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Open House

Wednesday, September 15 | 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

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Career ReDesign Fair +

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The University of the Arts Continuing Studies presents

Power up your creative career...

Learn more at CS.UARTS.EDU

RSVP by Friday, September 10. New students in attendance will receive a 10% discount on a new fall registration (no retroactive discounts). 320 South Broad Street | Philadelphia, PA 19102 | cs@uarts.edu | 215.717.6006

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Join us to learn more about enhancing your skills with over 80 evening courses and 8 certificate programs for adults in digital media, art and design at the University of the Arts.

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THIS FALL, LEARN TO

DANCE Fall Classes & Workshops No experience required. All ages / fitness levels. Call to register or for more information.

Absolute Beginner Ballet Wednesdays, 8 - 9 pm 6 weeks, beginning Sept. 22 Absolute Beginner Ballet Two Day Workshop Sat, Sept. 25, 12:30 - 2:30 pm Sun, Sept. 26, 1 - 3 pm Jazz! The Basics Workshop Sat, Oct. 2, 12:30 - 2:30 pm Symmetry Select Children Exclusive program, small classes, for ages 7-9. Saturdays, 8:45 - 9:45 am 6 weeks, beginning Sept. 25

Prostate Cancer Screenings The Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson and Prostate Health International’s Gary Papa Run are offering free prostate screenings as part of a research program. Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among men. Screening is important because prostate cancer shows no symptoms in its earliest stages.

Screening is recommended for all men age 35 years and older. Free screenings, offering a blood test for prostate specific antigen (PSA), testosterone and cholesterol, and a digital rectal exam will take place at the following two locations: • Wednesday, September 15, 2010, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Kimmel Cancer Center –Bodine Building • Tuesday, September 21, 2010, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Radiation Oncology Pavilion at Jefferson’s Methodist Hospital Registration is required. To register for your free screenings, or for more information, call 1-800-JEFF-NOW.

www.JeffersonHospital.org/prostate

1- 800 -JEFF- NOW 1- 800 - 533 - 3669


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WERE OPEN! Limited Edition “Monks Drive Thru” tees are available.

Monk’s Café

16th & Spruce • monkscafe.com • 215.545.7005

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city

STRAIGHT AND NARROW: Gearing Up, founded by Kristin Gavin (front), aims to help female ex-cons maintain their health and sobriety through bike riding. NEAL SANTOS

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[ bicycle therapy ]

FREEDOM RIDERS Can a bicycling program change the lives of female addicts and ex-cons? By Holly Otterbein

T

he members of Gearing Up, an all-female cadre composed of drug addicts, the homeless and ex-cons, are quite possibly the most polite bicyclists in the city. Setting out at 8 a.m. in mid-August, about a dozen of them — in matching vests, Gearing Up socks and shirts, and perfectly snug helmets — wind through Mount Airy, on streets with ethereal names like Mount Pleasant Avenue, Greene Street and Mermaid Lane. Their scenery is just as tranquil, consisting of sycamores — trees that look like brown paint has been scraped off to reveal drywall underneath — and big homes covered in ivy. Without fail, the women stop at every red light and signal at every turn. They are completely quiet at first, except when praising gravity on their way downhill, or dutifully warning others that there’s a “Car behind!” or they’re “Stopping!” or there’s a “Door right!” Halfway through the ride, when the women finally begin to talk, their spirit matches that of giddy, unself-conscious campers at a girlsonly retreat. They yell “Hi!” to almost every person on the street. They break into song. They smack their rumps while passing cars. (It’s an inside joke.) When the clock strikes 9 a.m., they must pedal back to Interim House, a drug rehab center in Mount Airy. Whether they’re full-timers

or outpatients there, what follows is mostly the same, as all stories of addiction are mostly the same: They’ll spend the rest of their day fighting relapse in every unexpected corner it coos, and struggling to regain their family, friends, jobs, purpose and health. Gearing Up, which Kristin Gavin founded in 2009 as a Temple grad student studying exercise and sports psychology, is a group of about 20 female cyclists that leaves three times a week from the aforementioned Interim House and CHANCES in Chinatown, also a drug treatment facility. (In August, another Gearing Up consort kicked off at New Directions for Women, an alternative to prison on Germantown Avenue.) Members also partake in other cycling-related activities, like the Earn-a-Bike class with Neighborhood Bike Works and the upcoming Bike Philly ride on Sept. 12. Judging by time alone, Gearing Up is an infinitesimal part of the women’s recovery. For one thing, not everyone at Interim House, CHANCES or New Directions participates; it’s completely voluntary. And those who do ride for just one hour a few times a week. And yet, the payoff is often big. “The women here who pursue biking, especially those who continue with it through residential, have a lower relapse rate than those who don’t,” says Kathy Wellbank, director of Interim House for the past 17 years. “It definitely improves their chances of maintaining sobriety.” So, what’s the secret? Part of it lies in their shared history: Quaint as they may look on a steel steed, 80 percent of the women in Gearing Up have served

“They’re ready to grab onto opportunities.”

time. Some were incarcerated for multiple DUIs or drug possession, while others were picked up for aggravated assault, attempted robbery, prostitution or “many, many different charges,” as one woman tells me flatly. Nearly all say that addiction was the root of their problems; they wouldn’t have ever sold sex or shoplifted or tried to steal someone’s purse if they hadn’t been high or trying to get high. Interestingly, it’s these formerly incarcerated women — especially those fresh out of jail, says Gavin — who benefit most from her program. If the city can figure out why this is and reproduce it elsewhere, its crime and recidivism rates could potentially drop, and it could spend fewer tax dollars on prisons. Because Gearing Up is relatively new — about 16 months old — there’s not much empirical research about its success. Gavin does have data on participants’ ages, races, work history, social supports and other factors, which has illuminated who Gearing Up helps most, but she’s in the middle of gathering more data about why, exactly, it helps them. She’s full of anecdotal evidence explaining as much, however. “The women coming from prison are >>> continued on adjacent page


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✚ Freedom Riders <<< continued from previous page

humbled,” says Gavin, who has a bike lane symbol tattooed on her right wrist and a bike chain link on her left. “Prison is hard living, and when they get out, they’re ready to grab onto opportunities.” Perhaps more significantly, there’s a problem that many of the ex-cons share that biking combats: “Almost all of them are overweight or obese when they get out,” says Gavin. Take Melissa Caraballo, for instance: The 29-year-old heroin addict weighed 110 pounds at the start of her sentence at Riverside Correctional Facility, Philadelphia’s jail for women. When she left six months later, she was 179 pounds. After riding with Gearing Up for several months, she’s down to a muscular 160. “There are gyms [in prison], but we didn’t get to go to them much because there aren’t enough guards on duty to watch you,” says Caraballo. “And there’s nowhere to walk and nothing to do.” According to Gavin, the ex-cons she’s worked with have gained an average of 10 pounds a month while in prison. Local advocacy groups report similar findings. “We hear from women at Riverside all the time that they put on weight,” says Ann Schwartzman, the Pennsylvania Prison Society’s policy director. “One of the issues is that the food at the prison is awful. ... They say they don’t get much fruit and because the kitchen is off-site, things are usually cold and less appealing than usual. So, they go to commissary and purchase chips.” It’s easy to argue that, as criminals, these women don’t deserve a Whole Foods meal ticket or a glitzy rec center. But as Schwartzman points out, obesity makes it harder for female ex-cons to reintegrate into society: “We are a weight-conscious nation and ballooning while

inside the jail is bound to add stress.” Furthermore, this stress increases the likelihood that they’ll relapse. Mike Resnick, a spokesman for the Philadelphia Prison System, doesn’t deny that many incarcerated women put on extra pounds, though he thinks some of the thinner ones ought to. “While on the streets, they don’t necessarily have good eating habits,” he says. “So when they start eating three regular meals a day, of course they’re going to gain weight.” Philly’s Prison System doesn’t keep track of how much its inmates weigh over time, which is indicative of how much it cares about tackling the issue. That may soon change, however: This month, Gavin got the goahead on a pilot spinning program at Riverside for women who are at the tail end of their sentences and are likely to enter into transitional shelter like Interim House upon release. It will be the first program of its kind in the city; the only thing close was a lone yoga class once run by the Pennsylvania Prison Society. If the women in Gearing Up are right, the spinning program’s participants will boost their chances of recovery not simply because they’ll be exercising, but because they’ll be biking — a special kind of activity, at least to them. “It makes me feel free,” says Caraballo, acknowledging that spinning won’t be quite as liberating, but close. Nearly everyone in Gearing Up also talks of “freedom” or feeling “free” when asked how biking is different than other workouts. As women forever chained to something — be it poverty, addiction, a criminal record or all of the above — that word means a lot. (holly.otterbein@citypaper.net)

thebellcurve CP’s Quality-o-Life-o-Meter

[ + 5 ] Almost 2,000 people participate in the second annual Philly Naked Bike Ride. And 4,000 amateur photographers.

[ -1 ]

Democrats and Republicans debate the successes of Pennsylvania’s subsidized jobs program that ends on Sept. 30. One thing they can agree on: Success isn’t something you figure out by examining data. You have to debate it.

[ -3 ]

After neglecting to pay a $3.3 million bond payment last month, Harrisburg considers bankruptcy. Not that you’d be able to tell the difference.

[ + 1 ] A play written by local teens explores flash

mobs. Scene One: Loot theater. Scene Two: There is no Scene Two.

Two additional women claim that Philadelphia Housing Authority executive director Carl R. Greene sexually harassed them, but don’t plan on filing complaints. “Sounds like these two ladies are horny for the Greene Monster,” says Greene. “OK, now we’re filing,” they say. “I have a problem,” says Greene.

[0]

Schools superintendent Arlene Ackerman vows to put the past behind her after dealing with three straight years of harsh criticism. “That’s cute,” say harsh critics.

[ + 1 ] Phillies first baseman Ryan Howard will

appear in the season finale of Entourage. And provide commentary for the collector’s edition of Hack.

[ + 3 ] Ryan Howard and Chase Utley will star in

the upcoming season of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.In addition to their two-man Fringe Festival adaptation of Breaking Bad.

[ -3 ]

Major League Baseball forces a local Flugtag team to remove the head of its Phanaticshaped vehicle. “We can’t have our officially licensed symbols associated with fast-paced entertainment.”

[ -2 ]

Another store closes on Antiques Row, further deteriorating the once-flourishing district. “I blame the bike lanes!” says Stu Bykofsky, who is priced to move in a storefront window at 10th and Pine.

This week’s total: -1 | Last week’s total: 10

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[ -2 ]

theotherwhitemeat ³ clowncrack.com

MR. FISH

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[ is washing off body paint ]

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[ the naked city ]

manoverboard! By Isaiah Thompson

THOSE DAMNED BICYCLISTS ³ ONE SUNNY SUMMER weekend — much like this past one

— when I was 10, I came up with a plan for the day: I’d follow my street as far as I possibly could, and find out where it went. The journey would be arduous, the distance great — and so I’d need my bicycle. It was a cheap junker of a mountain bike, but it had pedals and wheels: that humble, centuries-old recipe for freedom itself. On I rode, past my known universe, out past the woods of western Chicago, till I reached the airport. There was a tremendous roar, and I looked up to see a commercial airliner landing right over my head like a great metal dragon. Then came another and another. I had reached Xanadu, the Land of Oz, the monsterguarded gateway to the unknown. I clung to the handlebars of my bike, my only flimsy transport home, with horror and awe at this strange world — and a deep, deep itch to go farther. Freedom: It is the great promise of the bicycle, so swiftly granted that it’s no wonder those who don’t share it can hate and misunderstand it. We in Philly will undoubtedly spend some portion of the coming year squabbling over bike lanes and red lights again. The grouches and haters will dip their pens in the ever-rancid wells of bitterness and numbskullery and rag on Those Damned Bicyclists. The bad bicyclists, indeed, will make it worse for the rest — but the bad drivers won’t make it worse for their ilk, because theirs is the kingdom. But in these last glowing days of summer, I make a pre-emptive appeal to the very freedom-loving gut of mankind, to see the bicycle for what it is: the stuff of liberty itself, the Great American Dream on wheels. What, after all, could be more democratic than a bicycle? Old? You can bike. Overweight? You can bike. Poor? You can bike. One-legged? Nolegged? Oh yes, you can bike. So assures, for example, local man John Siemiarowski, who will accompany three disabled friends, one with muscular dystrophy and another with cerebral palsy, who power their bikes — legs be damned! — via hand cranks. They’ll ride this weekend’s Bike Philly ride, benefitting the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia — a group constantly heckled by the likes of the Daily News’ Stu Bykofsky for its work on bike lanes through Center City. And it was that mystical gong “Freedom!,” after all, that drew thousands of people this weekend to disrobe and ride naked through the streets for the second annual Philly Naked Bike Ride — not to shock or make a statement, but for the sheer pleasure of doing it. Too bad a few guys posing as interviewers showed up and used footage to assemble a DVD of the event, now being marketed on an “entertainment” website. Was it not that old itch of the great unknown that inspired a pack of Camden youth on BMX bikes to spontaneously and wordlessly join me and a group of friends, as we biked the final leg of a sun-bathed ride to the shore this weekend? Forming a phalanx around us, we all became a kind of parade, rolling through the sunset toward the Philly skyline, until we came to the Ben Franklin Bridge, the threshold of our world and theirs, where the kids finally stopped, looking slightly dazed — hungry for what lay beyond.

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The American Dream on wheels.

