Page 1

life in balance

redefine your thinking – one person can make a difference Your free copY

i ssue 8 dece mb e r ‘ 09 / J a nu a r y ’ 10 - Hap py new Year!

02

news & innovations co nsi der us, o i l y i ssues, so l a r roa ds

04

design ex t ra o rdi na r y cha ndel i ers, g l a ss tem pl es

06

living special feature energ y ef f i ci ency i n t he ho m e, f reewheel i ng fest i va l

08

travel af r i ka Bur ns - t r ul y t i m e o ut

10

food & drink gua tem a l a n cof fee, veg gi e reci pes, chi l l i sa uce

12

products o ut-of-t he-box g i vi ng and give-aways galore

14

art & Books g l a ss a ct i o n, f ree e-bo o ks


02 news

welcome welcome to the eighth issue of life in Balance, themed fire. Over the past year the editorial has been encouraging you, the consumer, to consider your choices regarding the products and services you engage with. all of us need to focus on what is sustainable and brands are waking up to this fact as a key driver in their future strategies.Our resources cannot be gambled with any more and the next 20 years will reveal the full impact of what making unsustainable choices for short term profit, will do for the people in need in this country. There are a few learned and adaptable captains of industry who are waking up to the fact that the only way their businesses will thrive is through a sustainable business model. Lip service will no longer sustain a brand when its followers start to question their ethical practises. As consumers we have real power and choice in who we spend our hard earned money with. in living we are fortunate enough to be able to bring you an editorial extract from the book, Bending the curve which talks about energy efficiency in the home and explains solar heating options. There are some out-ofthe-box product ideas for those of you giving gifts at the end of the year to colleagues and loved ones. This year think about the value chain that brought that little gew gaw or marvellous invention your way and what their longer term effect will be – other than a minute’s delight on Xmas day. Join the movement towards a more ethical space in living and being. As 2009 draws to a close, use the time to create a vision of what you want 2010 to bring you and how you can do your bit for the greater good. Enjoy and thanks for all your support this year. melissa@lifeinbalance.co.za

the cover that was... life in balance

redefine your thinking – one person can make a difference You r f r e e co pY

issue 8 de ce mb e r ‘ 0 9 / Ja n u a ry ’ 10 - H a p py n ew Yea r!

02

news & innovations co ns i de r us, o i l y i ss ues, so l a r roa ds

04

design ex t ra o rdi na r y c ha nde l i e rs, g l a ss te m pl es

06

living special feature e ne rg y ef f i c i e ncy i n t he ho m e, f re ew he e l i ng fest i va l

08

travel af r i ka Bur ns - t r ul y t i m e o ut

10

food & drink gua te m a l a n cof fe e, ve g g i e re c i pes, c hi l l i sa uce

12

products o ut- of- t he - box g i v i ng and give-aways galore

14

art & Books g l a ss a c t i o n, f re e e - bo o ks

a blue moon ends 2009 and heralds the beginning of 2010. This is the cover that was until the moon became our cover star instead.

Publisher: Michael Beatham michael@lifeinbalance.co.za editor: Melissa Baird melissa@lifeinbalance.co.za assistant editor and subscriptions: Michele Beatham michele@lifeinbalance.co.za art director: Elinore de Lisle elinore@iafrica.com Printing: ultra litho printer printed using soya based inks on 80 gsm Bond paper

cover photograph www.istockphoto.com © life in Balance is published 10 times a year by green publishing (pty) ltd, 210 on Long Street, Cape Town, South Africa. Tel: 021 481 1836 All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the prior written consent of the publishers is strictly prohibited. All prices correct at time of going to press, but subject to change. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for any unsolicited materials. It is assumed that any images taken from sources which are widely distributed, such as on the Internet, are in the public domain. However, since such images are passed freely between sources such as websites, the original source is not always possible to trace. It is possible that copyrighted material has ended up being treated as public domain as a result. if you see a graphic or image in this publication which is not public domain please contact Green Publishing.

please recycle

hot news conSider uS

talking garbage the oily truth by michele beatham

Wherever leaders get together to thrash out a framework for action on climate change, the average age in the room is somewhere around 55. This essentially, is one of the biggest challenges facing the issue. Adults have become jaded and cynical. We’ve heard the doomsday warnings so many times, and in such scientific detail that, for many of us, defeat is a given. Enter Consider Us. Originally conceived to highlight Cape Town Green Week and the UNEP Finance Initiative Roundtable on sustainable finance, Consider Us was meant to give the children of Cape Town a voice in determining their own future. Now the campaign has became a nationwide rally and promises to achieve global viral status. The campaign involved asking children between the ages of six and eighteen to explain, in twenty words, why world leaders should consider them when signing their climate change treaties. What is precious about our world? Why is it worth saving? These messages then appear, in real time, on a dedicated website, serving as a voice of the generation with the most to lose. A bound compilation of these messages will be presented at the Copenhagen Climate Change Summit in December and presented to various leaders and heads of state, who will be asked to sign the book. Once signed, the book will travel back to Cape Town where it will be buried in a time capsule at a UN heritage site, to be opened twenty years from now. We can only pray that our actions today will stand up to scrutiny in 2029. Children interested in becoming Consider Us ambassadors will find more information at www.considerus.org or on the Consider Us page on Facebook.

big thought for the month... What must we do to insulate the global financial system from recurring shocks and cyclical bubbles so that people of all nations can enjoy the promise of development and live in economic security? the answer is to find common solutions to the grave challenges facing us. and when it comes to two of the most serious – the financial crisis and climate change – that answer is the green economy. – ban Ki-moon, un Secretary general

SubScribe! We give you the paper free of charge via our distribution partners but if all the copies are gone you can read it online at www.lifeinbalance.co.za. Should you wish to receive a personal copy then please email michele@lifeinbalance.co.za. all you will be asked to do is pay for the postage costs to get it to you. thanks to our distriBution partnErs...

Few of us are left unaffected when oil spills contaminate our oceans and beaches, harming wildlife and particularly coastal bird populations. But how many of us realise the risks posed by the used oil from vehicles? It takes only one litre of used motor oil to contaminate one million litres of water, with potentially disastrous effects, not to mention the dangers posed by it seeping into the soil. Aside from the risks to wetlands, wildlife, and marine and freshwater organisms, human health is adversely affected. Used oil contains extremely harmful compounds which, besides other risks, can have carcinogenic properties. One of the issues being tackled by the ROSE Foundation, a non-profit organisation that manages the effective collection, storage and recycling of used lubricating oil, is the oil used in commercial farming. For instance, used oil is utilised by farmers as a cheaper alternative to wood preservative on fences and vineyard poles. It is also used on livestock and sprayed on dirt roads to control dust. Raj Lochan, CEO of the ROSE Foundation, warns, “The used oil will eventually seep into the ground, contaminating the soil and water table and entering rivers and dams where the water is drawn for irrigation and drinking.” The bad news is that spilled oil decomposes very slowly so it accumulates.

The good news is that the ROSE Foundation is striving to change these practices. “ROSE has placed a priority on educating and creating awareness in the minds of the public and changing farming practices. Conversion to more sustainable agricultural practice is necessary both to preserve South Africa’s biodiversity and to ensure a future resource base,” says Lochan.

“We all share the responsibility of protecting our environment and keeping our waters safe. It is ironic that in a water poor country such as South Africa, the very sector that relies on clean, fresh water the most is poisoning it! However it is never too late to change the way things are done and through combined efforts and energy, we can make a marked difference in the operating practices of many farms throughout SA.” “Recycling used oil allows us to continue to enjoy what many of us take for granted every day – clean, potable water,” concludes Lochan. Information kindly supplied by ROSE. To find out more about the dangers of used oil, the work of the foundation and where to drop off your used oil, visit www.rosefoundation.org.za.


news & innovations 03

news & innovations

corporate Heroes

Big brands starting to do their bit and making changes towards ethical practices.

community cooKer helPS the Poor and the environment

the kibera slum in nairobi, housing 800 000 people, is said to be africa’s largest. As no garbage collection or other services are provided by the city, it is not difficult to imagine the squalor of trashfilled streets and streams; people are literally living on rubbish. kenyan designers have now built a cooker fuelled by this trash, which not only feeds the poor; it provides hot water, destroys toxic waste and curbs the destruction of surrounding woodlands. invented by nairobi architect, Jim archer, after nine years of development the prototype is working in kibera and plans are underway to install them at slums and refugee camps around the country. source: reuters http://tinyurl.com/kccooker

