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Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit


Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs TOOLKIT The Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time (OST) Programs were developed to provide youth with the best opportunity to be healthy while attending OST programs in Philadelphia. These guidelines were developed through a process including local OST providers and health experts studying the out of school time system in Philadelphia. In imagining a setting that supports health and keeps youth at a healthy weight, our Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities (HKHC) Leadership Team envisioned healthy, attractive and tasty foods, space to play, and peers and staff supporting fun, physical activity. This vision grounded the discussion about the best guidelines and strategies for out-of-school time programs. The goal of these guidelines and this toolkit is to improve the OST environment to support healthy behaviors, like eating healthy foods and ensuring time for enjoyable physical activity, and to reverse the incidence of overweight youth. Many factors contribute to the statistics showing 30-50 percent of youth are overweight or obese, depending on where they live in Philadelphia. Many neighborhoods lack access to healthy foods and safe places to play. Sugary, fatty, and salty foods are common nourishment for many youth and few eat the recommended servings of fruits and vegetables. Few youth meet the recommendation of 60 minutes a day for physical activity. It is our hope that these Healthy Living Guidelines and this Toolkit will help guide Out-of-School Time Programs in Philadelphia to offer physical activity and create an environment where healthy food behaviors are supported. We thank the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and The Philadelphia Department of Public Health’s (PDPH) Get Healthy Philly made possible by the Department of Health and Human Services for funding this initiative; the OST management staff at Public Health Management Corporation (PHMC), the City of Philadelphia’s Office of Health and Opportunities; the PHMC Research and Evaluation Group, PHMC Communications, The Food Trust, National Nursing Centers Consortium, The University of Pennsylvania, the HKHC OST Partnership and Leadership Teams, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars, and the many OST staff, youth, parents, caregivers, and other key informants who contributed to this process.


Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs TOOLKIT For the Health of Children In Philadelphia Healthy Kids / Healthy Communities Out-of-School Time (OST) Initiative wants all youth attending after school and summer programs to be healthy and live a healthy life. Statistics show that over 30 percent of youth in Philadelphia are overweight or obese. Our OST Healthy Living Guidelines have been developed after careful consideration on how to improve the environment for OST youth so they get healthy food and a chance to be active every day.

Proven Strategies to Combat Obesity and Keep Youth at a Healthy Weight Increase physical activity:

Reduce the consumption of sugary drinks

ÌÌ 76 percent of Philadelphia youth do not attend physical education

ÌÌ Youth are drinking at least 2 sugary drinks – about 500 calories a day.

classes daily and many do not get recess in school. ÌÌ Less than 1/3 of our youth 6-17 nationally engage in vigorous physical activity for 20 minutes a day.

Reduce exposure to foods marketed to children ÌÌ Up to 10 billion dollars are spent advertising foods each year.

Reduce screen time activities:

Eat more whole grains, fruits and vegetables:

ÌÌ Youth spend 5-7 hours watching TV or on the playing computer or

ÌÌ Many youth live in neighborhoods where they can’t buy these foods.

video games.

ÌÌ Families often can’t afford to buy these foods.

This map shows the percentage of children who are overweight and obese in Philadelphia in 2008. According to the information on this map, an average of 47 % of children are overweight or obese. Look at your section of the city on this map to see the average of overweight and obesity rate in your neighborhood. There is a higher rate of overweight and obesity in lowerincome areas of the city. Many studies have shown the rate of obesity and overweight is higher in populations who did not graduate high school. In Philadelphia, approximately 60% of African-American and Latino children are overweight or obese, compared to 50% of White children. The national goal for overweight and obesity is 5%, so all racial groups are well beyond the target.


Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs TOOLKIT What is the problem with being overweight or obese? Being overweight or obese does not guarantee health problems, but it does increase the risk of 20 major diseases, including high blood pressure, heart disease, and type-2 diabetes. In one population-based study, 60 percent of youth, ages 5-10 years old that were obese, had at least one cardiovascular risk factor, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high triglycerides, and 25 percent had 2 or more risk factors. Medical costs to manage these diseases are sky rocketing, and our workforce is less capable to compete and be productive. In fact, nearly one- third of Americans ages 17-24 are too heavy to join the military.

How do we define Overweight and Obesity? Obesity is defined as excessively high amount of body fat compared to lean muscle mass. Overweight is an increased body weight in relation to height and compared to standard acceptable weight.

How is Obesity or Overweight Measured? A formula called Body Mass Index [BMI] is used to determine weight to height.

BMI =

(weight in pounds)

x 703

(height in inches) x (height in inches)

A simple online calculator from the Centers for Disease Control for youth and teens can be found at http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/dnpabmi/Calculator.aspx The BMI is charted on a BMI for age percentile growth chart. This compares the BMI of youth to others of similar age. ÌÌ A youth is underweight if less than the 5th percentile ÌÌ A youth is at a healthy weight if is at the 5th percentile to the 85th percentile ÌÌ A youth is overweight if at the 85th to the 95th percentile ÌÌ A youth is obese, if equal to or greater than the 95th percentile It must be noted that other genetic factors can impact weight. Doctors look to see if the trend for the child’s weight is constant. For example, a child who was born and measured at 85% BMI, and stays that way over their life is less concerning than a child who has been at 50% most of their life and shoots up to 85% at age 15. Also, a muscular person may weigh more and have a higher BMI than someone who is not as muscular. While BMI is a measure comparing weight and height, then compared by age, it isn’t a perfect measurement of overweight and obesity. Nurses in Philadelphia public schools take BMI measurements of all students to screen for overweight and obesity. If a child’s BMI puts them in overweight or obese category, a letter is mailed home to the parents. Parents who receive this letter can talk to the school nurse or their family doctor. See the Food Fit Philly Website for more information about Overweight and Obesity in Philadelphia: http://foodfitphilly.org/all-about-sugary-drinks/obesity/ For more general information about obesity see the Centers for Disease Control website: http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/


Healthy Living Guideline Pledge The Healthy Living Guidelines are an important part of keeping children healthy, fit, and active in their Out-of-School Time (OST) programs. The Healthy Living Guidelines include:

Food and Nutrition Guideline #1: OST programs do not serve or allow sugary drinks.Guideline #2: Safe, fresh drinking water is available to youth at all times, indoor and outdoors, including field trips. Guideline #3: OST program allows foods that model the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010. Foods that are not recommended should be discouraged and should not be brought and served OR OST program does not allow any outside food to be brought to OST sites. Guideline #4: A pleasant, social environment is provided during scheduled meals and snacks, encouraging social interaction, conversations, and positive eating behaviors. Guideline #5: OST programs that offer nutrition education use science-based nutrition materials from non-profit, federal, state, or city agencies. Materials with food company logos or advertising are not to be used. Guideline #6: The OST program serves meals and snacks in a clean and safe environment, at proper serving temperatures, in compliance with the Philadelphia Department of Public health Office of Food Protection requirements.

Physical Activity Guideline #1: School year OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. Summer OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 60 minutes of daily OST time or a minimum of 300 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. OST programs serving youth in grades (612) provide a minimum of 20% of daily or weekly OST time of moderate to vigorous activity. Guideline #2: Non-homework screen time is limited to 30 minutes per 3-hour block of OST time. Guideline #3: OST programs provide a safe environment for play and physical activity. Guideline #4: OST programs provide equitable opportunities for all youth to participate in quality sport and fitness programs.

Children need healthy food, nutrition, and physical activity to be able to learn, develop, and grow to their full potentials. As a staff member of the ______________________________ OST program, I understand that modeling the Healthy Living Guidelines provides an environment in which the children may follow these guidelines as well. This allows for both staff and children to lead healthier, more enjoyable lifestyles while in the OST program. Furthermore, to make best use of the Healthy Living Guidelines, staff and youth can use these standards outside of the after school program to stay healthy, happy and fit. Therefore, I, _________________________________, pledge to follow the Healthy Living Guidelines, as stated above while I am present in the _____________________________ Out-of-School Time program. I will also attempt to follow these guidelines to the best of my ability in my daily life as well so I may be a good role model for children and lead a healthier lifestyle. ___________________________________________ ___________________ Signature

Date


Table of Contents Healthy Living Guidelines Section 1: Food & Nutrition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Guideline #1: OST programs do not serve or allow sugary drinks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Guideline #2: Safe, fresh drinking water is available to youth at all times, indoors and outdoors, including field trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Guideline #3: OST program allows foods that model the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010. Foods that are not recommended should be discouraged and should not be brought and served OR OST program does not allow any outside food to be brought to OST sites . . . . . . . . . 16 Guideline #4: A pleasant, social environment is provided during scheduled meals and snacks, encouraging social interaction, conversation, and positive eating behaviors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Guideline #5: OST programs that offer nutrition education use science-based nutrition materials from non-profit, federal, state, or city agencies. Materials with food company logos or advertising are not to be used.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Guideline #6: The OST program serves meals and snacks in a clean and safe environment, at proper serving temperatures, in compliance with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health Office of Food Protection requirements.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Nutrition Resources & Parent Handouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Section 2: Physical activity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Guideline #1: ƒƒ School Year OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ Summer OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 60 minutes of daily OST time or a minimum of 300 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ OST programs serving youth in grades (6-12) provide a minimum of 20% of daily or weekly OST time of moderate to vigorous activity.. . . . . . . 53 Guideline #2: Non-homework screen time is limited to 30 minutes per 3-hour block of OST time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Guideline #3: OST programs provide a safe environment for play and physical activity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Guideline #4: OST programs provide equitable opportunities for all youth to participate in quality sport and fitness programs. . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Physical Activity Resources & Parent Handouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88


Section

1 Food & Nutrition


Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #1: OST programs do not serve or allow sugary drinks

Programs can create an environment that supports health by not serving sugary drinks. What is a sugary drink? Sugary drink (n): a non-alcoholic beverage with added sugar, such as: soda, non-100%-fruit drinks, sports drinks, flavored water, energy drinks, and ready-to-drink sweetened tea and coffee.1

The OST Drink List Drink These Healthy Drinks

Avoid These Sugary Drinks

ƒƒ Water

ƒƒ Non-diet sodas: orange, cola, grape, ginger ale,

ƒƒ Sparkling water with a splash of 100% juice

rootbeer, or lemon-lime sodas, etc.

ƒƒ Plain fat free or low fat milk

ƒƒ Sweetened Ice Tea-“sweetened tea drinks”

ƒƒ 100% fruit juice

ƒƒ Fruit Juice-“Hugs”, barrel fruit juices, fruit punch

ƒƒ Unsweetened decaffeinated or herbal teas

ƒƒ Non-diet flavored water- fruit waters, energy waters

ƒƒ Non-Dairy milk

ƒƒ Sports drinks and “ades”

ƒƒ V-8 juice or vegetable juice

ƒƒ Sweetened ice-based drinks, icy slushies, water ice ƒƒ Fruitades- lemonade, limeade

Water is the best drink! It has no calories and will

ƒƒ Energy Drinks- “Red Bull”, “Monster”

quench your thirst better than juice or soda.

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Proposed guidelines in National School Lunch Program (NSLP) say programs can serve plain and chocolate non-fat milk as long as it is within the total caloric range allowed for the meal. Proposed

Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations for Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) does not allow chocolate milk at all at meals, but does allow it at snacks if within the allowable caloric range. Between now and June, USDA will write language about milk standards that all programs using CACFP must use. This ruling on milk, mandated by Congress in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Act will go into effect in the summer 2011. This will allow non-fat or low-fat milk. Flavored milks have not been decided.

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #1: OST programs do not serve or allow sugary drinks

How this Guideline Helps OST Youth If a child consumes sugary drinks instead of healthier beverages, they miss out on important nutrients that are needed for their growth and development. A perfect example is milk that has calcium and vitamin D needed for bone health. Because Americans are drinking more sugary beverages in place of milk, most are not getting enough of either nutrient. ƒƒ Too many calories from sugary drinks can be a cause of unhealthy weight gain and other health problems, like diabetes and heart disease. ƒƒ Too many sugary drinks can cause tooth decay and cavities.

Tips for OST Programs To Keep Programs Free of Sugary Drinks ƒƒ Try the Rethink Your Drink lesson with youth in your program, so youth can see how much sugar they are getting in their favorite beverages. This works at parent meetings too! ƒƒ Send a note home to parents and caregivers about a sugary drink-free environment and do a lesson on sugary drinks at a program, open-house or enrollment event. ƒƒ Change vending machine selections to include healthier options. ƒƒ Talk with the local corner store and fast food sites about having healthier drinks available for youth. ƒƒ Create a sugary-drink free poster contest! ƒƒ Ask youth to keep their sugary drinks in their school bag during OST time. ƒƒ Call parents and remind them of the sugary drink policy at OST sites. ƒƒ Be a role model – only serve healthy beverages in OST programs, celebrations and events. Model the behavior you want to see! Drink water and do not consume sugar sweetened beverages on site.

Additional Resources Available: see “Sugary Drinks and Healthy Beverages” handout in Nutrition Resources section.

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #1: OST programs do not serve or allow sugary drinks

Read it Before You Drink It! Understanding the Nutrition Facts Sugary Drink Label: The serving size defines the size of the portion.

8 fl. oz. (246 g) 2.5

Servings Per Container show how many servings are in the

Calories list the amount of energy in a serving. There are 100 calories in 1 serving, and 2.5 servings in the whole container. Therefore, there are 250 calories in

container. If one serving is ½ cup, and there are 2.5 servings in the container, the container holds 1 ½ cups.

the entire bottle.

Look for beverages that contain 3 grams of sugar or less per serving.

20% or higher indicates that your drink is a good source of this nutrient. 5% or lower means your drink is low in that vitamin or mineral.

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #1: OST programs do not serve or allow sugary drinks

The Ingredient Label Example of a real beverage label: Contains pure filtered water, sweeteners (high fructose corn syrup, sugar) pear, pineapple and orange juices from concentrate, less than .5% of: passion fruit juice from concentrate, citric acid, natural flavors, modified cornstarch, glycerol ester of rosin, potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate and sodium hexametaphospate, and calcium disodium EDTA, Red #40, Green # 3.

Hidden names for sugar! Ingredient labels list the ingredients used in making a food product. Ingredients are listed by the most by weight to the least by weight. Water is listed as the first ingredient in most beverages, and has no calories. But the sugars listed do! Each gram of sugar is equal to ¼ teaspoon of sugar. Sugar by any name is still sugar. Sometimes food companies will use a variety of types of sugar in their product. Here is a list of other sugars often found on beverage labels: Sugar, corn syrup, brown sugar, cane sugar, corn sweetener, evaporated cane juice, honey, invert sugar, raw sugar, molasses, maple syrup. AND anything with an “ose” ending- maltose, lactose, fructose, glucose, high fructose corn syrup, crystalline fructose.

So be moderate and wise and avoid sugary drinks! Did you know? Soft drink makers produce a staggering 10.4 billion gallons of sugary soda each year, enough for a 12-ounce can for every American, every day, 365 days a year.

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #1: OST programs do not serve or allow sugary drinks

Re-Think Your Drink A great activity for staff, youth, and parents

Activity:

Class participants will examine the beverages they drink.

1. Depending on the number of individuals, divide students into small

They will learn how to read food labels to make healthier

groups, have them work individually. If they are too young to do the math, it may be necessary to show them how to figure out the

beverage choices and understand serving sizes.

amount of sugar per beverage. 2. Ask youth to think about how many bottles of sugary drinks they usually drink every day.

Purpose of Activity: This activity will help stud

ents

see how much sugar is added to vario

3. Provide each group with a beverage label. Have group members read

us beverages.

Age Level: Any

the labels and figure out how many servings are in each container.

Group Size: Can be adapted for almost any size

handout (Read it Before You Drink It) for details.

Time Involved: Preparation time: 10 minutes;

time: 15 - 30 minutes; depends on num

Example: A 20-ounce container is 2 ½ servings. See label reading

Activity

ber of beverages.

serving by the number of servings in the beverage container. ____ grams sugar per serving X ____ servings =

Materials Needed:

ÌÌ Several beverage containers with nutr

ÌÌ Measuring spoons or plastic teaspoon

ÌÌ Sugar

4. Multiply the number of grams of sugar (see nutritional label) per

ition labels

s

ÌÌ Clear plastic drinking cups

____ grams in beverage container 5. One teaspoon equals four grams of sugar; therefore divide the grams of sugar number by 4. ____ grams in beverage container ÷ 4 = ____ teaspoons sugar per beverage container 6. Have a student, or group leader, measure out the number of

  Additional Resources Available:

teaspoons of sugar in their beverage into clear plastic cups.

see “Re-Think Your Drink” handout in

7. Compare the amount of sugar in the various beverages.

Nutrition Resources section.

