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E]\RS`W\UeVS`Sb]SOb-8cabT]ZZ]ebVS^S]^ZS`S[]RSZW\Ug]c`YWbQVS\T E63<G=C¸@3TWfW\Uc^ 6=B:C<16(0SVS[]bVU`WZZSR aOcaOUSaO\ReWQVSaO`S bVSa^SQWOZbgOb@]QQ]¸aeVWQV VOaZ]QObW]\aW\T`]\b]TbV`SS Z]QOZ6][S2S^]ba

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OV]caSg]cZSO`\bVW\UaBVS RWTTS`S\QSPSbeSS\aO\RSRO\R c\aO\RSRU`]cbT]`SfO[^ZS]` V]eOT`SaVQ]Ob]T^OW\bT]`bVS POaS[S\babOW`eSZZaV]cZReOWb c\bWZOTbS`g]ceSRUSOeOaVS`O\R R`gS`R]e\bVS`S/\Rg]c`SOZ WhSbVOb\]OPcbbS`Y\WTSWa\]bO\ OQQS^bOPZSacPabWbcbST]`OTZOb VSORaQ`SeR`WdS` One of the easier-to-swallow lessons that renovations beget is where to eat when time is slimmer than a 1/32-inch drill bit and â&#x20AC;&#x201D; surprise! â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the whole house needs to be rewired and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be $3,000, please. For me, it started with Roccoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, the sausageslinging operation that feeds the utility-belted cognoscenti outside three area Home Depots. Speedy yet courteous, simple yet supremely flavorful, Roccoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s embodies the idea that fast food neednâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be ass food. For carpenters, plumbers, roofers, stonemasons, landscapers and hardwood refinishers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; just a few of the characters with whom you become intimately acquainted during home

improvement â&#x20AC;&#x201D; lunch is not something to linger over. Ditto for the stevedores, truck drivers and mechanics who start their workdays when most of us are going to bed. These haunts have names as plain as their digs: Moe, John, Frank, Mike. (You wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t trust a place named Bryceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sausage, would you?) Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the throes of remodeling or not, work them into your dining rotation and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be dropping their names into conversation as if they (and you) were just another one of the guys.

tion company hoodies here than anywhere else in the city. Sliced off a giant serpentine meat spiral, speared with a two-pronged fork and stuffed into Amoroso rolls, the sausage is a textural dynamo, the bronzed casings snapping like rubber bands. Mustard. Peppers. Onions. Even Parmigiana, finished with marinara ladled from soup warmers. 1651 S. Columbus Blvd. and 2539 Castor Ave., 7 a.m.-9 p.m. daily; 4640 Roosevelt Blvd., 8 a.m.-7 p.m. daily.

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/b@]QQ]¸abVS friendly grill-masters call you â&#x20AC;&#x153;sirâ&#x20AC;? and the Utz chips are always on the house â&#x20AC;&#x201D; cause enough to like owner Dan Winterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sausage-shed threesome, spin-offs from his best friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s same-named linkery in Queens. They serve breakfast sandwiches and steaks, but the hot-and-sweet sausage (a custom blend from Maglioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) is the real reason youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see more construc-

N;WabS`1VcPPg¸a Road prisonsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; escapee alarms has its advantages. A steady supply of uniformed guards cross the highway for Chubbyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daily deals ($3.89 Wednesday flapjacks) eaten at a counter decked with Pennsylvania Lotto machines. Be advised that extra syrup is 30 cents a pack, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth the splurge for this lively luncheonette, also a favorite of the grease-streaked mechanics who work in the auto body shop Chubbyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s continued on page 12Ă­

Meal Ticket, 2011, Issue No. 1  

Published by Philadelphia City Paper, 2011.

Meal Ticket, 2011, Issue No. 1  

Published by Philadelphia City Paper, 2011.