SALAR ROAd PIC: ARTIST COnCEPTIOn: dAn wALdEn

SaPPi cutS itS carbon footPrint

sappi recently announced that it has successfully begun reducing its carbon footprint by improving energy efficiency and reducing its reliance on fossil fuels. “we are achieving this by streamlining transport systems, making process changes, installing more efficient equipment, reducing purchased energy (electricity and fossil fuel) and by increasing the use of renewable energy - an approach which ultimately results in a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions,” said CEO Ralph Bottger. the percentage of energy derived from renewable resources is 38.1% (compared with 74% in north America and 31.8% in Europe) although the figure for South Africa should increase to over 50% once the Saiccor expansion project is fully operational. Sappi has also joined the Copenhagen communiqué on climate change, launched by the prince of wales’s corporate Leaders Group on Climate Change. “what we do about climate change today

nedbanK to go carbon neutral

has far-reaching consequences for the sustainability of businesses, communities and ultimately the natural world we depend upon for our existence.” Bottger said Solar roadS

as anyone who’s ever walked barefoot on a tar road in the height of summer knows, a lot of potential energy is being wasted. according to an idaho company, solar roadways, if every road in the us was fitted with solar panels it could power the world. while it sounds good in theory, there are problems; no solar panel can currently withstand such harsh conditions, they will need to be as cheap as asphalt and will need to be kept clean of snow and dirt. If scott Brusow, owner of solar roadways, is able to overcome the challenges, it has the potential to revolutionise the world and now, with a contract from the us department to build a prototype, a big step towards solar roads has been taken. www.solarroadways.com SaSol to go Solar

with Eskom’s planned requests for a 35% increase in each of the next three years, on top of a 31.3% increase this year, it is interesting to note that, while still more than conventional power, the cost of solar energy is reducing every year. At the same

tHe planet desperatelY needs an AMBITIOuS dEAL In COPEnHAGEn by lance greyling, mP

it is clear that the world is currently confronted with a number of complex and urgent challenges. An economic crisis, intractable conflicts, resource depletion and lifting two billion people out of poverty are all challenges we have to face head on. unfortunately however, climate change will exacerbate all of these problems and will lay to waste all of our efforts at resolving them. The reality that the international community has to accept is that unlike our global economy, the climate will not respond to short-term stimulus packages nor will it take notice of positive market sentiment. Once a certain level of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere is crossed, runaway climate change will kick in and there will be nothing that any of us can do to stop it. All of our noble sentiments, international negotiations and inspiring speeches will be disregarded by our changing climate and it will show neither mercy, nor morality in its devastation. Poor and vulnerable communities are already starting to feel its impacts regardless of the fact that it is wealthy countries that bear primary responsibility for causing climate change.

But now is not the time for blame. The climate simply cannot afford a global stalemate in the copenhagen negotiations in december with both sides using each others’ inaction as an excuse to do nothing. Industrialised countries must take on reduction targets of nothing less than 25 to 40 percent by 2020 and the electorates of those countries must keep the pressure up to demand this of their negotiators. In addition, financial and technical resources must be provided for developing countries to employ clean technologies. High emitting developing countries, and south africa unfortunately falls into this group, must also live up to their end of the bargain by agreeing to put in place low carbon action plans in time for the new treaty to be put into force. for all of this to happen though, political leaders need to give this issue the priority it deserves. It is therefore hoped that president Zuma will lead a delegation of african Heads of state to copenhagen so as to show that we are determined to ensure that such a deal is reached. Lance is Chief Whip of the parliamentary caucus and the national policy Convenor. Email: lance@id.org.za

time, solar generates more employment than coal power – 35 jobs per Mw for solar, 1.7 for coal. so it comes as good news that sasol and the central energy fund are planning a R900m plant to manufacture thin film solar panels from 2012. Based on technology developed by professor vivian alberts of the university of Johannesburg, the thin film panels, which are thinner than a human hair, will be more efficient and easier and cheaper to produce. They will be backed by glass or flexible steel and will be able to extract 16% of the sun power as opposed to the 7% of other thin-film panels. They will also include 70% local content, which far exceeds that of coal-generated plants. it is planned that 500 000 panels with an output of 40Mw will be produced annually at its paarl plant, but can be expanded to 200Mw. www.moneyweb.co.za; www.sasol.co.za; www.cef.org.za

nedbank plans to spend between r10-million and r20-million to become carbon neutral. In its 2007/8 financial year the bank realised electricity savings of 6-million kilowatt hours, with a further reduction of 3.7-million planned for this year. They also saved 71 500kl of water and 40 tons of paper. As it is impossible to operate without emitting some emissions, they will offset any emissions by purchasing certified emissions reduction certificates on the carbon market. we will watch to see where this is spent and if recycled paper is part of the plan. incredible e-WaSte recycling

recycling your e-waste has become a lot more convenient. Incredible Connection has teamed up with desco, an accredited e-waste disposal company, and now offers disposal facilities in each of its 55 stores nationwide. Special bins have been set up either in-store or in the workshop at the back of the store. recycling made eaSy

woolworths recently launched a pilot project at eight engen service stations in the western cape for the recycling of paper, cardboard, glass and plastic. nampak will collect the waste as part of its existing recycling routes and distribution networks and ensure it is recycled. If successful, it will be rolled out across the country. Recycling made easy – simply drop off your recycling while filling up.


04 design

Barrydale to washington by michele beatham and Shane Petzer

bright thinking In order to encourage original thinking among up and coming designers and artists who wish to contribute to the advancement of development in South Africa, Sanlam Private Investments established the (SPI) Innovation Awards and invited students from selected tertiary institutions to submit groundbreaking projects to be judged by high profile creative leaders. UCT school of Architecture and Planning student, John Edwards, won the Architecture category for his innovation entry titled: A landscape in transition – Architecture for an extreme climate/condition: Accommodating the informal within a flood-prone area. His aim is to come up with a way of managing the problems brought on by regular flooding of

informal settlements on the Cape Flats. Initially inspired by the British Antarctic base, Edwards was also motivated by South Africa’s service delivery crisis. Research included areas outside of traditional architecture in order to offer solutions for large-scale urban planning infrastructure, individual dwellings and ecological concerns. Judge Stefan Antoni of Stefan Antoni Olmesdahl Truen Architects was impressed by Edwards’ dignified and elegant execution of the project and praised him for confronting the challenges of an inhospitable environment that led to annual flooding and subsequent displacement of communities. For more information about the SPI Innovation Awards visit www.spi.sanlam.com.

glass temple Earlier this year, US President Barack Obama and Mrs Obama acquired two chandeliers for their new home at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Apart from the fact that they paid for them personally rather than using the White House budget, two things set them apart; they come all the way from the tiny Overberg town of Barrydale, and they’re made almost entirely from ‘junk’. Magpie Design Studio, essentially an art collective run from an old double storey building in the heart of town, started operations in 1998. Six years ago they moved to Barrydale where they promptly set up recycling bins on the veranda and invited the public to drop off recyclable materials. While they have historically used a lot of repurposed materials in their creations, it was in Barrydale that their materials base shifted to the PET bottles, glass, plastic, tins and paper dropped off by the community to make their artistic creations. Their multi award-winning work represents their belief that their approach makes a difference to the environment and brings about a new aesthetic aligned to the ethics of the ever-increasing numbers of consumers concerned with their personal carbon footprints. As a result more and more of their clients are turning to energy efficient lighting and changing other lifestyle habits to have a lower impact on resources. Magpie’s design team tries to use the best lighting solutions for creative designs that speak to the ethics and aesthetic desires of a growing, sophisticated clientele. They are best know for their chandeliers and lighting installations although they do

produce other furniture items and accessories. The two pieces bought by the Obamas – the La Riche Ella and the Princess (pictured) – are regency inspired and lean towards a classical interpretation of a chandelier, but they also create a number of unique designs for sale in their own gallery, as well as offering a bespoke service, creating installations for private homes, restaurants and offices worldwide. Shane says, “Chandeliers are extrapolations of people’s ideals. A great deal is said about the person who owns a chandelier as it represents much of the best of what they idealise and see as representing an object of beauty in addition to it being a practical piece that lights a room.” He adds that the Obama’s purchase paves the way for a new aesthetic, where an appreciation for what is, is valued more than what it is made of; it’s more to do with what the object represents or symbolises. The business includes a strong social responsibility aspect – the Rooi Doppies Project, www.rooidoppiesproject.moonfruit. com – that includes the development of a craft project to help locals generate income, rather than just being employed. They are trained to reproduce designs either marketed as stand alone pieces or as components of larger, more elaborate installations. Magpie also offers technical support to NGOs in the district that focus on health, human rights and social development. They believe all businesses should behave ethically and that forming relationships with state service providers is essential to help develop the capacity and quality of life of others. Every December 16 sees a ceremonial tree lighting ceremony (the best LED technology is used) with dancing, singing and performing around their Christmas tree installation made of alien wattle and repurposed PET decorations, which are made by children from an NGO called NET VIR PRET. Shane says it is their way of thanking the village for its support. Aside for the Christmas tree, they host annual exhibitions and parties and showcase new trends with different, fun themes. They are hoping the planned 2010 Masked Ball will draw visitors from near and far. Their creations are evocative and stunning testimonies to what is possible with innovation and inspiration. Visit Magpie Design Studio at 27 van Riebeeck Street in Barrydale, call 028 572 1997 or visit www.magpiefinehomeware.co.za

wonder what to do with your empty beer bottles? take some inspiration from these innovative Buddhists who built an entire temple from used Heineken and thai chang Beer bottles. Fifty years ago the Heineken Beer company looked at reshaping its beer bottle to be useful as a building block but that proved a bit tricky. It took a group of creative monks from Sisaket province in northern thailand to show them that it could still be done as they took matters into their own hands. They have been collecting the bottles since 1983 and have used them as building materials. The bottles are used to create walls and they offer loads of natural light and are very easy to clean. Over one million bottles were collected to build the wat Pa Maha Chedi Kaew temple and surrounding buildings in the complex. The more bottles the monks are able to re-use the more they can build. wouldn’t it be incredible if bottles in South Africa could be SOL-LifeInBalanceAd02.fh11 12/8/09 1:34 PM Page 1 used for a similar purpose? C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY CMY

K

...as nature intended.

Solahart systems are designed to use as much of the sun’s energy even on cloudy days. Backup elements, double coated ceramic tanks, toughened solar glass and thermosiphon technology makes Solahart the leader in solar water heaters in over 80 countries.

www.solahart.co.za

Tel: 0861-76524278 (SOLAHART) E-mail: info@solahart.co.za For more information SMS Solahart and your e-mail address to 33009. VAS Rates apply.

