Mother Nature Products E2d

Organic Prana E2

BABY PAVILION My Green Lunch Box

Stegi D3c

Org de Rac F35

Growing Paper E31

Documentar y Film Fest D7

Justin Roffey D13

ZK Healthcare D9

Synergy Co D15

Envirotou ch D16 Green Fields Energy C15

D20

Soaring Free D22

Kima Global Pub D26

Plastics Federation D12

Dugro D24

Biowash Southern Africa D10

Qlink D18 (was

Enchantri x D6

Turkish Spirit C17

D Power Plastics D4

SAPPI D8 Green Power C7

Hotelstuff C5

iLanga Heat C11

The Property Magazine C13

National Enzyme Co. C21

Harrewyn Organics C23

Biodelta C25

Big Tree D28

Vondi's B7 (was A10)

Sought After Seedlings C12 b

Heart 104.9 FM B11

By Nature C12a

Wellness Warehouse C8

Eskom Solar C10

Fry's Vegetarian E35

Waverley Hills Organic Wines E37

Kitz Air C29

SOUND BOO

TLC Wellbeing Clinic E39c

TLC Wellbeing Clinic E39c

Charmaine's Printing Works E16

Talborne Organics D17

Think! Shoes D19

Wholistic Lifestyle D30

Journal of Natural Medicine D32

Aruvedic Medicine

Curls C31

Giodano Hair C33

C35

Cazabella

D21

Aromatic Apothecary D23

Josephine D25

D25A

Animal Rescue D38

D40

Na Tou D

Pet Alive C39

C41

C4

Does your Dog itch?

D

C Blue Rain Creations B13

Solarzone B5

SPCA B3 (was A2)

Urban Harvest C6a (was B4)

China Herb F38

We have theD34solution...

GREEN HOME EXHIBITION Forest Creations C6

Wild Olive F36

Bean There Coffee E12

Women Watch E4b

Hills Solar D5

Avondale G20

Blue Sky Organics G14

Marina Skincare F30

Soil F28

Pure Beginnings F24

Bloublomme tjieskloof G12

SEATING

Department of Agriculture F10 (was B19)

Life in Balance/ N&O G4

Reyneke Wines G19

Feel Good Health D36

robac E3

Simply Green & Odyssey E7

Greens @Home G2

SA Nutritional Therapy G15

Complete Yoga G9

PRT G7

Raw Food Bar F39

Brewer's & Union F11

Earthsap G5

SAFeAGE Wall G1a

Laharna Farm F15

Organic CafŽ

Kapruka Virgin Coconut Oil F6

SAFeAGE G1

Loading Bay

Manuka Honey G3

Pesto Princess F21

FH

Natural rod F4

Storage

Emergency Exit

Hall 1

Emergency Exit

Floor Loading 1,5 Tons /m²

Organic Wine Garden

Emergency Exit

FH

Natural Pet Remedies Sweet-aHealthwa Sh'zen L'Occitane C20 vita C18 www.vondis.co.za (021)y C24 439 1784C26

C14

Kalyan Herbal C16

B19

Stem Tech B21

Eco-Lounge B16

Ecozone B15

Soil for life B23

M power B25

Karabo B27

Reviva B29

C28

Avon

B31

B

(was A1)

E-Clear B2

K9 Pet Food B4 (was A3) Bio-Energy B6

Baby Trendsetter B8

Organic Home B10 (was A7)

Therm Guard B12 (was A9)

Coirtex B14 (was B10)

FoodState B20

Body Talk SA Conscious Spaces B22 B24

African Organics B26

Esse B28

B38

Eat Smart Organics A27

STORAGE 1

Sanlam A37

A

Emergenc y Exit

FH

Organic CafŽ B30

A40

FH

FH

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F1

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Cruelty Free

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www.solarzone.co.za

Supplier of high quality domestic and industrial solar water- and solar electricity systems

C

B


natural & organic products exhibition 19 feb, ctIcc

what difference does it make? Pick n Pay are leading the green generation in their quest to recycle and offer products with reduced packaging. there is a wider selection of organic produce in stores and the introduction of the biodegradeable cleaning products is a great step in encouraging everyday shoppers to switch to products that are kinder to the earth. there are so many small steps that you can take that end up making a big difference in the products you choose and what you do with them thereafter. Visit the Pick n Pay stand at the natural and organic Show in Cape Town between the 19th-21st February and find out the difference you can make. use less electrIcIty:

