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music

DECEMBER 2009 NEW YORK

NOW sex march 2010 new york

march 2010 London

july 2010 London

november 2010 London

november 2010 new york

September 2010 LONDON

LATIN AMERICA october 2010 new york

black no & reserve white december 2010 LONDON

DECEMBER 2010 new york

NY0 0 0 3 0 9

japan music

NOW

JUNE 2010 London

N e w Yo r k

june 2010 new york

no reserve

APRIL 2010 NEW YORK

2009

80s

april 2010 London

December

MARCH 2010 NEW YORK

12

AFRICA bric FILM ITALIA

New York New York

NOVEMBER 2009 London

NEW YORK NEW YORK

new york new york 12 december 2009 new york


SALE INFORMATION Auction Saturday 12 December 2009 at 12pm Viewing Saturday 5 December, 10am - 6pm Sunday 6 December, 12pm - 6pm Monday 7 December, 10am -6pm Tuesday 8 December, 10am - 6pm Wednesday 9 December, 10am - 6pm Thursday 10 December, 10am - 6pm Friday 11 December, 10am - 6pm Viewing & Auction Location 450 West 15 Street New York 10011 jewels viewing location 4 - 8 December The Mark Hotel 992 Madison Avenue New York 8 - 12 December Phillips de Pury & Company 450 West 15 Street New York Sale Designation In sending written bids or making inquiries please refer to this sale as NY000309 or NEW YORK NEW YORK. Theme sales New York Corey Barr, Manager +1 212 940 1234 Anne Huntington, Cataloguer +1 212 940 1210 Stephanie Max, Administrator +1 212 940 1301 London Tobias Sirtl, Manager +44 20 7318 4095 Arianna Jacobs, Cataloguer +44 20 7318 4054 George O’Dell, Administrator +44 20 7318 4040 Consultant Steve Agin, Toy Art +1 908 475 1796 Catalogues Allyson Melchor +1 212 940 1240 +44 20 7318 4039 catalogues@phillipsdepury.com Absentee and Telephone Bids Rebecca Lynn +1 212 940 1228 +1 212 924 1749 fax bids@phillipsdepury.com client accounting Sylvia Leitao +1 212 940 1231 Buyers Accounts Nicole Rodriguez +1 212 940 1235 Seller Accounts Barbara Doupal +1 212 940 1232 Nadia Somwaru +1 212 940 1280 Client Services +1 212 940 1200 Shipping Beth Petriello +1 212 940 1373 Jennifer Brennan +1 212 940 1372 Property Manager Robert Weingart +1 212 940 1241 Principal Auctioneer Simon de Pury 0874341 Auctioneers Aileen Agopian 1199037 Sarah Mudge 1301805 Alexander Gilkes 1308958 Ellen Stelter UK Rodman Primack UK

Editor Karen Wright Louisa Wright, Editorial Assistant Photography Kent Pell, Matthew Kroening and Clint Blowers

E-mail Addresses All Phillips de Pury & Company e-mails are first initial and last name @phillipsdepury.com (e.g. twood@phillipsdepury.com) www.phillipsdepury.com Please note that all lots are offered and sold subject to (i) the StandardTerms and Conditions, and (ii) Special Terms and Conditions applicable to this sale as described within this sale catalogue. The Standard Terms and Conditions and Special Terms and Conditions should be fully read and

lot 20. Richard estes (detail)

understood prior to bidding at the auction. All lots are sold “AS-IS.” All lots are offered subject to a reserve unless otherwise indicated.


lot 111. Berenice Abbott


lot 234. Unknown designer (detail)


lot 274. Taffin


lot 336. Sol LeWitt (detail)


Contents

Simon de pury

NEW YORK NEW YORK – why we can’t get enough of it. A letter from the Chairman ...page 12

Alex katz

In the studio of a radical realist ...page 14

new york in black and white The city’s history in photographs ...page 22

agnes gund

Talking art, work and friendship with one of New York’s foremost collectors ...page 28

new lines on the horizon The most exciting new art spaces in town ...page 34

gigi gaston A recluse revealed ...page 38

Object lesson The skinny on Lot 305 ...page 42

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Contents

News

What’s happening in the international art world ...page 46

12pm: editions Lots 1 – 88 ...page 46

1.30pm: photographs Lots 89 – 211 ...page 74

3.30pm: design Lots 212 – 248 ...page 122

4pm: jewels Lots 249 – 285 ...page 140

5pm: contemporary art Lots 286 – 358 ...page 150

Buyers guide

How to buy and whom to contact at Phillips de Pury ...page 179

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‘NEW YORK NEW YORK, big city of dreams,’ as Grandmaster Flash would rap in the early 80s. That’s already what this city represented for me as a teenager in Switzerland back in the mid 60s. The minute I touched the ground at JFK during my first visit then, I was mesmerized by what I saw. Queuing for hours to get tickets to the musical ‘Hair,’ the beauty of Times Square at night, visiting artists in the slightly dangerous Greenwich Village, was all part of the experience. When I sit today at my Vito Acconci desk looking across 14th Street, now a chic fashion street rivaling Madison Avenue, watching the thousands of people strolling on the High Line, I am witness to the continuous morphing of this unique city. The one thing that has never changed, however, is the shot of energy that you get when you arrive in New York and that feeling of slight melancholy you feel when heading back to JFK and leaving the metropolis behind you. It is this energy that has enticed greatness in every imaginable area, and in none so much as in the world of art. For artists from Duchamp to Warhol to Koons, New York has been an unlimited source of energy and inspiration. Collectors are artists in their own right and so it is not surprising that New York is home to some of the world’s greatest collectors. Ronald Lauder and Agnes Gund are the ultimate examples of the genius and excellence that can be achieved in collecting. MoMA would not be what it is without the passion and commitment of New Yorkers like them. We are most grateful to Agnes Gund to have opened her home to our writer Karen Wright for the article in this catalogue. For this theme sale, we have asked our colleagues to focus on works either inspired by or created in New York. It is our hope that young and new collectors will find inspiration in some of the works being offered for sale. Only in NEW YORK kids, only in NEW YORK!

