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1. SUE Unveiling SUE’s skeleton, immediately after her unveiling in The Field Museum’s Stanley Field Hall. © The Field Museum

2. SUE in Stanley Field 2 SUE’s skeleton standing tall in Stanley Field Hall. © The Field Museum

3. SUE with Visitors Field Museum visitors admire SUE’s massive skeleton. © The Field Museum

4. SUE Teeth An inside look at SUE’s 600 lb skull. © The Field Museum

5. SUE Close Up 1 SUE gets ready for her close up, as cameras begin rolling in Stanley Field Hall for the new, 3-D movie Waking the T. rex 3-D: The Story of SUE. Courtesy of Rob Grzymala


6. SUE Close Up 2 SUE gets ready for her close up, as cameras begin rolling in Stanley Field Hall for the new, 3-D movie Waking the T. rex 3-D: The Story of SUE. Courtesy of David Clark

7. SUE Alive SUE comes to life in Waking the T. rex 3-D: The Story of SUE. Courtesy of D3D Cinema

8. Baby SUE In Waking the T. rex 3-D: The Story of SUE, visitors will see SUE as a young, feathered dinosaur. Courtesy of D3D Cinema

9. SUE in Forest SUE stalks her prey in Waking the T. rex 3-D: The Story of SUE. Courtesy of D3D Cinema

10. SUE Roar In Waking the T. rex 3-D: The Story of SUE, the Museum’s famous T. rex comes to life in an awe-inspiring way. Courtesy of D3D Cinema


11. SUE Logo © The Field Museum

12. SUE Logo Reverse © The Field Museum

13. Peter Makovicky Peter Makovicky, Ph.D., Associate Curator and Chair of The Field Museum’s Department of Geology Photo by John Weinstein © The Field Museum

14. Bill Simpson William F. Simpson, collections manager of fossil vertebrates at The Field Museum. Photo by John Weinstein © The Field Museum

15. Lindsay Zanno Palentologist Lindsay Zanno works to expose a dinosaur bone during fieldwork in South Dakota. Courtesy David Clark


16. Odontochelys The Odontochelys is the world’s oldest turtle fossil and only had a partial shell. Illustration by Marlene Donnelly

17. Suminia Living roughly 260 million years ago, Suminia is the world’s first tree-dwelling vertebrate. Illustration by Christina Stoppa

18. Buitreraptor The Buitreraptor gonzalezorum has a long, thin snout that may have been used to catch primitive reptiles, like the baby sphenodontian (a relative of the modern tuatara) in this image. Illustration by Jorge Gonzalez © The Field Museum

19. Permian Life Diorama This photograph of a Field Museum diorama of the ocean floor before the end-Permian mass extinction shows several simple, fixed organisms, including brachiopods, corrals and large yellow sponges. New research indicates that after the mass extinction that marks the divide between the Paleozoic and Mesozoic, complex ecosystems largely displaced these simple ones.


Photograph by Ron Testa Š The Field Museum


SUE Shot List