Turn off your geyser for a few hours every day. Switch off your lights and only use what is necessary. Most of South Africa’s energy comes from coal, a non-renewable resource. Our electricity is generated from coal burning, and large amounts of CO2 (carbon dioxide) are released into the atmosphere when it is burned. We share our planet with 4 700 bacteria, 5 000 viruses, 40 000 algae, 47 000 fungi, 21 700 fish, 4 700 birds and 4 600 mammals. South Africa is the third most biologically diverse country on earth. Amphibians are the most threatened group of animals on our planet and they play a key role in our ecosystems as they act as both predator and prey: they keep the insect population in check and feed on algae, which keeps water systems clean.* (1 Source - Red Data Books) As the earth is a closed system for matter, everything that is generated does not leave earth! The natural cycle is for the waste products to be recycled by the myriad organisms that make up an ecosystem, in an endless chain of birth, death and rejeneration. That’s why disposing of your waste intelligently by recycling and reusing what you can is vital. Landfills are brimful and as we hardly see them we think they do not exist and are not vaguely aware of their toxic fall out. When waste is not properly managed, soil and groundwater can be poisoned.

management of waste starts at home, with you, me and everyone we know. how you dispose of your waste helps down the line.

recycle yOur PlastIc:

Eleven recycled plastic bottles can make a pair of men’s trousers when recycled into polymers. recyclIng tIns and cans saves about 95% of the

energy needed to make a new can from iron ore.

keeP three bIns In yOur hOme:

a leakIng, drIPPIng taP at 1 drop

Labelled with Plastic, Paper and Glass. Once fill take them to be recycled at your closest depot.

per second will waste 30-60 litres of water. Don’t run the tap when you brush your teeth.

feed yOur OrganIc waste tO a wOrm bIn:

ImPrOve yOur cO2 fOOtPrInt, beautIfy yOur surrOundIngs and Plant trees:

They are surprisingly easy to set up, don’t smell and all the organic waste goes back to where it should, to the worms. This then becomes food for the soil and lessens landfill. recycle every PIece Of PaPer yOu can:

For every ton of paper recycled, 17 trees are saved.

For every 5 new trees planted in the right environments that live for 50-100 years, 1 ton of CO2 (carbon dioxide) is offset. Different trees absorb different amounts of CO2 and older trees offset greater amounts than younger ones. It takes 16 trees to supply enough oxygen for one persons life.

The new recycling bins will be in all Hypermarkets and selected corporate stores during March.* Drop off your CFL’s, ink cartridges, batteries, plastic bags & plastic containers. They are also perfect for disposing of your plastic packaging before you leave the store. *Western Cape hypermarkets: Ottery and Brackenfell. Western Cape corporate stores: Gardens, Kenilworth, Tyger Valley, Pinelands, Canal Walk, Longbeach, Claremont, Stellenbosch, Goodwood, Constantia, Strand and Waterfront.


12

wellness

a change of heart with homeopathy by genIe rOwsOn

For each of us, Valentine’s Day could mean so much more than a chance to gorge on heart-shaped chocolates, drink too much champagne or give a hopeful boost to the ego or libido. When it comes to health, we heal from the inside out and should therefore focus on our emotional dis-ease before we can see healing at a physical level. This means we need to get to the heart of the matter, as the state of the heart is the centre of one’s wellbeing. In my practice, I see an endless number of people who are suffering from the negative emotions of the heart, such as anger, grief, sorrow, resentment, bitterness, self-centredness, hatred, envy and greed. Over time, these emotions have manifested at a physical level as ailments such as circulation, blood, heart and lung disorders such as asthma, hypertension, migraines, shoulder and arm problems, to mention a few. Of course, none of these

physical disorders feels good, and the ultimate goal of a natural health practitioner or homeopath would be to find a natural remedy that can assist at an emotional level to help encourage the wonderful positive faculties of the heart, such as love, gratitude, joy, forgiveness, hope, trust, integrity, dignity, tolerance, kindness and empathy. There are many substances from nature than can ignite these positive emotions to bring about peace and happiness. Homeopathy uses many remedies that can bring about a change of heart and help correct the emotional disease we all suffer with from time to time. Here are a few of homeopathy’s most popular universal remedies that get to the heart of the matter: AuruM: This remedy is made from gold and is an important remedy for depression possibly brought on by the loss of love, grief or

severe emotional stress where a person becomes despairing, tired of life, discontented and has a profound sense of worthlessness; the person may be full of self-condemnation and is the epitome of gloom and doom, fearsome, worried, hurried and quarrelsome; cannot stand contradiction and is liable to outbursts of rage with subsequent remorse. Aurum suits the person whose negativity is brought on or made worse by grey, cold, cloudy days, and is also the homeopathic treatment for SAD – Seasonal Affective Disorder.