✚ Isaiah Thompson scratched his itch, and is now rehabilitating. Wish him

well at isaiah.thompson@citypaper.net.

feedback From our readers

QUIT WHINING As a “freelance writer” who’s had [to pay] the city of Philadelphia’s mandatory Business Privilege License for 30 years so that I could work as a journalist out of my apartment or rowhouse, this boohoo, bloggers-are-being-taxed-by-city-meanies brouhaha seems, well, a manufactured tempest in a teapot [Naked City, “Pay Up,” Valerie Rubinsky, Aug, 19]. Philadelphia has always applied this tax to writers, artists and, indeed, everyone who conducts a “business” from their home and elsewhere. This means bloggers, too. It seems bloggers want it both ways — they want to be viewed as “citizen journalists” with the emphasis on “journalist,” and yet they want to be viewed financially as “hobbyists” not making a living from their work. Well, welcome to the real world. Why should bloggers be exempt from the rigors of professionalism? Tashamaria Tromer CENTER CITY

OPT OUT Regardless of the good intent of these underpaid street solicitors, I am tired of them [Cover Story, “Idealists for Hire,” Isaiah Thompson, Aug. 12]. I live in Center City and can hardly leave my apartment

without having to deal with several of them. Even late at night, I have seen them in my neighborhood. I would think after working a certain area for a month or so they would move on. No. They just change the color of their T-shirts and pick up a new “cause”! I wish I could “opt out” instead of crossing to the other side of the street! J. D. Cooper CENTER CITY

BUSINESS AS USUAL Is City Paper on the lookout for Republicans? For a few weeks now, the paper has been quick to jump on Democrats for bullying opponents into withdrawing from races and preventing them from taking their seats as elected committee people, but I’m still looking for the articles that attack Repugs with the same vigor and thoroughness as the articles about Democrats do [Naked City, “When Elections Don’t Matter, Holly Otterbein, July 8; A Million Stories, Aug. 12, Aug. 19, Aug. 26]. When Repugs [sic] don’t follow the rules, that’s considered business as usual by the conservative media. When Democrats do the same thing, it’s all over the place. Donna Di Giacomo GERMANTOWN ✚ Send all letters to Feedback, City Paper, 123 Chestnut St., 3rd Floor,

Phila. PA 19106; fax us at 215-599-0634; or e-mail editorial@citypaper.net. Submissions may be edited for clarity and space and must include an address and daytime phone number.


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invites you to an advance screening on Tuesday, September 14 at a Philadelphia area theater

To enter for a chance to win two tickets text HEIST with your ZIP CODE to 43549 (Example: HEIST 19103)

Soundtrack Album on Silva Screen Records

www.thetownmovie.com

www.thetownmovie.com

IN THEATERS SEPTEMBER 17

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WARNER BROS. PICTURES PRESENTS

IN ASSOCIATION WITH LEGENDARY PICTURES A GK FILMS PRODUCTION A THUNDER ROAD FILM PRODUCTION “THETOWN” BEN AFFLECK REBECCA HALL COSTUMES JON HAMM JEREMY RENNER BLAKE LIVELY TITUS WELLIVER WITH PETE POSTLETHWAITE AND CHRIS COOPER DESIGNED BY SUSAN MATHESON DIRECTOR OF MUSIC EDITED PRODUCTION BY DYLAN TICHENOR, A.C.E. DESIGNER SHARON SEYMOUR PHOTOGRAPHY ROBERT ELSWIT COMPOSED BY HARRY GREGSON-WILLIAMS AND DAVID BUCKLEY EXECUTIVE BASED ON THE NOVEL “PRINCE OF THIEVES” BY CHUCK HOGAN PRODUCERS THOMAS TULL JON JASHNI WILLIAM FAY DAVID CROCKETT SCREENPLAY PRODUCED DIRECTED BY GRAHAM KING BASIL IWANYK BY PETER CRAIG AND BEN AFFLECK & AARON STOCKARD BY BEN AFFLECK

No purchase necessary. Deadline for entries is Friday, September 10, 2010 at NOON ET. Theater is overbooked to ensure a full house. Arrive early. Tickets received through this promotion do not guarantee admission. Texting services provided by 43KIX/43549 are free. Standard text message rates from your wireless provider may apply. Check your plan. One entry per cell phone number. Late and/or duplicate entries will not be considered. Winners will be notified electronically. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis, except for members of the reviewing press. No one will be admitted without a ticket or after the screening begins. This film is rated R for strong violence, pervasive language, some sexuality and drug use. Anti-piracy security will be in place at this screening. By attending, you agree to comply with all security requirements. All federal, state, and local regulations apply. Warner Bros. Pictures, Philadelphia City Paper and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred, or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible for lost, delayed, or misdirected entries, phone failures, or tampering. Void where prohibited by law. Must be 17 or older to enter to win.

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HALLOFSECRETS THERE ARE SOME THINGS THE CITY DOESN’T WANT YOU TO KNOW. ( By Holly Otterbein )

O

n a cloudy day in August, tucked away in a quiescent library on the 17th floor of a drab, gray-and-brown skyscraper along 15th and Arch streets, where the city’s law department resides, there is a stack of papers. Each one documents a case in which the city refused to reveal something to someone. There are, quite literally, hundreds of them, each offering a glimpse — but only a glimpse — into what our local government doesn’t think we should know. Take, for instance, the 911 tapes regarding the April 29, 2008, shooting of Dwight Dixon on West Thompson Street in North Philly: The public cannot hear them,

the city has decided — not now, likely not ever. Same goes for the Police Department’s procedures for investigating officers who’ve shot civilians, and the groundwater contamination records for a building on 1500 S. Columbus Blvd. Ditto for records showing which City Hall renovations from 1962 to 1977 may have involved asbestos, documents implicating the Board of Revision of Taxes in legal violations, video from surveillance cameras showing a car accident around Broad and Susquehanna on July 8, 2009, and many, many more. In some cases, the city says the records simply don’t exist. In others, the requested records did exist, but city officials destroyed them. In others still, the city asserts that the information is privileged because “a criminal investigation is not subject to disclosure” — not even 100 years after that investigation is fait accompli. Sometimes, of course, secrecy has its merits: The government has an interest in protecting trade secrets, information that might endanger citizens, invasions of privacy and so forth. But in this land of Vince Fumo, where politicians have destroyed public documents and will likely do so again, and where government agencies too frequently try to bury information that might embarrass them, the default should be transparency. And all too often, it’s simply, undeniably, not. And so you can’t help but wonder: Which of these hundreds of denied records requests involve things we ought to know? And more importantly, why doesn’t the city think we as taxpayers are entitled to them? These questions and gaps in intelligence brew an intoxicatingly, frustratingly, even tantalizingly mysterious air around City Hall — an air that Mayor Michael Nutter promised to promptly clear when he entered office in 2008. That climate is bad for politics, after all. But Nutter hasn’t done any such thing. In fact, in

the past two-and-a-half years, the fog has only grown thicker and darker.

CULTURE OF SECRECY

■ IT’S NOT SUPPOSED to be like this. On Jan. 7, 2008, with an ebullient crowd in front of him and red-and-white poinsettias wrapped in crinkly paper behind, Nutter delivered his inaugural address. He spoke of “a renewal of Philadelphia.” He got endearingly roiled in that classic Nutter way, declaring to criminals, “This is our city, not yours!” and “Enough is enough!” He made a bounty of promises that seem, for the most part, wildly optimistic and naïve today. But then he said something that, even in this new decade of cynicism, seems viable: “There is nothing government does that cannot be done ethically and transparently.” For Brett Mandel, former executive director of good-government group Philadelphia Forward and a candidate for city controller in 2009, it was a galvanizing moment. “I thought, Yes! He gets it,” says Mandel. “But that’s not how he’s chosen to act. Every administration holds their cards close to their vest, obviously, but the difference is this mayor came in saying, ‘I’m not going to do what everyone else has done.’ What’s uncommon — what’s appalling — is that the way he’s acted strays so far from his campaign rhetoric.” But at the time, Mandel and other good-government wonks, lawyers, activists, journalists, techies, academics and curious laypersons across the city took


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Illustrations by Evan M. Lopez

the Obama administration’s first year, The Washington Post reported in January, more than 300 individuals and public interest groups have sued the White House seeking records — and “in case after case, the plaintiffs say little has changed since the Bush administration years, when most began their quests for records.” In Harrisburg, the open-government ideal was clouded by a bad start. In March 2009 — three months after Pennsylvania’s new open records law went into effect — Mutchler sent Rendell a dismaying letter: “I know that you appreciate candor and I cannot be more candid than this. Some agencies, apparently at the direction of [the governor’s lawyers], are using the Right-to-Know law as a shield with which to block information rather than a tool with which to open records of government.” She detailed how the governor’s lawyers had instructed representatives of state agencies to not answer her calls and asserted that these agencies openly defied the new law; she wondered if “that opengovernment position” that Rendell touted was “shared by others further down [his] chain-of-command.” Since then, Mutchler says in an interview, she’s seen state and local agencies take egregious steps to keep their secrets: One wrote in response to a records request, “None of your business.” Others have illegally backdated their denial letters so that requesters can’t appeal those denials to OOR. In some cases, the agencies ignored record requests altogether.

In the city, too, the rhetoric of transparency has far outpaced the reality.

GADGETRY

■ RECORDS OBTAINED BY City Paper indicate that the press isn’t the only group trying to peer under the city and state governments’ lids: Lawyers, corporations, researchers, amateur slueths from Media and everyone in between are filing right-to-know requests en masse. For instance, from 2008 to 2009 — when the new law went into effect — the number of requests to the state’s Department of Corrections shot up almost threefold, from 397 to 944; of those, more than half came from prisoners, wondering about everything from how often they’d be getting new socks to the name of the cop who shot them. In theory, strong open records laws empower the little guy — those without the clout of a press badge or the resources to hire a lawyer. “The more scrutiny that we have on the government, the better it’s going to behave,” says Mutchler. Ed Goppelt, the citizen journalist who ran the nowdefunct hallwatch.org, once put it another way: “It’s no accident that Philadelphia ranks near the bottom of the country when it comes to jobs and schools. … If the public can’t see what kind of job their officials are doing, officials have no incentive to do a good job.” Both Nutter and Chris DiFusco, the city’s head open records officer, declined interview requests. Instead,

Terry Mutchler, executive director of the Pennsylvania Office of Open Records

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Nutter’s proclamation to mean that a politician was finally willing to halt Philadelphia’s legendary culture of secrecy. Here was someone who would let the public in on the decision-making process and, perhaps most importantly, hand over more of those shielded documents sitting in the library at 15th and Arch. In fact, all three tiers of government seemed to be coalescing around this open-government idea: On Feb. 14, 2008, Gov. Ed Rendell signed into law Pennsylvania’s new Right-to-Know act — which hadn’t been updated in 51 years — prompting groups like the Better Government Association and Investigative Reporters and Editors Inc., which had once ranked the old law as the second worst in the country, to believe that change was around the bend. Unlike the old law, the new one begins with the presumption that all records are public, and places the onus on the government to prove they’re not. A new state agency — the Office of Open Records (OOR) — was created to help citizens access public documents, and the governor appointed former Associated Press journalist Terry Mutchler its executive director. Early in 2009, President Barack Obama, too, weighed in, saying in a memorandum to the heads of his executive departments and agencies, “My administration is committed to creating an unprecedented level of openness in government. … In the face of doubt, openness prevails.” But it never did, at least not to the extent it was promised. In

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the administration referred questions to outgoing spokesman Doug Oliver, who will soon depart for a marketing post at Philadelphia Gas Works. Asked how Nutter has lived up to his campaign promises of open government, Oliver points to the city’s new 311 line, PhillyStat — the troubled database on city agencies, which has been inoperable since July — and the fact that the city now places more information online, including contract opportunities and weekly revenues. “Transparency isn’t always, you know, ‘Mr. Mayor, I want to see what’s on your desk,’” says Oliver. “It’s often about how you make people feel about their government and how their tax dollars are spent, so we’ve taken a very broad approach to transparency.” But has the city changed any official policies? “No,” says Oliver. Of the 20 or so lawyers, city workers, laypersons, reporters and good-government advocates interviewed for this story, almost all congratulate Nutter on making tech-friendly moves. However, some argue that gadgetry-as-transparency is merely a distraction. “People think that just because there’s a flow of Twitter information out there, that’s openness,” says Mutchler. “That’s not openness, that’s effusiveness.” Indeed, there’s a sense among open-government advocates that the city has continued in the wrong direction during Nutter’s tenure: They point to the armed security guard who prevented the press from entering a budget meeting in 2008; the fact that Superintendent Arlene Ackerman first refused to disclose the criteria for her $65,000 bonus, then blocked access to the school district’s payroll system from all but two city employees; and the 2010 budget process, which was downright mysterious compared to 2009’s, when the public was able to weigh in at budget workshops. “Philadelphia has gotten worse and worse in terms of filling [Right-to-Know] requests,” says Dawn Fallik, a onetime Inquirer reporter who is now an assistant journalism professor at the University of Delaware. For instance, Fallik points out, the city recently took down an online database of restaurant inspection violations. Also, in 2006, she requested and got information on how frequently Philly conducts restaurant inspections, which revealed the city was performing fewer inspections than its own regulations require. But when she sought the same thing this August? The city denied her. “I was told that looking at that was like letting somebody look at your personal medical records. That [attitude] scares me,” she says. “Like most things the mayor talks about, it’s form over substance. There’s a tradition in the city that says you don’t put mistakes in writing,” adds Leon King, the former Philadelphia Prison System commissioner and current civil rights attorney. He says that city

police and prisons are especially secretive, often claiming that investigations should be kept confidential on unjust grounds. “When I was commissioner, I used to put up a fight, say that investigations were sensitive,” he says. “Very rarely was that true.” Since then, says King, nothing’s changed.