SIMON de PURY Chairman, Phillips de Pury & Company 13


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Alex Katz photographed in his studio, New York, October 27, 2009

Alex katz radical realist

Text David cohen | Photography Jason Schmidt

Alex katz, like fellow New Yorker Woody Allen, encapsulates our perception of a city that, in turn, has shaped him as an artist. And just as there is two-way traffic between Katz and New York, so Katz’s relationship with the New York School has been symbiotic. He has drawn on multiple aspects of high and popular culture as well as artists with strikingly different allegiances. Over time, he has become an avatar who cuts across generational and stylistic divides. Katz is a realist within the traditional genres of landscape and portraiture. His approach, however, remains as radical as when, in the early 1960s, he achieved artworld acclaim with oversize, cool, flat, highly stylized portraits that caught the panache of the new decade. In another startling move, a figure could multiply within the same canvas, as in The Black Dress (1960) in which the artist’s chic young wife Ada (his constant top model) is lined up six times in varying poses. The bold delineations and solid fields of saturated color in classic Katz seemed like a fusion of advertising billboards and Coptic funerary portraits, as one commentator wryly observed. From the outset, Katz was acutely conscious of sartorial style and social posture in depictions of a close-knit circle of sitters – Ada, his young son, Vincent, his bohemian, downtown circle. There was none of the gloomy introversion of expressionist portraiture in either the painter’s delivery or the sitter’s demeanor. Instead, there was a suave optimism, depersonalized yet confident, pure New York. Katz was born in Brooklyn in 1927 and raised in Queens, never losing the distinctive accent of the outer boroughs. He studied at the Cooper Union and at the Skowhegan School in Maine where since the mid-1950s he has spent his summers. While Maine locales provide his landscape motifs, a number of significant topographical subjects were observed in New York in other seasons. There are stark winter trees from 15


Central Park, for instance, sandwiching the closely cropped, pallid, red-lipped pedestrian in her purple beret in January III (1992). His nocturnes do for New York what Whistler’s did for London, capturing the oddly abstract sensation of auto and street lights on Sixth Avenue near his Soho loft as surely as Whistler did smog on the Thames. His acute urban sense of artifice in reality harvested an audaciously pared-down motif of office lights left blazing at night in Varick (1988). This twelve-foot wide canvas is seemingly all black save for the masterful stroke of white for the lit corner office. Despite its slickness, the image is imbued with Hopperesque poignancy. His latest show, at PaceWildenstein earlier this year, featured Munch-like moonscapes in Washington Square. But for Katz, New York is a place for people rather than landmarks. His aesthetic has always been richly nourished by singularly cosmopolitan sources. As a young man, jazz and cinema were his touchstones. From Antonioni movies he got the idea that a drastically cropped face is more immediately present and compelling than a composed portrait – an insight confirmed by Japanese prints which he studied very closely as a student. He never lost his youthful fascination with ‘glamorous people’ (he once sold singer Lionel Hampton a hot dog at a black dance, he proudly recalls in his memoirs). He found Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis and Stan Getz to be ‘cool, all-over, technically brilliant, and lyrical,’ qualities that soon came to apply to his own painting. These smooth jazzmen were studiously anti-romantic: bebop was an upbeat, urbane refinement of the blues. In a similar way, Katz self-consciously distanced himself from the bombastic and mythic pretensions of the late followers of Abstract Expressionism who dominated the fifties scene. The soft palette of his painting in the 1950s and the delicacy of his collages – his first works to gain peer recognition – were deliberately antimacho. When someone at a party told him that they thought because of his name and style that he was a girl, he replied that he was pleased that his feminine side came through. At the same time that he was finding his distance from the Ab Ex aesthetic, however, the young Katz was taken up by Willem de Kooning and Franz Kline. Their energy, bravura and originality fuelled his own ambition. He was closer, in fact, to many abstract painters than to old-time realists, an anomaly he shared with Fairfield Porter, who was an early writer in support of Katz. Almost more than painting, Katz found aesthetic affinities in current dance and poetry, which in the 1960s came to take the place that jazz had occupied in his formative years. Edwin Denby, the poet and dance writer and his friend Rudy Burckhardt were instrumental mentors. When Katz first met Denby, the young painter introduced the dance writer to the latest moves 16


17


ÂŤWhen someone thought because of his name and style that he was a girl, katz was pleased his feminine side came throughÂť

18


at the Palladium. In turn, Denby set Katz up with the experimental dancer Paul Taylor, for whom Katz would design many sets and costumes. Katz and Taylor hit it off with a common attitude towards style: Taylor responded enthusiastically to his theory about style being content and having no content. ‘Paul said, ‘Oh yes! Yes! That was the first thing I decided – to make art with no content, no expression, and most of all NO FORM.’ Whether he was influenced by the work of New York School poets like Frank O’Hara, John Ashbery, James Schuyler and Kenneth Koch; jazzmen of the Fifties; dance people with whom he collaborated in the Sixties and Seventies; or the fashion world to which he has turned with increasing avidity, the twin attributes Katz has consistently discovered the twin attributes which define his own practice: detachment and technique. This has never amounted to remoteness or nonchalance: Katz’s aesthetic was rooted in Fifties cool rather than Sixties cold, to follow Robert Storr’s distinction. Sentiment and nostalgia have never been alien to his subject matter. But his values are studiously (and provocatively) concerned with stylistic surfaces rather than psychological depths. his COOLNESS, HIS distance from Abstract Expressionism, and the billboard association, naturally had him confused for a while with Pop Art. When he completed his first serial screen painting, Andy Warhol is reputed to have said, ‘Gee, they look like Alex Katzs.’ Katz, meanwhile, keenly admired James Rosenquist’s billboard aesthetic for its complexity, scale and finesse. But Katz was markedly indifferent to mass culture: he was concerned with the kind of style generated by interesting people, like the disparate circle of writers, artists and personalities populating Cocktail Party (1965), depicting a gathering in his Flatiron loft, not the banality imposed on the masses by ad men. Much as Katz was a realist who took more energy from abstraction than realism – the critic Irving Sandler coined the term ‘new perceptual realism’ to describe Katz’s and Philip Pearlstein’s idiom and stress their avant-garde credentials – so artists who have looked to Katz as an example have been abstract or conceptual as well as realist. In the 1960s, he began to visit the School of Art at Yale, where he had a significant impact on the generation which included Robert Mangold, Sylvia Plimack Mangold, Chuck Close, Janet Fish and Rackstraw Downes. Downes (a landscape painter who shows at Betty Cuningham Gallery and who recently received a 19