Composite


Click and save energy saving at home can be as simple as a few clicks of a button

You know that you should be doing more to save electricity but you aren’t always entirely sure how to.... You may be asking yourself: which appliances in my home gobble the most electricity? where am i wasting power? are the energy-savings tactics i’ve employed really making a difference? How much can i realistically save? where could i get the most savings from? the good news is that eskom has made it really simple. There are now three easy-to-use online tools available on the eskom website that can show you how much energy a typical household with your profile is using, where you could cut back and how much you could save. follow these three simple steps to understand how you can save electricity and money while making a contribution to reducing green house gas emissions and protecting the environment.

one go to www.eskom.co.za/dsm tWo under the heading calculate your energy click on express energy audit, comprehensive energy audit or appliance calculator under cost three Complete the fields four get your results express energy audit this tool gives you a calculation based on an average home. It considers whether you have a geyser, a pool and your use of heaters. This will give you a good idea of where electricity consumption is highest – and where your money is being spent. comprehensive energy audit with this tool you get a customised consumption report based on the specifics that you provided for your household. You’ll need to know the basics about the appliances you use in

your home, such as how big your geyser is, what temperature the thermostat is set at, what types of heaters you use in your home and how many hours you spend cooking on your stove. the report will show you how much energy – and money – your appliances consume by simply clicking on the category they fall under for more information. You will also find helpful advice on how to save. appliance calculator this tool calculates the operating costs of an individual appliance such as your home computer. You must indicate how much the appliance is used on average. with eskom’s online tool, understanding how to save energy at your home has never been easier. Go online today, make the recommended changes, and start enjoying the extra money in your pocket as a result of saving energy.

Brought to you by Eskom. www.eskom.co.za/dsm


06 living

energy in question – you at home Exclusive extract from the book Bending the Curve, Your guide to tackling climate change in south africa Eskom is in chaos, electricity prices are going to go up, so what can we do about managing our energy usage in our homes? Here are top tips from Robert Zipplies book, one we highly recommend you read to get to grips with the complex issues facing us. the randS and SenSe of electricity uSage

When there’s another electricity cut at home, your frustration with Eskom’s unreliable power supply escalates a further two notches. You reach for the Yellow Pages in search of a small, petrol-powered generator. Then, rather inconveniently, you remember Al Gore’s award-winning movie and his message of cataclysmic climate change. You redirect your thinking patterns to vague visions of electricity-generating windmills and solar panels. Coming back to Earth, you wonder what the pragmatic opportunities are for reducing your electricity consumption. Let’s take a look. By using less electricity, you will not only reduce your carbon footprint, but you can also save money, particularly as our era of cheap electricity comes to an end. Also, the less power South Africans use, the less likely we are to experience power cuts. electricity uSage breaKdoWn

In an average home the consumption range converts to between about 230 kWh and 340 kWh per person per month. One unit of electricity equals one kWh, which, in early 2008, cost approximately 45 cents a kWh (including VAT and service charges) in Cape Town. (Note that electricity costs vary by region, usage and service agreement.) This equates to between R103 and R153 in electricity consumption per person each month. Many households may consume significantly more than this per person. Lowconsumption (less than 450 kWh a month) and low-income households, depending on the region, qualify for 50 kWh (50 units) of free electricity. It is an eye-opener to realise that for every 1 000 kWh of electricity saved, you prevent about 540 kg of coal being burnt, 1 300 litres of water being used, and the release of about 970 kg of climate-changecausing CO2 and almost 9 kg of acid-rain causing sulphur dioxide.

firSt-rate inveStmentS

This category of investments is a “must-do” – not only will it reduce your carbon guilt, it will also save you lots of money. 1) Energy-efficient lighting – the quick return Traditional incandescent light bulbs are shamefully uneconomical, with about 90% of the electricity converted to heat instead of light. Compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) are far more energy efficient. Yes, they are not dimmable and they take time to reach full brightness, but they save you electricity, money and you can use them with a warm feeling in your heart. While the cost of CFLs is about four times greater than that of incandescent light bulbs (R20 as opposed to R5), they consume about 20% of the electricity of an incandescent bulb and last about six times as long. This means that they will pay for themselves within a matter of months, if used regularly, and their longer life means you replace them less often. So, throw out all your incandescent bulbs now and replace them with CFLs. Some countries, such as Australia, are going so far as to ban the sale of incandescent light bulbs altogether. The real downside of CFLs is their mercury content. So keep your burnt-out CFLs until appropriate recycling processes are found and encourage your local retailers and municipality to create recycling systems. 2) Solar water-heating – the big return Solar water-heaters are an old idea that is finally gaining momentum – to harness the power of the sun to heat water using a roofmounted, heat-absorbing plate. The heated water is fed into a special solar geyser that stores and, when necessary, uses electricity to further heat the water to the desired temperature – typically when there is a succession of cloudy days or when extra hot water is required. There are two main types of solar water-heating panels on the market: a) Flat-plate collectors: With this system, a thin, black metal sheet, covered by clear glass or plastic to improve heat retention, absorbs and transfers the Sun’s energy to the water. b) Evacuated tubes: This system consists of a set of heat-absorbing glass tubes, which contain a vacuum that reduces heat loss. More evacuated tubes are now sold globally than flat-plate collectors. While marginally

average electricity uSage Per houSehold

The choices we make at home largely determine the impact we have on the world. The type of house we live in, the furnishings and technical mod-cons we choose, the food we cook, the gardens we keep – they are all a reflection of how we choose to impact on the environment and each other.

more efficient, evacuated tubes in hot areas can overheat the water, thus activating the pressure-release valve from time to time and increasing wear and tear. The glass tubes are also more fragile, which may pose a problem in areas where hail is frequent. Systems can either be direct or indirect. Indirect systems are important in areas where temperatures can fall below freezing, as the solar panels are filled with an antifreeze mixture, which prevents possible bursting of pipes. The absorbed heat is then transferred to the water via a so-called heat-exchanger. In a direct system, the water itself passes through the solar-collector panels and is heated by the Sun – this is appropriate for most parts of South Africa. The panels need to have a northward angle, so as to maximise heat absorption, and, ideally, the geyser should be placed higher than the panels to obviate the need for a circulation pump. Solar-powered pumps are available. The system lifespan is between 20 and 25 years, and sometimes longer. If you would like to support local industry and reduce transport-related emissions, purchase a system that is locally manufactured – currently all evacuated-tube systems are imported. Switching to solar water-heating is a financial no-brainer. Although the cost of the system is fairly high – typically between R10 000 and R25 000 for residential systems, depending on size – the payback period is generally between four and 10 years. There is usually not a significant difference in price between the flat-plate and evacuated-tube systems. The payback can be further reduced with subsidies – of which we are likely to see an increasing number in a bid to reduce national electricity usage. In low-cost housing projects, low-pressure water-heating systems can be installed for as little as about R5 000. While solar water-heaters can save as much as 30% to 40% of a residential energy bill, variability

in water consumption and the availability of sunlight makes calculating an accurate payback period confounding. A Namibian residential study demonstrated that, depending on usage patterns, a break-even point was reached in about five years. Of course, the higher the water consumption, the shorter the payback period. In 2005, a South African study indicated that a 2 m x 2 m solar water panel can recover R700 a year (R1 225 for a 4 m x 4 m panel), assuming an electricity cost of 35 cents a kWh. Of course, this recovery will improve as electricity costs increase. there are a number of other cost- and electricity-saving ideas to implement, irrespective of whether or not you opt to go the solar-heating route:

• Wrap your geyser and the inlet and outlet pipes in a geyser blanket and insulation material. Some high-end geysers may not require wrapping – check this with your geyser supplier or plumber. A geyser blanket should not cost more than about R200 and should pay for itself within a few months. • Turn down the thermostat on your geyser to about 55 °C. This will cost you a short, if daring and dirty, climb into your ceiling and will save you many rands a month. Remember to switch off the electricity at the mains before you fiddle with the thermostat. • Install a timer switch that activates your geyser for only a few hours each day. This means the element is not switched on every time you wash your hands with warm water. A timer switch, including the installation fee, should cost you no more than R1 000. • Also install a water-saving showerhead, which fragments the water into smaller droplets and can, depending on the manu-


living 07 facturer’s claims, reduce your hot-water consumption by an impressive 50% to 80%. The impact on your daily showering experience is virtually non-existent. The cost of the showerhead is between R150 and R350. • Solar cookers use reflectors to concentrate and trap the Sun’s energy to cook food. Depending on the Sun’s intensity and the type of stove, temperatures of over 200 °C can be achieved for some parabolic cookers. Although a solar cooker can cost anything from a few hundred to over a thousand rand, it does not require any fuel and thus costs nothing to operate. A compact, entrylevel solar cooker, which costs under R300, is ideal for slow cooking lentils, rice and stews, and even for baking bread. If used regularly, it is likely to save you a rand or two every few days and can thus pay for itself within just a few years of regular use. • The hotbox. This is a must for every kitchen. A hotbox is made from two nonflammable, insulated bags (resembling mini beanbags) and works like this: you place semi-cooked, hot food into the hotbox and the retained heat will complete the cooking process. You can also use it to keep food warm for many hours. A hotbox works amazingly well for rice, pulses, stews, porridges and many other dishes. To cook plain rice, for example, heat the saucepan with the rice and water on the stove and let it boil for a few minutes before transferring it to the hotbox, where the cooking process is completed without any additional heating (or personal attention) being required. The results demonstrate that hotboxes can save you more than half of the electricity required for cooking a particular dish. A hotbox will set you back a mere R150 to R250

taKe note of Standby loSSeS

Electrical equipment, such as the television, hi-fi, computer, DVD player, microwave and many others, when left in standby mode, continue to draw energy. An international study revealed that standby power can consume between 3% and 10% of home and office electricity use. In the UK, the BBC reported that electrical devices left on standby consume the equivalent output of about two power stations, and result in CO2 emissions every year equivalent to a mindboggling 1.4 million long-haul flights. To save electricity, switch off your devices at the plug. When you buy new gadgets, compare energy efficiencies before deciding which one to purchase. heating and air conditioning