WANTON DISREGARD

■ THERE’S NO CUT-AND-DRIED way to quantify the city’s transparency, or lack thereof. But by looking at the cases in which the city is fighting the state Office of Open Records’ rulings, we can see what information the city is willing to go to court — and spend taxpayer money — to keep secret. The system works like this: If the city denies a record request, the requester can appeal to OOR, which then makes a legally binding final determination — it can deny, grant, withdraw or dismiss the request. If either the city or the requester disagrees with OOR’s decision, they can appeal to the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas and, from there, up the judicial food chain. Earlier this year, Jonathan Bari, president of the Constitutional Walking Tour of Philadelphia, asked for the meeting minutes of the Independence Visitor Center Corp.’s (IVCC) Board of Directors, on which Nutter sits, for the past six years. Bari suspects that the mayor is cutting deals with his business contacts at IVCC — he notes that Rendell also serves on the nonprofit’s board — such as Ride the Ducks. (This year’s state budget allocated $5 million to IVCC in Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program funds.) The city denied Bari’s request, arguing that because IVCC isn’t a city agency, the public isn’t entitled to know what happens at its board meetings. OOR overruled the city, noting, “If a public official serves on a private board in an official capacity, the public has a right to know the extent of that service and see records associated with it.” Instead of heeding OOR’s ruling, the city took Bari to court. (The IVCC is fighting the request, as well.) “What we don’t want is an unintended consequence where people say, ‘OK, let’s not put the mayor on this board because now our information is public,’” Oliver says. Bari requested related documents, too — the correspondence between the mayor and IVCC’s chairman, and records related to IVCC’s operations at the

Jonathan H. Bari, president of the Constitutional Walking Tour of Philadelphia

City Hall Visitors Center — and was denied. It’s doubtful the meeting minutes are as damning as Bari suspects. Nonetheless, the city “knows it’s supposed to give this information to [Bari], and will lose eventually,” says Mandel. “But by taking him to court, it sends a message. You scare other people from having this battle in the future.” That case is currently tied up in the Court of Common Pleas, as is Inquirer reporter Jeff Shields’ request for the past daily calendars of the mayor and City Council members, which Shields hoped might shed light on private meetings with lobbyists and other public officials. It followed the same course as Bari’s request: The city denied Shields; OOR ordered that it provide the records; and the city appealed. The city claims it’s a safety issue: “Release of the mayor’s daily schedule, including past schedules, would be reasonably likely to result in a substantial and demonstrable risk to the personal security of the mayor,” Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey wrote to OOR. This excuse, however, is belied by the Nutter administration’s own actions: Every weekday afternoon, the mayor’s office sends reporters an e-mail detailing Nutter’s itinerary for the following day. If there were a legitimate safety risk, one imagines, it would be at these well-publicized appearances, not at private meetings with lobbyists. Indeed, Fallik, who also requested the mayor’s calendar, doesn’t buy it, either. She points out that The New York Times published Timothy Geithner’s schedule from 2007 to 2009, when he was president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. “So that information is public at the federal level, but not here in Philadelphia?” asks Fallik. And then there’s the case involving the ACLU of Pennsylvania, which requested records from the Philadelphia Police Department (PPD) involving stop-and-frisk practices and officers’ interactions with undocumented immigrants. After asking the ACLU for a 30-day extension, PPD simply didn’t respond; when the ACLU appealed, OOR ordered the police department to hand over the information. “For the record, the OOR finds the PPD’s behavior a willful and wanton disregard for the [Right-to-Know law],” the state agency wrote in its final determination. PPD simply ignored OOR, too. It took the ACLU filing a petition with the Court of Common Pleas for the PPD to disclose those records. Howard Maniloff, a board member of the ACLU’s Philadelphia chapter, says he’s “never seen an agency less open” than the PPD.


the naked city feature

■ ONE BAROMETER OF a government’s openness is how well it keeps records of, well, records. Asked for the number of record requests the city has received, granted and denied since Nutter took office, DiFusco declined, saying that many of them are informal and thus impossible to measure. He allowed City Paper to examine what he called a “representative sample” of these requests. DiFusco also turned down a request for the same information about past administrations. State agencies have figured out how to track this information: Pennsylvania’s Department of Labor and Industry, for instance, reports that it received 201 requests in 2009, and 188 in 2008. And OOR keeps track of how many people appeal the city’s denials — 102 since 2009. (Comparatively, 17 people have appealed Pittsburgh’s decisions.) Of these 102, OOR sided with the city 19 times. In 24 cases, OOR overruled the city’s denial, at least in part — information that included everything from records

other aspects of Pennsylvania’s law, in particular the provision that allows agencies to deny requests deemed “disruptive.” “It’s difficult to draw the line between the person who the government thinks is disruptive and the hero in the eyes of the world,” he says. He also criticizes the fact that criminal investigations, even decades after they’re completed, are not considered public records. But poor law is only part of the problem. After all, the law only lays down the baseline for what governments must do; there’s nothing stopping Nutter from ordering his department heads to adhere to the standards of openness he promised during the campaign. Thus far, he hasn’t. The Nutter administration, meanwhile, insists that the mayor is keeping his campaign promises. “This government certainly isn’t trying to obstruct access to any information,” Oliver says. The stack of hundreds of denied record requests warehoused in the 17th floor of that drab Center City skyscraper suggests otherwise. (holly.otterbein@citypaper.net)

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DISRUPTIVE

of sheriff’s foreclosure sales to questions the School Reform Commission asked Ackerman about budget recommendations and legislative needs. (The rest were either withdrawn, dismissed, consolidated or are pending.) But these numbers don’t speak to those who never bothered to appeal to OOR, because they lacked time, were afraid of getting swept up into a costly legal battle, or simply didn’t know they could. (In at least one case, for instance, the Sheriff’s Office failed to inform a requester that he could appeal to OOR, though it must do so by law.) These factors, say good-government advocates, give agencies the upper hand in the appeals process. They argue that to tip the scales, there must be stricter punishments for violating the Right-to-Know law. Currently, the court may not exceed a penalty of $1,500. “That’s budget dust for most governments,” says Tim Potts, Democracy Rising Pa.’s co-founder and president. “In states that take their open records more seriously, repeat offenders of the law can be fired.” Robert Freeman, executive director of New York state’s Committee on Open Government, condemns

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artsmusicmoviesmayhem

re:view Robin Rice on visual art

PLUS AND MINUS There’s a sense of immediacy and accumulated time in Bennion’s abstract works. MARK BENNION & ALEX ROSKIN | Through Oct.

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30, Wexler Gallery, 201 N. Third St., 215-923-7030, wexlergallery.com

³ AN ALMOST JUNGIAN sense of time and archetypal consciousness links Mark Bennion’s paintings and Alex Roskin’s sculptural furniture in adjacent spaces at Wexler Gallery. That, and a commitment to the exploration of a singular formal process, seemingly guides each artist’s conceptual journey. The lighting in the gallery is as even and bright as one would expect, but memory recasts Bennion’s abstract paintings in a dark setting, illuminated only by firelight or chinks of starlight. A longtime practitioner of Nichiren Buddhism, Bennion uses a self-invented, almost ritualized fresco-related process to construct his paintings. Beginning with a surface of plaster incised with sgraffito markings, he moves through prescribed stages, including crushing the plaster-covered paper before gluing the crackled sheet to wood. Sanding produces a textured, faintly gestural surface that is stained in alternately additive and subtractive processes. The resulting layered and abraded painting suggests human markings on primordial walls.There’s a sense of immediacy and accumulated time; Bennion describes one of his goals in the words of sculptor Isamu Noguchi: “ancient innocence.” Noguchi’s furniture might well be an influence on Alex Roskin’s graceful, simple, non-functional furniture forms. “Tusk” works, such as a rocking chair, emphasize paired rosewood or oak tusk shapes mounted in brilliantly polished bronze. In “Skeletal” pieces, the curved wooden elements suggest ribs joined to a metal spine. The curved tusks, in particular, have a historical resonance, stretching back to mastodon tusks through the bull imagery of Crete to the ritual African use and Western collection of trophy elephant tusks. The showy non-functionality of Roskin’s tusk objects underlines an opposing reality: Tusks have always been collected as elite or power objects. Now they are relics of human vanity. (r_rice@citypaper.net)

MIRROR, MIRROR: In Lucinda Childs’ Dance, present-day dancers are juxtaposed with the 1979 video projected behind them. SALLY COHN

live arts | fringe ( 2010 )

THE SINCEREST FORM OF FLATTERY Lucinda Childs is and always has been the master of maximum minimalism. By Deni Kasrel

I

n Lucinda Childs’ Dance, a black-and-white film of dancers dressed in white performing on a white grid projects onto a large translucent scrim covering the front of a stage where a live cast, also dressed in white, simultaneously performs the exact same steps. More on: The mirroring is meticulously precise. But there’s one major difference: The film, conceived and created by Sol LeWitt, features the cast from the piece’s 1979 première, not the young dancers on the stage. “The whole thing could have been redone, because we have Sol LeWitt’s storyboard,” Childs says of the revival. But she likes the contrast. It adds another dimension to the piece. Besides, “People like the reference from 30 years ago.” Three decades ago, dance was moving beyond modern to what would become postmodernism, but it hadn’t gotten there just yet. “We’re sort of referred to as the ‘middle moderns,’” says Childs, referring to her colleagues, many of whom met while participating in the experimental collective known as Judson Dance Theater (1962-64).

citypaper.net

Judsonites rejected the confines of codified dance and its formal technique. They believed dance need not have a story or be “about” anything at all; as was the custom at the time, dance could be just movement for movement’s sake. Childs flourished at Judson (which included many dance innovators, including Trisha Brown, David Gordon, Deborah Hay, Steve Paxton and Yvonne Rainer) and went on to become a leading choreographer in her own right. Her mark of distinction was, and still is, maximum minimalism. “What made her important was the skill she displayed and the interest she generated in manipulating movement patterns with intense repetition and minimal, subtle, exquisitely chosen variations,” says Village Voice dance critic I N F I N I T E F E S T: Deborah Jowitt. “Her work was very cool. THERE’S PLENTY … Some people loved it and found it mesMORE LIVE ARTS/ FRINGE COVERAGE merizing, and some people wondered, ‘Is O N L I N E AT C I T Y P A something going to happen?’ And they had PER.NET/ARTS. to realize, what was happening was what was happening, and that was what was going to happen. But she built into increasing complexity.” Childs hasn’t had a company for 10 years, and even when she did, she toured more in Europe than in the U.S. “Here in the States, she was in vogue for a time and then she wasn’t and now she’s having her due,” says Nick Stuccio, producing director of the Live Arts Festival, which pays homage to Childs with performances of Dance at the Kimmel Center, films, a lecture by Jowitt, a class in Childs’ technique, plus a conversation with Childs and composer Philip Glass (who wrote the score for Dance and also collaborated >>> continued on page 16


the naked city | feature

[ a bizarre experiment in social engineering ] ³ short plays/short attention spans

Latin America and the U.S. are used to testing each other’s boundaries. But will Latino and American dancers do the same? When they disco and salsa beside each other, will there be peace? Will their cultures clash awkwardly or blend like tea and lemonade? Decadere (Sept. 15-18, Live Arts Studio), a dance performance by the BoánDanz Action Co. promising “masks, real-time video, real-time processed sound, speech and pop music,” seeks to find out. Let’s hope for no Minutemen. —Holly Otterbein

³ theater/throwback Elevator Repair Service sure likes its Roaring ’20s. The NYC theater-lit ensemble already tackled F. Scott Fitzgerald (Fringe 2007’s Gatz) before arriving at Ernest Hemingway’s tale of bullfights in Spain, eating in France and drinking throughout. By sampling from the original text (to say nothing of the bric-a-brac staging, mixed-bag choreography and slapstick-y smart brand of humor), The Sun Also Rises (Sept. 15-18, Arts Bank) arrives at a politicized no-man’s-land with electric references to present-day foreign affairs and Americans running crazy from the heat.

³ dance/international introspection Cédric Andrieux is a French dancer who spent eight years with Merce Cunningham’s company before returning to his home country. French theatrical experimenter/Live Arts vet Jérôme Bel turns Andrieux’s trans-Atlantic dance experience into a one-man show, aptly titled Cédric Andrieux (Sept. 14-16, Suzanne Roberts Theatre). The performer takes the stage talking — and dancing — his way through a long, technically demanding career; expect an unusually intriguing theater event, combining actual experiences of a professional dancer with a sophisticated movement survey.

—A.D. Amorosi

flickpick

DE LA CRUZ

J O S H M C I LVA I N

If you’re easily distracted but want a full program’s worth of entertainment, head over to Boat Hole (Sept. 15-18, Performance Garage, livearts-fringe. org), a compilation of 15 short plays written by Josh McIlvain. Per his prior production, Confessions of a Plate & Shoe, this one brings on the funny and the offbeat, tinged with an urban edge, because that’s just the kind of —Deni Kasrel guy Josh is.

Rodney Anonymous vs. the world

—Janet Anderson

[ movie review ]

[ B ] SINCE JOAQUIN PHOENIX first announced he was giving up acting to devote him-

The movie’s subject remains a cipher.

PHOENIX IN THE ASHES: I’m Still Here walks the line between fact and fiction. MAGNOLIA PICTURES

³ IF YOU’RE FAMILIAR with the Austrian tech-

no-pop outfit mind.in.a.box then you certainly already know that their first three CDs, Lost Alone, Dreamweb and Crossroads, were collections of spacey/catchy pop tunes which combined to tell a mysterious science-fiction tale that most of us are still trying to work out. You also probably know that their latest effort, Retro, is an ode to the days of 8-bit video game tunes. But what you definitely couldn’t know until a moment from now is that the next paragraph will be the beginning of David Copperfield with the word “titties” seamlessly inserted. Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show. To begin my life with the beginning of my life, TITTIES I record that I was born (as I have been informed and believe) on a Friday, at 12 o’clock at night. It was remarked that the clock began to strike, and I began to cry, simultaneously. Those of you who are unfamiliar with mind. in.a.box are probably old, which means that you’re always droning on and on about that time, back in ’89, when you saw Fugazi. Listen Pops: Shut your goddamn mouth and hurry up with that grande vanilla latte before one of the customers in line jumps over the counter and pounds your sorry ass into dust. Verdict: Even if 10 of the 11 songs on this CD sucked Michele Bachmann’s hairy balls (which they don’t), it would still be worth owning for the incredibly infectious tune “I Love 64.” (r_anonymous@citypaper.net)

✚ mind.in.a.box

Retro (METROPOLIS)

15

self to hip-hop, the suspicion has been that his hairpin career turn was part of an elaborate hoax, which is probably the most comforting frame within which to place Casey Affleck’s maybe-sorta documentary. If it’s not a put-on, then Affleck has captured his friend and brother-in-law amid a spectacular public meltdown, aided by what seems to be constant drug use and abetted by a crew of hangers-on who keep their jobs by never saying no. After an opening montage that establishes Phoenix’s post-Walk the Line high (and a home-movie prologue that sets up the contrived poetry of the movie’s closing sequence), Affleck hits us with the image of Phoenix gone to seed, his paunch swollen, his face shrouded by a cloud of hair. Mercifully, he holds off for a bit on Phoenix’s music, but when it does surface, it’s predictably dreadful, mostly weed-slurred whining about the price of fame. Were Phoenix actually engaged in what he refers to as “a hip-hop ‘Bohemian Rhapsody,’” there might be some nobility to his failure, but if this is self-expression, it seems he has precious little self to express. A few scenes of debauchery, including one in which Phoenix snorts coke from between a prostitute’s breasts, give I’m Still Here the flavor of an exposé, but the movie’s ostensible subject remains a cipher. Either as documentary or as fiction, Phoenix’s abrupt decision to stop playing “the character of Joaquin” doesn’t scan, nor does his selection of hip-hop, a genre about which he seems to know next to nothing, as his venue of choice. If he had set out to engineer his ignominious exit from the public eye, he could hardly have done better. But any argument that the film, or Phoenix’s rap career, is a joke has to be backed up by a theory as to why he would undertake such a bizarre experiment in social engineering, especially one that has kept him away from his (former) profession for two years. If it’s an act, then Phoenix is crazier than if it’s for real. —Sam Adams

Shut your goddamn mouth and hurry up with that grande vanilla latte.