MacArthur Foundation ‘genius’ award) was making abstract paintings when he was at Yale. To these artists, Katz presented the possibility of working with representation while being firmly rooted in very contemporary concerns with scale, perception and vernacular language. The sculptor Joel Shapiro also came under Katz’s influence, as later did the painter Jennifer Bartlett. There is clearly an affinity between Shapiro’s willingness to inject playful figuration within a reductive, purist idiom, and Katz’s abstraction- within-representation. There is no question, however, that Katz has also been a touchstone for artists who wanted to work from observation through years when artworld dogmatists were proclaiming that realist painting, or any kind of painting, was dead. In a way, though, Katz has maintained a foot in two camps: like his peers Neil Welliver, Red Grooms and the quirky painterly realist Lois Dodd, with whom he was close from his Cooper Union days, he has doggedly pursued his subject interests regardless of whether they are in fashion or not. At the same time he has also sought out, and been sought out by, successive generations of hip young artists in New York (and increasingly, internationally too). They are as likely to work in photography and video – pace the Swiss Beat Streuli – as painting. Katz himself has a ‘three year’ theory – a variant of Warhol’s fifteen minutes – in which an artist can be ‘up to date,’ after which he or she will be made to look oldfashioned. According to Katz, for instance, Picasso was put in the shade in 1913 by Léger and Gris. His own ‘bounce’ came in 1959–62, after which he saw himself as working against the grain. A rare exception to this harsh law of hipness was Matisse, who ‘hit a double’: as a Fauve, and then – in old age – with his cutouts. Katz is clearly talking about actual stylistic breakthroughs in the work rather than status or reputation. Otherwise, his own second inning would be measured at three decades rather than years, for since the 1980s he has come to enjoy the position of a mature artist in the company of young spirits. It was in the Eighties when his own 'comeback' began. Artists of the pictures generation, like David Salle, Richard Prince and Cindy Sherman, and neo-expressionists like Julian Schnabel, Eric Fischl and Francesco Clemente, heralded Katz as almost a Picabia in their midst. Francis Picabia was the seeming joker of the prewar Paris avant-garde. In the Eighties, he came to be regarded as highly relevant in terms of ironic attitude and subject matter. Katz, of course,


did not relate directly to either Picabia or to the artists of the 1980s in any painterly specific: the connection arose through the simple fact of his belligerent and stylish transgression of formal or conceptual norms. If there is a closer affinity, it exists most obviously in the work of Cindy Sherman: her cinematic self-regard arguably taps the multi-personality style-consciousness of Katz’s self-portraits and the glazed, ethereal remoteness of his Ada paintings. Into the Nineties, Katz's appeal persisted. Elizabeth Peyton’s fey icons of celebrities and friends, while emotionally remote from Katz’s coolness in their penchant for the doomed and the elegiac, do share Katz’s declared and evident interest in nostalgia and sentiment. Peyton found her pictorial language through a fusion of David Hockney and Katz, tapping a melancholy often present in Katz’s early faces of Vincent. That Peyton alighted on Katz is indicative less of his hipness than of his passé status – making him safe for rediscovery. Some younger artists in Katz’s circle have made it into his paintings as sitters – Cecily Brown (whose father, the British critic David Sylvester, was a champion of Katz following his discovery by Charles Saatchi), Mariko Mori, Ena Swansea and Jessica CraigMartin. Craig-Martin’s photographs of Hamptons parties, while unKatzian in the extent to which they are judgmental and subjective, share the master’s understated astuteness. Katz is important to artists well beyond New York. Peter Doig, the Canadian-ScottishCaribbean painter of emotionally charged symbolist landscapes, is an avowed fan. Merlin James, who shows small, quirky pictures steeped in a problematic nostalgia both for the old masters and for modernism at Sikkema Jenkins, is also a highly influential, polemical writer on art for whom Katz is almost the only vital, living link to the tradition that concerns him. The reasons for Katz’s allure differ between generations and milieus, but three factors are constant. The first is that he fuses disparate strands (historic, aesthetic) without offering a compromise: abstract and figurative, traditional and hip, nuanced and schematic. The second is that, despite his high standing among artists, his respectable market and frequent museum shows, he is not, like Jasper Johns, so institutionally vaunted that emerging artists are unable to relate to him. He is still in their orbit. And last but not least, is that he remains an artist staggeringly at the top of his game. Always within his own idiom, he is constantly moving into new territory. Unmistakable yet always changing? That sounds like New York. n David Cohen is editor and publisher of artcritical. com. He is also gallery director at the New York Studio School and former contributing editor at The New York Sun. 20


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new york in black and white text philip gefter

An ex-patriate in Paris in the 1920s, she worked for Man Ray before setting up her own portrait studio. Man Ray introduced her to Atget, whom she greatly admired; she had been the only photographer to make portraits of him. Abbott purchased Atget’s entire archive when he died in 1927 and moved back to New York in 1929. Enthralled by the city’s vibrancy and rapid growth, she began a systematic documentation of the towering new constructions, the old buildings, the streets, shops and houses. Abbott chronicled New York in the same way Atget had chronicled Paris, although the straightforward approach each of them brought to their documentation registers differently in the two bodies of work. Atget’s pictures of the architecture and parks of the ancien régime are poetic and as elegant as his subject matter; Abbott’s pictures of New York are filled with the geometry of the big city, all sharp angles and stark contrasts, exploding with new urban energy. ‘New York is nothing like Paris; it is nothing like London; and it is not Spokane multiplied by sixty, or Detroit multiplied by four,’ E B White wrote in his essay, ‘This Is New York,’ published in 1949. ‘It is by all odds the l oftiest of cities... Manhattan has been compelled to expand skyward because of the absence of any other direction in which to grow. This, more than any other thing, is responsible for its physical majesty. It is to the nation what the white church spire is to the village – the visible symbol of aspiration and faith, the white plume saying that the way is up.’