Heating can rapidly become a large user of electricity, especially as, in South Africa, most heating is inefficient because of our poorly insulated houses. Placing insulation in your ceiling is probably the most cost-effective strategy. Curtains also help to prevent heat loss through your windows. cooKing With gaS

Not only is burning gas more environmentally friendly (gas burns more cleanly than the coal Eskom burns), it is supposedly cheaper too, although gas prices have increased considerably. Working out a return on investment will depend entirely on how much you cook and the type of gas stove you purchase. Stoves can cost anything from a few hundred to a few thousand rands. Purchase Bending the Curve in bookstores or online at www.africageographic.com (special price R175, including VAT and delivery in South Africa). ISBN: 978-0-620-42572-8

freewheeling

the future-thinking festival Life in Balance attended the 2009 festival which is an annual three day event held on a farm just outside Stanford in the Cape. The workshops and presentations focus primarily on issues of sustainability; environment; education; economics; community-building; wellness and the arts. This ‘Festival of Conscious Living and Community’ is rapidly capturing the public imagination in the way it creates a space that challenges people to think ahead and to push the edge of innovative ideas and action towards a more sustainable future for all. The great aspect of this festival is that it is for all ages and special access is ensured for emerging young leaders. There is a parallel children’s programme that runs throughout the three days so the kids are well taken care of while you expand your mind’s horizons. The event offers the broadest range of

presentations, workshops, demonstrations, art, live music and theatre and the majority of items on the programme have never been seen or heard elsewhere. It’s an exciting experience, not to be missed! 2010 dates: 19-22 March 2010 at Stanford Valley Guest Farm. For more information visit www.freewheeling.co.za

oPinion

eskom, electricity and demand management What on earth is happening to one of the most important parastatal companies in South Africa, whose ineffective functioning and misplaced priorities could have us all returning to the era of candles and paraffin! From the outside it appears that the princes of BEE (or is that darkness) are fighting over the spoils of the consumers ever increasing payments. With the anticipated increases that our inefficient electricity providing monopoly is attempting to foist upon us you would be as insane as they are NOT to be thinking of how to save and use less electricity. Eskom relies on coal power for 90% of its electricity generation. This is the dirtiest way of generating electricity and Eskom contributes significantly to making South Africa the world’s 12th largest polluter. Current plans are to spend R385 Billion on new electricity generation over a number of years, of which a significant amount will be used to build new coal fired power stations, plans are also in the pipeline for new nuclear power stations, and in a sop to environmentalists there are some small solar and other renewable energy power generators planned. Based on their record of the last few years, are they really capable of properly spending this money? We can cite the insane coal purchasing policies under the leadership of Maroga where coal purchased under long term contract and delivered to the power stations in the most effective manner by conveyor belt, was replaced by coal delivered intermittently by trucks and the supply chain changed to a myriad of small BEE companies. The coal delivered was sub quality and dissolved in the rain, leaving us with the costly power cuts of early 2008. Consumers are being squeezed by ever increasing Eskom fees, with charges way above inflation to fund all this new generation, it has been revealed that we can expect increases of 35% and possibly more over the next two years. Is there not a better way? The main reason for these increases is to fund new generation. Surely a far more rigorous and active campaign of demand management and innovative reduction technologies in combination with a decentralisation and privatization of generation would be a far better path to follow? Demand management is essentially

by tai cheSSelet

the art of balancing supply and demand through all times of the day and all seasons. In an ideal grid scenario the power generator can for example switch household hot water geysers off throughout a city reducing peak demand and so needing to generate less electricity. We are unfortunately a long way from this kind of scenario in this country, although some of the billions being spent on new generation would be better spent on making ours an intelligent grid with automated demand management. The question we all have to ask is, so if the centralized monopoly generating and distributing electricity in our country cannot resolve the problems of demand management and insists on investing in highly polluting generation technologies, what can we as individuals do to reduce consumption? Eskom offers a Solar Geyser subsidy, but it still works out very expensive for most households. A first step would be to install an electronic timer switch on your geyser. This can be done for between R500 and R1000. Using this switch you can set the times you wish your geyser to heat up water and set the timings for outside of peak electricity consumption times (6am - 9am and 6pm - 9pm). You will very soon pay back your investment with a reduced electricity bill. Some of the other ways of reducing consumption are to replace an old fridge with a new lower energy fridge, switch off devices on standby, don’t use a tumble dryer except in an emergency and replace incandescent light bulbs with fluorescent bulbs. Do all of this and save yourself loads of money and contribute to the lowering of demand in our country, hopefully meaning that we can reduce the amount of CO2 being pumped into our atmosphere to power our lives. Finally we must all hope, hope that sanity prevails at Eskom, a company we theoretically own and have funded, and that perhaps the new leaders will focus on the correct priorities for that business. That is generating electricity to grow our economy and improve lives in the most efficient and ecologically sound manner possible, embracing green technology and enabling independent power producers to feed into the grid and thereby alleviating the need to build new dirty coal power stations.


08 travel

Imagine a lunar landscape, barren and vast, where the horizon blends into the colours of the sky. Then add a gregarious collection of sculptures, art cars, themed camps billowing silken flags like swishing tails, colourful characters - with the license to self express like never before - and you just may be able to picture what being present at Afrika Burns is like. The annual event of artistic and musical expression takes place in the starkly beautiful ‘empty’ landscape of the Tankwa Karoo. The 3.5 hour drive from Cape Town takes you past Sutherland, home of the largest telescope in the world and the long straight road brings you to a farm called Stonehenge, where farmer Henk resides. This year he was dressed up in a tuxedo and wearing purple sunglasses as he watched yet another out of this world scenario unfold before his eyes. All participants of the festival – which means everyone who attends, ascribe to the ten principles that guide the event: communal effort; participation; civic responsibility; immediacy; de-commodification; gifting; radical inclusion; radical self-expression; radical selfreliance and to leave no trace. This year’s art installations were based on the theme of Time and the creative expression was staggering. Participants were encouraged to leave their personal issues at the Ego Booth which was set on fire to metaphorically symbolize the release of being tied to them.

truly time out by meliSSa baird

There was a to-scale shipwreck complete with sharks fins in the ‘water’(sand) alongside a field of psychedelic daisies made from recycled plastic bottles. Children and the artists, musicians, poets and dancers that made up the group of grown ups were transported around the camp in a variety of art cars and bright, sometimes winged, bicycles. And forget money, the only way to trade is through fair exchange or through gifting which creates an openness and receptivity to creativity not before experienced by anyone. Make the journey, drive through the most

2010 Afrika Burns dates are 22-27 April at Tankwa Karoo. The theme is ‘Dreaming’. Participants leave no trace and bring everything they need for the days and nights they are out there including water. No money is exchanged, you get random gifts and should you wish to, you can dance all day and night. www.afrikaburns.com

farm 215 fynbos reserve sustainable & luxurious accommodation in the southern overberg

www.farm215.co.za | book@farm215.co.za | 028 388 09 20

AFRIKA BuRnS PHOTOS: MELISSA BAIRd, SOPHIE MACKEnzIE MAIn, CHYMERA dESIGn

afrika Burns

beautiful parts of this country and join a place where this gathering happens. This is the sister act of Burning Man in the USA, which has grown to host over 40 000 participants a year. It was conceptualized by an informal collection of individuals and organisations who questioned, and continue to question, mainstream, highly commercialized consumerist society and what it does to the notion and workings of community. The burning of some of the sculptures during the event acts as a symbolic statement and is born out of a ritual attempt to release what binds us. The fires act as cathartic memory of the cycles of birth and death and the promise of transformation. As one of the creative ‘burners’ says, “By building a large scale sculpture and then burning it, represents a first move away from materialism. It also represents a symbolic deconstructing of the norm, re-enforcing the transient nature of things. It is also beautiful, inspiring, exciting and fun, a total celebration.”


wine & coffee 09

know your beans sublime and complex beans by Sandy barloW

Speciality Guatemalan coffee is top of the taste list for coffee lovers and the beans from this farm are no exception. Rony Ascensio built his Santa Ana la Huerta farm more than 12 years ago in a remote area of Guatemala on a mountaintop with no immediate neighbours. Around six years ago as coffee prices crashed and financial ruin loomed, the farm was saved when Rony went into partnership with his brother in law Luis Pedro Zelaya. Their partnership has allowed them to pool their knowledge, experience and passion for coffee production and the result is an outstanding single origin bean.