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I’M STILL HERE

AUSTRIA!

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³ dance/international relations

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[ fringe-o-scope ]


feature | the naked city a&e classifieds | food | the agenda

citypaperfringeboard FOR TICKETS TO PHILLY FRINGE SHOWS, GO TO WWW.LIVEARTS-FRINGE.ORG

Journeys of the Wolf Presented by Seven Stones of Media Pennsylvania In Native American tradition, experience a ceremonial storytelling of family, love, and wisdom as experienced through the eyes of a wolf. Written by Christine Campbell, featuring John Swana and Chico Huff September 11 & 12 at 3PM

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Sketch Comedy Troupe

Lutheran Church of the Holy Communion 2110 Chestnut Street

PRESENTS:

THE REAL HOUSEWIVES OF SOUTH PHILLY 9/12 & 9/19 @ 6 & 8pm 9/14 & 9/16 @ 8pm

L’Etage Cabaret, Tix $15 www.thewaitstaff.com

JOINT CONCERT Dancefusion & 360º Dance Company 9/10 & 9/11 - 8PM, 9/11 - 2PM MANDELL THEATER 33RD CHESTNUT ST. $25 ADULTS - STU.$20 Fringe Tickets: 215.413.1318. Online: www.livearts-fringe.org Info: gbyedance.org

GROUNDED

Aerial Dance Theatre

September 10 & 11@ 8pm September 12 @ 3pm and 7pm Limited seating! Philadelphia School of Circus Arts

Groundedaerial.com

Presents

INSECTINSIDE Cast of 16 NYC aerialists, Dancers, and actors! Original musical score co-created by John Medeski (of Medeski, Martin and Wood)

[ arts & entertainment ]

✚ The Sincerest Form of Flattery <<< continued from page 14

“When you think of minimal stuff, you tend to think of minimal motion. With Childs’ dances, it’s extremely aerobic.” with Childs on the groundbreaking opera Einstein on the Beach). “The interplay between them is so beautiful,” says Stuccio of the synchronicity of Childs’ choreography, Glass’ music and LeWitt’s film. “It’s these three titans of American contemporary art minimalism and an example of some of the best interdisciplinary work I’ve ever seen.” Childs rehearsed her current cast to be precise — “about the steps and the relationship between the space and the music,” she says — “it has to synthesize.” Still, she allows each dancer to project a personal persona. “I like them to stay individual. But also they’re concentrating so much, they can’t think about anything much except the music and where they are in the steps. So that gives them a concentration and a kind of intensity that’s really special.” Dance is a creative composition of mathematical precision that explores the possibilities of a minimalist pattern through movement. However, as Jowitt observes, “When you think of minimal stuff, you tend to think of minimal motion. With Childs’ dances, the actual lexicon of steps may be fairly reduced, but it’s extremely aerobic and vigorous. They move with full energy.” Back when it premièred, Dance was radical. People walked out of the show, yelling, “This is not dance!” But times have changed, and what was once perceived as shocking and rebellious is now appreciated for its beauteous virtuosity. Childs appreciates the opportunity to tour the work once more. She’s well aware certain people may watch it and think it’s pretty much the same thing for an hour. “That’s true,” she says. “Or you could pay attention to the variations. And the music changes all the time … there’s no actual repetition. Every time something comes back, it’s in a different way.” (d_kasrel@citypaper.net) ✚ Dance runs Sept. 10-12, $25-$30, Kimmel

Center, 300 S. Broad St., livearts-fringe.org.


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9/16 Bratwurst Eating Contest 0-Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;}Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x160;v>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;V>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160;i>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;ÂśĂ&#x160;f£äĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160;}iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;tĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;vÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2022;ÂŤĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x152;°

THURSDAY

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FRIDAY

9/18 2nd Annual Oktoberfest Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;ÂŤ>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;`iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;ÂŤ>Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;V]Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;}Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;}Ă&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; iiĂ&#x20AC;t Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ?iĂ&#x152;iĂ&#x160;`iĂ&#x152;>Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x192;iĂ&#x160;iĂ&#x203A;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;}Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°LĂ&#x20AC;>Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;â°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C; SATURDAY

PERFORMANCES BY Asphalt Orchestra, Bang on a Can All-Stars, Uri Caine, The Crossing, Free Form Funky Freqs (Jamaaladeen Tacuma and Calvin Weston), Kyaw Kyaw Naing, Matmos, Normal Love, Signal, So Percussion, Spoken Hand Percussion Orchestra, Sun Ra Arkestra, and more.

MUSIC BY Louis Andriessen, BjĂśrk, Goran Bregovic, David Byrne and Annie Clark, Uri Caine, Michael Gordon, Annie Gosfield, Pelle Gudmundsen-Holmgreen, Kamran Ince, David Lang, Paul Lansky, Thomas Mapfumo, Meshuggah, Charles Mingus, Thurston Moore, Yoko Ono, Tarik O'Regan, Steve Reich, Kaija Saariaho, Stew and Heidi Rodewald, Frank Zappa, Evan Ziporyn, and more.

2010 Philadelphia Live Arts Festival Philly Fringe

September 3-18 livearts-fringe.org 215.413.1318

Presented by

Bang on a Can Marathon: Philadelphia TEN HOURS OF NONSTOP NEW MUSIC Buy one ticket and come and go all day long to this super-mix of music by today's most adventurous players and composers from around the globe-and around the corner. As artistically inclusive as it is audience-friendly, the Marathon is a wild gathering of genres, styles, innovation, and radically new sounds, delivered as one open mega-concert. World CafĂŠ Live 3025 Walnut Street

Sunday, September 12, 2pm-midnight $25 ($15 for students)

Tickets and information at 215.413.1318 or

livearts-fringe.org


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THE TAO OF PLOT ³ “LITERATURE AND THE world are full of women who don’t come home, of women who die in brutal accidents,” thinks Julián, as he tells his stepdaughter a shaggy-dog story about a pair of trees, to distract her from the fact that her mother is quite late coming home. “But at least in the world, in life, there are also women who … have a flat tire in the middle of the avenue and nobody stops to help.” Julián’s stories are the focus of Alejandro Zambra’s delicate, aimless novella The Private Lives of Trees (Open Letter, July 20). Zambra nests them in a long night, which starts out with the promise that the book will continue until the mother returns, but then meanders through a stepfather’s worries and concerns, bumping against the boundaries of a familial love triangle. The stories Julián tells and the one he inhabits have an open-ended, naïve simplicity. In their clean lines and resistance to easy resolution, they would nestle nicely among the motley collection of jokes and parables and koans that Scarlett Thomas sprinkles around Our Tragic Universe (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Sept. 1). Like Zambra, Thomas is interested in uncertainty, in resisting the consolations conventional plots offer. One of the chief strains running through Our Tragic Universe is the search for a “storyless story,” a narrative that resists formula, and because of that resistance can actually show reality. Thomas is a fearsomely intelligent writer, one who knits together the fringes of hard science into something erudite, simultaneously heavy and light. But Thomas’ preoccupation with constructing a storyless story knots Universe into a metaphysical clove hitch: It’s a non-genre novel by an ex-genre novelist about a genre novelist attempting to write a non-genre novel which takes shape as a catalog of the difficulties of writing a non-genre novel. If that sounds like more of a hot mess than a tantalizing puzzle, it is. As sharp and engaging as Thomas is when she gets swept up in tangents, Universe adds up to a self-dramatizing spectacle. One of the parables she cites, fittingly, is a singleparagraph story about a map that becomes so detailed it takes up the same amount of space it describes. Universe’s storyless-story investigation looks like that map, and ultimately just creates an appetite for the next book, the one that benefits from the therapy this one undertakes. The storyless story is a dilemma of selection: choosing which details to pull out to craft a representation of life. The dilemma, then, lies less in the experience than in the tools used to transmit it. Tao Lin, on the surface, would seem to possess tools calibrated to produce this brand of realism. His characters, most recently in Richard Yates (Melville House, Sept. 9), inhabit a world of surfaces, with Lin avoiding extended description of external scenery or internal contemplation, restricting

himself to conversation (as often virtual as face-to-face) and brief skims of surface thoughts. He’s also prolific, shamelessly selfpromoting, and a nurturer of the backlash against his style. Lin’s novels aren’t difficult to read, despite his provocations. With everything flattened out, muffled and smoothed by nondescript narration, the reader winds up in the same cotton-wool anomie as Lin’s characters. It’s like depression. Or like the side effects of a powerful antidepressant. Consequently, Richard Yates conveys the illusion of generational authenticity, with one foot in a virtual world and the other in meatspace, sealed off by earbuds, dressed in American Apparel, lacking an inner life or the moral need to create one. This may well be Lin’s intention, but his stylistic choices — the lack of affect, the awesome

Tao Lin is no Richard Yates. randomness of detail, the way conversation and chat and text are displayed identically and equally — are so strong and overriding that they carry the emotional and thematic weight that his characters cannot. Richard Yates uses this deadpan to pull focus close in on a pair of unfit lovers, and it invests their interactions and their love affair with the hyperdrama of adolescence. This close focus becomes increasingly claustrophobic; the last third of the book downshifts ickily, with the demanding, controlling boyfriend hounding his increasingly submissive teenage girlfriend. The feedback between Lin’s form and its effect, between the solipsism of trivial conversations and the cruelty they generate, belies the book’s title, making this story anything but storyless. Lin is no Richard Yates; here, in his attention to technique and effect, in his production of grotesquery, he’s actually more of a little Hitchcock. (j_bauer@citypaper.net)


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³ dance

✚ NOW SHOWING: IN REAL TO REEL LIVE ACTION 3-D!

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DIFFERENT ITEMS EACH DAY!

THIS WEEK Skirmish Paintball Hollywood Tans Cream and Sugar Bakery Optimal Sports Health Club Paddy Whacks Irish Sports Pub ¨SIGN UP at citypaper.net/win for your chance to win!

As long as the audience decides that what goes on behind the screen is more interesting than what’s actually on it, Casaburdan Productions has succeeded. Now Showing: In Real to Reel Live Action 3-D! is about new employees on the staff of a rundown movie theater in the ’90s. In between scenes, a screen will descend from the Walking Fish ceiling and show faux movie trailers — which Now Showing co-creator David Burgess call “cartoonlike and artsy.” To add to the theatrical experience, audience members will be able to buy movie snacks from the onstage concession booth.

There are few things as contentious and exciting as change — especially when it comes to those bastions of tradition we call neighborhoods. It’s such a rich topic that nonprofit COSACOSA art at large Inc. has made it the focus of its 20th anniversary cultural initiative, Change in the Making. The project has 20 artists in 20 communities — in Philadelphia and abroad — collecting visuals and interviews to share stories of local change dealing with everything from gentrification to health. Changing Places, an interdisciplinary dance piece choreographed by Adaobi Kanu, is an offshoot of the initiative — interpreting stories from 10 participating Philly neighborhoods through dance, visual art and text. —Julia Askenase Sept. 10-12, free, various locations.

³ performance art

✚ MAN BITES DOG

—Molly Eichel Sept. 9-12 and 15-18, $15, Walking Fish Theatre, 2509 Frankford Ave., 215-413-1318, livearts-fringe.org.

³ dance/circus arts

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✚ SPILL When emotions run high, they tend to spill out into the universe. Spill, directed by Sarah Mitteldorf, expresses anger, fear and loss through intense bodily contortions. During seven scenes, actors, dancers and circus artists confront these feelings while trying to make human connections. According to Mitteldorf, audiences should be on the lookout for “creepy creatures, fighting siblings, broken hands, disassembled bodies and an absent psychopath.” —Stephen Rose

Louis DeVaughn Nelson’s multidisciplinary media satire is a continuation of his 2007 première, Human Error, which asks one major question: What has this world come to? According to Nelson, America has become fascinated by news that is questionably newsworthy — from family feuds to flashes of flesh. —Stephen Rose Sept. 10-11 and 16, $15, Major Moment Studio, 1624 South St.

Sept. 17, $10, Philadelphia School of Circus Arts, 5900A Greene St.

³ visual art/workshop

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✚ LET’S FACE IT!

✚ 9 MM OF LOVE What would you do to win back the girl of your dreams? Jack (Justin Damm) goes as far as reaching out to a hit man (Chris Braak) — the only problem is, Jack thinks Q is a New Age therapist, not a cold-blooded killer. “He’s not just in it for the money,” director Jared Nelson says. “He’s more about ideals and code.” Dexter, anyone?

How do you see yourself? And what does that say about you? Participants in Linda Dubin Garfield’s regular self-portrait workshops ponder these concerns as they learn to tell a life story through their own image. Yours might involve words wrapping a neckline, or a vaguely figurative blur. It could include a personal totem, or a telling, longing stare. Completed pieces can be taken home, or donated to the collection Garfield amasses with each workshop she presents.

—Molly Eichel

—John Vettese

Sept. 12-16, 9:30 p.m., $10, Walking Fish Theatre, 2509 Frankford Ave.

Workshops, Sept. 12 and 15, 2 p.m., free, Book Trader, 7 N. Second St.