8. Discuss the effects too much sugar has on our bodies.

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #2: Safe, fresh drinking water is available to youth at all times, indoors and outdoors, including field trips

How this Guideline Helps OST Youth Everyone needs water for good health. It is important to drink water every day to prevent dehydration because we lose water through urination, breathing, and sweating. Water is a healthy replacement for sugar-sweetened beverages and has no calories or sugar.

What are the benefits of drinking water? ƒƒ Regulates your body temperature ƒƒ Moistens tissues ƒƒ Moistens skin ƒƒ Moistens joints ƒƒ Helps flush out waste ƒƒ Carries nutrients to cells ƒƒ Protects bodily organs ƒƒ Prevents dehydration

8

Your body needs      cups or more of water       each day

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #2: Safe, fresh drinking water is available to youth at all times, indoors and outdoors, including field trips

Tips for Having Water Available in OST Programs There are simple and inexpensive ways for OST programs to increase access to drinking water: ƒƒ Provide tap water by placing a gallon or more of water in a jug or pitcher and have cups in the area where youth are located. ƒƒ Create a hydration station: Place water in an area where children are active to encourage water drinking before, during, and after activities. ƒƒ Parents and community advocates can work with schools and their local government to raise awareness and money to improve drinking water access for students.

ƒƒ Be artistic! Have students create posters encouraging their peers to drink more water. ƒƒ Have a local major grocery store donate bottled water for summer trips. ƒƒ Purchase water bottles for your youth, or encourage youth to bring in water bottles from home. ƒƒ Float slices of lemon, limes or oranges in a pitcher of ice water.

When do you need more water? `` Heat, humidity, and physical activity increases our need for water. `` If you are physically active more than 10 minutes, take a water break. `` By the time you are thirsty, you are already dehydrated.

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #2: Safe, fresh drinking water is available to youth at all times, indoors and outdoors, including field trips

Drinking Water Availability Checklist Use this simple checklist to evaluate water availability in your site.

Indoor:

Yes No

Plan to Improve

Is fresh drinking water available, free of charge?

____________________________________

Are all drinking water sources clean?

____________________________________

Are all cups, coolers and water bottles clean?

____________________________________

Is water available at meals?

____________________________________

Is water pleasant in terms of taste and temperature?

____________________________________

Are posters hanging that highlight the benefits of drinking water?

____________________________________

Are youth encouraged to drink water?

____________________________________

Outdoor (do the same as above):

Yes No

Plan to Improve

Are water fountains/coolers available?

____________________________________

Do supervisors refill water coolers when needed?

____________________________________

OST Trips (do the same as above):

Yes No

Plan to Improve

In the summer: Is cool fresh water provided to students during trips?

____________________________________

Are parents sent reminders to provide water bottles?

____________________________________

Is there a plan in case a child forgets/loses their water bottle?

____________________________________

____________________________________

____________________________________

Are adequate water and toilet breaks scheduled for trips   lasting an hour or longer? Does staff schedule water breaks and actively remind youth   to drink regularly on trips?

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #3: OST program allows foods that model the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010. Foods that are not recommended should be discouraged and should not be brought and served OR OST program does not allow any outside food to be brought to OST sites. Please adopt one of the two above strategies to improve the foods eaten and the food environment in OST programs. The first option also covers food for daily consumption, refreshments for meetings, celebrations, and fundraisers.

How this Guideline Helps OST Youth The Dietary Guidelines recommend the best choices for good health and were created by the United States Department of Health and Human Services and The U.S. Department of Agriculture. We want youth to have the opportunity to live healthy and active lives. This OST Healthy Living Guideline makes it easier for youth to eat healthy and be physically active. Both youth and staff benefit.

Dietary Guidelines Key Recommendations The dietary guidelines contain three key recommendations to improve or sustain overall health and well-being.1

1

Balance Calories - Eat healthy foods and be active!

2

Eat less salt, sugar, saturated and trans fats, and foods made with refined grains.

A lifestyle that includes healthy eating (calories in) and physical activity

A diet high in sugar, saturated fats, trans fats, refined grains, and salt

(calories out) supports good health.

(sodium) has been linked to weight gain, heart disease, diabetes, and

Choose healthy foods and don’t overeat. Physical activity builds stronger bones, muscles, lungs, and heart, stimulates brain function and helps maintain a healthy weight. Youth should be active at least 60 minutes a day; adults should be active 30 minutes a day.

certain kind of cancers.

3

Eat more whole grain foods, fruits, vegetables, and fat free and low-fat dairy products.

These foods contain important nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, and fiber which are needed for good health. Studies have also If you want more information about

1

the 2010 Dietary Guidelines please visit www.cnpp.usda.gov/DietaryGuideline.html or www.health.gov/dietaryguideline

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

shown that a diet rich in these foods can reduce the risk of heart disease and certain types of cancers. Choose more nutritious foods to give your body the best “fuel”.

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #3: OST program allows foods that model the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010. Foods that are not recommended should be discouraged and should not be brought and served OR OST program does not allow any outside food to be brought to OST sites.

TIPS to improve the quality of foods FOR OST programs: ƒƒ Provide youth and parents with examples of healthy foods. ƒƒ Model good nutrition- When you have celebrations, fundraisers, and meetings, the foods served should be healthy foods. ƒƒ Serve fruit, veggies, and other healthy foods for snacks at program-sponsored events. ƒƒ Offer non-food prizes as rewards for good behavior, instead of cookies and candy. ƒƒ Use games, field trips or extra playtime, instead of food-based celebrations. ƒƒ Instead of selling unhealthy foods, choose from the list of creative fundraisers. ƒƒ Staff model healthy eating habits in front of youth. ƒƒ Educate OST youth about healthy food using some of the lessons in this toolkit. ƒƒ Give your food service provider suggestions of healthy snacks and meals that your youth enjoy. Offer to host a taste-test!

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #3: OST program allows foods that model the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010. Foods that are not recommended should be discouraged and should not be brought and served OR OST program does not allow any outside food to be brought to OST sites.

Go, Slow, Whoa Snacks Food Group Vegetables

Go Foods:

Slow Foods:

Whoa Foods: Eat only once in a

Eat almost anytime

Eat sometimes or less than often

while or on special occations

ÌÌ Raw vegetables like carrots,

ÌÌ Baked french fries

ÌÌ Hash browns

ÌÌ Fresh vegetables with regular

ÌÌ French fries

celery, broccoli, green beans with low-fat dressing

Fruits

dressing

ÌÌ All fresh fruits – whole or cut up

ÌÌ Dried fruits (i.e. raisins)

ÌÌ Canned or frozen fruit in their own

ÌÌ Fruits canned in light syrup

juice

ÌÌ Fruits canned in heavy syrup

ÌÌ 100% fruit juices ÌÌ Frozen fruit juice bars

Dairy

ÌÌ Low-fat yogurt

ÌÌ Chocolate milk

ÌÌ Ice cream

ÌÌ Low-fat string cheese

ÌÌ Low-fat frozen yogurt

ÌÌ Whole milk

ÌÌ Fat-free or low-fat milk

ÌÌ 2% milk

ÌÌ Milk shakes ÌÌ Full fat cheeses

Grains

ÌÌ Whole grain crackers

ÌÌ Baked tortilla chip

ÌÌ Cookies, cakes, pies

ÌÌ Whole grain cereal

ÌÌ White bread

ÌÌ Donuts

ÌÌ Whole grain muffins

ÌÌ White crackers

ÌÌ Sweetened cereals

ÌÌ Whole grain pretzels

ÌÌ Low-fat microwave popcorn

ÌÌ Honey buns

ÌÌ Air popped popcorn

Meat/Nuts/Beans

ÌÌ Cheese and buttery popcorn

ÌÌ Unsalted sunflower seeds

ÌÌ Salted sunflower seeds

ÌÌ Hot dogs

ÌÌ Tuna in water

ÌÌ Tuna in oil

ÌÌ Chicken nuggets

ÌÌ Unsalted nuts

ÌÌ Turkey or beef jerky

ÌÌ Hoagies with white bread

ÌÌ Hummus

ÌÌ Hoagies with wheat bread

ÌÌ Bean dip ÌÌ Three bean salad

Beverages

ÌÌ Water

ÌÌ 100% fruit juices

ÌÌ Fruit punch, lemonade

ÌÌ Free-fat or low fat milk

ÌÌ 2% milk

ÌÌ Soda

ÌÌ Unsweetened ice tea

ÌÌ Sport drinks

ÌÌ Sweetened ice teas

ÌÌ V-8 juice

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

ÌÌ Whole milk

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #3: OST program allows foods that model the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010. Foods that are not recommended should be discouraged and should not be brought and served OR OST program does not allow any outside food to be brought to OST sites.

Healthy School Celebrations Let’s party! From birthday parties to holiday celebrations, there are many celebrations in OST sites. Along with the fun, usually comes food. Just one school party can include pizza, sugary beverages, chips, cake, and ice cream, plus a goodie bag with candy. Offering so many treats so often can contribute to unhealthy eating habits. However, with a few easy changes, parents, OST staff, and students can shift the focus of school parties from unhealthy food to healthy fun.

TIPS for healthier classroom celebrations ƒƒ Have a scavenger hunt for items or information around your OST site. Have children search for items related to the party theme. ƒƒ Provide “free choice” activity time at the end of the day. ƒƒ Provide extra recess time. ƒƒ Celebrate creatively by setting up craft stations and playing music in the background. ƒƒ Plan special party games. ƒƒ Have a dance party. ƒƒ Read a children’s book related to the party theme. ƒƒ Allow students to pick a book of their choice and ask the principal or a parent to come in and read it.

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #3: OST program allows foods that model the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010. Foods that are not recommended should be discouraged and should not be brought and served OR OST program does not allow any outside food to be brought to OST sites. Celebrate with a Variety of Healthy Snacks Serve snacks with fun plates, napkins, cups, or straws, or have a tasting party where children can vote for their favorite healthy snack. ƒƒ Trail mix (pretzels, dried fruit, whole grain low-sugar cereals, sunflower or sesame seeds, etc.) ƒƒ Fruit kabobs made with a variety of fruits ƒƒ Yogurt parfaits with non-fat or low-fat yogurt, granola, and fruit ƒƒ Light or low-fat popcorn (without butter) ƒƒ Non-fat or low-fat pudding ƒƒ Applesauce or other fruit cups ƒƒ Raw veggies served with non-fat or low-fat dip, like salad dressing or hummus ƒƒ Bananas or strawberries and yogurt as a dip ƒƒ Graham crackers with jam or apple butter ƒƒ Fresh apple slices with caramel or yogurt dip ƒƒ Raisins or dried fruit such as bananas, apples, peaches, apricots, plums, etc. ƒƒ Whole grain tortilla chips and salsa ƒƒ Healthy breads, like corn bread or banana bread ƒƒ Whole grain cereal bars ƒƒ 100 % frozen fruit bars ƒƒ Fruit smoothies ƒƒ Crackers and cheese ƒƒ Hummus and vegetables

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #3: OST program allows foods that model the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010. Foods that are not recommended should be discouraged and should not be brought and served OR OST program does not allow any outside food to be brought to OST sites.

Read it Before You Eat It! Understanding the Nutrition Facts Sample food Label: Potato Chips The serving size defines the size of the portion.

Servings Per Container 1 oz. (28 g) 10

show how many servings are in the container.

Calories are a measurement of energy.

Limit foods high in cholesterol,

Total fat lists the amount of

sodium and sugar. Consuming

fat in a serving. Eat a diet

too much fat, cholesterol,

low in dietary fats. Avoid

sodium, and sugar can

foods high in saturated and

lead to weight gain, heart

trans fat. Remember if you

disease and diabetes.

have more than one serving you will get more fats, calories and sodium with it.

The % Daily Value shows the percent of this nutrient compared to what you need in a

20% or higher means that your food is a good source of this vitamin or mineral. 5% or lower means your food is low in that vitamin or mineral .

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

day. Eat less foods with high percentage of fats, cholesterol, and sodium. A higher % Daily Value for fiber or protein is good.

21


Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #3: OST program allows foods that model the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010. Foods that are not recommended should be discouraged and should not be brought and served OR OST program does not allow any outside food to be brought to OST sites.

Alternative Non-Food Fundraiser Ideas To Do:

To Sell:

ƒƒ Ask local businesses to donate a portion of their sales on a

ƒƒ Magazines

given date to your OST program

ƒƒ Holiday ornaments/flowers

ƒƒ Organize a marathon, bike-a-thon, walk-a-thon, read-

ƒƒ Mother’s day baskets

a-thon, and have sponsors pledge money, per mile, or

ƒƒ Picture frames

numbers of books/pages

ƒƒ Gift wrap

ƒƒ Organize a car wash

ƒƒ Greeting cards

ƒƒ Hold a talent show and sell tickets

ƒƒ Pedometers

ƒƒ Invite community members and businesses to donate items

ƒƒ Cookbooks with healthy recipes

for a silent auction

ƒƒ Balloon bouquets

ƒƒ Rent-a-teen helper

ƒƒ Healthy foods: Gift baskets with fruit/cheese, low salt foods

ƒƒ Penny wars (pennies +1 point, nickels +5 points,

ƒƒ Calendars with photos and upcoming events

quarter + 25 points, team with the most points wins)

ƒƒ Holiday ornaments

ƒƒ Book fair

ƒƒ Music CD’s

ƒƒ 3-on-3 basketball tournament

ƒƒ Fitness video/DVD

ƒƒ Recycle cell phones and printer cartridges

ƒƒ Valentine day flower sale

ƒƒ Bowling/Skate night

ƒƒ Halloween pumpkin sale ƒƒ Vegetable seedling or herb plants

Additional Resources Available: see “Analyzing Fast Food” activity and “Let’s Eat for the Health of it” handout in Nutrition Resources section.

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #3: OST program allows foods that model the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010. Foods that are not recommended should be discouraged and should not be brought and served OR OST program does not allow any outside food to be brought to OST sites.

Food in After School Programs Many OST programs offer snacks or meals to youth. The

CBS Kosher Food Program

National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and the Child and

85 Tomlinson Rd Unit D

Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) are both programs of the

Huntingdon Valley PA 19006

US Department of Agriculture, which reimburses meals and

215-938-0201

snacks at schools and OST programs serving youth from low-

http://www.cbsfoodprogram.com/index.html

income families. Each program has specific requirements for the type of foods that must be included to get reimbursed.

Preferred Meals http://www.preferredmealsystems.com/

If your program is located in a School District of Philadelphia

sales@preferredmealsystems.com

(SDP) building, OST snacks or meals is provided by the

800.886.6325 ext.9967

Division of Food Services of the School District.

Sites may also provide snacks or meals on their own, or

Programs not housed in SDP buildings may utilize any of the

contract with another food provider or caterer. To find out

following “school food sponsors� for meals or snacks. These

how to provide afterschool meals through your organization,

sponsors will provide the food. Your OST program will need

contact the Pennsylvania Department of Education, Division

to provide necessary documentation for the sponsors to get

of Food and Nutrition at 800-331-0129.

reimbursed for the food.

Kitchens will need to be certified by the Philadelphia

Nutritional Development Services (NDS)

Department of Health, Division of Food Protection. See Food

Archdiocese of Philadelphia

and Nutrition Guideline 6 for more information.

222 North 17th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103 215.895-3470 http://www.ndsarch.org/

OST Healthy Living Guideline Pilot Sites can contact rrifkin@ phmc.org or lwilliams@phmc.org at Health Promotion Council with any questions about afterschool or summer meals.

Philadelphia Department of Parks and Recreation 215-685-2725

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #4: A pleasant social environment is provided during scheduled meals and snacks, encouraging social interaction, conversation, and positive eating behaviors.