The purest coffee experience originates in beans from an unblended, single origin and the ultimate beans come from a single estate in which they are harvested from one farm or small producer group. Each bean must be of outstanding quality so that it meets the correct flavour profile. Estate coffees carry the name of the farm or grower association, while a single origin coffee carries the name of the country or region it comes from. Each estate has its own appellation, just like wine estates and the beans, like vines grow in their own terroirs affected by the micro-climate, soil type, quality, elevation, amount of sunshine, rainfall and tree varietals in the region. All these factors result in beans with distinctive flavours, aromas, acidity and body. Seattle Coffee Company’s roasters pay them a sustainable premium and have contributed to radical improvements in the farm’s output. New coffee washing channels have been installed and the construction of a new patio drying terrace have both helped improve quality levels. Last year, further improvements were made with the installation of a bio-digester system that cleans residues from water used in the mill before returning it to the ground via irrigation systems. This year, the farm’s seven permanent workers have seen the installation of electricity using solar panels. Look out for this outstanding coffee grown on a farm that was once on the verge of closure and is now a thriving business that produces one of the best coffees in the world. What doeS iS taSte liKe?

Delicious red berry fruit tones combined with honey-citrus flavours. The lingering finish contains notes of dark chocolate and complements rich, sweet foods.

ECO-BOUTIQUE HOTEL JOHANNESBURG

carbon-neutral wine interview with simon Back of Backsberg Estate Cellars South Africa’s first carbon neutral wine estate

Recently Backsberg was abuzz with visitors coming to celebrate the opening of the Earth Centre on the farm. This will be the place where Food and Trees for Africa can continue their great work in the Western Cape and also act as an information hub for action on climate change . I spoke to Simon about Backsberg’s initiatives: What prompted the decision to make the estate carbon neutral and what were the biggest surprises you had to manage as you made the shifts required?

It was mostly the influence of my father who has never liked to waste anything, coupled with his greater understanding of the impact the wine industry has on the land. We wanted to take responsibility for our actions as a business. Since June 2006 we have been offsetting our carbon emissions by various greening programmes in the local community. If you (a company) can just buy your carbon offset credits but don’t actively look at ways to reduce your use of resources and look at energy saving as a whole, then we feel you’re missing the point. Our greening programmes have also been coupled with a significant reduction of our fuel and electricity use. . We didn’t realise to what extent they contributed to the output, making up almost 80% of the farm’s total emissions. As a family we wanted to reverse as much of the impact as possible. That said, becoming carbon neutral is only part of the bigger picture, reduction of emissions through energy efficiency and carbon management is the real key. What has been the impact of this decision on other wine makers in the region? do you think your move to being carbon neutral will have a positive influence on the wine industry as a whole?

The curiosity of other wine farmers in the region has not been huge but we are always willing to engage with more people as they seek advice on the best way to approach this.

ment, as we believe emissions labelling of products is very likely in the future, especially for export markets. are there any plans to grow organic vines or invest in other crops to weather climate change?

Some of the farm is certified organic and we genuinely believe that farming as organically as possible is the way to go from a wine quality perspective. That being said, one of the major issues in our area is weed control in the vineyards and controlling the weeds through organic means is a real challenge. Also, what do you do if the mielie bug gets into your vineyard, risking the entire crop? When people think of sustainable farming, they sometimes only think of the environment. But for a programme to work in the longterm, you have to consider the economic and social factors as well. We try to consider all of these factors in our farming practices. Backsberg has invested in vineyard sites around the Western Cape to diversify our land holding with climate change in mind. Sometimes people make wine from organic grapes, but they exclude what happens in, for example, the cellar. Or they’ll bottle the wine in heavyweight bottles. Organic farming is very valuable, but we believe it needs to be combined with a more holistic perspective of how the farm does business. What do you see as the biggest challenges facing the wine industry in the next five years either from an environmental or social perspective?

Our view is that climate change is a reality. The biggest challenge then would be the mind shift in realising that ‘business as usual’ is no longer viable. For a detailed exploration of the initiatives and successes go to www.backsberg.co.za

What is the carbon footprint of a single bottle of wine?

In a diversified agricultural offering such as we have at Backsberg, it is very difficult to pin point that answer exactly. We’re currently working on a more exact measure-

MELROSE JOHANNESBURG | 011 537 9797 | WWW.THEPEECH.CO.ZA

2009 WinnerS of the nedbanK green Wine aWardS, in aSSociation With Wine magazine Best white wine and overall winner - Lazanou Organic Vineyards Chenin Blanc 2008 Best red wine - laibach the ladybird red 2007 Best environmental practice award - oak valley in elgin Full details are available in the december edition of wine magazine. www.winemag.co.za


10 food

seasonal recipes

by brad hale

organic tomatoeS Stuffed With feta cheeSe and SPring onionS

This recipe is for one serving, just add as many as you need depending on how many guests you expect. INgREDIENTS 1 beef tomato (large), halved, seeds removed 2 tbsp olive oil ½ onion, sliced couple of cubes of feta cheese Half a spring onion finely chopped Fresh parsley leaf, to garnish Salt and freshly ground black pepper METhoD Rub the tomato halves with one tablespoon of the oil (or liberal dash according to your preferred cooking style) and season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Place on a baking tray and roast for about ten minutes, or until cooked and soft. Heat the remaining tablespoon of oil (or another liberal dash) in a frying pan and fry the onion until softened. To serve, spoon the feta cheese and chopped spring onions into the tomato halves and garnish with parsley. courgette carPaccio With tomato, organic oliveS and a lemon, mint and ParSley dreSSing

This recipe serves two and it is a refreshing summer meal for those who claim to have no time to cook. INgREDIENTS 1 courgette, sliced lengthways into thin slices using a potato peeler 60g organic olives, stones removed, chopped 1 tomato, chopped ½ lemon, zest and juice only 1 small handful fresh organic mint, chopped finely 1 small handful fresh organic parsley, chopped finely 2 tbsp olive oil salt and freshly ground black pepper METhoD Lay the courgette slices onto two serving plates in a single layer. Mix the rest of the ingredients together in a small bowl and drizzle over the courgette slices. Leave to marinate for about ten minutes, then serve. Great with fresh bread. red cabbage With red onionS and almondS

This is a fine festive dish INgREDIENTS 3 tbsp olive oil 1 red onion, chopped 900g red cabbage, finely shredded 2 eating apples, cored, peeled and sliced 5 tbsp light sugar 4 tbsp red wine vinegar 3 tbsp red currant jelly ½ tsp ground cinnamon 100g blanched whole almonds METhoD Heat the oil in a large pan, add the onion and cook for 2-3 minutes. Stir in the remaining ingredients, except for the almonds. Season with salt and pepper, then cover and cook over a gentle heat for 30-35 minutes until the cabbage is tender. Stir in the almonds just before serving so that they retain their crunch.

hot stuff

bright as a button

We all know that our state-of-mind is influenced both by factors from within and from our everyday interactions. But new research coming to light indicates that we may be able to balance our state-of-mind by simply changing our diets. And this evidence is pointing towards the fact that chromium - an essential mineral found in mushrooms, whole grains, liver and brewer’s yeast - may be an important player. Chromium influences sugar levels in the blood. And as glucose is the brain’s primary fuel, it needs a constant supply otherwise you start feeling mentally fatigued and down. Scientists have begun testing chromium by itself or in combination with standard antideThe chilli has been exciting taste buds and pressants as a treatment for mood disorders bringing joy to the lives of human beings for ranging from mild to more severe and treatmillennia. It has been used variously in cookment resistant. The mineral has proved effecing, for its medicinal, health-giving properties tive, sometimes dramatically so, in small-scale and even, eye-wateringly, to boost sex lives. trials, and larger studies are now underway in It is estimated that chillies form part of the several medical centers. daily diet of almost a quarter of the world’s Take a form of depression known in the population. mental health world as atypical depression, The African Bird’s Eye chilli is an espeactually something of a misnomer because it is cially pungent little chilli that evokes a level hardly atypical. It afflicts more than a third of of passion that is inversely proportional to those suffering from depression. What’s atypiits size. Possibly the world’s smallest chilli, it cal is that sufferers crave carbohydrates, binge generates the world’s warmest reaction and is eat and sleep excessively and gain weight, in uniquely South African. contrast to garden-variety depression, marked As well as their knack for turning up the by obvious anxiety, loss of appetite, insomnia heat in any meal, chillies also have a number and weight loss. Persons with atypical depresof health boosting qualities. Chillies are virtusion also are exquisitely sensitive to rejection ally free of fat and oil, they contain high level and experience overwhelming, sometimes of vitamin C and are a huge source of vitamin paralyzing, fatigue. A, folic acid and potassium. They are rich in In 2002, researchers at Duke University, fibre and beta carotene. Capsaicin, the active Durham North Carolina, found that a daily ingredient in chillies, stimulates the body dose of 600 mg of chromium picolinate led to release endorphins which makes one feel to a significant decrease in symptoms among OSUMO 126 x 182.5 FA 30/9/08 10:28 Page 1 great (and some say it acts as an aphrodisiac). those with atypical depression. The mineral The capsaicin in chillies also enhances ones metabolism and burns fat, acts as a natural antibiotic that slows down the growth of bacteria in the body and has a lowering effect on cholesterol.

did you know? people have been eating chillies since about 7 500BC. during the course of several archaeological digs in tahuacan in Mexico, dried chilli seeds and fruit have been discovered in burial grounds 9 000 years old. Portuguese explorers, after discovering the cape of good Hope in 1487, introduced it to Africa and then to India in 1498. within a few decades, european travellers in asia found that it was used in cooking there and were mystified as to its origin. As a result, chilli is known by many different names: pepper, chilli, chillie, aji, paprika. Read: peri-peri the contrasts and contradictions of the african Bird’s eye chilli, available at exclusive Books stores nationwide. eaSy chilli Sauce

Make your own chilli sauce by choosing 10-20 fresh red or green chillies. Using a sharp knife chop them finely (wear gloves to protect your hands and don’t rub your eyes). If you like garlic, add a clove for every 3 chillies you use. Mix the chillies and finely chopped garlic in a clean glass jar and cover with good quality olive or vegetable oil. Add sea salt and refrigerate. Use according to your taste but chillies make just about any food come to life. Try them with scrambled eggs, toasted cheese and roast potatoes.