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Bran Nu Dae

✚ NEW BRAN NU DAE|C-

I’M STILL HERE|B Read Sam Adams’ review on p. 15. (Ritz Bourse)

RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE 3D

THE AMERICAN|B+ “I do what I’m good at,” says George Clooney’s black-ops weapons maker in Anton Corbijn’s abstracted thriller, The American, which is as close as the movie comes to getting inside his psyche. Clooney begins by killing two men in selfdefense, then executing an innocent woman unlucky enough to see him do it. Off he goes to Italy, home to his primary contact; he holes up in a small mountain town, building an assassin’s rifle to spec and trying to see a way out of the life he’s made. He enters, a tad too easily, into a romance with a local prostitute (the excellently named Violante Placido) and wards off the ministrations of the local priest (Paolo Bonicelli), who knows a wayward sinner when he sees one. Corbijn overplays his hand at times, but the movie is redeemed by the soulful weariness of Clooney’s performance. —Sam Adams (Pearl; UA Grant; UA Main St.) CAIRO TIME|B+ Smoky character actress Patricia Clarkson steps into the lead in Ruba Nadda’s sensual romance, playing a magazine editor stranded in the Egyptian capital while her U.N.-employed husband is stuck in Gaza. Her absent hubby dispatches former colleague Alexander Siddig to look after his marooned spouse, and they strike up a relationship, although the sparks don’t so much fly as gently drift. Nadda’s approach is classical without being clichéd, an old-fashioned romance for modern times; you feel two people coming together by choice, not simply because

SCREEN GEMS PRESENTS A RAINFOREST FILMS PRODUCTION IN ASSOCIATION WITH GRAND HUSTLE FILMS “TAKERS” MATT DILLON PAUL WALKER IDRIS ELBA JAY HERNANDEZ MICHAEL EALY MUSIC TIP EXECUTIVE “T.I.” HARRIS WITH CHRIS BROWN AND HAYDEN CHRISTENSEN BY PAUL HASLINGER PRODUCERS GLENN S. GAINOR GABRI EL CASSEUS CHRIS BROWN MORRIS CHESTNUT PRODUCED BY WILL PACKER TIP “T.I.” HARRIS AND JASON GETER WRITTEN BY PETER ALLEN & GABRI EL CASSEUS AND JOHN LUESSENHOP & AVERY DUFF DIRECTED BY JOHN LUESSENHOP CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

21

A haiku: Milla Jovovich

✚ CONTINUING

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An oddball glad-hander set in Western Australia in the late ’60s, Bran Nue Dae has all the chastely appealing teens, cartoonish authority figures and bland, unmemorable songs of an aboriginal High School Musical. Willie (Rocky McKenzie) is packed off to Perth to study for the priesthood under the guidance of Father Benedictus (Geoffrey Rush, sporting a Strangelove-ian German accent), but would rather be back home with his crush, Rosie (Jessica Mauboy). He hits the road, stumbles upon an estranged uncle (Aussie TV star Ernie Dingo), and the two hitch a ride with a young hippie couple. Coincidence drives the story, culminating in a flood of twists and revelations at the climax in which everyone’s thinly imagined story ends happily and nearly everyone is revealed to be related to everyone else in some convoluted fashion. But the story is secondary to clumsy comedy and cheery musical numbers whose tone will seem familiar to anyone forced to endure an afternoon’s programming on the Disney Channel. All wide smiles and neutered pop pastiche, these set pieces never threaten to stick in any listener’s head. The saturated colors make for an appealing landscape if one can look past the shamelessly mugging cast in the foreground, but looking to this film for any insight into Australia’s indigenous population is like visiting exotic locales and eating at McDonald’s. —Shaun Brady (Ritz Bourse)

Fighting zombies in 3D! (Acting still 2D.) (Not reviewed) (Pearl; Rave; UA Grant; UA Main St.; UA Riverview)


ROGER EBERT, CHICAGO SUN-TIMES

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“����! GRIPPING!”

their passions or the script dictate it. —S.A. (Ritz Five)

THE EXPENDABLES|C What this testicle-squeezing paean to American testosterone lacks in sense and subtlety — it’s on the same gory level as Sylvester Stallone’s last directorial/starring vehicle, 2008’s holy-shit-this-is-violent Rambo — it makes up for in sheer gut-ripping, head-’sploding glee. —Drew Lazor (UA Grant; UA Main St.) FAREWELL|B In April 1981, Sergei (Emir Kusturica) is conflicted. Though the KGB colonel is the first to note the successes of the Soviet Union, he’s also privy to what’s gone wrong. Based on a true story, Farewell tracks Sergei’s decidedly unorthodox efforts toward that end. That is, he starts giving information to Pierre (Guillaume Canet), an engineer, who has no experience in espionage.

After he accepts a first file, Pierre is reluctant to continue, especially when his wife insists that he consider the danger to his family. Pierre keeps meeting with Sergei. As they lie to their loved ones, they also develop a sort of intimacy, discussing their personal pasts and desires for “change.” Farewell mixes thriller conventions and melodrama, as Sergei and Pierre try to keep control of the borders between their domestic and secret lives. —Cindy Fuchs (Ritz Five)

GET LOW|B The house is ablaze for a good few minutes before a lone figure suddenly bursts out of a second-floor window, rolls down the slanted porch roof and runs, clothes still burning, away from the scene. This enigmatic opening image promises a secret that will inevitably be revealed — which seems sort of a shame, as Felix Bush (Robert Duvall), squirrels himself away from the world for 40 years in order to keep it. A near-

PHOENIX AFFLECK

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–Avi Offer, NYC Movie Guru

“If you loved MAMMA MIA!, this BRAN NUE DAE is for you.” –Michael Snyder, Sirius/XM Radio

“Magical!”

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–Dr. Joy Browne, WOR

–Jack Wilson, The Age

“Hilarious… A Celebration! The next homegrown cinema classic.”

“Geoffrey Rush is awesome!” –Ain't It Cool News

–MTV (Australia)

 I loved this film!”

–Win Kang, OC Examiner

Going home never felt so good. ©2010 OMNILAB MEDIA. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENTS START FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 10

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MAGNOLIA PICTURES PRESENTS THEY ARE GOING TO KILL US JOAQUIN PHOENIX “I’M STILL HERE”

PRODUCTIONS

imstillheremovie.com SEXUAL MATERIAL, GRAPHIC NUDITY, PERVASIVE LANGUAGE, SOME DRUG USE, AND CRUDE CONTENT

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[ movie shorts ]

death experience convinces the Tennessee hermit to throw himself a funeral while he’s still around to enjoy it (a shindig inspired by a true story), and as he reintegrates into society, his terse utterances show the toll of his solitude. It’s disappointing that Felix’s prosaic truth finally eclipses his legend, but in the end the film is held together solely by Duvall’s valedictory performance. —S.B. (Ritz East)

GOING THE DISTANCE|C Nanette Burstein’s feature debut strives in every possible way — from its Apatowian raunch to its potty-mouthed dialogue — to break from the glossy, simplistic rom-com norm, and succeeds. But that doesn’t make it a competent movie. Erin (Drew Barrymore), a 30year-old journalism intern, meets-cute music exec Garrett (Justin Long); they wallow in misery after a spell of happiness, which is exactly as much fun to watch as it sounds, with only supporting turns by Christina Applegate, Jason Sudeikis and scene-stealer Charlie Day to break up the monotony. —Molly Eichel (Pearl; Roxy; UA Grant) THE LAST EXORCISM|B+ A documentary crew follows Baton Rouge’s Reverend Cotton Marcus (Patrick Fabian), an admitted huckster and exorcism “expert” who believes in the power of preaching but has no investment in its precepts. Completely at peace with taking mocking advantage of faith-based bumpkins who believe their loved ones have been possessed by demons, Marcus brings the cameras along to a rural Louisiana town, where sorrowfilled widower Louis (Louis Herthem) agonizes over the dead-eyed, violent behavior of his usually sweet-assweet-tea teen daughter Nell (Ashley Bell, wonderful and creepy as all hell). Marcus pulls out all his usual tricks (battery-operated, smoke-expelling crucifix!), collects his fee and heads on down the road — but when a catatonic dead-eyed Nell shows up in his motel room unannounced, leading the not-so-good reverend to second-guess his belief that “God-fearing” is synonymous with “goddamn stupid.” Daniel Stamm’s erratic handheld camera work is nothing we haven’t seen before, and some of his bigger scares you’ll see coming, but all told this is a movie worth seeing — especially since you don’t know much about it. —D.L. (Pearl; Rave; UA Grant) LEBANON|B+

LANDMARK THEATRES

RITZ FIVE

Center City 215-925-7900

Samuel Maoz’s film begins and ends in a field full of sunflowers, parched


ANIMAL KINGDOM | B+ Ritz at the Bourse

LOTTERY TICKET|C

THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT | B+ Ritz East For full movie reviews and showtimes, visit citypaper.net/movies.

MACHETE|B+ Robert Rodriguez and Ethan Maniquis’ awesomely-on-the-nose realization of a gag trailer nestled within 2007’s fanboy wet dream Grindhouse, Machete further fetishizes the gory, sex-stuffed American B-movie genre, dancing a nihilistic jig around big-ticket issues and milking every last hoot and holler out of its perma-adolescent target audience. The movie, which is purposely chewed up and spit out to look like it’s been left in the Mojave Desert for a decade, begins with Machete (Danny Trejo), a stoic Federale with a penchant

MAO’S LAST DANCER|BPlucked from a rural peasant family to study ballet in Beijing, Li Cunxin was taught early in life how to adapt to sudden cultural upheavals. But not even that life-altering move could have prepared him for the shift from the Cultural Revolution to late-’70s Texas. Adapted from Li’s autobiography, Mao’s Last Dancer opens with his disconcerting welcome to Houston, where he joined the Houston Ballet as an exchange student under the guidance of director Ben Stevenson (Bruce Greenwood). The film’s politics never rise above simplistic good/evil, East/West dichotomies, but when Li takes the stage, director Bruce Beresford’s eye suddenly toughens, capturing a sense of toil and strain that underlies his graceful movements. —S.B. (Ritz Five) MESRINE: KILLER INSTINCT|BKiller Instinct, the first half of JeanFrançois Richet’s diptych, follows Frenchman Jacques Mesrine from his days as a torturer of Algerian rebels through a series of robberies and murders in Europe, Canada and

MESRINE: PUBLIC ENEMY NO. 1|B In the second and final part of JeanFrançois Richet’s slick biopic, Jacques Mesrine (Vincent Cassel) is on the run. He’s as much escape artist as career criminal, constantly in and out of prison, his public profile growing with each break-out. His sense of self grows as well, blotting out the others around him, including occasional henchman Matthieu Amalric; even his belly swells with self-importance. Evidently motivated by professional jealousy, he cops some of Baader-Meinhof’s rhetoric, proclaiming himself an opponent of the system, a claim with which the movie wastes little time. Burdened by extra pounds, Cassel seems torpid, an aging man fighting his life’s inevitable endpoint. —S.A. (Ritz Five) SOUL KITCHEN|B The violent passions of Head-On and the world-weary machinations of The Edge of Heaven are here replaced by a charmingly sloppy spiritedness, less a story you want to follow than a place where you enjoy hanging out. That place is the Soul Kitchen itself, a rundown restaurant owned by Zinos Kazantsakis (co-writer Adam Bousdoukos) and operated for a small constituency of undemanding regulars who don’t mind less-than-sanitary conditions and frozen food. Fatih Akin’s characters, as always, are ruled by uncontrollable passions and irrational impulses, the result of which could be viewed as the chaos of

life or the machinations of fate. —S.B. (Ritz at the Bourse)

THE TILLMAN STORY|A Six years after he was killed by American soldiers in Afghanistan, the facts about Pat Tillman’s death are still surfacing, a tribute to the lengths to which the military and civilian administrations went to bury them. Amir Bar-Lev (My Kid Could Paint That) grabs a shovel and digs deep, turning up first-person accounts that Tillman’s death was less a matter of friendly fire than pure recklessness, the acts of unseasoned and uncontrolled troops more concerned with discharging their weapons during a potential firefight than being sure of what they were shooting at. Tillman emerges as a complicated figure, an avowed patriot who gave up a promising football career to enlist after Sept. 11, yet passionately questioned the conduct of the war, reading Noam Chomsky in his bunk. The military continues to claim that the misreporting of Tillman’s death — initially claimed as a combat fatality, and exploited to boost the war effort in exactly the way he disdained — was the result of a series of errors, but if nothing else, The Tillman Story should put that lie firmly in the ground at last. —S.A. (Ritz at the Bourse)

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citypaper.net ✚ CHECK OUT REPERTORY F I L M L I S T I N G S AT C I T Y PA P E R . N E T / R E P F I L M .

SCREEN GEMS DAVIS FILMS/IMPACT PICTURES INC. CONSTANTIN FILM INTERNATIMUSICONAL GmbH PRESENT A CONSTBASED AUPONNTIN FILM INTERNATIASSOCIATEONAL GmbH/DAVIS FILMS/IEXECUTIVE MPACT PICTURES INC. PRODUCTION A FILM BY PAUL W.S. ANDERSON MIL A JOVOVICH ALI LARTER “RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE” KIM COATES SHAWN ROBERTS SERGITTEN ANDO PERIS-MENCHETA SPENCER LOCKE WITH BORIS KODJOE AND WENTWORTH MIL ER BY TOMANDANDY CAPCOM’S VIDEOGAME “RESIDENT EVIL” PRODUCER HIROYUKI KOBAYASHI PRODUCERS MARTIN MOSZKOWICZ VICTOR HADIDA PRODUCEDBY JEREMY BOLT PAUL W.S. ANDERSON ROBERT KULZER DON CARMODY BERND EICHINGER SAMUEL HADIDA WRIDIRECTED BY PAUL W.S. ANDERSON

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and limp. The relative quiet is interrupted by a tank, rolling noisily to a destination that matters only to the people already there, the victimsto-be. For the men inside the tank, everywhere is the same: cramped, hot, clanging. Under orders during the 1982 invasion of Lebanon, the Israeli crew obeys their superiors’ wishes, but their sense of context is as limited as the space they inhabit. The movie makes this point repeatedly, in throbbing close-ups that either take the gun-scope-POV of the new and utterly horrified gunner Shmulik (Yoav Donat) or his fellows’ views inside the tank. Tight shots show sweaty faces and fragmented images of violence: blown off limbs, explosions and broken buildings, unidentifiable enemies and terrorized civilians. Repeatedly, the crew members are confronted by their veteran platoon leader Jamil (Zohar Strauss), who enters and exits the tank, grim and relentless as he peers at his men, expecting more than they can know. Impressionistic throughout and often abstract, the film reveals the impossibility of war, and also its monstrous banality.

Encouraged by a fortune cookie on what otherwise seems to be the worst day of his life, Kevin (Bow Wow) wins a $370 million jackpot, but has to keep the ticket safe through the three-day July 4 weekend when the lottery office reopens. Word gets out, of course, and suddenly Kevin is the most popular guy in the projects. The film, directed by music video vet Erik White, argues against the false hope proffered by lotteries and demonstrates how those that escape the projects — typically through crime, celebrity, or both — fail to give back and lift others out of the poverty they’re left behind. But this call for unity centers on a community made up of tired, cartoonish types: Kevin’s Jesusobsessed grandmother, a money-grubbing preacher, a misunderstood hermit. Ultimately, it delivers the muddled message that money is the root of all evil — but it sure would help out around here. —S.B. (Pearl; Rave; UA Grant; UA Main St.)