How this Guideline Helps OST Youth A pleasant social eating environment is relaxing, promotes healthy eating habits, and allows youth to accept and enjoy meals and snacks without pressure. This allows youth to learn to listen to their hunger cues and understand when they are full, attain internal self control and practice mindful eating. OST programs can encourage youth to try new foods by increasing their exposure to a greater variety of foods.

Never praise, reward or bribe a youth to finish a meal, or use food as a punishment. Weight problems can result when we associate food with being rewarded or punished.

Tips for OST Programs to Promote Healthy Eating Behaviors: ƒƒ Have regularly scheduled meals and snacks and avoid eating in-between.

ƒƒ Set clear expectations for mealtime behaviors and socialization. For example, expectations may include

ƒƒ Allow plenty of time to eat and enjoy foods.

sharing pleasant conversations, trying new foods,

ƒƒ Allow youth to eat in small groups to encourage

practicing good table manners, and helping with clean up.

socializing and conversation. ƒƒ Don’t use mealtime and snack time to reward or discipline youth. ƒƒ Trust children with their food. If a youth says they are hungry at mealtime, it is okay for them to eat. If they say

ƒƒ Be a role model. Youth respect and look up to their teachers. If youth see their teachers eating healthy foods they will learn to like them too. ƒƒ Encourage youth to try new foods. Explain that learning to like new foods takes time and to try and be open-minded.

they are full, it is okay for them to stop. It is important

ƒƒ Never force or bribe youth with food.

for everyone get a sense of when they have had enough.

ƒƒ Involve youth with planning meals, food preparation and

ƒƒ Offer positive feedback to reinforce nutrition guidelines.

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

clean up.

24


Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #4: A pleasant social environment is provided during scheduled meals and snacks, encouraging social interaction, conversation, and positive eating behaviors.

Promoting Positive Eating Behaviors Have regular family meals.

Make a variety of healthy snacks available.

If youth know when meals are served, they will come to the table

Keep plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grain snacks, and healthy

hungry and ready to eat. Family meals also encourage positive

beverages (water, milk, 100% fruit juice) around and easily accessible

interactions between parents and children; this is a great opportunity

so kids become used to reaching for healthy snacks instead of empty

to learn about what is going on in your children’s lives. Studies have

calorie snacks like soda, chips, or cookies.

shown that children who have regular family meals are less likely to become overweight and do better in school. Even if you are bringing in take-out food, sit down and eat together as a family.

Be a Role Model. Parents are their child’s first teachers. Children often mimic their parents’ behaviors. If children see their parents eating healthy foods,

Cook more meals at home.

the likelihood that they will eat healthy foods increases.

Eating home cooked meals is healthier for the whole family and sets a great example for kids about the importance of food. Restaurant meals tend to have more fat, sugar, and salt. Preparing meals at home is also less expensive than dining out. Save dining out for special occasions.

Involve children with food chores. Children like to help adults shop for groceries, choose what goes in their lunch box, prepare dinner, and clean up. It’s also a chance for you to teach them about different foods, their nutritional value, and (for older children) how to read food labels.

Don’t force or bribe kids with foods. Offer and encourage youth to try new foods. Be patient, it sometimes takes more than a dozen times to learn to like a new food. Eating is a learned behavior and it takes time to learn new flavors and textures. Forcing may cause resistance and rebellions as a result.

Let your children choose how much to eat. Suggest they take enough food to start and more if they are still hungry. Don’t insist your child finish all their food unless they want to. Let them know they won’t be eating again until snack time or the next meal.

Additional Resources Available: see “Be a Healthy Eating Role Model” and “Benefits of Family Meals” posters in Nutrition Resources section.

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #5: OST programs that offer nutrition education use science-based nutrition materials from non-profit, federal, state, or city agencies. Materials with food company logos or advertising are not to be used.

How this Guideline Helps OST Youth Nutrition education helps youth and their families make healthier food choices and develop healthy eating behaviors. Nutrition education can be formal or informal, for example it may be led by a nutrition educator, with or without the help of a curriculum, or it may be taking advantage of teachable moments during eating times. Nutrition education can take place in the classroom, the food store, the vegetable garden, through a cooking class, or at mealtime. Send the right health messages to youth. Avoid using materials from food companies that use health messages as marketing tools that can be misleading. Nutrition information should come from credible sources, without any bias from food companies trying to sell their products. Credible sources include the government agencies, universities, school districts, and non-profit agencies and health education foundations.

Tips for OST Programs to Offer Nutrition Education: ƒƒ Hang nutrition posters, like MyPlate or Re-Think your Drink. ƒƒ Discuss the benefits of healthy foods during snack and meal time. ƒƒ Include activities that involve healthy eating. ƒƒ Have youth create a list of fruits and vegetables they want to try. Then sample them each week. ƒƒ Provide handouts, coloring pages, and healthy eating worksheets. ƒƒ If possible, get youth involved with food preparation. A food activity, like making pizza or smoothies, or a vegetable tasting offer youth hands-on experience.

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #5: OST programs that offer nutrition education use science-based nutrition materials from non-profit, federal, state, or city agencies. Materials with food company logos or advertising are not to be used.

Nutrition Education in OST Online Resources OST Project Based Learning Blog

Team Nutrition

http://ostprojects.wordpress.com/2011/02/28/school-gardens/

http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/educators.html

A resource for Out-of School Time providers in Philadelphia. The project

Team Nutrition is a national initiative designed to bring youth, schools

based learning website offers examples of successful PBL activities

and families together to improve the health of the nation’s children.

including gardening activities.

This initiative based on the principles of the Dietary Guidelines and

Media Smart Youth http://www.nichd.nih.gov/msy/index.htm#subnav3

MyPyramid encourages students and their parents to eat a variety of low fat and nutrient rich foods. Even though schools are the primary focus for Team Nutrition there are many great and interactive materials on this site that can be used in any setting.

Is an interactive afterschool program for youth ages 11-13. The goal of this program is to show youth how the media can influence their

Nutrition Explorations

nutrition and physical activity choices. This program is designed to help

http://www.nutritionexplorations.org/educators/lessons-main.asp

students become critical thinkers and develop skills on how to make good decisions concerning their health.

Milk Matters http://www.nichd.nih.gov/milk/teachers/index.cfm

Fun and interactive materials designed for preschool to upper elementary age students.

Produce for a Better Health Foundation http://www.pbhfoundation.org/educators/teachers/curriculum/index.php

Is a public health campaign designed to encourage youth to consume more calcium rich foods. This site allows providers to find a variety of

Produce for a Better Health Foundation is an organization that is

activities such as fun worksheets and online games for all ages.

dedicated to ensuring that individuals have access to fruits and veggies.



Their curriculum “Healthy Eating with Peanut and Produce”, designed for grades 3-6th teaches students the nutritional benefits of eating fruits, vegetables and peanuts. Another great component of this curriculum is that it teaches students where we get our food.

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #5: OST programs that offer nutrition education use science-based nutrition materials from non-profit, federal, state, or city agencies. Materials with food company logos or advertising are not to be used. The Eat.Right.Now

Tiger’s Action Plan - Fit Plan Living Healthy:

http://webgui.phila.k12.pa.us/offices/n/nutrition

http://web.tigerwoodsfoundation.org/programs/ twlcLessons/fitPlan/index

The Eat.Right.Now Program provides nutrition education in Philadelphia public and charter schools for youth and low-income families. Too see if your

Developed and tested at the Tiger Woods Learning Center, the Fit Plan is a

program qualifies for this free program, check out the Eat.Right.Now website.

unique curriculum focusing on living healthy through nutrition activities,

MyPlate.gov

exercise and diet. This contains many good lessons, fun activities using real-life examples. All ages.

www.choosemyplate.gov/ A communication initiative based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines is

 ational Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s N Portion Disortion

designed to serve as a reminder to eat healthy at all times. The main

http://hp2010.nhlbihin.net/portion/

objectives of MyPlate are to remind consumers to balance calories, what foods to increase and reduce.

We Can! http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/wecan/index.htm

Over the past 20 years the portion sizes served at restaurants and fast food establishments have increased. To find out how today’s portions compare to the portions available 20 years ago, quiz yourself on Portion Distortion I (2003) and Portion Distortion II (2004). You will also learn about the amount of physical activity required to burn off the extra

Is a national movement spearheaded by the National Heart, Lung,

calories provided by today’s portions.

and Blood Institute that is designed to give parents, caregivers and communities the tools to help prevent obesity in children ages 8-13. On

Growing Healthy Habits

WE CAN’s website you can find informative factsheets tailored towards

http://md.nutrition-ed.org/

adults and interactive activities for children.

KidsHealth by Nemours

This curriculum developed by the University of Maryland teaching nutrition through gardening.

http://kidshealth.org/ KidsHealth is a popular website for children’s health and development. This is a good website to visit if you are looking for healthy recipe ideas or if you are trying to get a better understanding of the terms that surround nutrition.

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #5: OST programs that offer nutrition education use science-based nutrition materials from non-profit, federal, state, or city agencies. Materials with food company logos or advertising are not to be used. Take advantage of local talent There are many food and nutrition experts in your community. For example nutrition experts may include chefs, university nutrition students, hospital dieticians, and farmers. Invite them to come in and speak to youth about their careers. If they have nutrition cooking expertise, they can do a food demonstration or tasting at your site. Nutrition education from SNAP-Ed or Penn State is in available in many of our communities and may be able to work with your youth. http://www.panen.org/philadelphia-county

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #6: The OST program serves meals and snacks in a clean and safe environment, at proper serving temperatures, in compliance with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health Office of Food Protection requirements.

How this Guideline Helps OST Youth Safe food handling is critical in helping to prevent food borne illnesses and keeping people healthy. Hand washing is essential to prevent the spread of infectious. Food should be completely defrosted and served at proper serving temperatures for youth to enjoy. Serving utensils, food preparation and eating surfaces must be clean and sanitized. Hand washing can prevent the spread of infectious diseases.

Tips for OST Programs for Hand washing ƒƒ Always wash your hands before and after handling or serving food. ƒƒ Hang hand washing signs on bathroom walls to remind youth and staff to wash their hands. ƒƒ Wash your hands after using the bathroom, taking out the trash, eating, drinking, smoking, gardening, or handling any chemicals.

Additional Resources Available: see “Wash Your Hands” posters in Nutrition Resources section.

All OST sites must register with the Office of Food Protection in the Philadelphia Department of Public Health. Go to www.phila.gov/health/environment/foodprotection.html and fill out pages 22-24.

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Section 1: Food & Nutrition Guideline #6: The OST program serves meals and snacks in a clean and safe environment, at proper serving temperatures, in compliance with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health Office of Food Protection requirements.

Tips for OST Programs to Keep food safe ƒƒ Defrost and store food in the refrigerator and not on the counter. ƒƒ If you touch raw meat before serving and preparing another

Wash hands for at least 10-15 seconds with soap  and warm water. Use a paper towel to turn off the faucet!

food, always wash hands, and make sure the preparation surfaces are clean. ƒƒ Rinse fresh fruits and veggies before serving. ƒƒ Serve and prepare food on clean surface areas. ƒƒ Clean all surface areas with detergent and hot water. ƒƒ Make sure that dishes and utensils are clean before using. ƒƒ Do not serve or prepare food for others if you are sick. ƒƒ Do not sneeze or cough near food. ƒƒ Keep cold food cold, keep hot food hot. ƒƒ Wear plastic gloves when working with, or serving foods that will not receive further cooking.

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Nutrition Resources 1 & Parent Pages

Section


Section 1: Food & Nutrition Additional Resources Guideline 1 ƒƒ Philadelphia Department of Public Health: http://foodfitphilly.org/all-about-sugary-drinks/facts/ ƒƒ Harvard School of Public Health: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/healthy-drinks/focus/index.html ƒƒ Liquid Candy, Center for Science in the Public Interest: http://www.cspinet.org/liquidcandy/index.html ƒƒ The Negative Impact of Sugar Sweetened Beverages on Children’s Health The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Healthy Eating Research Synthesis, November 2009: http://www.rwjf.org/childhoodobesity/product.jsp?id=52668 ƒƒ Sweet and Vicious, The Case Against Sugar, by Gary Taubes, April 17th, 2011, The New York Times Magazine section ƒƒ Are You Pouring on the Pounds? NYC Health Anti-Soda Ads - Man Drinking Fat: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-F4t8zL6F0c - Do You Drink 93 Sugar Packets a Day?: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hF8XnU4L33U - Man Eating Sugar: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62JMfv0tf3Q ƒƒ PSA on Sugar-Loaded Beverages, Seattle & King County Public Health Dept: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6idXRO8Voas&NR=1 ƒƒ How Much Sugar in a Can of Cola?: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yKZ2ZqBYlrI&NR=1

Guideline 2 ƒƒ Water in Schools: www.Waterinschools.org/faqs

Guideline 4 ƒƒ Ellyn Satter: http://www.ellynsatter.com/

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Your Child’s After-School and Summer Camp Program is Sugary Drink Free! Sugary drinks are full of sugar and calories. When kids drink sugary drinks instead of milk, juice, or water, they probably are not getting the nutrients they need for health and to grow. Sugary drinks can lead to an unhealthy weight and cavities, and many parents and teachers report that youth behave better when they avoid sugary drinks.

Sugary drinks include: ƒƒ Non-diet soda ƒƒ Hugs and fruit drinks ƒƒ Sports drinks ƒƒ Non-diet flavored water ƒƒ Energy drinks ƒƒ Sweetened coffee drinks and lattes ƒƒ Sweetened iced tea ƒƒ Slushies, water ice, and ice slurps ƒƒ Lemonade

Serve and Send in Healthy Drinks! Nonfat or low-fat milk, and 100 % fruit or vegetable juice, and water are the healthiest drinks. Nonfat or low-fat milk has protein, Vitamin D, and calcium, which are essential for your child’s growth and health. Kids and teens should have 2-3 cups of milk a day. Try lactose-free milk, or soymilk if your child has trouble digesting milk due to “lactose intolerance”. 100 % fruit juice is loaded with vitamins and minerals, natural fruit sugar, and calories. 8-ounces a day is plenty! 100 % vegetable juice is delicious and loaded with lots of vitamins. We need about 8 cups of water a day. Drink more when it’s hot or after exercise! Tap water is safe and low in cost, so there is no need to buy bottled water. Instead, bring a water bottle for trips away from home.

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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Re-Think Your Drink A great activity for staff, youth, and parents

Activity:

Class participants will examine the beverages they drink.

1. Depending on the number of individuals, divide students into small

They will learn how to read food labels to make healthier

groups, have them work individually. If they are too young to do

beverage choices and understand serving sizes.

Purpose of Activity: This activity will help students see how much sugar is added to various beverages.

Age Level: Any

the math, it may be necessary to show them how to figure out the amount of sugar per beverage. 2. Ask youth to think about how many bottles of sugary drinks they usually drink every day. 3. Provide each group with a beverage label. Have group members read

Group Size: Can be adapted for almost any size Time Involved: Preparation time: 10 minutes; Activity time: 15 - 30 minutes; depends on number of beverages.

the labels and figure out how many servings are in each container. Example: A 20-ounce container is 2 ½ servings. See label reading handout (Read it Before You Drink It) for details. 4. Multiply the number of grams of sugar (see nutritional label) per

Materials Needed: ÌÌ Several beverage containers with nutrition labels ÌÌ Measuring spoons or plastic teaspoons ÌÌ Sugar

serving by the number of servings in the beverage container. 5. One teaspoon equals four grams of sugar; therefore divide the grams of sugar number by 4.

ÌÌ Clear plastic drinking cups

6. Have a student, or group leader, measure out the number of teaspoons of sugar in their beverage into clear plastic cups.

1 oz. (28 g) 10

7. Compare the amount of sugar in the various beverages. 8. Discuss the effects too much sugar has on our bodies.

____ servings per beverage container X ____ grams sugar per serving = ____ grams in beverage container

____ grams in beverage container ÷ ____(# of grams/teaspoon) = ____ teaspoons sugar per beverage container

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

35


Drinking Water Availability Checklist Use this simple checklist to evaluate water availability in your site.

Indoor:

Yes No

Plan to Improve

Is fresh drinking water available, free of charge?

____________________________________

Are all drinking water sources clean?

____________________________________

Are all cups, coolers and water bottles clean?

____________________________________

Is water available at meals?