Composite

was most effective in curbing their tendency to overeat. The dose was considerably higher than that which most people get through a normal diet. It’s not entirely clear how chromium works against depression but it’s known to affect important neurotransmitters in the brain, such as the release of norepinephrine. It also influences the supply of serotonin. But the action of chromium on mood may be directly and indirectly an effect of the mineral’s influence on insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar. Lack of mental and physical energy seems to be a critical facet of the disorder. A further study entitled: Evaluation of the chrome content of some wild-living and cultivated mushrooms from a human nutritional aspect, by A Barancsi, concludes that edible mushrooms can be regarded as functional food because of their important microelement content. In their experiments they found that mushrooms have significantly higher chromium content than other food and although the amount of chromium is slightly lower in the stem than in the cap of the mushroom. So whether you cook them or eat them raw, make sure you use the whole mushroom. They are delicious fresh or lightly sauteéd in butter with aCM sprinkle of fresh herbs. C M Y MY CY CMY K


wellness 11

health watch

Beware phthalates in perfumes and cosmetics by belinda WeSSon

Recently, phthalates (pronounced ‘thalates’) were banned from cosmetics by the European Union. They are commonly used in nail enamel to inhibit chipping by making the polish more flexible. They have also been banned in Europe for use in baby bottles and toys and teething rings as the ingredient was used to make plastic more flexible. What is not commonly known is that phthalates are very widely used in the perfume industry. Due to the highly secretive nature of this industry, fragrance manufacturers are not compelled to declare their ingredient listing which makes it tricky for the consumer to know what exactly is being used

to create the fragrances and other perfumed products that can be so compelling to use. In September 2000, the Centre for Disease control and Prevention in U.S.A reported that seven types of phthalates had been detected in the 289 people that were tested. During the analysis of this information, it came to light that women of childbearing age had the highest concentration of phthalates, specifically dibutyl phthalate (DBT) in their bodies. It was speculated that cosmetics might be the source of contamination. In a study that was published in November 2000 by the Environmental Working Group, DBT was indeed found in popular nail care products like enamels, top coats and hardeners. Later, this organisation found alarming concentrations of phthalates in perfumes. In 2002, an intensive study revealed that 52 out of 72 randomly selected mass-market products (e.g fragrances and fragranced body lotions) contained phthalates. These chemicals have been proven to penetrate the skin and nail bed. Once inside the tissues of the

body, they mimic oestrogen, but are infinitely more potent. Dibutyl phthalate has been linked to permanent birth defects in the male reproductive system of babies, as a result of exposure whilst in utero. Some fragrances tested contained diethyl phthalate (DEP) in concentrations as high as 28 000 parts per million. That equates to almost 3% of total formulation. Until consumers become more aware of these toxins, cosmetic manufacturers will continue to use questionably chemicals. Your first step is to refer to the research

that The Environmental Working Group has gone to great lengths to produce. There is a website where you can research what goes in to mass-market products – go to www.cosmeticsdatabase.com There is also good information at www.safecosmetics.org or search ‘Not too pretty’ which will give you more information on the intensive study on phthalates in cosmetics. By being aware of the ingredients you will now be able to make better decisions about the products you use and minimise your exposure to harmful chemicals.

do you want to be right, or do the right thing? what on earth is going on? one of the questions i am often asked is, “why, when i know what to do, how to do it, and what it would be like (great!) when i did it, do i not then do it? what is it that makes smart, rational people not do what is important to them? when we say something is important to us and we don’t do it, the reasons for not doing it must be more important than doing it. Excuse me?! Bear me out. Let’s use an example: Goal: I want to earn a decent amount (be specific) of money so that I can live a great quality of life. what is the plan? i identify how many clients i need, how many prospects i need to convert to clients and how many calls I need to make. what do i get out of it? l make a difference to the people i work with who get fabulous results, i make the money i say i want, i have purpose, direction and meaning.

what is the pain of not doing it? i am in debt, I worry about my finances, I lose my confidence in what I do. If I carry on like this things are going to get really bad. My relationship is suffering, I am not getting to the gym. what happens? i continue to go round in circles. what! why? what is going on is the same thing that has our planet in peril; I justify my position, i let my ego tell me it is hard for me and easy for others, i dominate conversation with my drama of how life is difficult for me. This is the drug; the fix, that keeps us from having a great life. A life that works. wH auden said, “we would rather be ruined, than changed.” So, to rather change than be ruined, please get in touch with me! send me a question or a challenge that you have in this area and i will respond. Visit www.siekin.com, email si@siekin.com or call 082 565 0765


12 products

out-of-tHe-Box

giving save water, time & energy

natures nappy

light news

Eco friendly nappies made from bamboo towelling which is silky soft, highly absorbent and has a natural antibacterial quality. So far these nappies used instead of disposable nappies have kept a whole load out of landfills.

Soylights candles are soot-free and offer a 50-hour burn time. They are made from the purest, raw GM-free soy and are free of paraffin wax and other additives, making them suitable to use as a therapeutic skin oil for relief from dry skin; cracked heals; eczema; minor abrasions, etc. Non toxic and biodegradable, all the packaging is locally sourced and packaging re-used. Choose from eight different blends including lemongrass, lavender and lime for rejuvenation; rosewood and ylangylang for a romantic touch; geranium and jasmine for harmony and cedar wood and pine (popular blend for men) for tranquility.

Trial pack consists of: • 1 bamboo towelling shaped nappy which adjust to fit from birth to potty training • 1 small breathable waterproof nappy cover (fits 0- 4 months) • 20 biodegradable & flushable nappy liners • 5 litre lidded bucket To find out more about the earth-friendly mother & baby range call 021 7829117 or visit www.mothernatureproducts.co.za

Until now, accurately measuring the amount of water to be boiled in your kettle has been all but impossible. The result? It is estimated that, on average, we boil twice the volume of water needed every time, which means twice as much energy is used. With a 3kW kettle that’s the same as wasting the energy of around 50 light bulbs! The new ECO KETTLE is different: the internal reservoir holds a full capacity of water ready for use, while the measuring button allows any quantity – from a single cupful to full capacity – to be released into the separate chamber for boiling. The result? Exactly the right amount of water every time you boil –and no more waste. In consumer trials directed by the Energy Saving Trust, the ECO-KETTLE used an average of 31% less energy than normal kettles.

Soylights also offers custom branding and corporate gift options. For stockists and other information visit www.soylites.co.za, email info@soylites.co.za or call Nicole on 0828588095

!el-lite packs Wthrien v a r t e s each

ne of andle to win o 6 travel-lite c a by g nce.co.z in la in a a t b in ” con fe li t h oylig s ichele@ with “s 0 email m 1 0 2 y ar e. 20 Janu the subject lin in

Available directly from BIogRoW. Call 028 313 2054, fax 028 313 2084 or visit www.biogrow.co.za.

hand held labyrinth These fabulous handheld meditation tools will bring the sacred geometry of a labyrinth right onto your lap/desk. A perfect gift for someone who is keen on finding a quiet space in their busy lives. Just trace the paths with your eyes closed and experience the benefits of balance, integration and relaxation, instantly. Visit www.handheldlabyrinth.com. Also available at the good Stuff, Cavendish Square.

Win!

Five lucky readers s tand a ch win a Mo ance to ther natu re Baby t valued at rial pack, r215 eac h. Email michele@ lifeinbala nce.co.za 20 Janua by ry 2010 w ith “eco n appy” in the sub ject line.

think! We love these shoes for their Innovative styling and the fact that they are expertly hand-crafted makes for a great fitting shoe that cushions your feet every step of the way. All the materials used in their creation are organic or recycled and the leather is tanned using vegetable dyes. These shoes last for seasons. Available at 210onLong, Long Street, Cape Town. Sole Agent: Isabelle Steiger, 083 655 0698, www.thinkshoes.co.za

happy bodies

Win!

ducts, to er of pro mail p m a h e n e to win o 0 please e of r50 o.za by .c e c the valu n la a @lifeinb “pure michele 010 with 2 ry a u n ct line je b 20 Ja u s ” in the s g in n in beg

This range consists of everyday personal hygiene products that will leave you feeling naturally revitalized and fresh. Great care has been taken in formulating products that are luxurious and effective whilst using the highest quality natural and certified organic ingredients. They do not contain petrochemical, parabens, synthetic fragrances, aluminium or animal products and the range is endorsed by Beauty Without Cruelty.

Products include: Body Wash (250ml) R65. Body Lotion (250ml) R76. Shampoo (250ml) R85. Conditioner (250ml) R85. Shave Créme with cooling effect (150ml) R68. Crisp Mint toothpaste with Xylitol (100ml) R40. Living Eco roll-on deodorant 75ml fragranced R59, fragrance-free: R54. Available at selected healthshops. Visit www.purebeginnings.co.za or call 031 764 4049


products 13 every home should have one!