[ movie shorts ]

the agenda | food | classifieds

THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE | B Ritz Five

the U.S. The ferociously charismatic Vincent Cassel plays Mesrine as a star in the making, one canny enough to shout “Vive le Québec libre!” at TV cameras as he’s taken into custody in Montréal. The movie even provides a flash-forward to his outlaw’s death, as a tubby Casell and future belle Ludivine Sagnier are ambushed by a truck full of gun-wielding men. —S.A. (Ritz Five)

a&e

EAT, PRAY, LOVE | C UA Grant

for blades, being forced to watch the slaughter of his family at the hands of Torrez (Steven Seagal, very fat), a Mexican drug kingpin who’s sick of the sandpaper-faced do-gooder’s meddling. Cut to several years later, when Machete’s eking out an illegal living in Texas; his prowess in a labor-site fight impresses shadowy suit Booth (the awesome Jeff Fahey), and he’s hired to assassinate the sneering Senator McLaughlin (Robert De Niro, having fun), a politician so against illegal immigration he wants to build an electrified border wall. Of course, it’s all one big frame job, which leads to Machete stabbing his way through thugs aplenty en route to clearing his name. —D.L. (Pearl; Rave; UA Grant; UA Main St.)

the naked city | feature

As the tank proceeds and sputters, lurches and stops, the men alternately turn and depend on one another. They’re unsure where they’re going. The metaphor is plain but also apt. —C.F. (Ritz at the Bourse)

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mondays 2pm - 6pm m sstarting tarting sep

S E P T E M B E R 9 - S E P T E M B E R 1 6 , 2 0 1 0 | C I T Y PA P E R . N E T

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Thursday, September 9 4pm – 6pm if you’ve got style, grace, personality... the look of a fashion model – get ready for the audition of a lifetime! we’re searching for more of the hottest cocktail servers to join the #1 parkette team!

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meet at the team member entrance.

lady gaga ticket giveaway Friday, September 10 •360 text in to win a pair of lady gaga tickets!

entertainment Thursday, September 9

Saturday, September 11

totally latin thursday latin music & dance instruction

loop masquerade dj basara

Friday, September 10 don’t call me francis dj johnny b

Sunday, September 12 birds vs. packers 25¢ wings & ½ price beer the place to watch all the birds games

exit 37 off i-95 or exit 351 off the pa turnpike.

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audition


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agenda

the

LISTINGS@CITYPAPER.NET | SEPT. 9 - SEPT. 16

icepack

[ Your to-do list, no matter what you’re doing ]

By A.D. Amorosi

³ WHEN GOOD FORTUNE smiles, you give back. Me? I’ll give what Dennis Hopper in Blue Velvet called a love letter — “a bullet from a fuckin’ gun, fucker.” Local foodie overlords Michael Solomonov (Zahav), Audrey Claire Taichman (eponymous hot spot) and Stephen Starr (everyplace else) give less graphically when it comes to Live Arts/Fringe. Hence, the Feastival at the fests’ NoLibs Hub, Sept. 15. The idea for Feastival came when Nick Stuccio and Richard Vague (founding producer and board prez of LA/FF, respectively) asked Taichman to join their board in 2009 and if she had ideas about raising money and awareness to a different demographic. “I said, ‘Let’s have a party,’” she says. She quickly brought in her restaubar compadres and chefs for the charitable event. “That’s how it started. My industry employs so many struggling artists. It was a no-brainer to collect my colleagues to help support those artists.” As Vague says, “World-class cities need world-class culture. Feastival celebrates two great economic engines that push Philly forward.” So far this year, Taichman has seen Sanctuary by Brian Sanders (“goosebumps”), will see Lucinda Childs’ Dance,and is hoping to catch ¡El Conquistador! by Lucidity Suitcase Intercontinental. Want more on Taichman and the Feast? Check CP’s A&E blog, Critical Mass, next week. Tix? phillyfeastival.com. ³ G. Rich Goldberg and his investors didn’t buy the RUBA Club so they could have a place to drink Ukie beer.They got a new sound system and brought Joe Tayoun to book and oversee renovations. His first order of biz: Middle East reunion, First Fridays. Hummus for everyone. ³ When Jezebel reported that American Apparel was near-doomed due to lousy biz practices, we went looking for Dov Charney’sfave model/rent boy/adopted son, Philly’s Jonny Makeup, late of VIP. Nothing yet. Jonny, phone home. ³ Bloodhammer Mgmt has got a restless sleepover planned for the Troc, Sept. 11-12, what with Big Crowd Popular and Brick+Mortar’s pajama party the first night, and a True Blood finalefest with Baptist Preachers’ new lineup, Emerson B and Mirrors&Wires the next. ³ When Andy Hurwitz isn’t busy with H&M, Alex’s Lemonade and King Britt (all part of Sept. 12’s Baby Loves Disco Lemonade Tour dance party at Shampoo), he’s helping Philly’s Kuf Knotz find his boom box. The loquacious rapper — who’s signed to Hurwitz’s MAD Dragon with a due-soon CD, Boomboox Logic — lost his aged legendary stereo. “Someone stole it from Kuf in South Philly,” says Hurwitz. “We wanna do a reward thing or something.” ³ Saw two fine pork-related tweets: Adsum’s twispers of homemade corn dogs at the bar, and Swift Half Pub’s pig-out with bacon ice cream chipwhiches. ³ More ice? Citypaper.net/icepack. (a_amorosi@citypaper.net)

GANG STARS: With the help of Temple social worker Harold Haskins, a group of black gang members created a film that, 43 years after its creation, is being honored alongside Michael Jackson’s Thriller. TEMPLE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES, URBAN ARCHIVES

[ found films ]

MIGHTY JUNGLE A powerful little North Philly film gets its longawaited due. By Shaun Brady THE JUNGLE | Screens Sat., Sept. 11, 8 p.m., $7, Moore College of Art &

Design, 1916 Race St., 215-965-4099, thesecretcinema.com

W

hen the Library of Congress announced the list of films that would be preserved as part of its 2009 National Film Registry, alongside such landmark titles as Michael Jackson’s Thriller, Sergio Leone’s Once Upon a Time in the West and Sidney Lumet’s Dog Day Afternoon sat a littleknown 1967 short titled The Jungle. Created by a group of African-American gang members in North Philly under the supervision of Temple social worker Harold Haskins, the gritty, remarkable 22-minute film circulated on the educational market for years, but re-emerged when Secret Cinema’s Jay Schwartz discovered a print several years ago. This Saturday’s reprise screening, with Haskins in attendance, will celebrate the Registry induction and headline Secret Cinema’s “From Philadelphia With Love 2010” program. Scribe Video Center will also show the film later this month.

archive forever with Michael Jackson. … I never thought that we’d ever get the recognition for what we did, but I knew that we had produced something of quality in 1967. I was very happy because this creates a whole new dynamic not only for this film but for America in terms of what young people who don’t have all of that so-called legitimate education can do to contribute to this country as well as to their own communities. CP: Why do you think there’s still such interest in The Jungle? HH: The film was kept alive by the young people who produced it.

They knew what they had done [and] there was national interest in the fact that a group of young black males who were basically functionally illiterate could produce something of quality.

“This creates a new dynamic.”

CP: Why is it important for people

to see this film today? HH: The importance of this film

is to show political leaders that they have to dig deep to have people contribute to the well-being and development of [their] communities. There’s so much talent that just gets destroyed that we don’t have the capability to understand what young people can contribute. CP: What impact has the film has had over the past 40 years? HH: To this day, we really don’t know the impact of what this film

City Paper: Were you surprised at the film’s induction into the

Library of Congress? Harold Haskins: Can you imagine? Our names will be in some

has made on American society. But there are a number of these young men who are still alive because of the film that we produced. (s_brady@citypaper.net)


[ the agenda ]

WAY DOWN with Papertrees,

Charlotte Littlehales & Swedeland, 9:30pm, $10, Johnny Brenda’s, 1201 N. Frankford Ave., 877-435-9849.

SATURDAY 9/11 Crowd Popular & Future Future, 11pm, $10, The Balcony, 1003 Arch St., 215-922-6888.

✚ MUSIC ³ rock/pop THURSDAY 9/9 Q AOI with The Great Vibration,

Doomstar! & The Eeries, 8:30pm, FREE, Millcreek Tavern, 4200

Chester Ave., 215-222-9194. Q BITCH with Steph Hayes & Adam

Brodsky, 8pm, $12, North Star Bar, 2639 Poplar St., 215-684-0808. Q BRAD HINTON BAND with

Pawnshop Roses & Liz Fullerton, 9pm, $9, World Café Live, 3025 Walnut St., 215-222-1400. Q CHRIS BRUNI with Onufrak, 8pm,

$5, Triumph Brewing Co., 117-121 Chestnut St., 215-625-0855. Q DIRK QUINN BAND with Adam

Monaco Band, 8:30pm, $5, Puck, 85 Printers Alley, Doylestown, 215348-9000. Q GOREVETTE with The Midnight

Beat, 8pm, $10, M Room, 15 W. Girard Ave., 215-739-5577. Q KATATONIA with Swallow the

Sun & Orphaned Land, 7:30pm, $16-$39, Trocadero, 1003 Arch St., 215-922-5483. Q RIVER CITY EXTENSION with

Japanese Sunday, 9pm, $10, North Star Bar, 2639 Poplar St., 215-6840808. Q CORINNE BAILEY RAE with

Harper Blynn, 8:30pm, $27.50-$30, Electric Factory, 7th & Willow sts., 215-336-2000. Q ELSINORE with El Fuego & Mini

Mammoth, 7pm, $8, M Room, 15 W. Girard Ave., 215-739-5577. Q JACKSON BROWNE, 8pm, $41$76, Tower Theater, 19 S. 69th St., Upper Darby, 610-352-2887. Q JOE DUFFEY’S UNDERWATER WINDOW GARDEN AND JOE BRADY with Hidden

River & Construction, 10pm, $8, Fire, 412 W. Girard Ave., 267-671-9298. Q LITTLE BROTHER, 9pm, $20,

TLA, 334 South St., 215-922-1011. Q MANTIS METAL MELTDOWN

with Dead From The Cure, Pale Existence & Slaughter of Elysium, 6pm, $15, Trocadero, 1003 Arch St., 215-922-5483. Q SOMEONE STILL LOVE YOU BORIS YELTSIN with Telekinesis,

6pm, $10, Barbary, 951 Frankford Ave., 215-423-8342. Q STRAPPING FIELDHANDS with

The Doozer, 7:30pm, $8, Kung Fu Necktie, 1250 N. Front St., 215-2914919. Q THE HALF OF IT with Sails Tacks,

FRIDAY 9/10

10pm, $5, Triumph Brewing Co., 117121 Chestnut St., 215-625-0855.

Adam and Dave’s Bloodline & Faux Slang, 8pm, $10, M Room, 15 W. Girard Ave., 215-739-5577. Q CAPILLARY ACTION with Her-

mit Thrushes & Old Goats, 7:30pm, $8, Kung Fu Necktie, 1250 N. Front St., 215-291-4919. Q DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS

with The Levee Drivers, The Fallen Troubadours & Riley Etheridge, 9pm, $10, North Star Bar, 2639 Poplar St., 215-684-0808. Q FLYLEAF, 8:30pm, $25-$28,

Electric Factory, 7th & Willow sts., 215-291-4919. Q PAGAN BABIES with Wisdom

In Chains, McRad, Violent Society, Common Enemy & Thee Nosebleeds, 7pm, $12-$15, Trocadero, 1003 Arch St., 215-922-5483. Q SPLINTERED SUNLIGHT, 10pm,

$5, Triumph Brewing Co., 117-121 Chestnut St., 215-625-0855.

Q TOBACCO with Junk Culture &

Dreamend, 8pm, $12, First Unitarian Church, 2125 Chestnut St., 215-563-3980.

Q US FUNK TEAM with Upsince-

friday & Kite Party, 10pm, $7, Fire, 412 W. Girard Ave., 267-671-9298. Q WES MATTHEU AND THE NEW

Q THE MECHANICALS with The

LGB Porject & The Beekeepers, 811pm, $5, Cedar Street Studios, 3211 Cedar St., 215-413-1200.

SUNDAY 9/12 Q BAPTIST PREACHERS with

Sela, 8pm, $8, The Balcony, 1003 Arch St., 215-922-6888. Q BEN SOLLEE with The Spinning

Leaves, 9pm, $10-$12, Johnny Brenda’s, 1201 N. Frankford Ave., 877-435-9849. Q BLUEBOND’S INDOOR PICNIC CONCERT, 2pm, $5, The Balcony,

1003 Arch St., 215-922-6888. Q DESPISED ICON with Misery

Index & Revocation, 7pm, $13, First Unitarian Church, 2125 Chestnut St., 215-563-3980. Q THE WORLD AT LARGE with

The Tea Club, Twin Temples & Banned Books, 8pm, $8, North Star Bar, 2639 Poplar St., 215-684-0808.

MONDAY 9/13 Q KOTTONMOUTH KINGS with

Blaze Ya Dead Homie, Big B & Bliss N Eso, 6:30pm, $22, TLA, 334 South St., 215-922-1011. Q WOODS with Birds of Maya &

Meg Baird, 8pm, $5, Kung Fu Neck-

P H I L A D E L P H I A C I T Y PA P E R | S E P T E M B E R 9 - S E P T E M B E R 1 6 , 2 0 1 0 | C I T Y PA P E R . N E T |

Tim McGlone and The Turn & Miz, 8pm, $11-$13, World Café Live, 3025 Walnut St., 215-222-1400.

Q BLAYER POINTDUJOUR with

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Q CASPIAN with Rosetta, Lehnen &

the agenda

Q BAPTIST PREACHERS with Big

the naked city | feature | a&e

IF YOU WANT TO BE LISTED:

Submit information by mail (City Paper Listings, 123 Chestnut St., Third Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19106), e-mail (listings@citypaper. net). Include details of the event, dates, times, address of venue, telephone number and admission price, if any. Listings must be received at least 10 days in advance of publication. Incomplete submissions will not be considered, and listings information will not be accepted over the phone.