____________________________________

Is water pleasant in terms of taste and temperature?

____________________________________

Are posters hanging that highlight the benefits of drinking water?

____________________________________

Are youth encouraged to drink water?

____________________________________

Outdoor (do the same as above):

Yes No

Plan to Improve

Are water fountains/coolers available?

____________________________________

Do supervisors refill water coolers when needed?

____________________________________

OST Trips (do the same as above):

Yes No

Plan to Improve

In the summer: Is cool fresh water provided to students during trips?

____________________________________

Are parents sent reminders to provide water bottles?

____________________________________

Is there a plan in case a child forgets/loses their water bottle?

____________________________________

____________________________________

____________________________________

Are adequate water and toilet breaks scheduled for trips   lasting an hour or longer? Does staff schedule water breaks and actively remind youth   to drink regularly on trips?

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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How Much Calories, Fat, Salt & Sugar Do I Need Each Day? Females: Fat

Sodium (salt)

Age

Activity Level

Calories

30 % or less of calories from fat per day

In milligrams (mg)

9-13

Not active

1,400-1,600

50

1500*- 2300

None

Active

1,600-2,000

60

1500*- 2300

None

Very Active

2,000

67

1500*- 2300

None

Not Active

1,800

60

1500*- 2300

None

Active

2,000

67

1500*- 2300

None

Very Active

2,400

80

1500*- 2300

None

14-18

Sugar

* Further reduce sodium intake to 1,500 mg among persons who are 51 and older and those of any age who are African American or have hypertension, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease. The 1,500 mg recommendation applies to about half of the U.S. population, including children, and the majority of adults.

Males: Fat

Sodium (salt)

Age

Activity Level

Calories

30 % or less of calories from fat per day

In milligrams (mg)

9-13

Not active

1,600-2,000

60

1500*- 2300

None

Active

1,800-2,200

60-73

1500*- 2300

None

Very Active

2,000-2,600

67-87

1500*- 2300

None

Not Active

2,000-2,400

73-80

1500*- 2300

None

Active

2,400-2,800

80-93

1500*- 2300

None

Very Active

2,800

93

1500*- 2300

None

14-18

Sugar

* Further reduce sodium intake to 1,500 mg among persons who are 51 and older and those of any age who are African American or have hypertension, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease. The 1,500 mg recommendation applies to about half of the U.S. population, including children, and the majority of adults.

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

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STUDENT SHEET 1.5A

ANALYZING FAST FOOD INTRODUCTION:

MATERIALS (OPTIONAL):

Mmmmm… fast food; so delicious, but do you really know what you are putting into your body when you eat a cheeseburger and french fries? Do you ever feel lazy and bloated after a fast food meal? Fast food is very cheap, convenient and tasty, but the food is loaded with empty calories, fat, sodium and sugar — nutrients that can alter mood and cause stomach pains if eaten in excess. The following activity will help show you what is lurking in your favorite fast food meals!

     

Shortening Table sugar Digital scale or teaspoons Spoons Weighing boats or clear cups Fast food nutrition facts

PROCEDURE: PART I- FINDING OUT THE FACTS 1.

Using the nutrition facts from Student Sheet 1.5b or the internet, record the amount of calories, fat, sodium and sugars from each of your food items in the data table below.

ANALYSIS: FOOD ITEM:

CALORIES:

TOTAL FAT (G):

SODIUM (MG)

SUGAR (G)

TOTAL: 1.

What do you think about the amount of calories, fat, sodium and sugar in your fast food meal?

2.

Look at the total amounts of calories, fat, sodium and sugar in your meal. How do these numbers compare to the recommended daily amounts for the average person?

FIT PLAN: LIVING HEALTHY

UNIT 1: LET’S BEGIN!

STUDENT SHEET 1.5A: ANALYZING FAST FOOD 28


STUDENT SHEET 1.5A

ANALYZING FAST FOOD PART II: VISUALIZING THE FACTS (OPTIONAL) DIRECTIONS: Measure the amount of fat (shortening) and sugar (table sugar) in your entire fast food meal using the digital gram scale or a teaspoon. If you are using a teaspoon, use the conversion 1 teaspoon = 4 grams and measure accordingly.

FAT:

SUGAR:

1.

Record the total amount of fat in your meal:_______g.

1.

Record the total amount of sugar in your meal:_______g.

2.

Gather the shortening.

2.

Gather the granulated sugar.

If using a scale:

If using a scale:

3.

Zero the scale with the weighing boat on the measuring platform.

3.

Zero the scale with the weighing boat on the measuring platform.

4.

Using a spoon, add shortening until the total amount equals the amount of fat in your meal.

4.

Using a spoon, add sugar until the total amount equals the amount of sugar in your meal.

5.

Set aside final amount.

5.

Set aside final amount.

If using the teaspoon method, assume 1 teaspoon = 4 grams of fat: 6.

Using the teaspoon, add shortening until the total amount equals the amount of fat in your meal. You may need to

If using the teaspoon method, assume 1 teaspoon = 4 grams of sugar fat: 6.

estimate a fraction of the teaspoon to get the measurement as exact as possible. 7.

Set aside the final amount.

Using the teaspoon, add sugar until the total amount equals the amount of sugar in your meal. You may need to estimate a fraction of the teaspoon to get the measurement as exact as possible.

7.

Set aside the final amount.

ANALYSIS: 1.

Observe your results. What do you think about what you see?

2.

Do you think this is a healthy meal? If not, what kind of changes can you make to cut down on the calories, fat, sodium and sugar? List a few examples of healthier menu items.

3.

How has this activity changed your outlook on fast food?

FIT PLAN: LIVING HEALTHY

UNIT 1: LET’S BEGIN!

STUDENT SHEET 1.5A: ANALYZING FAST FOOD 29


STUDENT SHEET 1.5B

FAST FOOD NUTRITION FACTS LARGE HAMBURGER:

CHICKEN SANDWICH:

REGULAR ICED TEA:

Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 540 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 29g Sodium . . . . . . . . . 1040mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9g

Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 500 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 17g Sodium . . . . . . . . . 1150mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10g

Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . . 15mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0g

SMALL CHEESEBURGER:

GRILLED CHICKEN SANDWICH:

SMALL SODA:

Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 12g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . 750mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6g

Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 420 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 10g Sodium . . . . . . . . . 1190mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11g

LARGE CHEESEBURGER:

CHICKEN NUGGETS:

Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 440 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 23g Sodium . . . . . . . . . 1150mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7g

Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 10g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . 450mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0g

SMALL FRENCH FRIES:

FISH SANDWICH:

Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 13g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . 140mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0g

Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 18g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . 660mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5g

MEDIUM FRENCH FRIES:

CHICKEN SALAD W/ DRESSING:

Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 20g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . 220mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0g

Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 320 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . 970mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11g

LARGE FRENCH FRIES:

WATER:

Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 570 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 30g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . 330mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0g

Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . . . 0mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0g

(4PCS)

Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . . 10mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40g

MEDIUM SODA: Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . . 15mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58g

LARGE SODA: Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 310 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . . 20mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86g

HARD TACO: Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 10g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . 350mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1g

SOFT CHICKEN TACO: Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 270 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 14g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . 820mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3g

LARGE BURRITO: Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 390 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 13g Sodium . . . . . . . . . 1360mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5g

BEAN & CHEESE BURRITO: Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 470 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 20g Sodium . . . . . . . . . 1400mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5g

MEDIUM SHAKE: Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 550 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 13g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . 190mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72g

ICE CREAM: Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 330 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 10g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . 180mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48g

BAKED APPLE PIE: Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 270 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 12g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . 190mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14g

COOKIE: Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . . 90mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15g

FRUIT YOGURT: Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . . 55mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19g

NACHOS: Calories . . . . . . . . . . . . 330 Total fat . . . . . . . . . . . . 21g Sodium . . . . . . . . . . 530mg Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3g

This lesson reproduced with prior written consent of the Tiger Woods Foundation. All information contained within the Fit Plan curriculum, or materials is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any health problem. Always consult your physician or qualified health professional on any matters relating to your health or fitness before beginning a new diet or exercise program. A Full disclaimer and Additional Fit Plan activities are available at: http://web.tigerwoodsfoundation.org/programs/twlcLessons/index.

FIT PLAN: LIVING HEALTHY

UNIT 1: LET’S BEGIN!

STUDENT SHEET 1.5B: FAST FOOD NUTRITION FACTS 30


Nutrition Measuring Fast Facts Measurement Equivalents

For Nutrition Calculations

By Volume:

Fat

ƒƒ 3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon

ƒƒ 1 teaspoon fat = 4 grams

ƒƒ 2 tablespoons = 1 ounce

ƒƒ 1 gram fat has 9 calories

ƒƒ 1 cup = 8 ounces= 16 tablespoons

By weight: ƒƒ 454 grams = 1 pound

Salt ƒƒ 1 level teaspoon (6 grams) = 2400 mg sodium

Sugar ƒƒ 1 teaspoon= 4 grams ƒƒ 1 gram of sugar has 4 calories

Calories ƒƒ 1 pound of fat has 3500 calories ƒƒ 1 cup sugar has 775 calories

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Healthy Corner Stores in Philadelphia Healthy corner stores are improving access to healthy food in their communities. Every corner store in the Philadelphia Healthy Corner Store Network has introduced at least four healthy products, such as fresh produce, low-fat dairy and whole grain products. These corner stores also help customers make healthy choices with colorful signage inside the store that provides easy-to-use nutrition information. Look for the Healthy Corner Store Network in the window of your corner store for healthy-eating options. For a list of over 500 corner stores that are part of the Healthy Corner Store Network go to FoodFitPhilly.org http://foodfitphilly.org/eat-healthy/healthy-corner-stores/

Check it out: Snackin Fresh is a website that helps youth learn how to get healthier foods in their neighborhoods. For more information please visit http://www.thefoodtrust.org/php/SnackinFresh

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Tips for Parents: Positive Eating Behaviors Have regular family meals.

Make a variety of healthy snacks available.

If youth know when meals are served they will come to the table hungry

Keep plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grain snacks, and healthy

and ready to eat. Family meals also encourage positive interactions

beverages (water, milk,100% fruit juice) around and easily accessible

between parents and children; this is a great opportunity to learn

so kids become used to reaching for healthy snacks instead of empty

about what is going on in your children’s lives. Studies have shown

calorie snacks like soda, chips, or cookies.

that children who have regular family meals are less likely to become overweight and do better in school. Even if you are bringing in take-out

Be a Role Model.

food, sit down and eat together as a family.

Parents are their child’s first teachers. Children often mimic their parents’ behaviors. If children see their parents eating healthy foods,

Cook more meals at home. Eating home cooked meals is healthier for the whole family and sets a

the likelihood that they will eat healthy foods increases.

great example for kids about the importance of food. Restaurant meals

Don’t force or bribe kids with foods.

tend to have more fat, sugar, and salt. Preparing meals at home is also

Offer and encourage youth to try new foods. Be patient, it sometimes

less expensive than dining out. Save dining out for special occasions.

takes more than a dozen times to learn to like new food. Eating is a learned behavior and it takes time to learn new flavors and textures.

Involve children with food chores. Children like to help adults shop for groceries, choose what goes in

Forcing may cause resistance and rebellions as a result.

their lunch box, prepare dinner and clean up. It’s also a chance for you

Let your children choose how much to eat.

to teach them about different foods, their nutritional value, and (for

Suggest they take enough to start and more if they are still hungry.

older children) how to read food labels.

Don’t insist your child finish all their food unless they want to. Let them know they won’t be eating again until snack time or the next meal.

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Be a Healthy Eating Role Model Parents are role models and the most important influence in their children’s lives.

As role models, parents need to demonstrate healthy behaviors so that their children have healthy attitudes about eating and develop healthy eating habits. Your attitude about food and eating habits might influence your children: l Do you skip breakfast? l Do you drink sodas rather than milk with your meals? l Do you diet all the time and have a fear of (or talk about)

eating “bad” food?

l Do you snack all day long? l Do you eat in front of the TV? l Do you eat whenever you are bored or under stress?

If you answered “yes” to more than a few of these questions, you are likely sending unhealthy messages to your child about food.

Healthy Eating Starts With Parents Modeling healthy eating supports the development of healthy behaviors in children. Here are a few healthy eating habits parents can role model for their children: Never skip meals—especially breakfast. Take moderate portions. Limit junk food in the house. Drink water and milk instead of soda. Cook and prepare food with your children. l Eat foods from all food groups—milk, fruit, vegetables, whole grains and lean meats, fish & beans. l Try fruit and yogurt for dessert. l l l l l

Teaching Healthy Habits at Mealtime Children won’t perceive healthy eating as important if it is not something that they see you doing. l Eat the way you want your child to eat—try new foods together but don’t force your children to try them. l Avoid emphasizing “good” and “bad” foods—teach your child that he or she needs to balance nutritious food with fun snacks. l Show ways for managing stress that do not include eating. l Encourage your kids to help prepare meals, set the table and help with dishes. l Enjoy your meals—positive attitudes are contagious!

For more ideas on healthy family meals, visit www.MealsMatter.org. ©2010 Sponsored by Dairy Council of California


Benefits of Family Meals Eating meals as a family plays a key role in raising high-achieving, healthy and welladjusted children.

Improved Academic Achievement l Frequent family meals are linked with being

successful in school, including getting better grades and scoring higher on achievement tests.

Better Nutrition l Family meals contribute to higher daily intakes

of fruit, vegetables and important nutrients like calcium, fiber, iron, vitamins B6 and B12, C and E, and less overall dietary fat.

Higher Self-Esteem l Mealtime conversation brings the family together,

promotes positive self-esteem in children and starts a lasting and positive relationship with food.

Making Mealtime Family Time Family meals should be dynamic—an exchange of ideas, conversation and feelings. Mealtime is a wonderful opportunity to strengthen family ties and pass on family cultural traditions. l Eat together as a family whenever possible. l Keep mealtime pleasant—avoid power struggles over what

gets eaten, and remember that mealtime is not a time for discipline. l Turn off the TV, video games, mobile phones and the computer. l Use conversation-starters to get children talking, such as “What is the best or worst thing that happened today at school?”

For more ideas on healthy family meals, visit www.MealsMatter.org. ©2010 Sponsored by Dairy Council of California


Section

2 Physical Activity


Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #1: ƒƒ School Year OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ Summer OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 60 minutes of daily OST time or a minimum of 300 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ OST programs serving youth in grades (6-12) provide a minimum of 20% of daily or weekly OST time of moderate to vigorous activity.

How this Guideline Helps OST Youth The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Physical Activity Guidelines for Children and Adolescents recommends that youth get 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day. Most children and adolescents are not getting enough exercise and this has led to an increase in the number of overweight and obese youth. OST sites can serve as the outlet where children and adolescents can be more physically active. After school and summer hours has traditionally been a time when youth have participated in physical activity, whether it is playing in their communities or participating in after school or summer sports programs. Parents of youth in Out-of-School Time programs told us that youth are less likely to be active at home after OST programming. OST programs tend to be more flexible than schools and can incorporate daily time for physical activity in programming. Studies show that as we are exposed to different activities and find the ones we enjoy, we increase our chances of being physically active throughout our lifetime. Endurance (aerobic), flexibility (stretching) and muscular strenthening activities are all essential for physical fitness (see list on page 56.)

Youth love to be challenged. They will want to practice every day and improve their fitness levels at the same time.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #1: ƒƒ School Year OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ Summer OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 60 minutes of daily OST time or a minimum of 300 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ OST programs serving youth in grades (6-12) provide a minimum of 20% of daily or weekly OST time of moderate to vigorous activity.

These are some of the many benefits of being fit and physically active: ƒƒ Improves ability to learn, concentrate, and improves test scores ƒƒ Helps maintain a healthy weight ƒƒ Strengthens the heart, lungs, muscles, and bones ƒƒ Improves coordination and stamina ƒƒ Reduces the risk of getting heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and certain types of cancer ƒƒ Relieves stress ƒƒ Increases self-esteem and confidence ƒƒ Helps youth build social skills such as sharing, communication, and conflict resolution skills and team work ƒƒ Improves ability for goal setting and decision making ƒƒ Reduces fidgeting ƒƒ Decreases fighting and violent behavior This information can be shared with parents and caregivers who are concerned about homework completion.