A ‘must-have’ for every family, the bluebox is an all-in-one kit with 24 remedies to treat the whole family, naturally & safely. Compact for travel, refillable and so easy-to-use. Treat sinus, coughs & colds, injuries, indigestion, diarrhoea, cramps, travel sickness, insect bites etc. Safe for use in pregnancy, during breast feeding and for infants. Stocked in pharmacies and health shops countrywide. Tel/fax 021 712 0324, www.pegasuskits.com.

healthy teeth The Olgani Oral Herbal range are made from 100% natural ingredients and their beneficial properties are based on a long tradition of use in herbal medicine and confirmed by recent scientific studies. They can be easily integrated into your everyday brushing routine. All that you need is a pinch of Oral Herbal salts that can be added to your regular toothpaste or on its own but know that they taste quite salty. The salts are both a treatment and a preventative so there is no need to use multiple products. It’s the single step option to complete oral health.

blooming marvellous Made with love and only using ingredients taken straight from the farm this is a wonderful nourishing balm for the whole family. Other products in their body range include a hair and body wash, sage shampoo and conditioner, handmade fynbos soap and pet shampoo. All products certified organic and biodynamic.

The olgani oral herbal range consists of: • Oral Herbal Original – to treat existing periodontal disease • Oral Herbal Green Tea –for the prevention of plaque and gum disease • Oral Herbal Xylitol & Aloe – for the prevention of tooth decay. Good for children

Available at selected health food stores and from Pick ‘n Pay and Checkers. For more information email wlilje@telkomsa.net

Visit www.olgani.co.za or contact an olgani consultant on 021 715 9416

biowashball Surprise your domestic goddess with a green ball. This is an intelligent alternative to laundry detergent and replaces the detergents and softeners usually used in your washing machine. It is hypo-allergenic, environmentally friendly and economical as it lasts for approximately three years before needing to be replaced.

swish soap Not all soaps are as pure as they claim, but Aleppo Soap (Salon D’Alep), made in the same way since the 8th Century, contains absolutely no artificial colourings, synthetic fragrances, preservatives or chemical additives. 100% natural and made from the best Olive and Sweet Bay oils, Aleppo soap has remarkable moisturising, soothing and medicinal qualities. Gentle enough for babies, soothing enough for shaving, it can be used for everything from washing linen (for sensitive skins) to dry and cracked heels. 99% biodegradable within 24 hours, it releases no harmful chemicals into our precious water.

! n i W

ne win o each soaps. n a c rs po eade ized alep e.co.za cky r 10 lu 3 guest-s einbalanc eppo lif of ‘al pack michele@ 10, with ‘ . e 0 l Emai January 2 ubject lin s 0 e 2 h t by ’ in soap

For more information or orders contact Marietjie on 021 976 0728, 083 414 5566 or email info@biowashball.co.za

Tel: 021 976 0728 Mobile: 083 414 5566 Email: info@biowashball.co.za Web: www.biowashball.co.za

take note South Africa’s first fully eco friendly 320-page journal and comprehensive resource guide will be your guide through 2010. Enjoy referring to the tips for the workplace and home and learn how to make your own non toxic cleaning products. There is a comprehensive planting guide so you can start your own vege garden. Most importantly there is an up-to-date recycling guide – offering a full list of what to recycle and where. R165 each including VAT, excluding postage. To order email michael@lifeinbalance.co.za

Win!

olgani are giving aw ay two fu Brushing ll sets of salts valu ed at r17 Email mic 9 each hele@life inbalance 20 Janua .co.za by ry 2010 w ith “olgan in the sub i” ject line.

stellar winery From Stellar Winery, the organic and Fairtrade producers comes a brand new release: Stellar Organics Sparkling. This is a very pale yellow, white sparkling wine with fresh mixed fruit cocktail faintly on the nose. The taste is dry, clean, fresh and tingly with a very clean finish. The freshness on the taste is this wine’s outstanding feature. Approximate retail price: R50 Tel: +27 27 2161310, Email: info@ stellarorganics.com, visit: www.stellar organics.com


14 art & books

oh so glassy

Visit Cape town’s EdGE Glass Gallery

in glass. You could say that in Hart’s vision, the Ur-parrot, the one burning original parrot for which all 350 species of parrot ( at the present time) are descended, is the Phoenix, a symbol of art’s capacity to conjure out of extinction a renaissance. So far international glass artists are given their only representation in Africa through this gallery and their creations in glass confirm that this little space is world class. Investing in glass art is a new concept for South Africans but a visit to the EDGE abraham le roux: vortex

Step a few paces away from the busy and vibrant top end of Long Street and you will find a tranquil and friendly haven full of colour and light, waiting to be explored. Glass artist, Nelius Britz has created a glass gallery that truly glows like a gem. Here he exhibits his own work together with pieces made by his colleagues and other glass artists of note from South Africa and abroad. The Cape Glass studio, attached to the gallery, is where Nelius and his fellow artists specialise in colourful kiln-formed glass with the emphasis on glass casting. Nelius’ own glass sculptures are primarily inspired by to van hove: early morning Stretch

EDgE glass gallery and Cape glass Studio 29 Vredenburg Lane (off top of Long St) Tel/Fax 021 4233370 www.capeglassstudio.com noel hart: bula bula

natural forms, be it plants or pebbles from the beach or coral formations and life under the sea. The international artists represented at the EDGE Glass Gallery are all renowned craftsmen whose work Nelius has handpicked from their individual studios overseas. Take for instance Australian Noel Hart who works with rich colours and sculptures glass to embody natural forms rich in colour and texture. Inside his mysterious, semi translucent shapes the essence of parrot is transmuted into flame; first extinguished, then alchemically revived and rendered precious abraham le roux: rose

nelius britz: Pebble

on the shelf

Gallery could open up the awareness of this possibility when experiencing the excellence on show here. Nelius welcomes visitors to the gallery and is only too willing to explain the different glass forming processes that are represented in the gallery.

SuStainable energy Without the hot air david Mackay I have not finished reading david MacKay’s book, but am already viewing sustainable energy in a different light. david, recently appointed Chief Scientific Advisor of the uK department of energy and climate change, challenges us to think big. His practical and visual approach to sustainable energy is presented instead in an easy to read, informative and even entertaining way, without preaching and should be required reading for everyone. He mentions he did not write the book to make money and backs this up by offering it free for download at www.withouthotair.com in various formats, including both high and low resolution. This is one book I will be passing on to others, including sceptics.

Sue meyer: hollow oak you can’t afford not to be green Yudu Business Guide A recent report reveals that nearly 50% of South african businesses have no plans to implement sustainability measures yet what few realise is that, for offices particularly, making changes to save the planet will in fact save them money and this volatile economic climate few can afford not to. The first step would be to read this free online book, which lists 51 easyto-implement measures, most of which will have an immediate effect on a company’s bottom line. And if you’re not a business owner, forward the following link to your employer - it may well ensure your next bonus! http://tinyurl.com/yudugreenbusiness


life in balance

classifieds

To advertise here email: michele@lifeinbalance.co.za Tel: 021 788 1733 or 076 270 6658

Mother Nature Products Great products for green moms & babies!

Shop Online for Natural & Organic Products Food, Health, Beauty and Personal Care Good for You. Good for the Earth.

www.greengrocer.co.za

Serving independent health and wholefood stores and delis with a wide range of certified organic food products.

Trade enquiries: 031 765 4370 or info@goodlife.co.za

See stockists or agents or download order sheet at www.mothernatureproducts.co.za Tel: 021 782 9117

Does your Dog itch? We have the solution...

Natural Pet Remedies www.vondis.co.za (021) 439 1784

Laibach proudly presents The Ladybird, a SGS certified, organic red wine. A unique individual expression of organically grown fruit combined with the art of our winemaker. TEL: +27 (0) 21 88 44 511 FAX: +27 (0) 21 88 44 848 info@laibachwines.com www.laibachwines.com

redefine your thinking – one person can make a difference

what’s happening? Cop15 – our FuturE dEpEnds on it one of the most important events of 2009, and that will domintae the december calendar, is COP15, the climate conference. Officials from over 192 countries and representatives from various ngos the world over gather from 7 to 18 december in Copenhagen in denmark. if you’re still not sure what the brouhaha is all about, our short breakdown will help clarify the what, where, how and why. despite the location of the conference, the acronym cop stands for conference of the Parties, of which 14 have taken place to date. the goal of the conference is to establish a binding agreement on global climate change. This agreement will replace the Kyoto Protocol (COP3), which expires in 2010. numerous meetings and countless negotiations have been taking place throughout 2009 in preparation and to resolve difference, particularly between nations. the fact is that in order to prevent catastrophic climate change, we need to reduce our greenhouse gas emission by 25 – 40% of the 1990 levels, by 2020. If not, we face conditions such as rising sea levels, half the world’s population without access to water (and remember, south africa is already classified as chronically stressed), coral reefs destroyed and up to half of all animal and plant species becoming extinct. up until now, the richest nations in the world have fallen far short of the