27


HOPWORLDTRANCER&BHOUSE ELECTROBREAKSTECHNOP UNKSOULD&BINDIEROCKELEC TROREGGAEGOTH/INDUSTRIAL HIPHOPWORLDTRANCER&B HOUSEROCKELECTROBREAK STECHNOPUNKSOULD&BINDIE ROCKELECTROREGGAEGOTH/INDUSTRIALHIPHOPROCKWORLD TRANCER&BHOUSEELECTRO BREAKSTECHNOPUNKSOULD& BINDIEROCKELECTROREGGAE KGOTH/INDUSTRIALD&BHIP REGGAEGOTH/INDUSTRIALHIP HOPWORLDTRANCER&BHOUSE ELECTROBREAKSTECHNOP UNKSOULD&BINDIEROCKELEC TROREGGAEGOTH/INDUSTRIAL HIPHOPWORLDTRANCER&B

FIND YOUR

djnights get a life

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SCREEN GEMS PRESENTS AN OLIVE BRIDGE ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION A WILL GLUCK FILM “EASY A” PENN BADGLEY MALCOLM MCDOWELLDIRECTEDALY MICHALKA AMANDA BYNES THOMAS HADEN CHURCH PATRICIA CLARKSONPRODUCEDCAM GIGANDET LISA KUDROW WRITTEN STANLEY TUCCI BY ZANNE DEVINE WILL GLUCK BY BERT V. ROYAL BY WILL GLUCK

To win passes for you and a guest to an advance screening, visit www.citypaper.net and search through the website to find the hidden red letter A. When you find it, log on to CITYPAPER.NET/WIN and tell us where you found it to be entered into the drawing. Five random entries will be selected to win an EASY A prize pack.

No purchase necessary. Passes are available on a first-come, first-served basis, while supplies last. One admit two pass per person. Employees of all sponsors are not eligible.

IN THEATERS SEPTEMBER 17


[ singer-songwriter ]

the agenda

SHERVIN LAINEZ

the naked city | feature | a&e

✚ AGENDA PICKS

food | classifieds

³ ALLISON WEISS There’s a line in “Why Bother” that sums up what Allison Weiss is all about. “There’s a price to pay for doing what I do, but I can’t stop,” she sings. “I open up my heart like it’s my job.” Sure, she’s great at turning heartache into catchy tunes, but there’s so much more to her than that. Go see for yourself. Fri., Sept. 10, 10:30 p.m., $10, with Leila Broussard and Bess Rogers, Tin Angel, 20 S. Second St., 215-928-0978, tinangel.com. —M.J. Fine [ rock/pop ]

³ OF MONTREAL

[ jazz ]

³ MAXFIELD GAST TRIO

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Maxfield Gast has played saxophone on recordings with Philly jazzbos (Puzzlebox), ska heads (Public Service!) and elegant world musicians (Bebek). None of those things prepare you for what a clear and concise ax man he is — possessing a richly snake-charming tone reminiscent of a sexier Paul Desmond whether on alto, soprano or tenor sax. Even when Gast expressed himself through taut improvisations on his wonky electro-funk debut Eat Your Beats, you didn’t quite grasp what a cutting sense of dynamics and spirit he had. Side by Side,the first recording from his Trio (Brian Howell on upright bass, Mike Pietrusko on drums) remedies that. Filled with self-penned, self-produced tracks, Side by Side plays it cool and straight in calming post-bop fashion. “In the Fall” is spacious and, yes, autumnal. “Parallel” is a dancing leap through upward chromatics with Gast’s tone at his most slithery. “Nine” is an ominously slow and rolling rhythmic escapade worthy of a cheap ’50s detective flick with Gast finding all manner of light within the usual noir shadows. Impressive stuff, this. Fri., Sept. 10, 9 p.m., $8-$10, with Oscuro Quintet, Moonstone Arts Center, 110 S. 13th St., second floor, luckyoldsouls.com. —A.D. Amorosi

P H I L A D E L P H I A C I T Y PA P E R | S E P T E M B E R 9 - S E P T E M B E R 1 6 , 2 0 1 0 | C I T Y PA P E R . N E T |

If you wrote off Athens, Ga.’s Of Montreal back in their Kindercore days for being just too unbelievably freaking precious (guilty!), well, OK, they’re still unabashedly affected. Their latest, False Priest (Polyvinyl), is either a wink and a nod to ’70s flash or a genuine paean to the disco era. Kevin Barnes and co. crank out 13 songs packed full of danceable grooves, harmonized falsetto, swelling keyboards, jigga-jigga guitar and a song called, no joke, “Sex Karma.” Wed., Sept. 15, 9 p.m., $25-$28, with Janelle Monáe, Electric Factory, 421 N. Seventh St., 215-627-1332, electricfactory.info. —Brian Howard


the naked city | feature | a&e the agenda

THIS SATURDAY NIGHT!

food | classifieds

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Management reserves the right to change or cancel this event at any time without notice. Must be 21 or older to gamble, enter and remain in a New Jersey casino or participate in any Showboat promotion. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-GAMBLER. ©2010, Harrah’s License Company, LLC.

P H I L A D E L P H I A C I T Y PA P E R | S E P T E M B E R 9 - S E P T E M B E R 1 6 , 2 0 1 0 | C I T Y PA P E R . N E T |

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the agenda | a&e | feature | the naked city food classifieds S E P T E M B E R 9 - S E P T E M B E R 1 6 , 2 0 1 0 | C I T Y PA P E R . N E T

34 | P H I L A D E L P H I A C I T Y PA P E R |

f&d

foodanddrink

portioncontrol By Drew Lazor

PASTA-OLOGY ³ MY LUSTIEST ENVY is reserved for the organized. Clutter-free, devoid of dust and dog hair, with brightly labeled hooks and shelves and knobs and jars containing every molecule of cutesy bric-a-brac that makes up their lives. The people who have boxes containing boxes full of boxes full of chronologically annotated doodads. They wake up at 90-degree angles. Their pornography is Real Simple.They know where their keys are at all times. They know where your keys are, too. If there is an official cookbook for this exclusive club I so long to be a part of (where the hell are my keys?), it is surely The Geometry of Pasta, set for a Sept. 15 release by Philly’s Quirk Books. A team effort from Brits Caz Hildebrand (a graphic designer) and Jacob Kenedy (chef at Bocca di Lupo in London’s West End), the book burrows deep into Italy’s most-exported tradition, providing a literal A-to-Z guide to every pasta shape imaginable. But instead of sunlit photos of flour-dusted hands working ribbons of tagliatelle in some stone-walled villa, the recipes are accompanied by Hildebrand’s sexily symmetrical offerings, blackand-white diagrams with more clean lines than Kirk Cameron’s wedding vows. It’s so sleek that a glance at the tomato sauce section will make you want to clean your garage. Plenty of people like to say that food is art, but The Geometry of Pasta provides empirical proof. Of course, the book would be useless if it were all Op Art flash and no practical dash. That’s why it’s so wonderful that Kenedy’s writing is as conversational as it is didactic — he’s got a charming knack for weaving history and cheffish tips into his recipes, which range from homey specialties like potato gnocchi to the elaborate preparation of pansotti (“big bellies”), a Ligurian specialty that calls for fresh-foraged chicory and dandelion. “The startling diversity we wonder at in the natural world is mirrored in microcosm in pasta,” writes Kenedy, an opinion bolstered by Hildebrand’s full-page illustrations, which could be mistaken for microscope fodder if they didn’t so strongly resemble eye charts personalized for Mario Batali. Cookbook traditionalists accustomed to colorful photo spreads might not like the categorical approach of The Geometry of Pasta, as it casts a nearly scientific eye on a food synonymous with stuffed-silly belt-loosening. But Kenedy and Hildebrand deserve praise for systematically stripping the marinara-splattered Sunday Gravy tradition down to reveal its beautiful and meticulous roots. (drew.lazor@citypaper.net)

KING SALMON: Tweed chef David Cunningham cures and smokes Irish salmon three ways for this luxurious trio. MARK STEHLE

[ review ]

CLOTHBOUND The natty Tweed dresses up local/seasonal cooking in one hell of suit. By Adam Erace TWEED | 114 S. 12th St., 215-923-3300, tweedrestaurant.com. Open for dinner Mon.-Thu., 5-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat., 5-11 p.m.; brunch Sat.-Sun., 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; lunch begins Sept. 12. Appetizers $5-$12, burgers $12, entrées $12-$29, sides $5-$8. Wheelchair accessible.

T

ake away the menu display at 114 St. 12th St., and “restaurant” isn’t what immediately springs to mind. An upper-crusty clothier would be a better guess — there’s a revolving door and the name of a fabric calligraphed onto the façade. Tweed indeed is a More on: restaurant, though, one where good looks are good form.Hospitality maestro Edward Bianchini hired URBANSCPACEDEVELOPMENT to wash away the bayou muck left by the last occupant, Les Bons Temps, and in June opened this American eatery named for the cloth favored by English professors everywhere. It’s Bianchini’s court, and he moves through the dining room’s lush flower arrangements like a panther through grass. My mom, a florist for 20 years, should see these blooms. Piled into tall vases on the zinc bar and short ones framing the floating staircase, the exotic flora defied my botanical proficiency, leaving me bereft of all classification but “fuzzy purple lollipop” and “fern

citypaper.net

harvested from the velociraptor compound on Jurassic Park.” Bianchini minds Tweed’s details like a zealous nanny. Clearly, he’s invested in this business, and good on this Philly boy for it. The maharajah-funeral’s worth of stems must cost him six times the most expensive entrée (a $29 lobster Cobb salad), or at least as much as the smart ivory suit the owner sported during one dinner service. That warm summer evening, Ivy Leaguers lined the gorgeous bar, and willowy women in Labor Day whites floated around the room like specters, just tanner. Smooch, smooch. The boat in Margate. Smooch, smooch. Huntington Valley. Everyone seemed to know everyone in this sleek room, on this slick night. If Tweed feels like a chic auberge on the French Riviera, it’s because Bianchini ran one, the Hotel les Muscadins in Mougins. The inn’s since sold, but its esprit de corps lives on in this less glamorous locale, like a temporarily MORE FOOD AND dethroned and making-the-best-of-it royal. DRINK COVERAGE But under this glossy veneer lurks one AT C I T Y P A P E R . N E T / very unexpected attribute: earnestness. M E A LT I C K E T. Beneath the stylishly glum blues and grays of an Icelandic winter, there’s a real restaurant here. Rest assured, 39-year-old David Cunningham, who’s been the chef at Bookbinder’s and less recently cooked at New York’s Le Bernardin and Lespinasse, has the most heartfelt of culinary intentions. He refers to his purveyors as “fellas,” as in “the fella who makes the honey up the road from my house” or “the nice fella who raises the pigs for the kieblasa and the pork chop.” If you want their names, see the bottom of the menu, where they’re all honored in an elegant footnote that allows the food descriptions to stay unencumb>>> continued on page 36


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Independents, Couples, Models, Photographers, Videographers and other interested parties may rent studio space for fetish shoots or personal play. No alcohol, drugs, or prostitution or smoking permitted on premises. Information: 215-569-4333. “THANK YOU MISTRESS MAY I PLEASE HAVE ANOTHER!”

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This Affectionate And Healthy Female Yorkie Puppy For Adoption Is health registered and currently on all her shots and vaccines, this baby need is just a new loving home where she will be getting so much love and care,she will be more than glad to be new members of any lovely family and friends so if will like to have this well socialized puppies home Email back at (leoyoung002@yahoo.com) for more information PERSONAL PROTECTION

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She is a cute, playful, and will simply steal your heart. All she need is a warm loving home that will love and accept her

TINY TEA CUP CHIHUAHUA PUPP

Gorgeous teacup chihuahua puppies for any one that is ready to adopt babies of this nature. they are 12weeks old and weighs between 2-3 ibs. they are vet checked and AKC registered. contact now to take them home via email .(par iskelly95@hotmail. com)

Health Services LON MILO DUQUETTE

Lon Milo DuQuette lecture at Thelesis Lodge OTO in Philadelphia. Sun.Oct.10,2010. Topic of lecture TBA. Admission is $25.00. For more information please visit our website www.thelesis.org. SCENTED BODY OILS!

Personal use and wholesale options available, even host your own scent making party. Unique and essential oils. Roll ons, vials or bulk sales. Many discounts possible, contact Stacy today at 267-750-8407 or litz@drexel.edu

SPY / GADGETS (BUY OR RENT)

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Va m p i r e s & V i r g i n s h a s teamed up with JPJustParties to provide the most exciting Halloween Event in Las Vegas. All in the greatest location in the world. www. Party969.com

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jobs

NEEDED! Must have a minimum of 2 years experience. These are full-time positions. Apply within Honey Restaurant at 618 Market St. Philadelphia, PA 19106

Help Wanted – General AIRLINES ARE HIRING:

Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified-Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888) 834-9715. FIGHT FOR WORKING CLASS FAMILIES!

Working America, AFL-CIO is seeking infor med and enthusiastic candidates to support politicians who will fight for working class families. Working America is an equal opportunity employer and Women and people of color strongly encouraged to apply to: 215-568-2490, or submit resume to: philly@ workingamerica.org. www. WorkingAmerica.org Drivers-New Trucks!!! NE REGIONAL and OTR Freight Increase, Immediate Openings. Great Pay and Benefits! Class A CDL and 1 year experience required 800-6775627 www.westsidetransport.com. $$$ HELP WANTED $$$

Help Wanted – Regional HELP WANTED

Counter Person & Line Cook

Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! C a l l o u r L i ve O p e ra t o r s Now! 1-800-405-7619 Ext. 2450 http://www.easyworkgreatpay.com.

beautiful girl looking for a lovely and forever home. Lovely coats, great type, excellent line.she fully inoculated (including FLV and Chlaymidia), litter trained, wormed, Front lined, chipped andregistered. more details upon request

215.670.9535

www.mambomovers.com

HELP WANTED DRIVER

Home Time You Deserve! Class-A CDL Drivers Needed. Practical Mile Pay. $2,400 Bonus.Guaranteed Home-Time. Strong, Stable, & Safe. 1-Year OTR experience required. www.veriha.com 800-3339291. HELP WANTED DRIVER

Looking for a great Flatbed Co ?? You just found it! Grand Island Contract Carriers. Must have 1 year OTR Experience. Enjoy great benefits-generous home time-solid pay pkg. Terminals in Grand Island, NE and Rensselaer, IN. Call today 866-483-5318 or www.gioo. chiiofind.com. HELP WANTED DRIVER

Reefer, Tanker, Flatbed Driv-

ers Needed! Experienced drivers & Class A commercial students welcome! Our Incredible Freight network offers plenty of miles! 1-800-277-0212 www. primeinc.com. HELP WANTED DRIVER

TRUCK DRIVERS WANTED! HOME HOMETIME! TOP PAY! EXCELLENT BENEFITS! NEW EQUIPMENT! Up to $.48/mile company drivers! HEARTLAND EXPRESS 1800-441-4953 www.heartlandexpress.com. HELP WANTED INSURANCE

COLONIAL LIFE seeking Life & Health agents to market voluntary employee benefit programs to employers. Register for our Informational Event. Contact Trivonne Gilliam, 856-482-021 8. Trivonne. Gilliam@ColonialLife.com. MOVIE EXTRAS

earn up to $150/day to stand in backgrounds of major film. Experience not required. CALL NOW! 1-888-664-4621.