Fear of a loved one being harmed. SEPIA: My favourite woman’s remedy. Helpful for symptoms including sadness, tearfulness and irritability. The person is easily offended, snappy (especially with her husband and children); feels that she can’t cope and is exhausted. Sleep is restless and unrefreshing. She has low libido and cannot stand to be touched. nAT Mur: For the long-term ill effects of grief (and even fear or anger) where the person will not let go of the pain, still feels emotional hurt, bears grudges, feels resentful and dwells on

“When it comes to health, we heal from the inside out and should therefore focus on our emotional dis-ease before we can see healing at a physical level. “ IGnATIA: Best used where the emotions are in great turmoil after shock, grief, loss of love or disappointment, and where symptoms of worry, anxiety or hysteria are most pronounced. This emotional state may be accompanied by symptoms such as hiccoughs, a lump in the throat, sighing, trembling and twitching, or even hysterical vomiting, diarrhoea or insomnia. Moods may vary from sadness, silence and sobbing to total uncontrollable or inconsolable hysteria; brooding or bottling up of emotions. LACHESIS: This remedy will help with negative emotions such as hatred, bitterness, jealousy and envy. It suits the person who feels sad in the morning, with no desire to mix with the world. The person may feel restless and uneasy, and is suspicious of others. All symptoms are worse after sleep, and mental labour is best performed at night. PuLSATILLA: For fear or anxiety about separation which leads to clinginess, tearfulness and emotional changeability.

past emotional upsets such as separation, divorce, betrayal, financial difficulties and lack of parental love. Also helpful in cases where the emotions have been suppressed. This remedy will suit the person who appears ‘in control’, is irritated by consolation and prefers to cry alone. Where a friend or loved one seems almost too brave and stoic under dire circumstances, Nat Mur will ease their suffering. Homeopathy is an affordable, gentle, non-toxic and highly effective system of medicine. It is used all over the world and is growing in popularity in South Africa. Potentised remedies are available from homeopaths, pharmacies, online from www. theresaremedyforthat.com or from agents nationwide. For details of your nearest outlet call There’s a remedy for that! on 076 130 8058 (Health Line) or visit us online. Genie Rowson is a Fellow of the British Institute of Homeopathy and Author of ‘There’s a remedy for that!’


products

think! We love these shoes for their innovative styling and the fact that they are expertly handcrafted makes for a great fitting shoe that cushions your feet every step of the way. All the materials used in their creation are organic or recycled and the leather is tanned using vegetable dyes. These shoes last for seasons. Cape Quarter, Level 1, Green Point, CT. 083 655 0698 www.thinkshoes.co.za

Afriteaque Rooibos’ powerful anti-oxidant properties mimic the body’s own anti-aging enzyme. Its anti-inflammatory properties make it ideal for those who suffer from highly sensitized skin, acne, atopic dermatitis or allergic skin conditions such as eczema. The result: A smoother, softer, calmer and clearer skin tone, naturally. Afriteaque is free from parabens, SLS, petrochemicals, artificial colours and fragrances and is cruelty free. The range includes: Rooibos Cleansing Milk, Toning Lotion, Day Cream, Night Cream & Body Lotion. To order email: afriteaque@ lifeinbalance.co.za or visit www.africanfairtrade cosmetics.com

13

adVERtoRiaL

how safe are your cosmetics? With increasing awareness of the dangers of many ingredients, consumers are opting for safe alternatives like Vitaderm’s innovative skin care range based on botanical actives.

hand-held labyrinth These fabulous hand-held meditation tools will bring the sacred geometry of a labyrinth right onto your lap/desk. A perfect gift for someone who is keen on finding a quiet space in their busy lives. Just trace the paths with your eyes closed and experience the benefits of balance, integration and relaxation, instantly. Visit www.handheldlabyrinth. com. Also available at The Good Stuff, Cavendish Square

eco-kettle

On average we boil twice as much water as we need which means we use twice as much energy. With a 3kW kettle that’s the same as wasting the energy of about 50 light bulbs! This marvellous kettle sorts this out by enabling you to measure the exact quantity of water you need – per cup – before you boil the water. Trials have proven this kettle uses 31% less energy than normal kettles. Available directly from Bio-Grow. Call 028 313 2054 or visit www.biogrow.co.za