Two cities may lay claim to the birth of photography – London and Paris – but throughout the Twentieth Century the world of New York was clearly photography’s oyster. Certainly, London has the Royal Photographic Society, dating from 1853, and Paris might boast an earlier record of photographic documentation, but it was in New York that the medium of photography would come into its own and garner credibility as an equal among the arts. No surprise, then, that New York has been the subject of – and the backdrop for – so much significant photographic imagery. In the early 1900s, Edward Steichen and Alfred Stieglitz formed the 291 Gallery on Fifth Avenue, initially to exhibit works of pictorial photography. The two photographers were instrumental in positioning the medium as an artform. Eventually they presented photographs at the gallery alongside painting and sculpture – notably the work of Matisse, Picasso, Cezanne and Brancusi, amongst others. The Flatiron (1904) by Steichen, a picture of one of the first skyscrapers in New York, was made only steps from the 291 Gallery. This beautiful study in amber, black and gray is emblematic of Pictorialism, a movement in which photographic imagery drifted from the optical clarity of its origins towards a more painterly and dream-like resolution. Steichen and Stieglitz both made pictures of the streets of New York that serve as records of the era and evoke the society of old New York described in the stories of Edith Wharton. Stieglitz once recounted his own experience while photographing the Flatiron Building: ‘It looked, from where I stood, as though it were moving toward me like the bow of a monster ocean steamer – a picture of the new America that was still in the making... Later, when I saw the Flatiron Building again, after many years of having seen other tall buildings in New York City shooting into the sky – the Woolworth building and then still others – it did seem rather ugly and unattractive. There was a certain gloom about it.’ Berenice Abbott was one of the early visual chroniclers of New York.

For most of the last century, New York was not only the art capital of the world but the media capital as well. The Museum of Modern Art would become the great institutional champion of the medium of photography as an artform, beginning with Beaumont Newhall, the museum’s first director of photography, in 1940; Edward Steichen, its second director; and John Szarkowski, the museum’s third director and perhaps photography’s most 22

© The Metropolitan Museum of Art/Art Resource/Scala, Florence

The Flatiron, 1904, Edward Steichen


Museum of the City of New York

Vista from West Street, 1938, Berenice Abbott

Courtesy of the artist and Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York

Playland Cadillac, Times Square, 1945, Frank Paulin


Š Estate of Helen Levitt, Courtesy Laurence Miller Gallery, New York

Getty images The Art Institute of Chicago

From top: The Critic, 1943, Weegee. New York, 1939, Helen Levitt. Accident, New York City, 1952, Louis Faurer 24


VJ Day, Times Square, 1945, Alfred Eisenstaedt

Getty images

«The sailor kissed the nurse and became a symbol of peace (and love), as well as an emblem of Times Square»

circa 1937, shows a not very well-to-do couple lifted into the music, at least for a moment, at the Savoy Ballroom. One of the most enduring pictures of New York is VJ Day in Times Square, August 14th, 1945, by Alfred Eisenstaedt. He was a Life magazine photographer who had immigrated to the United States from Germany as the Nazis rose to power. Eisenstaedt’s picture captures the buoyant mood in the streets of New York on the day World War II ended. The sailor kissed the nurse in the center of an international crossroads, and became in Eisenstaedt’s picture a symbol of peace (and love), as well as an emblem of New York’s Times Square.

eloquent – and effective – advocate. At the same time, magazines, newspapers, the advertising industry and the television networks formed a media center to which photographers flocked for employment and recognition. So many photographers lived and worked in New York City that it would become a subject of exploration and observation integral to the medium. Arthur Fellig, a photojournalist who acquired the name Weegee as a phonetic reference to the ‘Ouija’ board, was known to appear, as if with mystical powers, at crime scenes in advance of the police. The truth was that Weegee monitored his own police radio to be able to get exclusive pictures to sell to news publications. He was predisposed to photographing the underbelly of New York – murders, fires and the seedier side of nightlife. The glare of his flash seemed to underscore in stark black and white the film noir drama of these events. At the same time, he rendered the existential condition of his subjects in photographic terms, and that’s what elevates his work to something beyond the work-a-day news picture. The Critic (1943), among his most famous images, shows the disparity of rich and poor in New York as two patrons of the Metropolitan Opera ignore a woman begging for change. The residents of New York implicitly understand the distinctions among the city’s varied neighborhoods. Midtown is a professional center while Downtown is not only a geographical location but a state of mind at odds with convention. In the early part of theTwentieth Century, Harlem was a vibrant cultural center. Today we marvel at its musical legacy of clubs and theaters – The Apollo, the Cotton Club and the Savoy Ballroom – in which Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, and Duke Ellington launched their careers. Aaron Siskind’s Harlem Document is a rigorous Depressionera chronicle of that neighborhood. Siskind wanted to produce a body of photographs that would effect social change. His picture, Savoy Dancers,