Do not take physical activity from youth as a punishment or make youth do physical activity as a punishment. Both send the wrong message about the role and purpose of physical activity.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Tips for OST Programs to Increase Physical Activity: Tips to Incorporate Physical Activity in OST Programs ƒƒ Plan physical activity into daily and weekly schedules. ƒƒ Schedule time for physical activity before or directly after snack or meal time, as a break from sitting all day in school. This gives youth a time to relax and recharge. ƒƒ Use creative strategies to get children moving as they transition from one activity to another. (See waiting time and transition strategies) ƒƒ Use physical activity energizers to get youth moving in OST. For every 1 hour of work, take a 5-10 minute break to do something active like stretching, walking or dancing.

ƒƒ Plan events that youth will get excited about and want to practice. For example- an end of the season dance performance, jump rope competition or games day. ƒƒ Have youth track their progress- for example time running around the gym or playground ƒƒ Invite local high school and college athletes to visit for a play day with youth to inspire youth. ƒƒ Consider gardening as a physical activity- it supports good nutrition and can very physical (see gardening curriculum resource) ƒƒ Praise youth for trying an activity instead of being “good” at something.

Invigorating physical activity helps energize all day long.

ƒƒ Ask youth to support and encourage each other.

(See the list of energizers)

ƒƒ Choose physical activity incentives that promote or reinforce

ƒƒ Incorporate learning with physical activity, for example, have youth practice spelling words or math as part of a relay

positive health behaviors. ƒƒ Make sure youth are having fun!

or dance. ƒƒ Partner with recreation and community sites that can provide space and training for physical activity. See pg 53.

Tips for Staff Training and Resources in OST Programs ƒƒ Use one of the evidence-based curriculums for creative

Tips to Engage Youth in OST Programs ƒƒ Offer active group activities like basketball, as well as activities based on individual action, performance and interest, like walking, weight lifting, dancing, running or yoga. It is best to offer a variety of physical activities. ƒƒ Ask youth about the activities they would like to do in OST,

lessons to use with your students. ƒƒ Offer opportunities for staff to attend trainings or review curriculum and become skilled leaders in physical activity. ƒƒ Encourage staff to be positive role models and participate in physical activity. The more enthusiastic and skilled they are, the more they will model and promote physical activity with youth.

and include these in your programming. ƒƒ Turn on some music and let the youth dance.

Remind parents to dress children in the proper

ƒƒ Start a walking club

attire ( i.e., sneakers and comfortable clothing)

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #1: ƒƒ School Year OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ Summer OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 60 minutes of daily OST time or a minimum of 300 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ OST programs serving youth in grades (6-12) provide a minimum of 20% of daily or weekly OST time of moderate to vigorous activity.

Types of Exercises for Children and Adolescents Children and adolescents should get 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a day. These 60 minutes of exercise should include a combination of aerobic, muscle strengthening, and bone strengthening exercises.

Types of Physical Activity1: Aerobic Exercises: Aerobic exercises cause you to rhythmically move your larger muscles as they strengthen your heart and lungs. Running, jumping, and dancing are all aerobic exercise. Most of the 60 minutes of physical activity a day should include some type of aerobic exercise. Aerobic exercise is categorized by heart rate intensity: moderate to vigorous.

Moderate Intensity Aerobic (Slightly out of breath) ƒƒ Brisk walking

ƒƒ Gardening

ƒƒ Frisbee

ƒƒ Games that require

ƒƒ Hopscotch

ƒƒ Line dancing

ƒƒ Dodgeball

ƒƒ Baseball

catching and throwing

ƒƒ Relay races

Vigorous intensity Aerobic (Breathing rapidly) ƒƒ Hip hop and jazz dancing

ƒƒ Basketball

ƒƒ Martial arts

ƒƒ Tag

ƒƒ Track and field

ƒƒ Hockey, Lacrosse

ƒƒ Jumping rope

ƒƒ Soccer

ƒƒ Tennis

ƒƒ Football

ƒƒ Calisthenics

ƒƒ Stair climbing

1

Examples for types of exercises for children and youth were taken from the 2008 Physical Activity Guideline for Americans

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #1: ƒƒ School Year OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ Summer OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 60 minutes of daily OST time or a minimum of 300 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ OST programs serving youth in grades (6-12) provide a minimum of 20% of daily or weekly OST time of moderate to vigorous activity.

Types of Physical Activity1: Muscle Strengthening Muscle strengthening exercises improve the strength and endurance of your muscles. Climbing, lifting weights, and playing tug of war are muscle strengthening exercises. It is recommended that you do some type of muscle strengthening exercise at least three times a week. ƒƒ Rope climbing or climbing walls

ƒƒ Push ups

ƒƒ Yoga

ƒƒ Tug of war

ƒƒ Martial arts

ƒƒ Sit ups and push-ups, curl-ups

ƒƒ Swinging on playground equipment

ƒƒ Calisthenics

ƒƒ Resistance bands

Bone Strengthening Bone strengthening exercises put a force on the bones that promotes bone strength and growth. Hopscotch, basketball, and tennis are examples of bone strengthening exercises. ƒƒ Hopscotch

ƒƒ Running

ƒƒ Gymnastics

ƒƒ Hopping, Skipping, Galloping

ƒƒ Volleyball

ƒƒ Tennis

ƒƒ Jumping rope

ƒƒ Basketball

1

Examples for types of exercises for children and youth were taken from the 2008 Physical Activity Guideline for Americans

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #1: ƒƒ School Year OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ Summer OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 60 minutes of daily OST time or a minimum of 300 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ OST programs serving youth in grades (6-12) provide a minimum of 20% of daily or weekly OST time of moderate to vigorous activity.

Waiting Time When working with a large group of youth, it is difficult to give each child individual attention. This creates waiting time. For example, when you are assisting a youth with their homework and another youth needs help, the other child has to wait until you are finished. These waiting periods can also occur when youth participate in physical activity. Often times there are not enough equipment and supplies forcing students to wait. When a child has to wait for an extended period of time they may become tired, bored, or lose interest in the activity. Children are also losing time that they can be physically active. For example, if youth only have 30 minutes daily to be active, but they have to wait 10 minutes to be able to participate in the game…then they are only active for 20 minutes of their day.

Tips to Reduce Waiting Times ƒƒ Use activities like soccer and dance that allows for participation by more than one student. ƒƒ While youth are waiting, have them walk or jog in place, or around your OST site. ƒƒ If equipment is in short supply, create centers. For example, there could be a hula hoop, jump rope and basketball center. Have students spend a certain amount of time in each center and then allow them to switch to a different center. ƒƒ Instruct students on the proper usage of playground equipment and supervise their play. ƒƒ Be organized! Make sure you have all your equipment, supplies, and lesson plans ready in advance. Then you can begin an activity immediately.

For more ideas on activities to during waiting times see the Energizers list on page 60.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #1: ƒƒ School Year OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ Summer OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 60 minutes of daily OST time or a minimum of 300 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ OST programs serving youth in grades (6-12) provide a minimum of 20% of daily or weekly OST time of moderate to vigorous activity.

Transition Time Strategies It is recommended that youth in OST sites are physically active daily. However, this is not always easy to accomplish due to other obligations that sites have to fulfill (i.e. PBL’s , homework time and field trips). One strategy to help students transition from one activity to the next is to include physical activity. Doing some form of physical activity can help ease students through those transition periods and help them be physically active.

Physical Activity Ideas for Transition Time ƒƒ While taking attendance, have students do some type of exercise. For example, when the youth hears their name called they can get out of their seats and do 5 jumping jacks. To make it more interactive the students can pick a letter of the day and whenever a youth’s name is called that begins with that letter everyone has to do jumping jacks. ƒƒ While walking down the hall have youth pretend that they are different forms of transportation. For example, they can wave their arms in the air like an airplane or pump their hands to mimic the horn on a train. ƒƒ Turn on the radio and let the students dance while cleaning the room. ƒƒ Do a form of exercise while reciting multiplication facts or vocabulary words.

For more ideas on activities to do during transition periods see the Energizers list on page 60.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #1: ƒƒ School Year OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ Summer OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 60 minutes of daily OST time or a minimum of 300 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ OST programs serving youth in grades (6-12) provide a minimum of 20% of daily or weekly OST time of moderate to vigorous activity.

Physical Activity in OST Energizers:

Online Resources:

Just a Minute (JAM)

SPARK

www.jamschoolprogram.com

www.sparkpe.org

Just a Minute is a free resource guide that brings health and physical

The original SPARK Physical Education (PE) study was launched by the

fitness into the classroom. Jam offers a weekly one minutes exercise

National Institutes of Health to create, implement, and evaluate new and

routine and a monthly newsletter with more great exercise ideas for all

innovative approaches to physical education content and instruction,

age groups. Checkout the one minute exercise of the week.

then test them in “real world” settings. SPARK PE was designed to be

Eat Smart Move More North Carolina www.eatsmartmovemorenc.com Energizers and activity tools for elementary and middle school students.

more inclusive, active, and fun than traditional PE classes. Today, after lessons learned from more than 20 years of ongoing research and field testing nationwide, SPARK PE is the most researched and field-tested Physical Education program for ages 5-14 in the world – a true solution to our growing problem of overweight and obese children. See free curriculum resources.

Empower Me 4 life www.empowerme2b.org A fun and practical 8-session healthy living course equipping kids ages 8-12 with new attitudes, skills and knowledge about eating better and moving more—for life.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #1: ƒƒ School Year OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ Summer OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 60 minutes of daily OST time or a minimum of 300 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ OST programs serving youth in grades (6-12) provide a minimum of 20% of daily or weekly OST time of moderate to vigorous activity.

PE Central

VERB It’s what you do

www.pecentral.org

http://www.cdc.gov/youthcampaign

PE Central contains a huge variety of physical education lesson plan idea

VERB It’s what you do is a national campaign coordinated by the Centers

for all age groups.

for Disease Control and Prevention to encourage young people ages 9

Fit Source http://nccic.org/fitsource

to 13 to be physically active every day. The campaign has shown a 34% increase in weekly free-time physical activity among 8.6 million children ages 9 and 10. After school programs can download materials—including kits to help children create new games and explore games from around

Fit Source, launched in 2005 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Child Care Bureau, is an interactive web site for child

the world, a tool to help track daily physical activity, and ideas for rewarding completed physical activity goals.

care and afterschool providers looking for resources to help address easily search for a variety of physical activity and nutrition resources

San Diego County Office of Education Afterschool Physical Activity

by age, topic, and keywords. Providers will find: games and activities,

http://www.afterschoolpa.com/home.html

the nation’s childhood obesity epidemic. The site allows providers to

lesson plans, healthy recipes, information for parents, physical activity campaigns, funding strategies, informational resources, and Spanish

The San Diego County Office of Education Afterschool Physical Activity

language Web sites. Fit Source has resources for any age group whether

web site, designed to promote physical activity and good health through

you are working with elementary or high school students. The site links

fun activities to students in grades 4th-8th. The Web site offers program

to existing federal resources and was developed after receiving input

staff a wide array of activities, including “Street Games,” “Multicultural

from over 100 child care providers about their needs.

Activities,” and “Sports with a Twist.” These activities require relatively little “real” equipment and rely on creative use of household materials and limited space. Funding for the site was provided by the CDC.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #1: ƒƒ School Year OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ Summer OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 60 minutes of daily OST time or a minimum of 300 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ OST programs serving youth in grades (6-12) provide a minimum of 20% of daily or weekly OST time of moderate to vigorous activity.

A World Fit For Kids!

NFL Play 60

http://www.worldfitforkids.org/

http://www.nfl.com/play60

Provides healthy behaviors and personal empowerment programming

Launched in 2007, NFL Play60 is a national health and fitness campaign

and training that result in a triple bottom line for participants: obesity

focused on increasing the wellness of youth by encouraging them to be

reduction, increased graduation rates, work readiness/jobs. Since 1993,

active for at least 60 minutes a day. The NFL Play 60 campaign has teamed

they have worked with over 170,000 elementary, middle and high school

with other organizations to tackle childhood obesity by getting kids

students in communities with some of the highest diabetes rates and

active through school and afterschool programs and online child-target

lowest high school graduation rates in Los Angeles. Through a wide

outreach. On this website you can find tips on ways to get youth active and

range of strategically designed activities—from sport, dance and cultural

a student planner that helps them track how much physical activity they

enrichment, to leadership training, mentoring and academic support—

are getting daily. To date, the NFL has donated over $200 million dollars to

they work to ensure that young people develop the physical, mental and

youth health and wellness program through NFL Play 60 campaign.

emotional fitness they need to succeed.

Let’s Move!

SaJai Foundation Moving Kids’ Minds, Hearts and Bodies

http://www.letsmove.gov/

http://sajaifoundation.org/

Let’s Move is a national campaign started by Michelle Obama that is dedicated to solving the challenge of childhood obesity so that

SaJai Foundation Moving Kids’ Minds, Hearts and Bodies focuses on

children will grow up healthier. The Let’s Move! campaign does this by

teaching kids ages 5-11 why to value and how to lead a healthy life.

giving parents helpful information on how to make healthy choices,

WISE Kids program is a turnkey kit for wellness programs during and

providing schools with healthier foods and ensuring that families have

after school day hours and based on the premise that as kids learn how

access to healthy and affordable foods. On Let Move’s website you can

to incorporate healthy eating, physical activity, and outdoor exploration

find factsheets on nutrition, physical activity and obesity, and tips on

into their lives, they will become healthier, they will reach out to others,

starting a community garden.

leading to healthier communities and a healthier world. Childhood obesity can be battled, one child at a time.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #1: ƒƒ School Year OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ Summer OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 60 minutes of daily OST time or a minimum of 300 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ OST programs serving youth in grades (6-12) provide a minimum of 20% of daily or weekly OST time of moderate to vigorous activity.

Guides to Implementing Best Practices in Physical Activity:  hanging Lives, Saving Lives: C Healthy Behaviors Initiative

California Project Lean http://www.californiaprojectlean.org/

http://www.ccscenter.org/afterschool/Step-By-Step%20Guide Learn how to strengthen physical education by ensuring students A Step-by-Step Guide to Developing Exemplary Practices in Healthy

engage in MVPA (moderate to vigorous physical activity). Video clip with

Eating, Physical Activity and Food Security in Afterschool Programs

California experts explains why Physical Activity is important and a few

 romoting Physical Activity and Healthy P Nutrition in Afterschool Settings www.nccic.acf.hhs.gov/afterschool/fitness_nutrition.pdf

quick tips to integrate.

 ational Institute on Out-Of-School Time at the N Wellesley Center for Woman http://www.niost.org/Our-Work/our-work

Strategies for Program Leaders and Policy Makers. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Administration for Children and Families Child

The National Institute on Out-of-School Time (NIOST) at the Wellesley

Care Bureau.

Centers for Women at Wellesley College, together with the University of

The Move More North Carolina

Massachusetts Boston (UMB) and the YMCA of the USA, collaborated to found the Healthy Out-of-School Time Coalition (HOST).

http://www.eatsmartmovemorenc.com/AfterSchoolStandards/Texts/ NCAfterSchoolStandardsFINAL.pdf

The vision for this national coalition of leaders in the OST field is to foster health and well-being practices in afterschool programs nationwide,

Recommended Standards for After-School Physical Recommendations

using science-based standards for healthy eating, physical activity,

for providing quality physical activity in North Carolina after-school

screen time, and social supports for these behaviors including staff,

programs. The standards are based on current research and expert

family and child engagement.

opinion on how after-school programs can help young people move more.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #1: ƒƒ School Year OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ Summer OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 60 minutes of daily OST time or a minimum of 300 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ OST programs serving youth in grades (6-12) provide a minimum of 20% of daily or weekly OST time of moderate to vigorous activity.

