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Architecture | Digital Design

Illinois Institute of Technology Bachelor of Architecture


Philosophy My approach to architecture is not founded on a fixed style or aesthetic. Design begins with a comprehensive study of each project’s constraints, requirements, building use, users, and pre-existing context. Design then evolves from a continued search for ideas, concepts, and answers. These problem-solving criteria are then transformed to create a conversation between the innovative and vernacular architecture. This portfolio is a collection of work I have created as an undergraduate student at the Illinois Institute of Technology. Each project includes a description of my understanding of the projects and my interpretation of design. Each project represents my beliefs as an architect combined with the education I have received.


Contents Contents Glassblowing Arts Center West Whitney Museum Digital Design Computer Renderings Model Construction Technical Details Chicago Lot Home + Studio Benedictine Monastery

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Glassblowing Arts Center

South Elevation

Designed as a community for glassblowers, this project was located at Morgan and Lake Streets, placed in the up-and-coming ar s c West Loop. The goal of this project was to combine a glass blowing workshop with a community center and a place for educa on. The idea of weaving this center into the community started with the idea of visibility and transparency, leaving the north facade along the second floor clad with glass so the en re work space was visible to the CTA public transporta on. The first floor event space was designed with retractable glass walls that could be opened up to the public for events, or closed o for private par es or inclement weather. WIth the visibility and openness to the public, the center was to be a springboard for events in the community while providing a func onal work environment for professionals.


Exterior View from Green Line

First Floor Interior View

Second Floor Education Area

Exterior View from Northwest


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Exterior View from Street Corner

Exterior View from Northeast

First Floor Interior View

Exterior View from East


West Whitney Museum

The West Whitney museum was a proposed extension to the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City. At the proposed site of 10th and 21st in Chelsea, the museum was adjacent to the High Line and offered direct access from the street as well as the High Line. The combined access was meant to draw more visitors and have the museum re-invent itself through the new a racted audience. Not only serving as a museum to display artwork, the West Whitney also housed an educa on center, small dining facility, mul -purpose theater, and large event space with stunning 360 degree visuals of NYC in hopes of drawing as many individuals or groups as a place to convene and educate themselves on art as well as merge cultures. The large ‘W’ on the side of the building operates jointly as a built-in adver sement and a rac on for the West Whitney and as structure for the architecture itself.


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Transverse Section


Digital Design

With a focus on the advancing techniques in the digital world of architecture, my course of study included two digital forms that would be nearly impossible to fabricate without new digital modeling tools. On top is a small scale ‘pavilion’ modeled in Rhino and Grasshopper, then made physical using 3D prinƟng. This test model was used as a basis for exploring new material technology, and the final form was cast using carbon fiber and resin. The lower images of are a bench that curves to fit two comfortably. Again modeled with Rhino and Grasshopper, the final model was then fabricated through use of a CNC RouƟng Machine, and easily assembled by interlocking the cut pieces together.


Computer Renderings

Various digital rendering projects completed through the course of study at IIT.


Model Construction

These hand constructed wood models are exploraƟons of a case study of Tautra Monastery in Norway from Jensen & Skodvin. Built to understand the fundamentals of Ɵmber construcƟon, these models include a 4’x1’x1’ full building study (upper images) and a larger scale 6’x4’x1’ front facade study, with progression of layers built up.


On the leŌ is an exploraƟon of wood and cable tension construcƟon of a children‘s camp mess hall. On the right is an acrylic, wood, and “perforated metal” model of the previously shown Glassblowing Art Center.


Technical Details

An open-air wide-span pavilion designed through a shortened workshop to understand technical connecĆ&#x;on details and lightweight materials such as ETFE panels. Supported with cables, columns, and a lightweight aluminum assembly, this facility could serve mulĆ&#x;ple purposes.


ConnecĆ&#x;on detail of the center of the sloping ETFE panels where the aluminum framework and cables met to support the structure.

The top of the column where welded brackets transfered the load of compression to tension from the hanging panels to a cable anchored to the ground.

The detailed connecĆ&#x;on of the cable anchored to a concrete block in the ground along with how this load would need to be anchored underground to provide adequate support through any type of live load and dead load the pavilion would encounter.


Chicago Lot Home and Studio

Third Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

My first design project taught the fundamentals of draŌing and construcƟon. While not graded on design, the idea was to be able to fit the program on the narrow boundaries of the lot while understanding draŌing style and learning the fundamentals of architectural details in draŌing and computer generaƟon.


Benedictine Monastery

Scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”

This secluded monastery in the middle of Indiana was designed as a place of contempla on for the 12 monks assigned to this area. The study in this project focused on the quali es of light and sound. The chapel’s large monolithic beacon was proposed to draw in and focus light and act as a focal point for visitors of the chapel. The visual sightline of the cloister and sanctuary is concealed by being par ally submerged into the earth with the sightline from the inside being directly at the cornfields surrounding the convent. With li le disrup on of the gus ng winds of the area, the breeze creates a soothing calm over the area and a place for medita on and contempla on.


Scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”

Scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”

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