FAIRMOUNT

&,%!

-!2+%4 Largest Outdoor Flea Market In Phila.

Sat, Sept. 11th

CUTE CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES FOR

GENTLY MOVING YOUR EARTHLY POSSESSIONS

CDL-A Drivers: NOW OFFERING: New Performance Bonus Program. Lots of Miles w/great Pay. 2011 Freightliner Cascadias Have Arrived! $500 Sign-on for Flatbed Drivers. CDL-A, 6 mo. OTR. Western Express 888-801-5295.

Over 200 Vendors Featuring Antiques, Collectibles, Vintage Furniture, Jewelry, Glassware, Books & Much More!

AFFECTIONATE BENGAL KITTEN

She cute, playful, and simply steal your heart. All she need is a warm loving home and they’re friends for life. Adorable female chihuahua puppy for a happy home. The puppy come from a strong line of Yorkshire Terrier. Both parents are tiny toy size. she is ready for your home, now! Don’t miss this chance to

HELP WANTED DRIVER

HELP WANTED

Pets

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find the chihuahuas of your dreams!(kellyyoung123@ hotmail.com)

Rain Date Sun, 9/12

Fight for Working Class Families! Working America, AFL-CIO is seeking informed and enthusiastic candidates to support politicians who will fight for working class families. Working America is an equal opportunity employer and Women and people of color strongly encouraged to apply to: 215-568-2490, or submit resume to: philly@workingamerica.org www.WorkingAmerica.org

22ND & FAIRMOUNT 9AM til 5PM

But Early Birds Welcome! Parking Available In The Adjacent Lot

215 - 625 - FLEA (3532) www.PhilaFleaMarkets.org

45

from Home. *Medical *Business *Paralegal *Computers *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-220-3984 www.CenturaOnline.com.

REGULAR TRADITION MASSAGE

in to and she is a friend for life.this female Yorkie puppy needs a happy home. This puppy comes from a strong line of Yorkshire Terrier. Both parents are tiny toy size. She is ready for your home, now! Don’t miss this chance to find the Yorkshire terrier of your dreams!for more information on her just get back to me via adlinjones@hotmail.com

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EQUIPMENT

Graduate in just 4 weeks! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http://www.continentalacademy.com.

ad the first time it runs. This newspaper can assume no responsibility for errors beyond the first printing of the incorrect ad. City Paper will not be responsible for failure to insert an advertisement. City Paper reserves the right to edit advertising copy, graphics and photos.

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HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA!

POLICIES: It is the responsibility of the Advertiser to check his or her

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real estate

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We have several excellent opportunities in our Northeast Philadelphia ofďŹ ce for Masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;slevel professionals looking for a rewarding career in the ďŹ eld of Human Services.

-Behavioral Specialist Consultant -Mobile Therapist For speciďŹ c duties and requirements, log on to www.pa-mentor.com Pennsylvania MENTOR offers excellent beneďŹ ts for our full-time employees. Coverage options include health, dental, vision, Flexible Spending Accounts, 401k with a company contribution, Tuition Reimbursement, and an Employee Assistance Program.

Land/ Lots for Sale LAND FOR SALE

RENT ME!! RENT ME!!

ABANDONED SOUTHERN TIER FARM 14 Acres$25,995 w/ Gorgeous views, excellent deer and turkey area. Statelands all around. Beautiful woods and meadows. Financing available. Call today for FREE CLOSING COSTS! 800-229-7843. www.LandandCamps.com. Central Montana Ponderosa Pine Ranch 22 Acres-Beautiful Views County Road & Utilities-$24,900. 160-500 Acres Starting @ $800/acre. Beautiful trees, ponds, & views. The best elk & deer statewide. Call 888-3613006 or visit www.WesternSkiesLand.com. LAND FOR SALE

Stepheny.booker@thementornetwork.com Please make sure that your resume indicates the months and years worked in previous positions in order for your application to be considered complete. Also seeking BA level professionals to ďŹ ll Therapeutic Staff Support positions

46 | P H I L A D E L P H I A C I T Y PA P E R |

S E P T E M B E R 9 - S E P T E M B E R 1 6 , 2 0 1 0 | C I T Y PA P E R . N E T

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New York State DISCOUNTED HUNTING PROPERTIES 42 Acres-Borders State: $59,995. 97 AcresBorders State: $119,995. 14 Acres-Southern Tier Farm: $25,995. 25 Acres TUG HILLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BEST, On Trails: $39,995. 50 Acres -Salmon River Area; $59,995. Over 100 properties and camps discounted. Call: 800-2297843 Or visit www.LandandCamps.com.

Seasonal/ Ocean Property for Sale WATERFRONT PROPERTIES

Great Land & Spectacular Oceanfront-Absolute buy of a lifetime: Surf & turf, the best of all worlds at OCEAN VIEW on Virginiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eastern Shore. Spectacular 1 to 3 acre lots, on the seaside (the mainland) overlooking pristine oceanfront barrier island 1 mile away. Each lot includes deeded ownership of nearby private island oceanfront beach Sun, sail, swim, fish, clam, and play on the islands secluded beach during the days and dine at nearby quaint restaurants at night. May remind you of the Jersey shore many years ago. Unique situation makes these lots available at 1/3 of original cost. Waterfront pon lots $65,000 and view lots at $40,000. Every lot has spectacular ocean, bay and marsh vistas. Community dock planned. Owner (757) 665-4410, email oceanandtrust@yahoo.com.

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HUGE 3 BDRM IN N. LIBERTIES

Completely renovated in 2006, Sundrenched 3 bedroom, 1 bath apar tment for rent. Hardwood floors throughout, washer/dryer access and AC units. Off street parking available. Small pets ok. Available 9/1. $1800/mo. Call Jason at 215-327-2217.

LAND FOR SALE

SEND YOUR RESUME TO

ALARM SYSTEM - NICE BALCONY MUST SEE $850.00 PH#215 287-8063 PETE

Apartments for Rent APT FOR RENT AVE.OF THE ART

1 BEDROOM WITH LIVING ROOM/KITCHEN - HARDWOOD FLOORS - WASHER/ DRYER - REFIGERATOR -

FOR RENT! Quality 1-2-3 Bedroom Apts. Temple University & International Students Welcome! Call 215928-8868 TEMPLE OFF-CAMPUS RENTAL

3bed/1bath entire floor unit available for immed. occupancy!!! Located in center of campus, just off Broad St. Join the Temple students already on the same block. call NOWâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;-484-467-4118

Studio/ Efficiency MODERN CHARM IN ART MUSEUM

Old world charm meets modern amenities in this studio condo in the convenient and classy Ar t Museum area. Bamboo hardwood floors, central air, intercom entry and on-site laundry are just a few of the amenities. Available September 1st. $990/month Follow link for full listing and photos: http://www.realtor. com/realestateandhomes-detail/2019-Spring-Garden-St1F_Philadelphia_PA_19130_ 1120535447 Contact Realtor Keya Epps (610)209-4128 or eppskw@hotmail.com Serious Inquiries Only please! Thank you!

One Bedroom 15TH/SPRUCE

Beautiful Art Deco High-rise 1Bdrm Apt, Desk Attendant, HW Flrs, Updated Kitch, Onsite Laundry, Intercom Entry, Amazing Location! Avail Nov. From $1080/Mo. 215-7358030. Lic #219789. 15TH/SPRUCE

HUGE 1bdrm in Beautiful Brownstone, Great Location, Hi Ceilings, 2 Deco FP, HW Flrs, Updated Kitchen, Onsite Laundry, AC, Intercom Entry, Pet Friendly. $1340/Mo. 215735-8030. Lic # 380139. NORTHEAST PHILLY RESIDENCE

Temple students - are you looking for a room to rent off campus? - very reasonable, 30 minute commute to school. Non-smokers, please. Very very reasonable. 215-7452803 QUEEN VILLAGE: 4TH + FITZWATER-

1BR. Wall-Wall Carpet, Central Air, Washer/Dryer, Dishwasher. $745+. No pets. Call 215-432-4695, between 9am-10pm. **RENTAL SPECIALS TEMPLE ONE BEDROOM

Option to rent for the 20102011 school year. Or just sublet in September or October until the end of July,2011. This Edge apartment complex is equipped with free gym, free tanning, game room, lounge with flat screen, TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 24/7 security and computer center. Right on Templeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Campus! The bedroom that is being offered is $744/month within

a 4 bedroom 4 bathroom fully furnished apartment. It is a room in the apartment with the bathroom located directly in it. The other suite-mates or apartment-mates are awesome girls and very easy to get along with. I will take $44 off of the rent until July. This is the lowest apartment cost that is available in the Edge since I have renewed my lease! For more questions send me an email

phia University; 3-block walk to Germantown Ave. for the 23 bus to the Chestnut Hill East Region Rail Station (R7) or GFS (Germantown Friends School) â&#x20AC;˘ Close to Lincoln Drive, 76, 202, City Ave. â&#x20AC;˘ Twenty minutesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; drive to Center City â&#x20AC;˘ Great for mountain bikers and runners: close to Wissahickon Valley Park â&#x20AC;˘ $1100/month; $3300 to move in; tenant pays all utilities; no pets

Two Bedrooms

532 WATKINS STREET

1173 SOUTH 10TH STREET

$1350 a Month. Central Air, Washer, Dryer, Dishwasher Included! *Great Neighborhood! MUST SEE!* CALL: (215) 922-3910. mcolaizzo@ comcast.net LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATIO

Great 2 bedroom apartment near T University and Center City. Immaculate and ready to move in. Call for appt. Max 215 518 0153

Three+ Bedrooms 15TH & SPRUCE/AVENUE OF THE ARTS

PENTHOUSE Avail! One of a kind spacious bi-level penthouse in historic Art Deco High-Rise, 3bdrms/ 3 Full Baths/ 2 half baths, 4 Lrg Terraces w/Amazing City Views, Entertainment Rm w/ Wet Bar, New Kitch w/ Granite Countertops, W/D, CA, Vaulted Ceilings, HW Flrs. $3999/Mo. 215735-8030. Lic #219789. GREAT 5BR ROWHOME

Newly Renovated 5BR, 2BA Rowhome at 1523 Cambridge Street. Avail Sept 1, $1975/ mo. Near Broad Street Subway and Temple U. On a quiet street with plenty of parking. Great for Students. Hardwood Floors, FREE Washer/Dryer, Gas Stove, Dishwasher, Garbage Disposal, Microwave, A/ C, New Windows, Back Patio. Call Stacey at Keller Williams 215-757-6100, x173. RITTENHOUSE SQUARE

Rittenhouse Square: Enormous 3bdrm w/ 2 Full Baths in Beautiful Historic Brownstone, Full Size Washer/Dryer in Apt, HW Flrs, 2 Decorative Fireplaces, Hi Ceilings, Newly Remodeled Kitchen w/ Granite Countertop, Separate Dining Rm, Living Rm, & Family Rm, A/C, Spacious Rooms, Terrific Location! $2799/Mo. 215-7358030. #216850. SOUTH PHILLY

Corner Property. Brand new Kitchen and carpeting. 3 bedrooms. His & Her Sink. W/D, Central Air, Dishwasher, G/D and over range microwave. $1,1,00 + NO PETS (215) 271-9582.

Homes $1100/3BR WEST GERMANTOWN

â&#x20AC;˘ Off-street parking for 2 cars â&#x20AC;˘ 3 bedrooms, 1 office, half bath on first floor, full bath on second floor â&#x20AC;˘ 1701 sq. ft., 3 floors â&#x20AC;˘ Full basement â&#x20AC;˘ Back patio â&#x20AC;˘ Alarm system â&#x20AC;˘ Internet / Cable-ready â&#x20AC;˘ Spacious, eat-in kitchen â&#x20AC;˘ Convenient access to public transportation for easy access to Center City or the suburbs: less than ten minutes to walk to the Tulpehocken or Upsal Stations for the Regional Rail line; 2-block walk to H (HXH) bus for LaSalle or Philadel-

Pennsport Area, Modern 3 Bedroom Home, Hardwood floor, Washer/Dryer, Fridge, Large Basement $750/month. Pete: 267-307-0371 HOUSE FOR RENT 18TH&SNYDER

2 BDRM, 1.5 bath, fresh paint, new carpet, washer/ dryer, very clean. $750/month Call Eric 215-399-8962

Commerical/ Warehouse ARTIST STUDIOS 130SF $100

Art Studios available at The Paper mill in Kensington 130sf for $100.00 per month. Larger spaces available. Visit our Facebook group for more details: The Papermill Community of Ar tists Contact Karen at 215.687.8391

Office/ Retail ARTIST WORKSPACE OR OFFICE RENTAL

319 North 11th Street 2nd Floor, 700 Sq. Ft. W/Elevator, High Ceilings & Windows, $1,000/mo. For more info call: 215-882-1187 RETAIL SPACE FOR RENT

125 North 11th Street Cor ner Proper ty, ground floor, central air 1550 Sq. Ft., W/Basement 1400 Sq. Ft. $3400/mo For more info call: 215-882-1187

Roommates ROOMATES.COM

Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of a mouse! Visit: http:/www.Roommates. com. TEMPLE UNIVERSITY OFFCAMPUS

One rental unit available for immediate occupancy!!! Entire floor has 3 bedrooms / 1 bath with common kitchen area. All new appliances and central air conditioning. Call NOWâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;-484-467-4118

Rental Wanted 2-3 BEDROOM IN MT. AIRY!

I am currently looking for a 2-3 bedroom in the Mount Airy section of the city asap! Please call me @ (302) 3332734.

Vacation/ Seasonal Rental VACATION RENTALS

OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102 Online reservations www. holidayoc.com.


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2740 S Front St . Philadelphia    215-467-1980

Philadelphia City Paper, September 9th, 2010  

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