Vitaderm continually strives to use safe, effective ingredients and does not use the following: FoRMaLdEhydE was used frequently in the past as an active ingredient in nail hardeners and a preservative in many creams and still features in some cosmetics today, despite being banned internationally over 20 years ago due to its carcinogenic activity. PhthaLatEs, absorbed through the skin, act as hormone disruptors, especially risky during pregnancy. All perfumes contain varying concentrations. cosmetics containing ‘parfum’ are also affected. Vitaderm has never used artificial fragrances. PREsERVatiVEs (parabens, imidazolidinyl urea, diazolidinyl urea, quaternium-15) are under investigation. cosmetics houses have been asked to remove these ingredients, shown to be linked to breast cancer and skin irritation. Vitaderm has used very low concentrations of imidazolidinyl urea and parabens (0.028%), but no longer do so. Vitaderm uses phenoxyethanol (originally found in the sage plant), considered the safest preservative available, and has 14 oil-based, 100% preservative-free products. sodiuM LauRyL suLPhatE and sodium laureth sulphate have a harsh drying effect on the skin. Sodium lauryl sulphate forms the base of conventional washing

Vitaderm, champions of e face chemical-fre e giving ar , and body care exes to pl m co dy away 5 bo 1140. Email the value of R alance.co.za nb michelle@lifei March 2010 before the 30 ” in the with “Vitaderm e. lin t ec subj

powders, dishwashing liquids, is used to remove motor grease from workshop floors and features in 90% of bubble bath formulations. tRiEthanoLaMinE is a pH-regulator avoided due to the possible presence of the harmful toxin 1,4 dioxane. cosmetic companies have been asked to exclude it and while some have switched to sodium hydroxide (caustic soda), Vitaderm uses the costlier, but mild and conditioning, jojoba derivative. CyCLoMEthiConE and its derivative cyclopentasiloxane are light and increasingly popular due to the velvety after-feel, despite concern that both can penetrate the dermis. research is underway to determine the toxicity. Evidence already shows that cyclopentasiloxane is toxic to our waterways. although not considered harmful as such, Vitaderm excludes the following two ingredients due to concerns: MinERaL oiL, a by-product of the petrol refining process that often leads to dehydration and sensitivity. isoPRoPyL MyRistatE, a popular thickener, has suspected comedogenic (poreclogging) effects, especially in teenagers. Further research: www.cosmeticsdatabase.com www.safecosmetics.org or Google ‘not too pretty’ and ‘the toxic trio’


14

wine & coffee

stellar choice OrganIc sParklIng wIne

Stellar Winery is celebrating the arrival of 2010 with the launch of its long-awaited Stellar Organics Sparkling wine. It is a blend of Chardonnay and Chenin Blanc, with a faint nose of mixed fruit cocktail. The dry, fresh tingly taste has a very clean finish and a burst-inyour-mouth freshness is its most outstanding feature. Enjoy the bubbly with canapés, spicy curries, oysters or poultry dishes. Another

know your beans

the art of the espresso by sandy barlOw

Espresso is a concentrated coffee. It is brewed by forcing hot water under high pressure through finely ground coffee. It differs from other brewing methods as the consistency is thicker, it is highly concentrated with an intense flavour and it is topped off with a golden crema. This classic Italian brewing method – the godfather of today’s café culture society – has changed the way we enjoy

and drink our coffee. Espresso can be found at almost every coffee shop and restaurant but, more often than not, the espresso is less than satisfactory. The key to ensuring the quality of espresso lies in the machine’s ability to produce the right amount of pressure. The quality of coffee beans is also a crucial factor. Ensure that the blend you use is multilayered. Finally, it becomes the responsibility of a skilled barista to produce great espresso with outstanding crema and with

sweet intense flavour notes. A great espresso-based drink should always have a sweet base; it should be full of flavour and it should never ever be bitter. Bitter espresso is usually over extracted, burnt or made using a stale or cheap blend of coffee. A good espresso will resemble honey dripping off a spoon when being pulled. If it gushes out of the machine it will be flavourless. Remember, the best espresso will be intense and flavourful... and if you are ever in doubt, ask your barista. C