Dr hAushcKA therAPist

EMpLoYMEnt opportunitY

Organic & Holistic Facial Treatments Therapeutic Massage Also stock Victorian Garden Organic Cosmetics

life in balance

organic baobab seed oil Known for its Omega 3, 6 and 9 fatty acids this is a rich and nourishing oil with excellent skin moisturizing properties. Apply to scarred or stretched skin. Safe during pregnancy. This oil has healing properties and is used for eczema, psoriasis, sun spots, scaly skin disorder and skin cancer. www.ecoproducts.co.za

life in balance

your monthly green solution to natural & eco-friendly living w w w. l i fe i nba l a nce.co. za

life in balance

your monthly green solution to natural & eco-friendly living w w w. l i fei n bal an ce.co. za

i ssu e 1 oc to b e r/ n ove m b e r 20 0 8

02

the UPside of junk, eco-specifier, g re e n b u i l d i n g p ro d u c ts

life savin g b o t t les, wa ter savin g, p o lit ica l p la n n in g

04

04

e rea c t – ca b i n et p o l i cy fo r c l i m a te c h a n ge, m et a l c ra f t

pa p e r foa m , t h e a r t of wo o l , n ew pa r l i a m e n t – sa m e c h a l l e n ges

ro c kin g t h e d a isies a n d t ic ket give- away

06

06

06

special feature

design forest creations, b lack chilli d esign, free fold furniture

06

design & living

living & travel

west coast birds, islan d adve n tu res off Madagascar

succul ent soekers h of, M oza m bi qu e adven tu re

sta r ga zin g in s u th erla n d, bicycle tra ils w ith h ea rt

g reen veh i c l es, a rc h i tec t u re – en erg y wo r ks, eco m o

we l l i n g to n t rea s u re, B u s h m a n s k l o of – t h e wo r l d ’s b est

h a r vest m o o n , t h e r im of a f r ica , d esign wit h a rep u r p ose

08

08

08

08

08

08

food & wine

food & drink

food & wine

travel & living

o rga ni c market u pdate, fest i ve t i pple

G M fo o d la bellin g, sa lt secrets, tequ ila fa n ta stica , tea

t ra n s i t i o n town s, eco l o d ges, wi l d d o gs a n d c h eet a h s cen s u s

t h e g re e n c h ef t a l ks c h o co l a te, co co n u t wa te r, b o o k g i veaway

over b erg oa sis, t ra c kin g t h e ca p e leo pa rd

10

10

10

10

09

fashion & beauty

weddinGs

fashion & beauty

food & drinks

sun sense s kin care, gi ft gui de

specia l fea tu re. say in g ‘i do ’ differen tly

t h e g reen c h ef, va n i l l a s p i ce, m i c ro b rewer i es & f ree b eer

cof fe e – t h e p e r fe c t c u p, fa i r t ra d e w i n s, Pu ro g i veaway

go in g lo ca , raw fo o d rec ip es, cof fee c h a t

13

12

12

12

12

beauty & wellness

wellness

wellness

yo ga ni dra, osteopathy, wo o d o i l s

lovely trea ts, h emp bed- lin en , v isio n qu estin g

p ro d u c t u p d a tes, j i n s i n j i ts u , avo i d i n g b u r n o u t

l oa d s of g i veaways, m e r i d i a n m a g i c, t ra i n yo u r b ra i n

ba m b o o ba b ies & co lla gen c u res, life coa c h in g

14

14

14

14

14

dy lan lew is, water – the Great Mystery review

na ked ex hibition , give-away - the world according to Montsano

gla ss a rt, so nya Ch o qu ette rev iews a n d give- away

wire art, top eco reads, even ts ca l en d a r, c l a ss i f i ed s

a r t f ro m t h e ea r t h , o n t h e s h e l f, eve n ts & c l a ss i f i e d s

a r t f ro m t h e o cea n , o n sh elf & sc reen , even ts & c la ssif ied s

art, books, dvds

art, books, dvds

art & books

the good ness of goed ged acht, p roject 90 x 2030

travel Pugh to swim Mount everest, strange p laces, p hantom forest

09

food & drink eating smart, zingy d ressings five-minute food

12

products & wellness

ProdUcts & wellness

watsu – wate r th e rapy w ith a diffe re n ce, yoga nidra

14

art, books, dvds

08

food & drink

coffee featUre

hydratin g beau ty, sh oes to kn ock you r socks off

12

wellness

living

travel

food

wate rblom m e tjie tagliate lle, biodive rsity w in e ch am pion s

10

Products & wellness jeans & iron trees, clean cosmetics & giveaways

14

art & books

art & Books

your free coPy

news & innovations pap er trails, winning word s

04

event preview

innovation & design

design & living

eco a rch itects, so la r fridges, biofires, fire la n tern s

06

travel

02

news & innovations

recyc l i n g ca n s, g reen p r i n t i n g i nvest i ga ted

04

desiGn & livinG

wo o dwo rk , paper f u rn itu re, re- usi ng alien trees

06

travel

i ssue 7 nove m b e r 0 9

02

gla ss recyclin g, bo ttled su n sh in e, a frica bu rn festiva l

04

design & living

redefine your thinking – one person can make a difference

you r f r e e co py

issu e 6 se pte mbe r 09 - 1st bi r thday e di ti on

news

news & innovations

a rbo ur week, in digen ou s Xm a s t ree gu ide, recyclin g

04

gadge ts, cardboard fu rn itu re, h olistic lan d m an age m e n t

06

travel

life in balance

your monthly green solution to natural & eco-friendly living

02

02

news & innovations

yoU r f re e co Py

i ssU e 5 J ul y/aug ust 0 9

your f re e co py

i ssu e 4 a p r i l / M ay 0 9

02

life in balance

your monthly green solution to natural & eco-friendly living

your monthly green solution to natural & eco-friendly living

you r f r e e Copy

i ssu e 3 fe br ua r y/M a rc h 0 9

news & innovations

life in balance

life in balance

your monthly green solution to natural & eco-friendly living

i ssu e 2 de ce m b er 0 8 /J a n u a r y 0 9

02

news & innovations re cyclin g, you r wate r footprin t, m arin e we e k

04

desiGn & livinG

art & books books, dave Matthews cd download , events and classified s

This issue proudly sponsored by...

u c r o fr py ee

Carri: 021-7125656 carrifree@gmail.com (Bergvliet)

All component stainless steel handrail railing systems 012 653 0053/3955 Graham: 083 302 1841 dspsag@telkomsa.net www.dspaa.co.za

recommended targets and this time round all eyes are on the us after george Bush famously pulled out of signing Kyoto just days into his presidency, despite assurances that he would regulate emissions. the good news is that a few countries, like Japan and norway, have committed to drastic reductions of up to 40%. However, these are often only on condition that other nations make similar commitments, which in turn is an issue for poor and developing nations. despite conflicting news reports from the various meetings, including the recent talks between the us and china, there is at least some indication that world leaders are taking climate change seriously. what comes out of cop15 is anyone’s guess at the moment (and there are those predicting the worst), but let’s hope that politics can, for once, be put aside for the sake of our planet and its inhabitants. Become a member of hopenhagen.org and follow the world’s comments and actions during this conference

This issue proudly sponsored by...

This issue proudly sponsored by

yo LIB_Newspaper_issue1.indd 1

10/7/2008 4:56:45 PM

LIB_Newspaper_issue2.indd 1

12/1/2008 1:19:36 PM

LIB_newspaper3.indd 1

2/17/2009 2:09:18 PM

LIB_newspaper4.indd 1

4/20/2009 11:20:23 AM

LIB_newspaper5.indd 1

7/22/2009 11:31:10 AM

LIB_newspaper6.indd 1

9/22/2009 10:00:44 AM

LIB_newspaper7.indd 1

10/23/2009 12:00:49 PM

Life in Balance is looking for two wonderful people to join the team in 2010. You will be enthusiastic, dedicated and a creative thinker who is adaptable and eager to work on the newspaper that is turning people’s heads and hearts in new directions. the key focus will be creating partnerships with advertisers who have products and services that fit the Life in Balance profile and who value the opportunity that the paper gives to them to promote their good work. Your relationship-building skills will be a core factor to your success, and so will your ability to network. ideally you have worked in a sales position before but we will offer sales training to the right candidate. please send a short CV and a one page letter explaining why you would like to work for Life in Balance to melissa@lifeinbalance.co.za. applications close on the 15th January 2010.

www.organixsa.co.za Lizelle Barnard: 083 264 3011 Lizelle@organixsa.co.za


19-21 Feb 2010

CAPE TOWN INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE show hours Friday 19 Feb Saturday 20 Feb Sunday 21 Feb

10h00 -18h00 10h00-18h00 10h00-17h00

admission R50.00 per person

Can you afford not to install Solar Power? With a planned increase of 146% in electricity rates, visit the Green Home Exhibition and make your living space affordable and sustainable •

See the latest products and technology that will inspire you to embrace solar and wind energy

Understand the new developments in LED lighting

Minimize water use with state-of-the-art taps and shower heads

Drip irrigation will be the future for your garden

Garden furniture and decking from recycled plastics

New ideas from composting and recycling solutions to eco wall paints and chemical free cleaning products

Be sure to visit the Green Home Exhibition and find unique solutions to green your home!

Be inspired & informed to make better choices at the 7th Natural & Organic Products Exhibition. PRODUCTS EXHIBITION 2010

Call SE Shows & Events on 021 671 0935 for more information www.naturalandorganic.co.za


life in balance

redefine your thinking – one person can make a difference Your free copY

i ssue 8 dece mb e r ‘ 09 / J a nu a r y ’ 10 - Hap py new Year!

02

news & innovations co nsi der us, o i l y i ssues, so l a r roa ds

04

design ex t ra o rdi na r y cha ndel i ers, g l a ss tem pl es

06

living special feature energ y ef f i ci ency i n t he ho m e, f reewheel i ng fest i va l

08

travel af r i ka Bur ns - t r ul y t i m e o ut

10

food & drink gua tem a l a n cof fee, veg gi e reci pes, chi l l i sa uce

12

products o ut-of-t he-box g i vi ng and give-aways galore

14

art & Books g l a ss a ct i o n, f ree e-bo o ks

Life in Balance issue 8  

redefine your thinking - one person can make a difference