Black-and-white street photography began to define photographic art-making in the mid-1950s, perhaps as a result of Helen Levitt’s photographs of New York taken in the previous decade. In contrast to the public – or epic – display of celebration in the Eisenstaedt image, Helen Levitt photographed the residential streets of the city with an intimacy of observation and a tangible affection for the true, unsuspecting moment. Her pictures of children playing on stoops, making chalk drawings on the pavement, wearing masks, and looking out of apartment windows render the urban jungle as a lyrical, if somewhat hardscrabble, playground. She is the folk artist of 1940s New York photography, capturing with innocence and unexpected delicacy the city as it was inhabited by ordinary people. New York, 1939, her picture of trick-or-treaters on Halloween, was included in the Museum of Modern Art’s inaugural show of photographs in 1940. The 1950s proved a fertile decade for New York City photographers, not least because of the publication of Robert Frank's The Americans. Frank, who lived in New York and knew the Abstract Expressionist artists and Beat Generation poets, was influenced by their improvisational approach to art- making, as were other young photographers, from Louis Faurer to Lee 25


New York Nights, Studio 54, 1978, Tod Papageorge

Frank Meadow Sutcliffe. They recognized early on that photography was important and their evolving collections helped increase interest in the medium and raised the value of the photographic print. New York is reflected in imagery made not only on the streets but in the professional studio and in private apartments. Richard Avedon’s tour de force, the life-size group studio portrait of the members of Andy Warhol’s Factory, was first shown at Marlborough Gallery in 1975. The Ballad of Sexual Dependency, Nan Goldin’s chronicle of friends and acquaintances in the clubs and bars and apartments of New York’s East Village, has been shown in many incarnations, from early slide shows projected at the Mudd Club in the late 1970s to the Whitney Museum in 1988. Within these works, the photographic image conjures up New York not by representing the physical streets of the city but by identifying unique sensibilities that have come to define the composition of art and culture on the island of Manhattan. Glamour is among the qualities that defines New York City, from the exquisite skyline to the brightly lit marquees of Broadway, swanky restaurants and soigné parties all over town. Studio 54 was a club unparalleled in the city’s history for its winning combination of international celebrities, stylish women, beautiful gay men, throbbing disco music, drug-fuelled exuberance, and outré exclusivity. Many photographers documented the nocturnal splendor of the club, but Todd Papageorge’s lovely photograph of a group of well-turned out revelers intertwined on the floor in a post-party pile of intimate exhaustion, one reaching up to touch a floating balloon, is a poetic coda to the end of an era in New York City. By that I mean New York photographed in black and white. In the 1980s, color photography began to define modern photographic practice. And New York photographed in color just doesn’t look the same. n

Friedlander, William Klein, Saul Leiter and Garry Winogrand. Theirs was a much smaller community of peers, then, and each one of these photographers attempted to capture their own authentic experience of life as it transpired in the streets of New York City. Playland Cadillac, Times Square, 1956, by Frank Paulin, typifies the street photography of the period. Paulin often photographed around Times Square because of the rich visual backdrop of advertisements, neon signs, shop window reflections, and the bustle of people on the street. He captured the contrast of high and low in his picture of a black Cadillac, the ultimate symbol of power, glamour, and optimism in mid-century America, parked on the street it stands in stark counterpoint to the mundane surroundings of Broadway during the day. Bruce Davidson was 24 in 1959 when he made his first body of work about a teenage street gang in Brooklyn. The pictures resonate with urban restlessness and the sexual charge of adolescent longing. He would go on to document other aspects of New York City over the years, notably in his series on the subway and Central Park. His chronicle of East 100th Street, which recalls the Harlem Document, was exhibited in a one-man show at The Museum of Modern Art in 1970. Provocative exhibitions at The Museum of Modern Art, from New Documents (1967) to Diane Arbus (1972) to William Eggleston’s Guide (1976) set the stage for the art world’s growing acknowledgment of photography, and, in the 1970s, the marketplace for photography was born in New York. Several New York galleries opened with the intention of showing photographs exclusively, in particular Light Gallery and Witkin Gallery. At the same time, a group of New York collectors, including, most prominently, Sam Wagstaff, began to attend the few photography auctions that took place at the time in London; they scoured the antique bookshops of London and Paris to buy albums of British and French photographers, such as Gustave Le Grey, Julia Margaret Cameron, William Henry Fox Talbot, and

Philip Gefter is a contributor and former picture editor at The New York Times. He is the author of the recently published Photography After Frank. 26

Courtesy Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York

«Glamour is among the qualities that defines New York City, from the exquisite skyline to the brightly lit marquees of Broadway, swanky restaurants and soigné parties all over town»


© Bruce Davidson/Magnum Photos © Lee Friedlander, Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, SF and Janet Borden, Inc. NY

From top: Brooklyn Gang, 1959, Bruce Davidson. Father Duffy, Times Square, New York City, 1974, Goldin

Lee Friedlander. Nan and Brian in Bed, NYC, 1983, Nan Goldin 27


agnes gund art, work & loyalty text karen wright | Photography Cheryl koralik

Her art-laden apartment on the Upper East Side is often opened to artists and people in the arts. Choosing who to showcase in New York City was a no-brainer. Agnes Gund is without doubt one of the great art collectors in a city full of collectors. She lives surrounded by art and two lively wheaten terriers, Giotto and Tina. She tells me that she used to live with cats but now has replaced them with her dogs. Walking into the house, it is clear that they are beloved members of the family – beside their bed stands a large, installation-like pile of doggie toys. On the other side of the hallway is a rather more severe installation – a pure white marble piece surrounded by loose grains of rice by Wolfgang Laib – and on the work a piece by Teresita Fernández. Looking around the beautiful apartment, with its distinctive mix of iconic artworks – paintings and drawings as well as unusual sculptures – I might assume a gifted curator was behind the scenes here. But when longtime friend and gallerist Angela Westwater asked Aggie’s assistant whose idea it was to juxtapose those artworks, she responded it was Aggie herself who devised the installation. I sit in a small room waiting for Aggie to emerge at 9.30am, perfectly coiffed and dressed in a deep red dress with a very modern piece of simple jewelry. She is every inch the uptown lady but with a twist, in the form of her very beautiful but über-contemporary necklace. I am being investigated myself by a lively Giotto; I point out to Aggie that John Baldessari also has a dog