mouthwatering aspect is the fact that it is easy on the pocket selling at a RRP of just under R50, so it’s easy on the budget. The Stellar Winery is situated in the Lower Olifants River Valley on the West Coast Wine Route and is South Africa’s largest producer

of organic Fairtrade wines. The cellar is jointly owned by the Rossouw brothers and the Stellar Fairtrade Employees’ Trust. The vineyards and winemaking process are organically certified by Control Union Certifications. The cellar produces a range of award-winning organic and no-added-sulphur organic wines from the vineyards in Trawal, the Van Rhynsdorp area, Koekenaap and Kakamas. Each region produces a wine with its own character, from the crisp whites of the coastal vineyards to the rich, ripe reds from the Van Rhynsdorp region. Visit www.stellarorganics.com Email: info@stellarorganics.com

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living

energy in question – you at home Eskom is in chaos, electricity prices are going to go up, so what can we do about managing our energy usage in our homes? Here are top tips from Robert Zipplies’ book, one we highly recommend you read to get to grips with the complex issues facing us. the rands and sense Of electrIcIty usage

Exclusive extract from the book Bending the Curve, your guide to tackling climate change in south africa SOL-LifeInBalanceAd02.fh11 12/8/09 1:34 PM Page 1

When there’s another electricity cut at home, your frustration with Eskom’s unreliable power supply escalates a further two notches. You reach for the Yellow Pages in search of a small, petrol-powered generator. Then, rather inconveniently, you remember Al Gore’s award-winning movie and his message of cataclysmic climate change. You redirect C

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...as nature intended.

your thinking patterns to vague visions of electricity-generating windmills and solar panels. Coming back to Earth, you wonder what the pragmatic opportunities are for reducing your electricity consumption. Let’s take a look. By using less electricity, you will not only reduce your carbon footprint, but you can also save money, particularly as our era of cheap electricity comes to an end. Also, the less power South Africans use, the less likely we are to experience power cuts. electrIcIty usage breakdOwn

In an average home the consumption range converts to between about 230 kWh and 340 kWh per person per month. One unit of electricity equals one kWh, which, in early 2008, cost approximately 45 cents a kWh (including VAT and service charges) in Cape Town. (Note that electricity costs vary by region, usage and service agreement.) This equates to between R103 and R153 in electricity consumption per person each month. Many households may consume significantly more than this per person. Lowconsumption (less than 450 kWh a month) and low-income

15

saved, you prevent about 540 kg of coal being burnt, 1 300 litres of water being used, and the release of about 970 kg of climate-change-causing CO2 and almost 9 kg of acid-rain causing sulphur dioxide. fIrst-rate Investments

This category of investments is a “must-do” – not only will it reduce your carbon guilt, it will also save you lots of money. 1) Energy-efficient lighting – the quick return Traditional incandescent light bulbs are shamefully uneconomical, with about 90% of the electricity converted to heat instead of light. Compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) are far more energy efficient. Yes, they are not dimmable and they take time to reach full brightness, but they save you electricity, money and you can use them with a warm feeling in your heart. While the cost of CFLs is about four times greater than that of incandescent light bulbs (R20 as opposed to R5), they consume about 20% of the electricity of an incandescent bulb and last about six times as long. This means that they will pay for themselves within a matter of months, if used regularly, and their longer life means you replace them less often. So, throw

average electrIcIty usage Per hOusehOld

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Composite

The choices we makeonatthe home largely the impact households, depending out all determine your incandescent bulbs we have on the The house live in, thewith region, qualify forworld. 50 kWh (50type of now and we replace them furnishings and technical mod-cons choose, the food units) of free electricity. It is an CFLs.weSome countries, suchweas cook, the gardens we keep – they are all a reflection of how eye-opener to realise that for Australia, are going so far as we choose to impact on the environment and each other. every 1 000 kWh of electricity to ban the sale of incandescent