Helpful Internet sites for OST on Healthy Eating and Physical Activity: We Can!

science-based, behavior-focused, and motivational messages about

http://wecan.nhlb.nih.gov.

healthy eating and physical activity. The campaign communicates four major themes to children and caregivers, including the importance of

(Ways to Enhance Children’s Activity and Nutrition) is a national public

eating breakfast, balancing your day with food and activity, and taking

outreach program created by the National Institutes of Health to encourage

family time to emphasize being active. An array of support materials is

healthy weights for children. In addition to community and youth outreach,

available to help caregivers implement activities, including posters, “Power

We Can! provides resources to educate parents and caregivers about how they

Panther” costumes, and slogans.

can support healthy choices and educate their children about the importance of good nutrition. We Can! encourages parents and primary caregivers to: ÌÌ Increase the availability and accessibility of healthy foods in the home; ÌÌ Limit the availability and accessibility in the home of sweetened beverages,

Harvard School of Public Health Prevention Research Center www.hsph.harvard.edu/research/prc/resources

high-fat foods, and energy-dense foods with low nutrient value; ÌÌ Enjoy small portions at home and at restaurants;

This website offers a variety of good lessons, teacher trainings, parent

ÌÌ Support and enable family physical activity;

and family educational materials and PowerPoint presentations on

ÌÌ Support and enable reduced screen time.

nutrition and physical activity.

We Can! produces Families Finding the Balance, a handbook for parents that

Flyers and information sheets

provides background information on the obesity epidemic, and practical, useful tools to help families adopt healthier lifestyles.

Eat Smart. Play Hard http://www.fns.usda.gov/eatsmartplayhard/About/overview.html.

can be sent to parents at different intervals to remind them of the importance of physical activity and to give them practical suggestions for remaining positive about physical activity: ÌÌ www.cdc.gov/youthcampaign/marketing/adult/pdf/Time_for_Kids_Family.pdf ÌÌ www.cdc.gov/youthcampaign/marketing/adult/pdf/Active_Families_Brochure.pdf

Eat Smart, Play Hard is a national nutritional education and promotion campaign designed by the USDA’s Food and Nutrition Services to convey

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

ÌÌ In Spanish: www.cdc.gov/youthcampaign/marketing/adult/pdf/Hispanic.pdf ÌÌ In Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, English: www.cdc.gov/youthcampaign/ marketing/adult/pdf/in_lang_Active_Families_Brochure.pdf

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #1: ƒƒ School Year OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ Summer OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 60 minutes of daily OST time or a minimum of 300 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ OST programs serving youth in grades (6-12) provide a minimum of 20% of daily or weekly OST time of moderate to vigorous activity.

Physical Activity and Managing Behaviors Physical activity is important for a child’s physical, mental, and cognitive development. Play and exercise allows children the opportunity to regroup, reduce their stress levels, and release their energy. Given the value of physical activity in a child’s life, taking away the opportunity for a child to be active sends the wrong message and is a counter-productive discipline strategy. Many sites report that they withhold physical activity as a behavior management technique. Withholding a child’s opportunity for being physical active may cause that child to misbehave more. Studies have shown that daily physical activity breaks improve children’s on-task behavior and reduces stress and unwelcome behavior. In addition, withholding physical activity from youth is an example of a negative reinforcement strategy. Negative reinforcement strategies such as the suspension of privileges and sentence writings have shown only to improve youth behavior temporarily and may even increase the likelihood of misbehavior. Positive reinforcement strategies have been shown to help manage behavior and can improve the overall climate in OST sites. The idea behind this approach is if you give positive feedback for good behavior then the likelihood that this child maintains that behavior increases. Also, other children will see this child receive praise and they will mimic this behavior so they can be rewarded as well.

Tips for OST Programs To Reinforce Good Behavior ƒƒ Teacher’s helper

ƒƒ Dance to favorite music

ƒƒ Certificate, prize, trophy, or ribbon

ƒƒ Get “free” choice at end of day

ƒƒ Play a favorite game or puzzle

ƒƒ Receive a movie pass

ƒƒ Coupon for prizes or privileges

ƒƒ Eat lunch with teacher

ƒƒ Private lunch with a friend

ƒƒ Extra music, art or time for physical

ƒƒ Line Leader

activity

ƒƒ Get stars or stickers

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #1: ƒƒ School Year OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 150 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ Summer OST programs serving youth in grades (K-5) provide a minimum of 60 minutes of daily OST time or a minimum of 300 minutes per week of moderate to vigorous activity. ƒƒ OST programs serving youth in grades (6-12) provide a minimum of 20% of daily or weekly OST time of moderate to vigorous activity.

Encourage staff to use positive reinforcement strategies to prevent, redirect, and manage inappropriate behaviors, instead of withholding physical activity.

Keep in mind that even if you are using positive reinforcement strategies there will be incidences where a child may still misbehave.

Alternative Behavioral Management Strategies ƒƒ Have youth write an apology letter to the person that they offended. ƒƒ Have youth write a letter home to their parents describing their behavior and why it was inappropriate. ƒƒ Have a meeting with the youth’s parents to discuss their behavior. Come up with solutions together on ways that youth’s behavior can be improved. ƒƒ Have students create and sign a student contract. This will hold them accountable when they demonstrate inappropriate behavior. ƒƒ Move youth away from the group to allow them to reflect on their behavior. Have them “earn” their way back into the group once they have calmed down. ƒƒ Instead of taking away recess or physical activity, take away computer or sedentary play time. ƒƒ Create a behavior chart with the youth to monitor their behavior. ƒƒ Have a one-on-one talk with the youth who is continuously misbehaving. Often there are other problems that are causing that child to “act out” (i.e. problems at home, and being bullied by other children). Help the youth find the appropriate resources to deal with that problem.

Physical activity is a proven strategy for reducing stress.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #2: Non-homework screen time is limited to 30 minutes per 3-hour block of OST time.

How this Guidelines Helps OST Youth Program can support activities that promote physical activity and health, rather than screen-based activities. When a child substitutes screen time for physical activity, they lose the important benefits that playing, relaxing, and socializing can bring. Screen time activities include computer and gaming-based activities, television, movie watching, and smart and mobile phone use. Unfortunately, there are very few screen-based activities that incorporate physical activity. Studies show that six to seven hours of a youth’s day are spent on screen time.

Excessive screen contributes to: ƒƒ Obesity

ƒƒ Developmental delays

ƒƒ Poor grades

ƒƒ Increased violent behaviors

Reduced screen time can: ƒƒ Help youth be active

ƒƒ Improves social skills and family interaction

ƒƒ Help youth be healthy and at a healthy weight

Tips for OST Programs to Keep your Program Free of Screen-Based Activities ƒƒ Send a note home to parents letting them know about

ƒƒ Lead a lesson about screen time in which you help children

screen time limits, and encouraging them to reduce at-

to track their screen time over time and set goals to reduce

home screen time so that non-screen time becomes a part

screen time.

of daily activity for both parents and children. ƒƒ Call parents to follow-up on screen time limits and to

ƒƒ Alter free-time activities so that screen time-based activities are not an option.

discuss any issues you have observed around screen time

ƒƒ Ask students to keep phones off and in their school bag.

in OST activities.

ƒƒ Reduce screen time at your celebrations and OST events.

ƒƒ Ensure that screens are only used for educational purposes.

Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs Toolkit

ƒƒ Be a role model – avoid screen usage around children!

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #2: Non-homework screen time is limited to 30 minutes per 3-hour block of OST time. What is screen time? Screen time is any time your child (or you!) spend with a screen, including computer, gaming, phone, iPod, television, or video screens. Most screen time is sedentary.

Did you know? The average youth spends six to seven hours of per day on screen time. That’s more than 40 hours per week! Why does screen time matter? Because children spend such a large part of their day on screen time, it cuts down the amount of time that they are spending being physically active. This means that children aren’t getting the necessary amount of active time. Too much screen time contributes to childhood obesity, poor grades, developmental delays, and increased violent behavior, whereas reducing screen time can help youth be active and health.

Did you know? All youth should get a full hour of moderate to vigorous physical activity each day!

Did you know? The American Academy of Pediatrics, an organization of children’s doctors, says that children should have no more than two hours of screen time each day!

1

Adapted from Nemours “Stay Active” handout; “What Out-of-School Providers Can Do to Promote Healthy Screen Time Habits”; “Stay Active Physical

Activity Tips – 6 years and older”

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #2: Non-homework screen time is limited to 30 minutes per 3-hour block of OST time. How do I cut down on my child’s screen time? Here are some important tips to help your kids reduce their screen time and increase their physical activity: ƒƒ Have children ask before using screens and set a maximum amount of time per day they can use a screen (a “screen allowance”). Use a log, such as the one attached, to chart the amount of screen time your child has per day and try to reduce it. ƒƒ Use screens together and for educational purposes, that way you control what your child sees. ƒƒ Make non-screen activities part of your everyday—go for a walk after dinner, read a book together before bed, play a board game, or have your child do homework in the kitchen while you cook dinner. ƒƒ Make sure that TVs, phone, and other screens are off during dinner. ƒƒ Do not allow children to have computers or TVs in their rooms. ƒƒ Put on the radio or a CD instead of the TV for background noise. ƒƒ Be a good role model—enjoy non-screen activities with your children and, when possible, don’t use screens around them. Make physical activity challenges for the whole family and set goals for reducing screen time and increasing physical activity.

What can my child do instead of screen time activities? ƒƒ Do homework while you cook. ƒƒ Read a book, comic book, newspaper, or magazine alone or with you. ƒƒ Play a board game with you or friends. ƒƒ Write a letter to a family member who lives far away. ƒƒ Go for a walk after dinner. ƒƒ Cook a healthy dinner with you. ƒƒ Do arts and crafts with items from the recycling bin. ƒƒ Sing songs, dance, or put on a “talent show” for the family.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #2: Non-homework screen time is limited to 30 minutes per 3-hour block of OST time. Here is a log to track screen time each day! Goal: Limit screen time to 2 hours per day Name: Jane D. Week of: 5/23/2011 TV

Video Games

Monday

2 hours

Tuesday

DVD

Computer/Internet

Time (hours)

1 hour

1 hour

4 hours

3 hours

1 ½ hours

1 hour

5 ½ hours

Wednesday

1 ½ hours

1 hour

½ hour

5 ½ hours

Thursday

4 hours

1 hour

5 hours

Friday

4 hours

1 hour

Saturday

3 hours

2 hours

2 hours

1 hour

8 hours

Sunday

2 hours

1 hour

2 hours

2 hours

7 hours

2 ½ hours

5 hours

TOTAL: 40 hours Jane D. has some work to do—she needs to cut down her screen time to two hours a day, at most! Her parents and out of school time providers can help her to reduce screen time by providing alternatives to screen time and being good role models by limiting their own screen time.

Additional Resources Available: find blank copies of the log for you to fill out in Physical Activity Resources section.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #3: OST program provides a safe environment for play and physical activity.

How this Guideline Helps OST Youth One goal of Out-of-School Time programs is to provide a physically and emotionally safe environment for youth, both after the school day and in the summer. Space and facilities for physical activity vary greatly among Philadelphia OST sites. Often as a result of limited safe play areas on-site or in the neighborhood, youth do not participate in physical activity. Programs can assess alternative resources on site or in the neighborhood to provide a safe environment for enjoyable physical activity. Children’s brains are constantly growing and they are unable to learn if they do not feel emotionally and physically safe. Therefore, it is important for children to be in a safe and secure environment so they are able to develop to their full potentials. Research has shown that children are more resilient, emotionally capable of handling situations, and less violent when they grow up and feel safe and secure OST programs may be able to utilize community and private recreation centers, parks, faith-based centers, and community gardens for physical activity. This provides youth with lifelong links to resources in their communities. Programs like Safe Routes to Schools have strategies for promoting and supporting safe active transportation to and from the program.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #3: OST program provides a safe environment for play and physical activity. Emotional Safety

Physical Safety

Youth feel emotionally safe when they feel valued, respected,

Physical activity is fun, engaging, and exciting. It can also be

and accepted. OST programs can create a climate that’s based

dangerous if the proper steps and precautions are not in place

on trust and supportive peer to peer and staff to student

to ensure that youth are safe while being physically active. Good

relationships. If students do not feel emotionally safe, they

planning and organization are the first step to physical safety.

may withdraw or not participate in program activities in fear that they will be teased or bullied.

In an emotionally safe environment: ƒƒ No child is left out regardless of their weight, gender, height, or physical ability

Some things to consider in creating a physically safe environment for youth are: ƒƒ Facilities are clean, and meet local health and safety requirements. ƒƒ Equipment for active play is safe.

ƒƒ Bullying is not allowed or tolerated

ƒƒ All play equipment is in good working order and is kept clean.

ƒƒ There is open communication between students and staff

ƒƒ Unsafe areas should be fenced off from youth.

ƒƒ Everyone is treated fairly

ƒƒ Is there a plan in place for emergency situations? ƒƒ Is there enough adult supervision? (See staff to youth ratios.)

Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Staff to Youth Ratios: Additional Resources Available: see “Safe Space Checklist” in Physical Activity Resources Section.

Grade

Staff to Student Ratios

K-3rd

1:12

4th-12th

1:15

High Risk activities,

1:8

i.e. swimming, field trips

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #3: OST program provides a safe environment for play and physical activity. Tips for OST Programs to Ensure Physical and Emotional Safety ƒƒ Staff supervises unstructured play, games, and activities ƒƒ Staff selects the right equipment for the size of youth ƒƒ Program eliminates games where children are targets ƒƒ Program documents all injuries and potential risks ƒƒ Any allergies and medical limitations are documented and respected ƒƒ All medicines should be easily accessible (i.e inhalers, epi pens) ƒƒ Staff is trained in CPR and first aid ƒƒ A first aid kit is located on the premise at all time and checked weekly to ensure that it is fully stocked ƒƒ Make sure that children and staff wear the proper attire (i.e sneakers and comfortable clothing) ƒƒ Program has an emergency plan in place ƒƒ Program ensures that water is easily accessible ƒƒ Parent and caregiver contact information is always kept up to date ƒƒ Programs institute a zero tolerance policy for staff behaviors that put students at risk ƒƒ Staff should not be talking with friends or texting during out-of-school time; instead they should be fully engaged with the youth ƒƒ Programs and staff value the individuality of a child and respect their capabilities ƒƒ Physical activities should be age appropriate and contributes to the development of a child ƒƒ Staff and youth should not tease for any reason, including the abilities, differences, challenges, or body size of others ƒƒ Develop a culture of caring and teach youth to look out for each other

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #3: OST program provides a safe environment for play and physical activity.

Recreation in your OST community Many Philadelphia Out-of-School Time sites don’t have a safe or large enough space for youth to play. However, some sites can build relationships and develop agreements to use facilities near their programs. In recent years many schools and OST programs have collaborated with other community and recreation sites for this purpose.

Geographic Information Systems maps (GIS) can identify recreation sites for physical activity. GIS maps can help sites identify resources in the community. For example, resources may include a potential playground or school, farmers’ market or community garden. An example of a GIS map is in the back of this toolkit. This toolkit includes a GIS map for your OST program and surrounding community. GIS stands for geographic information systems. It’s the software behind familiar applications like Google Earth and Google Maps and works hand in hand with global position systems (GPS). GIS allows us to make maps from data layers. What data you put in determines how the resulting maps can be useful. GIS can be helpful for understanding public health by allowing us to see what healthful resources—like community gardens and recreation centers—and unhealthful influences—like fast food restaurants and outdoor advertising—are in our communities. Kids have to travel from home to school to out-of-school time programs through our communities. Using GIS mapping, we can look at the routes children take, the stores they pass, and the places where they spend time in order to understand how the environment might influence their behavior. Ultimately, we can also use GIS to make informed decisions about how to design more healthful communities for our kids. GIS can map any data that has a geographic location. For example, a list of schools with street addresses can be mapped using a process called geocoding. Aggregate U.S. Census data of household composition, race/ethnicity, and income can by mapped by census tracts and other administrative units with thematic maps. Once data are in a GIS, they can be analyzed visually or statistically to calculate distances and identify spatial patterns. Residents who live in a community are the best people to review a GIS map to see if it is complete since GIS generally relies upon administrative data that is not always complete or up-to-date.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #3: OST program provides a safe environment for play and physical activity. Using Geographic Information Maps (GIS) Each OST Pilot site will receive a special GIS map showing your site, and nearby resources to link to for healthy food or play. Included are: ÌÌ Food stores,

ÌÌ Gardens

ÌÌ Police Athletic Leagues

ÌÌ Swimming Pools

ÌÌ Healthy Corner Stores

ÌÌ Recreation Centers

ÌÌ Public & Private Schools

ÌÌ Parks

ÌÌ Farmers’ markets

ÌÌ Playgrounds

ÌÌ Libraries

Take time to look at your map and see if there is a place you’d like to link to for education, or play. For example:

Gardens and Master Gardeners

For a list of over 500 corner stores that are part of the Healthy Corner

If there is a community garden in your neighborhood, take a walk over

Store Network go to FoodFitPhilly.org

and meet the gardeners. Most gardeners would love to speak to youth

http://foodfitphilly.org/eat-healthy/healthy-corner-stores/

about the garden and why they garden. There may even be space for your youth to create and maintain a garden. If master gardeners are

Farmers’ Markets

in the community garden, they may have to do gardening community

The farmers’ market season runs from May or June through October

service, which could be a good resource for your program.

or November. If there is a farmers’ market in your neighborhood, bring your youth over to get to know the farmers who grow food in

Healthy Corner Stores in Philadelphia

Pennsylvania. They can learn about fresh fruits and vegetables, and

Healthy corner stores are improving access to healthy food in their

when foods are in season. Most of these farmers markets accept SNAP

communities. Every corner store in the Philadelphia Healthy Corner

(food stamps). This is a great way for youth to share healthy eating

Store Network has introduced at least four healthy products, such as

resources with their families. If kids have some extra money that they

fresh produce, low-fat dairy and whole grain products.

would have spent on chips and sugary drinks in corner stores, have

These corner stores also help customers make healthy choices with colorful signage inside the store that provides easy-to-use nutrition information. Look for the Healthy Corner Store Network logo in the

them buy something to eat at the local farmers’ market.