Agnes Gund grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, the second of six children. Her father made a fortune in banking; her mother died when Agnes was just 14. Agnes, called Aggie by all who know her, studied history for her BA at Connecticut College. Later, having become an enthusiastic art collector after her father's death in 1966, she returned to her studies. She took her masters in History of Art at Harvard University in the 1970s, while she was living in Concord Massachusetts with her first husband, Albrecht Saalfield and their four children. It was during her second marriage – to lawyer Daniel Shapiro, from whom she is now estranged – that Gund moved to New York. In 1976, she joined MoMA as a trustee. From 1991 to 2002, she served as president, using that period to champion the construction of the new building by Japanese architect Yoshio Taniguchi, of which she is a fierce advocate. Today she remains as president emerita of MoMA and heads the MoMA board for PS1 Contemporary Art Center, as well as serving on the boards of a number of prestigious institutions, including the Frick Collection, the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, the Foundation for Art and Preservation in Embassies and the Socrates Sculpture Park. In 1977, she founded her own charity, ‘Studio in a School,’ in which approximately 30,000 children participate annually. Inspired by cuts in art teaching in the public school system, it is a cause for which she continues to raise funds, and in which she remains an active participant. 28


Agnes Gund photographed at home, New York, October 29, 2009 29


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called Giotto, and she says she knew someone did but not who. I ask about the lively, colorful ceramic pieces on the small table in front of us. They are by an Italian artist, Claudia De Monte, for whom Aggie recently hosted a book launch at the apartment. She also contributed the preface of Claudia's book, something beyond the normal commitment to an artist. She goes to give me a copy of the book, saying, ‘I like her work. She was doing these ceramics but now she is doing more bronzes like this one, which she gave me as a gift for doing the preface. I gave it to my daughter as a present. She has been working out a lot recently and lost some weight.’ I laugh and say she could use it in her exercises, curling with a bronze, and we laugh together. It is not a rude comment. Looking through the book later, I see that De Monte is a political artist, enmeshed in feminism and woman helping themselves. She agrees that ‘woman artists do have it tough. They don’t get paid so well – their work is not so well regarded.’ She mentions that she had recently helped get a Beatriz Milhazes into MoMA. I ask why Milhazes’ work has not become more collected? She sighs. ‘Perhaps because she is a woman and makes beautiful work, something that has not been fashionable recently.’ As well as the feast of artworks there is abundant evidence of Aggie’s love for her family. A series of framed portraits sits close beside me and there is frequent talk of her grandchildren. When I show her the recent Phillips de Pury & Company LATIN AMERICA catalogue, she looks thoughtfully at the lots, stopping at a Campana Brothers chair. ‘We had a [Campana Brothers] chair, but it was not the Mickey Mouse one like this but one with doggies on it. It used to play that song' – she hums ‘How much is that doggie

«I want to make sure PS1 is not just used as a closet to show things we don’t have room for in town. It has a different function. It doesn’t need to plan years in advance like the mother ship» 31

in the window’ – ‘We still have it, but it doesn’t play that tune anymore. It drove me crazy, but the children loved it!’ Aggie takes me into a nearby room to show me a Vik Muniz picture in chocolate which she commissioned of her grandchildren. She recalls how she first came across a Muniz work, when someone had sent her a portfolio. In those days, she had a place under her bed where she stored things to keep them out of the way. She laughs. ‘The person kept phoning me to ask if I had looked at it and reiterating that this person is going to be a great artist. I would say, “I will look.” Eventually I dug it out and chose one, it was of tennis shoes tied together. And now he is indeed a great and successful artist.’ Aggie is still very much involved with MoMA. She became the head of the board for PS1 because she was determined to keep it in the style of its founder and long-term director Alanna Heiss as a separate institution not just an adjunct from MoMA. Aggie was instrumental in the recent appointment of Klaus Biesenbach, a long-term curator there, and someone who had worked closely with Heiss for many years. ‘I want to make sure it is not just used as a closet to show things we don’t have room for in town. It has a different function… It can do shows with a few months’ notice. It doesn’t need to plan years in advance like the mother ship. ’The atmosphere is completely different at PS1, she says. ‘I was in the toilet there the other day. It still looks like a school and that will never change. They have other things to correct – the humidity and the air conditioning – but the toilets will remain.’ She is also currently involved with the Barnes Foundation and its rebuild. I ask why she likes this museum so much and she says that, like the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, the Phillips in Washington and the Frick in New York, the Barnes is a museum as much about the collector as the work collected. She is pleased that the architects are respecting the current house but making iconic works like Matisse’s Dance accessible to all. The hallway running through the apartment is lined with drawings. I spy an instantly recognizable drawing of a coffee can by Jasper Johns near to a Roy Lichtenstein and a flower drawing by Ellsworth Kelly. ‘He is a favorite of mine,’ she says, looking at the black-andwhite drawing of statuesque irises. ‘He is a gorgeous person.’ I stand before a series of Vija Celmins black-and-white waves and some intricate,


«I bought an early hofmann from Bill Rubin who later tried to buy it back. I said ‘No WaY, Bill!’» almost obsessive-compulsive, black-and-white drawings. Aggie identifies them as works by Bruce Conner and says they ‘count among [her] favorites.’ Off the hall is a room dominated by black-and-white photography, which contains many photographs by William Wegman, ‘another friend.’ There is a black-and-white photograph of a young Johns. I ask who took the photograph and she says, ‘Oh, that is by Bob Rauschenberg.’ The neutral color scheme of the stunning living room is lifted by the sparkling color of the paintings. ‘I don’t actually own many of these paintings, they are all gifts to different organizations.’ Many of them will be going to her hometown of Cleveland, as well as to MoMA. ‘I wanted to make sure they would go to places that would show them, not just put them in a cupboard. When I was in Cleveland they had no contemporary works at all.’ The Johns flashlight work is going to MoMA – ‘They don’t have any sculptures by Johns!’ She points to a stunning early Johns map. ‘I bought Johns when no one else was buying him and Castelli would always give me the pick of anything. He and Johns knew that I would never sell the work.’ Johns is one of the living artists with whom Aggie has established a long-term relationship. They have sat on committees together and when later we walk into a smaller room, she points at a work that she tells me Johns himself helped her to re-stretch when it became loose, something he has never done before. ‘That is again because he knows I will never sell his work. ’ This friendship she says is important to her, based as it is on an acknowledgement of her unswerving loyalty to the work. ‘I could have sold that work for a lot of money which would have come in useful to give to other causes.’ Looking around us, she points to a nearby marble group by Louise Bourgeois. She still sees Louise, she tells me, who continues to work. I hear later that it is her determination that MoMA shows women fairly that led to her questioning the fact that Bourgeois was not on show at the time and led to their installing a work.