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living

light bulbs altogether. The real downside of CFLs is their mercury content. So keep your burnt-out CFLs until appropriate recycling processes are found and encourage your local retailers and municipality to create recycling systems. 2) Solar water-heating – the big return Solar water-heaters are an old idea that is finally gaining momentum – to harness the power of the sun to heat water using a roof-mounted, heat-absorbing plate. The heated water is fed into a special solar geyser that stores and, when necessary, uses electricity to further heat the water to the desired temperature – typically when there is a succession of cloudy days or when extra hot water is required. There are two main types of solar water-heating panels on the market: a) Flat-plate collectors: With this system, a thin, black metal sheet, covered by clear glass or plastic to improve heat retention, absorbs and transfers the Sun’s energy to the water. b) Evacuated tubes: This system consists of a set of heat absorbing glass tubes, which contain a vacuum that reduces heat loss. More evacuated tubes are now sold globally than flatplate collectors. While marginally more efficient, evacuated tubes in hot areas can overheat the water, thus activating the pressure-release valve from time to time and increasing wear and tear. The glass tubes are also more fragile, which may pose a problem in areas

where hail is frequent. Systems can either be direct or indirect. Indirect systems are important in areas where temperatures can fall below freezing, as the solar panels are filled with an antifreeze mixture, which prevents possible bursting of pipes. The absorbed heat is then transferred to the water via a so-called heat-exchanger. In a direct system, the water itself passes through the solarcollector panels and is heated by the Sun – this is appropriate for most parts of South Africa. The panels need to have a northward angle, so as to maximise heat absorption, and, ideally, the geyser should be placed higher than the panels to obviate the need for a circulation pump. Solar-powered pumps are available. The system lifespan is between 20 and 25 years, and sometimes longer. If you would like to support local industry and reduce transport-related emissions, purchase a system that is locally manufactured – currently all evacuated-tube systems are imported. Switching to solar water-heating is a financial no-brainer. Although the cost of the system is fairly high – typically between R10 000 and R25 000 for residential systems, depending on size – the payback period is generally between four and 10 years. There is usually not a significant difference in price between the flat-plate and evacuated-tube systems. The payback can be further reduced with subsidies – of which we are likely to see an increasing number in a bid to reduce national electricity usage. In low-cost housing projects, low-pressure waterheating systems can be installed for as little as about R5 000. While solar water-heaters can save as much as 30% to 40% of a residential energy bill, variability in water consumption and the availability of sunlight makes calculating an accurate payback period confounding.

there are a number of other cost- and electricitysaving ideas to implement, irrespective of whether or not you opt to go the solar-heating route:

• Wrap your geyser and the inlet and outlet pipes in a geyser blanket and insulation material. Some highend geysers may not require wrapping – check this with your geyser supplier or plumber. A geyser blanket should not cost more than about R200 and should pay for itself within a few months. • Turn down the thermostat on your geyser to about 55 °C. This will cost you a short, if daring and dirty, climb into your ceiling and will save you many rands a month. Remember to switch off the electricity at the mains before you fiddle with the thermostat. • Install a timer switch that

activates your geyser for only a few hours each day. This means the element is not switched on every time you wash your hands with warm water. A timer switch, including the installation fee, should cost you no more than R1 000. • Also install a water-saving showerhead, which fragments the water into smaller droplets and can, depending on the manufacturer’s claims, reduce your hot-water consumption by an impressive 50% to 80%. The impact on your daily showering experience is virtually non-existent. The cost of the showerhead is between R150 and R350. Purchase Bending the Curve in bookstores or online at www. africageographic.com (special price R175, including VAT and delivery in South Africa). ISBN: 978-0-620-42572-8


Click and save

Energy saving at home can be as simple as a few clicks of a button

you know that you should be doing more to save electricity but you aren’t always entirely sure how to.... you may be asking yourself: Which appliances in my home gobble the most electricity? Where am I wasting power? Are the energy-savings tactics I’ve employed really making a difference? How much can I realistically save? Where could I get the most savings from? The good news is that Eskom has made it really simple. There are now three easy-to-use online tools available on the Eskom website that can show you how much energy a typical household with your profile is using, where you could cut back and how much you could save. Follow these three simple steps to understand how you can save electricity and money while making a contribution to reducing green house gas emissions and protecting the environment.