Recreation Centers, Pools and Playgrounds Most OST sites probably know about these resources in the

window of your corner store for healthy-eating options. If your site

neighborhood, but the next step could be having a discussion with these

allows healthy outside food, your OST site staff and youth can suggest

sights about accessing these spaces for safe play. A permit or joint-use

healthy foods for them to sell that would be permitted in your program.

agreement could expand opportunities for OST programs and youth.

If your local corner store has not signed up this would be a great way to get them involved.

Have your OST staff and youth study these maps; this gives them a birds-eye view of healthy resources in their community.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #3: OST program provides a safe environment for play and physical activity. Joint Use Agreements: After identifying a site, you can approach the Site Director to negotiate for use of the site. Negotiations can include time for using the site, amount of space, liability, security, fees for regular use or to pay for security, equipment sharing, and maintenance. Joint-use agreements are formal agreements that two separate entities can use to spell out shared use of a facility. A checklist and sample of a joint use agreement can be found in the back of this toolkit. This information is from National Policy and Legal Analysis Network to Prevent Childhood Obesity (NPLAN). Their website contains a lot of information on joint-use agreements, including liability information particular to Pennsylvania. www.nplanonline.org All Out-of-School Time sites must have liability insurance to cover any liability in case of injury. Sharing that document with neighborhood sites can alleviate a primary concern.

As the OST Healthy Living Guidelines are being piloted, we can try to assist your site in developing a relationship and joint use agreement with sites in your community. This helps us learn more about their use in Philadelphia and can help other sites use this strategy as the Healthy Living Guidelines are rolled out to all Department of Human Services (DHS) sites.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #3: OST program provides a safe environment for play and physical activity. Collaborate with community partners that deliver high quality physical activity programs. Many Philadelphia programs offer instructors, training and resources for physical activity. Contact these programs to discuss ways your sites can use their services. Philadelphia Youth Sports Collaborative

Arthur Ashe Youth Tennis & Education

www.sp2.upenn.edu/ostrc/pysc/index.html

www.ashetennis.org

www.sp2.upenn.edu/ostrc/pysc/prog/index.html

”The mission of Arthur Ashe Youth Tennis and Education is to create The Philadelphia Youth Sports Collaborative (PYSC) is a pioneer in

opportunities for a diverse cross-section of young people, especially those

the country. It augments the impact of Philadelphia’s extraordinary

from low-income families and communities, to make positive choices in

collection of independent, non-profit organizations that use sports to

their lives, remain in and succeed in school, reject violence and other

benefit local children and youth, particularly those from under-resourced

risky behaviors, and grow into active, responsible and productive citizens.

environments Currently, PYSC is a collaborative of fourteen such groups

We work to achieve these goals through innovative tennis instruction,

that offer character-building and life skills training within the framework

education, life skills, and leadership development programming in

of healthful physical development. Collectively, these groups offer a full

neighborhoods throughout the Philadelphia area and at the Arthur Ashe

range of sports activities, including cycling, golf, ice hockey, lacrosse,

Youth Tennis and Education Center.”

martial arts, riding, running, soccer, squash, swimming and tennis. By sharing ideas, combining resources, identifying common areas of

Black Women in Sport Foundation www.blackwomeninsport.org

need, and leveraging support, PYSC facilitates communication between these organizations and strengthens the positive impact they have

The Black Women in Sport Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated

on youth, families, and communities. The collaborative also provides

to increasing the involvement of Black women and girls in all aspects of

resources to other agencies interested in promoting positive youth

sport, including athletics, coaching and administration. The Foundation is

development through sports activities.

resolute in facilitating the involvement of women of color in every aspect

PYSC enjoys a partnership with the Wharton Sports Business Initiative (WSBI). Along with its extensive network of faculty, students and facilities,

of sport in the United States and around the world, through the “handson” development and management of grass roots level outreach programs.

WSBI brings a wealth of knowledge, research and opportunity to PYSC. These resources help inform best practices and maximize overall impact.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #3: OST program provides a safe environment for play and physical activity. Cadence Cycling Foundation

L.E.A.P.S.

www.cadencefoundation.org

www.leapslax.org Fiscal Sponsor: Resources for Human Development

The Cadence Cycling Foundation helps Philadelphia youth between the ages of 9 and 18 years old discover all of the possibilities that the sport of

LEAPS’ mission is to enrich the lives of youth through lacrosse and

cycling has to offer. CCF mentors and coaches help participants develop

education, as well as instill the importance of a healthy and active

life skills, both on the road or in the classroom. Coaches and mentors

lifestyle. All of which will, in turn, help them develop a positive

provide the participants with the resources, guidance, and support to

worldview. LEAPS will show that with hard work on and off the field,

maintain these traits throughout their college preparation process.

anyone can be successful.

Ed Snider Youth Hockey Foundation

Philadelphia City Rowing

www.esyhf.org

www.philadelphiacityrowing.org

Snider Hockey is a cutting edge program that uses the sport of hockey

Philadelphia City Rowing seeks to empower local public school students

coupled with a rigorous off-ice life skills curriculum and supplemental

through the sport of rowing.

educational services to build character and academic skills for high-risk inner-city boys and girls from Philadelphia and Camden, NJ.

PlayWorks Philadelphia www.playworks.org

The foundation provides full equipment, ice time and experienced coaching to more than 3,000 children, at no charge to them or their families.

International Student Athlete Academy

Playworks is a national nonprofit organization that supports learning by providing safe, healthy and inclusive play and physical activity to schools at recess and throughout the entire school day.

www.isaainc.com The International Student Athlete Academy was founded in 1995 with

SquashSmarts www.squashsmarts.org

the purpose of helping young athletes realize their true academic and athletic potentials. The ISAA is based in Philadelphia, PA and currently

SquashSmarts combines the sport of Squash with AcademicTutoring for

serves the Greater Delaware Valley community. We target our services

under-served, urban youth in order to develop academic and athletic

to junior high, high school and junior college athletes. The ISAA has

achievement. Founded in 2001, SquashSmarts is the 3rdprogram

grown significantly over the past ten years and now offers a full range of

nationwide to utilize squash as a vehicle for changing young people’s lives.

programs and services to benefit student athletes in our area.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #3: OST program provides a safe environment for play and physical activity. Starfinder Foundation

Work To Ride

www.starfinderfoundation.org

www.worktoride.net

GOAL! Starfinder’s soccer, educational, and personal development

Created in 1994 by Lezlie Hiner, Work to Ride is a non-profit, providing

programs inspire young people from underserved communities to

disadvantaged urban youth from Philadelphia with constructive activities

achieve success both on and off the field. Starfinder promotes youth

centered around horsemanship, equine sports, and education. Located

leadership, a love of learning, the benefits of teamwork, and the rewards

in Fairmount Park, the setting provides a unique opportunity to bring

of commitment and responsibility.

7-to 19-year-old youth in contact with animals and nature. While most

Students Run Philly Style

participants are trained in several sports, polo has proven to be the perennial favorite of Work to Ride youth.

www.studentsrunphilly.org

Zhang Sah Martial Arts Students Run Philly Style is the only program in Philadelphia that offers

www.zhangsah.org

marathon training to help youth succeed in life. We do this by connecting students with adult mentors who help them accomplish goals beyond

Zhang Sah is a 501c (3) non-profit organization serving the Philadelphia

their dreams, including the completion of a marathon. Since 2004,

County since 1998. We provide innovative programming that combines

Students Run Philly Style has served over 2500 students, ages 12-18,

education, positive youth development, martial arts and fitness to

from neighborhoods across Philadelphia. Through the leadership of over

help individuals become both physically and mentally progressive and

200 adult mentors, called Running Leaders over 50 schools, recreation

perfect their character. We deliver programs and classes that support

centers and community leaders will host Students Run Philly Style teams

and empower individuals as they develop skills to confront and

this year. Students train side-by-side with their mentors three days a

overcome challenges through the study of traditional

week from March to November. Along the way, they complete eight road

martial arts and learn to apply these new skills to their

races, and engage in leadership and character development.

lives outside of Zhang Sah.

The First Tee John MacDonald, Executive Director www.thefirstteephiladelphia.org Mission: To impact the lives of young people by providing learning facilities and educational programs that promote character development and life-enhancing values through the game of golf.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #3: OST program provides a safe environment for play and physical activity. After School Activities Partnerships

Safe Routes Philly

www.phillyasap.org

www.saferoutesphilly.org

Program Description: ASAP provides recreational opportunities for

Program Description: Safe Routes Philly promotes biking and walking as

children in grades K-12, promoting skill-building, teamwork and fun.

fun, healthy forms of transportation in Philadelphia Elementary Schools.

ASAP recruits, screens and trains volunteer activity leaders as well as

We provide pedestrian and bicycle safety programming and support

OST staff to lead after school enrichment activities (chess, Scrabble,

for elementary schools in Philadelphia. The Safe Routes Philly program

debate, drama) at local schools, libraries, community and recreation

introduces walking and cycling as fun, healthy, and environmentally

centers, and other out-of-school time programs. Audience: K-12

friendly activities. In addition to walking and riding safely, students

(depends on the activity).

learn to view the bicycle and their feet as good means of recreation,

Playworks

exercise and transportation. Encouraging students to bicycle and walk more addresses issues of active living, obesity and diabetes, and

www.playworks.org

environmental health.

Program Description: Playworks hires and trains recess coaches. We

Safe Routes Philly youth educator teaches a 45-60 minute in-class lesson

serve low-income elementary schools by helping to organize their recess

to any private, parochial, independent or charter school, as well as

periods into safe, inclusive places where students can have fun and

various after school and summer programs in Philadelphia County. In

transition back to the classroom ready to learn. We also provide physical

addition to riding safely, students learn to view the bicycle as a good

activity periods called class game time where we reinforce concepts we

means of recreation, exercise and transportation.

want to see on the playground like game rules, boundaries and conflict resolution skills.

Creative Kids Club www.creativekidsclub.net

Playworks’ direct service model works specifically with elementary-aged students at schools where at least half of the total school population

Our mission is to provide recreational and educational events, activities

applies for free-or-reduced lunch. Our training model works with any

and workshops that empower our families and youth, to strength and

organization looking to improve the skills of their youth developers or

enhance personal growth, education, self-sufficiency and leadership.

school support staff. In addition, we also do trainings as part of individual

One of the fun and exciting programs that Creative Kids has to offer is

organization’s team building requirements.

Hoopstarz, a hula hoop dance troupe.

Playworks works in OST time by providing both before school and after

*There is a $25 membership fee to participate in Creative Kids activities.

school programming, and extra-curricular, developmental sports leagues.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #3: OST program provides a safe environment for play and physical activity. Urban Blazers

International Institute for Restorative Practices

http://www.urbanblazers.org/

http://www.iirp.edu/whatisrp.php

Founded in 2005, Urban Blazers‘mission is to encourage youth to become

Restorative practices is a new field of study that has the potential to

responsible for their own development in education and leadership.

positively influence human behavior and strengthen civil society around

Hands-on and outdoor activities such as rock climbing, hiking, camping,

the world. The fundamental premise of restorative practices is that people

canoeing and skiing are used to engage youth and improve their social

are happier, more cooperative and productive, and more likely to make

and leadership skills. Since its creation, Urban Blazers have served over

positive changes when those in authority do things with them, rather than

700 Philadelphian youth

to them or for them. Here are the three principles of fair process

A recommended approach as an alternative to traditional punitive

ÌÌ Engagement—involving individuals in decisions that affect them by

discipline styles and conflict mediation strategy.

listening to their views and genuinely taking their opinions into account ÌÌ Explanation—explaining the reasoning behind a decision to everyone who has been involved or who is affected by it ÌÌ Expectation clarity—making sure that everyone clearly understands a decision and what is expected of them in the future

Adapted from Regional Traveling Services Directory 2011 Out-of-School Time Resource Center (OSTRC), http://www.sp2.upenn.edu/ostrc/resources/documents/Spring2011TravelingServicesDirectory.pdf

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #3: OST program provides a safe environment for play and physical activity. Other Local Community Partners for Physical Activity Sports Clubs and Fitness Centers ƒƒ Philadelphia Kids Club www.kidson12th.com/ ƒƒ Philadelphia Sports Clubs

ƒƒ Attitude Tennis Training of Philadelphia www.attitudetennis.com/ ƒƒ United States Tennis Association www.usta.come/schools

www.mysportsclubs.com/clubsched/pscclubs.htm?WT.

www.10andunderTennis.com

ac=PSC_Home_AllClubs_List

Training, equipment assistance, grants, curriculum, staff

ƒƒ University City Swim Club www.ucswimc.org/ ƒƒ Fox Chase Swim Club www.foxchaseswimclub.com/ ƒƒ Lombard Swim Club www.lombardswimclub.com/ ƒƒ Aquatic and Fitness Center www.afcfitness.com/ ƒƒ Salvation Army Kroc Center of Philadelphia www.use.salvationarmy.org/use/www_use_Philadelphiakroc. nsf/vw-text-dynamic-arrays/8724C7533B07E7058525779A00 635C26?openDocument ƒƒ City of Philadelphia Pools www.phila.gov/recreation/sports/Pool_Locations.html ƒƒ Arthur Ashe Youth Tennis and Education

support, no courts required ƒƒ The Rock School for Dance Education www.therockschool.org/ ƒƒ Rennie Harris Puremovement www.rhpm.org/ ƒƒ Koresh Dance Company – Kids Dance www.koreshdance.org/outreach_kidsdance.php ƒƒ Dance Vision www.dancevisionnj.org/subtiers/outreach.html ƒƒ Yoga Child www.yogachild.net/ ƒƒ The Yoga Garden www.yogagardennarberth.com/ ƒƒ Yoga Unites www.yogaunites.org

www.ashetennis.org/

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #3: OST program provides a safe environment for play and physical activity. ƒƒ City of Philadelphia Recreation Centers (by district) www.phila.gov/recreation/facilities/Facilities_by_Distri.html ƒƒ City of Philadelphia Parks-list of neighborhood parks www.phila.gov/recreation/parks/Neighborhood__Parks_.html ƒƒ City of Philadelphia, Sports and Athletic Programs and Contacts www.phila.gov/recreation/sports/Sports_And_Athletics.html ƒƒ City of Philadelphia Department of Recreation Permits http://www.phila.gov/recreation/Permits.html http://www.phila.gov/recreation/Permits.html

College and university sports teams, college facilities ƒƒ Local public, private or charter school facilities

Professional Sports Teams ƒƒ Philadelphia Eagles Equipment Program Donation

ƒƒ Phillies Reading Program http://philadelphia.phillies.mlb.com/phi/community/ phanatic_reading.jsp ƒƒ Phillies baseball in community projects http://philadelphia.phillies.mlb.com/phi/community/ baseball_softball.jsp http://philadelphia.phillies.mlb.com/phi/community/ jr_rbi_league.jsp http://philadelphia.phillies.mlb.com/phi/community/rbi.jsp ƒƒ Philadelphia 76rs: tickets – Community Assist programs www.nba.com/sixers/community/community_assists.html ƒƒ Philadelphia 76rs Fit for Fun www.nba.com/sixers/fit/index.html

Police Athletic League of Philadelphia www.phillypal.com/

http://philadelphiaeagles.com/community/equipment-

YMCA of Philadelphia & Vicinity

donation.html

www.philaymca.org/

ƒƒ Eagles Book Mobile Youth Literacy Project

Christian Street: www.philaymca.org/branches/christian-street

http://philadelphiaeagles.com/community/

Columbia North: www.philaymca.org/branches/columbia-north

eagles-youth-partnership/literacy.html

Northeast: www.philaymca.org/branches/northeast

ƒƒ Eagles Playground Build http://philadelphiaeagles.com/community/ eagles-youth-partnership/playground-build.html

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Roxborough: www.philaymca.org/branches/roxborough West Philadelphia: www.philaymca.org/branches/ west-philadelphia

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #4: OST program provides equitable opportunities for all youth to participate in quality sport and fitness programs.