Aggie says she visited her recently in the studio. She admits to limiting her visits now because Louise always gives her presents and she feels guilty about this. She goes and retrieves the recent Tate Gallery catalogue, showing me the illustration of the totem piece which is nearby in the hall. Leafing through the catalogue, she shows me a plate of the hanging work, Janus, and says, ‘Louise gave us a plaster cast of this work as a wedding present.’ Aggie remembers when she was last in the studio, there was a photographer shooting Louise. Undeterred, Louise continued making amazing drawings in red ink to give people for Christmas presents. ‘They are enormously beautiful, bold and full of life.’ She says she can still be devilish. ‘We went to lunch there a while ago. The first course was grilled leeks – delicious. I wondered what we would be having for the second course. In came Jerry with this plate with a huge tongue which he put on the table. Louise picked up this large barbeque fork and wham! This was all done with an impish smile.’ I am constantly being caught off guard by works I feel I should know. Together we look at a James Rosenquist in the living room. It is an edgy piece, one that she says she had not had displayed before. To me looks a lot like a Warhol. Westwater told me that the newly hung Rosenquist canvas had also really struck her – it was so fresh and contemporary and unexpected, a revelation about the artist. When later I asked Westwater what made Aggie special as a collector, she said, ‘Aggie is someone who really pays attention. She feels intuitively for the work and has the imagination and experience to understand just the right context. It is her passion and her eye which fuel her brain.’ Among the 1,400 odd works in the collection many are by household names, but there are some surprises, too. I try and place the installation in the hallway, only to discover it is the work of a young woman, Teresita Fernandez – whose work I see later installed in Lehmann Maupin gallery. There is a stunning, brightly colored painting, contemporary looking in its 32

boldness, that I feel I ought to recognise. When I ask, Aggie says it is an early Hofmann – pre the 1960s slab works so familiar. ‘I brought it from Bill Rubin who later tried to buy it back. She laughs. ‘I said “No way, Bill!”’ There are lots of women in the collection, not only Bourgeois but also Lynda Benglis, represented by a large wall installation recently hung in the dining room near to the iconic Roy Lichtenstein with its eerily appropriate text, ‘Why Brad darling – this painting is a masterpiece! My, soon you’ll have all of New York clamoring for your work.’ Close by is a beautiful Sigmar Polke, while the ceiling has a fresco by the young British artist Richard Wright. Aggie tells me that this recently had to be redone. ‘We were changing the lighting and had to restore the ceiling. I asked if he would consider reinstalling it and he very kindly came and did it again.’ Is it the same? I ask. She looks at it carefully before saying, ‘No, not quite. The ring is more brown and less gold then it was. The two purple rays are a bit longer and that line comes out.’ Anyone who thinks that collectors don’t look at their work should hear this recitation. I ask about her work with another great collector, the late Vera List with whom she sat on several committees. She recalls that Vera would call the meetings for Sunday morning. ‘Sunday morning used to mean church for me, but we would be having these meetings about Connecticut. People would be coming and trying to get their friends, who made works of ballerinas twirling, appointed and Vera would say no. I also liked working with Tom Hess: it is a shame that he died without seeing more of what he wanted to achieve with the Met.’ She swallows quietly. ‘I liked Vera and what she did with the loans for students. It was important. She did it at Harvard and Brown and again at the New School. I think that without her the collection would just have been sold, which would have been so sad. I liked Vera so much. I loved the Christo tree on the lawn.’ Her own much-loved Studio in the Schools program remains high on her list of priorities and she is off to see Chuck Close, another artist whom she has encouraged MoMA to collect. She is getting artists to make works to sell for her studio program, which like all charities has been hit by hard times. ‘I have got a great print by Brice Marden already,’ she says happily. She rushes off, remembering all the chores she has to do. She leaves behind her space that contains all the components which support her ideas that art and beauty don’t need to lead separate lives. n


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new lines on the horizon text LouisA wright

Never has a skyline been more iconic, more revered, than that of New York. Distinctive architecture is a feature of the great city. Given that New York is famous for galleries showing the most contemporary and cutting-edge art, it seems right that architects should turn their hands to transforming such spaces. Pictured are galleries and museums that have had recent architectural makeovers to keep pace with the ever-changing horizon.

Sperone Westwater, Bowery, Foster + Partners. The architects dealt with the narrow plot by incorporating an elevator as extra exhibition space.

Foster and Partners

The elevator has bright red walls and is visible from the street through the milled glass exterior to the gallery

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New Museum, Bowery, Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa/SANAA. Tokyo-based architects change the skyline of the district with a seven-storey space made of white cubes.