One Go to www.eskom.co.za/dsm twO Under the heading calculate your Energy click on Express Energy Audit, comprehensive Energy Audit or Appliance calculator under cost three Complete the fields fOur Get your results express energy audit This tool gives you a calculation based on an average home. It considers whether you have a geyser, a pool and your use of heaters. This will give you a good idea of where electricity consumption is highest – and where your money is being spent. comprehensive energy audit With this tool you get a customised consumption report based on the specifics that you provided for your household. you’ll need to know the basics about the appliances you use in

your home, such as how big your geyser is, what temperature the thermostat is set at, what types of heaters you use in your home and how many hours you spend cooking on your stove. The report will show you how much energy – and money – your appliances consume by simply clicking on the category they fall under for more information. you will also find helpful advice on how to save. appliance calculator This tool calculates the operating costs of an individual appliance such as your home computer. you must indicate how much the appliance is used on average. With Eskom’s online tool, understanding how to save energy at your home has never been easier. Go online today, make the recommended changes, and start enjoying the extra money in your pocket as a result of saving energy.

Brought to you by Eskom. www.eskom.co.za/dsm


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art & books

jewels for the home by mIchele beatham

Architect and now Senior Architecture Lecturer at UFS, Martie Bitzer has always had a passion for art and is an accomplished artist in a variety of media, including water colour, acrylic and pencil. But a 2004 visit to a local craft market, where an abstract mermaid by Elize Roodt literally stopped her in her tracks, resulted in a new direction. Pewter work dates to the Bronze Age and as Martie finds her inspiration in the roots of cultures like the Inuits and Aborigines, as well as the old African proverbs, it is perhaps no coincidence that she would be led to work in this medium. Her abstract pieces seem to capture the essence of timeless tales, resulting in work with a universal appeal. Despite the exacting, unforgiving medium – one mistake and you have to start over – Martie has experimented and developed her work in innovative ways. She is the only pewter artist to use jeweller’s enamel to embellish certain pieces. She missed colour, she says, and wanted to add different layers and meaning to her work. Add to this pewter’s natural tendency to capture the light in any space, it is no

wonder that architect Jan Smit considers Martie’s work “jewels for the home”. More recently, Martie has begun creating stunning collages that incorporate painting, pewter, silver leaf and an assortment of found objects such as gears and other metal pieces – visiting local scrap yards is a favourite pastime. Martie also finds inspiration in being a South African. “We may

still have a lot to do as a country,” she says, “but we’ve come a long way.” While some would call her an idealist, she believes the innovative spirit in South Africa, and specifically its youth, will ultimately triumph. One of her contributions is to make beautiful things that move others. Contact Martie on 083 281 6806, bitzer@telkomsa.net or www. martiebitzer.com (coming soon)

on the shelf

grOw tO lIve: a sImPle guIde tO grOwIng yOur Own gOOd, clean fOOd Pat Featherstone, Jacana Media Eating the freshest food straight from your own garden is budget friendly and, experts agree, much healthier. This illustrated guide by pat Featherstone of Soil for Life provides clear, encouraging and easy-to-follow guidelines on growing your own food using little more than your own kitchen and garden waste. Available at most bookstores or directly from Soil for Life www.soilforlife.co.za

the carbOn suPer market: yOur future fOr sale kate Evans Environmental cartoonist and author of the brilliant ‘Funny Weather: Everything you Didn’t Want to Know About climate change But probably Should Find out’, explains carbon trading and its implications in easy to understand comic book style. As Kate says, if you didn’t care about the carbon trading before, you will now. A must read and free for download (3.6MB) at www.cartoonkate.co.uk.

anImal, vegetable, mIracle: Our year Of seasOnal eatIng Barbara kingsolver, Faber & Faber After 25 years, Barbara Kingsolver and her family move from the deserts of Arizona to farmland in Kansas to live in a place where they could eat food grown in their own neighbourhood. So starts their journey to eat local – and from their own gardens. This engaging and amusing account of includes valuable tips and delicious recipes. First published in 2007, it is more than relevant today as we learn more about what is really in the food we buy. isBn 978-0-57123357-1


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take note

South Africa’s first fully eco friendly 320-page journal and comprehensive resource guide will be your guide through 2010. R165 each including VAT, excluding postage. To order email michael@lifeinbalance.co.za


PnP’s new range of Green cleaning products are not only good for the environment, but for your family as well. The range is fully biodegradable and completely non-toxic to humans, animals, aquatic life, plants and septic tanks. It’s the first cleaning range to be endorsed by the Department of Environment and Tourism’s Indalo Yethu initiative, which promotes eco-friendly practices as part of every South African’s lifestyle. Why not make the PnP Green cleaning range part of yours.

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Taking care of your family and the environment

Life in Balance issue 9  

redefine your thinking - one person can make a difference

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