How this Guideline Helps OST Youth Program can support activities that promote physical activity and health for all children, including those with physical and mental impairment, to foster a lifelong enjoyment of activity. When a child is encouraged and supported in their physical activity, they are more likely to enjoy those experiences and continue to engage effectively in physical activity. It is vital that children are given positive exposure to physical activity in order to ensure lifelong healthy habits. This means that denial of physical activity should never be used as a behavioral management strategy—in fact, physical activity can act as an outlet for emotional stress and has been shown to increase mental functioning and academic achievement. OST programs also have the opportunity to show children of all abilities that there are productive ways to stay physically active.

Tips for OST Programs to Promote Youth Enjoyment of Physical Activity ƒƒ Always give positive feedback. Even if it is “nice job,”, “great try,” or “good effort”. ƒƒ Work with children to understand their abilities and create enjoyable physical activities that are in line with their abilities. ƒƒ Be sure to include all children in physical activities—never single a child out. ƒƒ Stay positive about physical activity and always join in trying new activities. ƒƒ Never allow staff or other children to tease children about weight or physical ability. ƒƒ Make sure that all students participate, unless they have a note from a health care provider indicating otherwise. In situations where students don’t want to participate, assess alternatives that will engage them. ƒƒ Encourage youth to support and help each other. ƒƒ Use physical activity as a reward to reinforce positive behavior or celebrate group achievement, but never take physical activity away as punishment. ƒƒ Choose physical activity incentives that promote or reinforce positive health behaviors. ƒƒ Try to develop discipline strategies that are in line with what a student was doing wrong. ƒƒ Share these strategies with parents and caregivers to reinforce at home. Let them know you can address any concerns they have about their child’s opportunities to be physically active. ƒƒ Make sure youth are having fun!

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #4: OST program provides equitable opportunities for all youth to participate in quality sport and fitness programs. Adaptive Strategies and Equipment1 As an OST provider, it is important to remember that youth come from a variety of different backgrounds and physical abilities. Some differences that may impact participation include: ƒƒ Behavioral and emotional (ex. ADHD, autism) ƒƒ Learning (ex. auditory and visual processing disorders) ƒƒ Physical (ex. cerebral palsy, visual impairments) ƒƒ Health (ex. asthma, obesity) Students often know what physical activities they can participate in and will enjoy. Therefore it is important to engage all students in determining what physical activity would be best for their abilities. Understanding students’ abilities and their unique disabilities and cultures can be facilitated by working directly with parents. It’s important to remember that some students may need medications, such as an asthma inhaler, during or after physical activities. Check with parents!

Once you have determined the unique needs of the children that you work with, implement activities that meet their unique needs and are enjoyable. Here are some examples of strategies used to address each type of disability:

Behavioral and

Learning

Physical

Health

Emotional

ÌÌ Provide written and spoken

ÌÌ Give students with visual

ÌÌ Allow breaks

ÌÌ Provide clear, additional instructional (spoken, written,

directions ÌÌ Demonstrate using visual cues

and otherwise) reminders ÌÌ Shorten activity length to keep children’s attention

1

impairment pre-orientation

ÌÌ Use smaller playing field

to the space ÌÌ Adjust space, length of activity, and physicality according to needs

Adapted from California After School Resource Center Physical Activity Guideline 8.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #4: OST program provides equitable opportunities for all youth to participate in quality sport and fitness programs.

Example

Potential Issues

Inclusion Ideas ÌÌ Provide additional reminders about instructions for

hard time staying on-task; trouble controlling impulses

20 30

Auditory and visual processing disorders

Cerebral palsy

ÌÌ Give praise for what the student has accomplished instead of focusing on what wasn’t completed. ÌÌ Offer activities of shorter lengths, and change

activities to match the student’s attention span.

ÌÌ Give clear directions and ask the student to do one or two things at a time.

ÌÌ Give directions in a format that the student can Limited communication skills;

Autism

activities.

10

Hard time paying attention; fidgety;

may react strongly to touch, noise, or lights; prefers to play alone

process. For example, a student may respond better to picture directions than verbal directions. ÌÌ Each student with autism is different. Learn about triggers that upset them, and try to avoid them or help the student prepare for them.

30 20

10

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

ÌÌ Involve the child in group activities using a gradual process.

ÌÌ Provide directions in a form that the child can Difficulty processing verbal instructions; difficulty processing where one object is in relation to another; difficulty interpreting visual cues, such as signs, colors, and boundaries

process, such as written directions for a child that has trouble processing auditory directions.

ÌÌ Demonstrate how to understand and use visual cues, such as boundaries and hand symbols for games. ÌÌ Be patient and supportive if the student needs

extra time to process directions. Ask other students to be patient as well.

Difficulty walking; may require wheelchair or cane; difficulty talking; uncontrollable muscle contractions

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ÌÌ Choose environments carefully, so that if a child falls there is the smallest risk of injury.

ÌÌ Adjust intensity, distance, and duration to tolerance.

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Section 2: Physical Activity Guideline #4: OST program provides equitable opportunities for all youth to participate in quality sport and fitness programs.

Example

Potential Issues

Inclusion Ideas ÌÌ Give the child a pre-orientation to the activity and environment. For example, allow the student to walk the distance between the starting and stopping point of an activity.

Visual impairments

Trouble getting around; trouble understanding the physical environment; cannot process visual cues

ÌÌ Provide tactile clues. For example, add cones to mark boundaries, and allow the child to feel the cones. ÌÌ For students with low-vision, provide bright cues,

40 50 Asthma

ÌÌ Use equipment that makes noise.

ÌÌ Partner child with a sighted student. Ask all students to pick partners.

ÌÌ If a student uses an inhaler, always keep it close by during physical activity. Trouble breathing during physical activity; trouble breathing due to certain allergens, such as grass or pollen; possible need for inhaler before, during, or after physical activity

ÌÌ Offer indoor physical activity, if a child’s asthma is worse outdoors due to allergens.

ÌÌ Tell students it’s ok to take a break, and encourage them to rejoin the group when their breathing improves.

ÌÌ Use a smaller play area if a child cannot run long distances due to asthma.

ÌÌ Offer lower-intensity options, such as walking briskly instead of running. Trouble moving for longer periods of time;

Obesity

50 40

such as fluorescent tape.

trouble doing certain physical movements, such as hopping or bending

ÌÌ Provide a smaller play area if a student has trouble covering a large area. ÌÌ Make it okay to take short breaks, and still encourage participation. ÌÌ Consider equipment modifications for the whole group. Use rope loops to make larger hoops.

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Section

2

Physical Activity Resources & Parent Pages


Screen Time What is screen time? Screen time is any time your child (or you!) spend with a screen, including computer, gaming, phone, iPod, television, or video screens. Most screen time is sedentary.

Did you know? The average youth spends six to seven hours of per day on screen time. That’s more than 40 hours per week! Why does screen time matter? Because children spend such a large part of their day on screen time, it cuts down the amount of time that they are spending being physically active. This means that children aren’t getting the necessary amount of active time. Too much screen time contributes to childhood obesity, poor grades, developmental delays, and increased violent behavior, whereas reducing screen time can help youth be active and health.

Did you know? All youth should get a full hour of moderate to vigorous physical activity each day!

Did you know? The American Academy of Pediatrics, an organization of children’s doctors, says that children should have no more than two hours of screen time each day!

1

Adapted from Nemours “Stay Active” handout; “What Out-of-School Providers Can Do to Promote Healthy Screen Time Habits”; “Stay Active Physical

Activity Tips – 6 years and older”

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Why is Physical Activity Important? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Physical Activity Guideline for Children and Adolescents recommends that youth get 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day.

Why is physical activity important for my child? Physical Activity has been shown to benefit children’s health, growth, and development. Physical activity: ƒƒ Helps maintain a healthy weight ƒƒ Strengthens the heart, lungs, muscles, and bones ƒƒ Reduces the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and types of cancer ƒƒ Relieves stress ƒƒ Increases self-esteem and confidence ƒƒ Helps youth build social skills such as sharing, communication, and conflict resolution skills ƒƒ Improves ability good setting and decision making.

What is the connection between physical activity and academics? Physical activity not only improves your child’s health but it may improve their learning and test scores. Regular exercise breaks can stimulate their brain activity and help them stay alert, focused, and concentrate better in school.

Ways for your child to be more physically active at home ÌÌ Turn on the radio and let your child dance around the house. ÌÌ Let your child help you clean the house. Not only will they learn some life skills but they will also be physically active. ÌÌ Take daily after dinner walks. ÌÌ Walk up and down the stairs in your house or apartment. ÌÌ Put on an exercise video and get a good workout. ÌÌ Plan family fun fitness days. ÌÌ  Enroll your child in a sport program. There are many free or low cost programs in the city. For more information visit http://www.phila. gov/recreation/ or call (215) 683-3600.

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Here is a log to help you and your child track their screen time each day! Name:__________________________________________________________________ Week of:____________________________ TV

Video Games

DVD

Computer/Internet

Time (hours)

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday TOTAL:

Name:__________________________________________________________________ Week of:____________________________ TV

Video Games

DVD

Computer/Internet

Time (hours)

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday TOTAL:

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SAFE SPACE CHECKLIST Name of OST site:___________________________________________________________________ Date of Review:__________________ Location:_______________________________________________________________________ Reviewed by (initials):_______________ Use this checklist quarterly to evaluate the safety in your OST site. If something in your site is not up to standard, use this checklist to develop an improvement plan to correct the issue.

Sport Areas: Basketball Courts

Yes

No

1.) Does the court have the proper lighting?

2.) Are safety rules/ regulations posted?

3.) Is activity area free of hazards and debris?

4.) Is the emergency exit of the facility clearly marked?

5.) Is there a first aid kit on the premise?

Comments: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Improvement Action Plan:___________________________________________________________________________________________ Tennis Courts

Yes

No

1.) Is there adequate lightening?

2.) Is the surface clean, smooth and hazard free?

3.) Has the court been well maintained?

Comments: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Improvement Action Plan:___________________________________________________________________________________________ Soccer Field

Yes

No

1.) Are the yard and zone lines visible?

2.) Is the playing field leveled and free of hazards/debris?

3.) Has the playing surface been adequately maintained (i.e. watered, mowed and weeded)?

4.) Is the field well lit?

5.) Is there a first aid kit located near the field?

Comments: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Improvement Action Plan:___________________________________________________________________________________________

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Sport Areas (continued): Baseball/ Softball Field

Yes

No

1.) Has the playing surface been adequately maintained (i.e. watered, mowed and weeded)?

2.) Is there a first aid kit located near the field?

3.) Is the baseball diamond groomed, leveled and free of hazards (i.e. holes and rocks)?

4.) Are bases secured?

5.) Does the diamond have a backstop behind home plate?

Comments: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Improvement Action Plan:___________________________________________________________________________________________ Hockey

Yes No

1.) Are safety rules/ regulations posted?

2.) Is the ice area free from hazards and debris?

3.) Are doors to ice area properly closed?

4.) Is a first aid kit located on premise?

5.) Is there proper lighting and ventilation?

Comments: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Improvement Action Plan:___________________________________________________________________________________________ Football

Yes No

1.) Are goals post properly padded?

2.) Is the field free from hazards/debris and does surface provide adequate footing?

3.) Are the out-of-bound areas properly marked?

4.) Is there a first aid kit nearby?

Comments: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Improvement Action Plan:___________________________________________________________________________________________

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Gym: Indoor/Outdoor

Yes No

1.) Is the floor surface smooth and free from cracks and holes?

2.) Is the gym floor clean and free of hazards?

3.) Is the gym well-lit?

4.) Are safety signs posted?

Comments: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Improvement Action Plan:___________________________________________________________________________________________

Swimming Pool: Indoor/Outdoor

Yes No

1.) Are there lifeguards present?

2.) If not, are there other safety measures in place?

3.) Are there pool rules posted?

4.) Is safety and first aid equipment easily accessible?

5.) Is there an accessible and visible phone for calling EMS?

Comments: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Improvement Action Plan:___________________________________________________________________________________________

Classroom:

Yes No

1.) Is the floor free from debris?

2.) Have chairs and desks been moved out the way?

3.) Is there a first aid kit nearby?

Comments: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Improvement Action Plan:___________________________________________________________________________________________

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Outdoor Recreation: Playground

Yes No

1.) Is the playground are free of litter or dangerous debris?

2.) Is the equipment free of damage?

3.) Is equipment not missing any parts?

4.) Is the playground equipment free of any protruding bolts, screws, nails or fixtures?

Comments: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Improvement Action Plan:___________________________________________________________________________________________ Parks

Yes No

1.) Is the park clean and free of litter, debris and graffiti?

2.) Does the park equipment (i.e. benches, grills, playgrounds) seemed to be well maintained?

3.) Are park rules and regulation posted?

Comments: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Improvement Action Plan:___________________________________________________________________________________________

Track:

Yes No

1.) Are boundaries clearly marked?

2.) Is track free of hazards/debris and traffic?

3.) Is track surface leveled and provides adequate footing?

4.) If there an emergency action plan in place to handle accidents?

Comments: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Improvement Action Plan:___________________________________________________________________________________________

For more detail information about playground and recreation safety please visit the United States Department of Education’s website http://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/cur/physhlth/out_of_class/appendix_e.pdf or United States Consumer Product Safety Commission’s Public Playground Safety Handbook found at www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/325.pdf

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Example of a GIS Map:

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Example of a GIS Map:

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Example of a GIS Map:

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Checklist for Developing a Joint Use Agreement (JUA) Many communities lack safe, adequate places for children and their families to exercise and play. Schools might have a variety of recreational facilities—gymnasiums, playgrounds, fields, courts, tracks—but many districts close their property to the public after school hours because of concerns about costs, vandalism, security, maintenance, and liability in the event of injury. Most states currently have laws that encourage or even require schools to open their facilities to the community for recreation or other civic uses. Nonetheless, school officials may be reluctant to do so, cautious about the expense in times of increasingly tight budgets. The good news is that city, county, and town governments can partner with school districts through what are known as joint use agreements to address these concerns A joint use agreement (JUA) is a formal agreement between two separate government entities – often a school and a city or county – setting forth the terms and conditions for shared use of public property or facilities. JUAs can range in scope from relatively simple (e.g., opening school playgrounds to the public outside of school hours) to complex (allowing community individuals and groups to access all school recreation facilities, and allowing schools to access all city or county recreation facilities).1 Just as there is no one model JUA, there is no single method to develop an agreement. Successful JUAs require a lot of thought, effort, and cooperation to reach agreement on a range of issues. This checklist is designed to identify issues for the parties to consider when developing a JUA to share existing facilities. Not all of the issues presented will be applicable in all situations, and there may be issues unique to a community that are not included here. NPLAN has developed four model JUAs as templates for communities to use to develop their own agreements. See all NPLAN joint use products online at www.nplanonline.org.

www.nplanonline.org

March 2009


Healthy Living Guidlines for Out-of-School Time Programs  

Toolkit: Healthy Living Guidlines for Out-of-School Time Programs

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