Dean Kaufman

Inside, the gallery has walls of glass and aluminium mesh, reflecting the large windows and exterior cladding of the building

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The Museum of Arts and Design, Columbus Circle, Allied Works Architecture. The

Gladstone Gallery, 21st Street, Selldorf Architects. Unusual proportions and the brick

new building capitalizes on natural light. Robert, Johanna Grawunder.

faรงade imbue the building with a distinctively industrial character

The new restaurant at MAD has a dramatic design, incorporating new artworks

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Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, Herzog & de Meuron. In keeping with local architecture and the landscape, the new space will take advantage of

MAD exterior: Hélène Binet. Jennifer Steinkamp, Orbit 2, 2008, Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin Gallery Parrish Art Museum © Herzog & de Meuron (for elevation)

the natural light with large sections of glass

THE NEW SPERONE Westwater gallery on the Bowery, designed by Norman Foster, is due to open next year. It is a notably narrow plot, one that forces the building upwards out of the former ‘skid row.’ One of Foster’s solutions to the problem of space was to include a lift that would not only transport visitors around the museum, but that would act as an additional exhibition space. The elevator can fit up to 240 people at any time, a unique architectural innovation to deal with the crowded streets of New York. Like the dark gray brick exterior and industrial skylight of the new Gladstone Gallery and the surrounding warehouses, the architects respond to the surroundings of the city while enhancing the space for viewing art. Also on the Bowery, the New Museum rises from the street like a pile of ice-cubes. The museum was designed by Tokyo-based architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa/SANAA, who used the white boxes as a way to deal with the slimness of the plot. It is interesting that these two contemporary buildings have landed on the Bowery, thrusting skywards their soaring rooftops. At Columbus Circle, the Museum of Arts and Design has been designed by Allied Works Architecture with a focus on bringing views and natural light into the space. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the new restaurant, Robert, that opened in November. Curated by Dr. Brian Salzman, the restaurant was conceived as a collection of contemporary art and design, such as a new piece of video art by Jennifer Steinkamp. The sculptural furniture includes a fifteen foot steel communal table bisected by a six foot high 'sound wave' designed by London based architect Philip Michael Wolfson. And, as if the art and design weren't enough, the restaurant boasts spectacular views over Manhattan and where visitors dine at eye-level with the Christopher Columbus statue. In Southampton, (or NYC-by-sea), Herzog & de Meuron are designing the new Parrish Art Museum. In striking contrast to the boldness of the architects’ Tate Modern, the new Parrish will be in keeping with the landscape and the northern light, a restrained white building nestled into the grass. Simple and accommodating (the design includes a wrap-around porch for visitors to take in the landscape, and over 12,000 feet of uninterrupted galleries), the museum rests within the horizon, differing enormously from the high-rises of the city. These architects are not only transforming exhibition spaces, but are turning the city and its skyline into a contemporary work of art n. 37


gigi gaston thE BlaCk floWEr opEns up INTERVIEW KAREN WRIGHT | ARTWORK JOSH GOSFIELD

Gigi Gaston was born in Bulgaria in 1943. Her mother was shot dead while Gigi was still a child, leaving her an orphan. At an early age, Gigi moved to Paris and rocketed to fame as a pop-star. In 1964, on his way to her concert at the Olympia, Paris, Gigi’s lover died. She married Giorgio Fortuna in 1967, and later killed him in a ‘crime of passion.’ She has been in hiding since.

I was told that questions could be submitted to Gigi through a chain of go-betweens, but there was no guarantee that I would ever receive a reply. The lines of connection – who passed on my questions to whom – were never revealed to me, but to my surprise, after about a week a meticulous, hand-written sheet of paper was delivered to me. It ended simply: ‘I haven’t thought about these things for a long time, so I hope this will be as helpful to you as it was to me. Regards, G.’

KW Do you feel bitterness towards the newspapers and photographers who followed your ups and downs? GG I am too old for bitterness.

KAREN WRIGHT What initially made you run from the press? Did you feel in the same way that you did when your lover was killed in the tragic accident on the way to seeing you perform? GIGI GASTON If you hide out from the world for so long that no one cares about you anymore, the press will leave you alone.

KW Would you ever consider staging a comeback? GG My music exists in the past. I would not embarrass myself or my fans that way.

KW How has your son helped you and been affected by the tragic events that led you to withdraw? GG I gave my son life, but now he is the only reason that I am still alive.

KW How do you fill your time now? GG Time is not a bucket to be filled. The elementary tasks of living are perfectly timed to the hours of the day.

KW Your whole life has been filled with tragic incidents mixed with lucky accidents – do you think this helped to make you a better artist? GG In my life as an artist I was never concerned with being ‘better’ because there were figures such as Picasso and Piaf who would always be ‘better’ than me. I was never anything more than a girl with a guitar.

KW What have you learned from the whole experience about fame and its vicissitudes? GG Achieving fame at an early age is like piloting a plane blindfolded: you are incapable of making rational decisions and will almost certainly cause great damage to yourself and others.

KW The family who befriended you were of very different circumstances – was this difficult for you? GG Any middle class difficulties that existed in the Gaston home were dwarfed by the fact that they had saved me from a life of miserable drudgery and abuse behind the stone walls of an orphanage.

KW Do you think it would all be different now? GG It doesn’t matter. I sit here by the window that overlooks the sea and it is as if my past is swept out by the tides every day.

KW Do you think that your looks and those of your husband made you more famous and accessible as artists? GG Other people might have seen something different in me but I used to hate my nose with a passion, and I wrote a song called ‘I am a Mirror’ in which I sang, ‘Please take this look from my face.’

KW Are you prepared to say where you are now? GG I am sitting here at my table writing as the sun goes down. 38

Courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery, New York

KW Do you still make music? GG I never made music – music made me.


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ÂŤEvEryonE sEEms to go looking for somE kind of famE

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the well-respected critic from Rolling Stone, as well as various actors playing Gigi’s son and the slightly crazy-looking private investigator. ‘I was doing the documentary in the style of Ken Burns, trying to show how crazy the whole situation was. It was in creating the images for the video that the story evolved further. It soon became clear that Giorgio who was initially meant to be based on London photographer David Bailey, the inspiration for the David Hemmings character in Blowup, was simply too good-looking to be a photographer. I saw instead that he must be an actor, and a cad as well, as anyone that good looking must be a cad.’ Josh says that the idea was a way of investigating how the media has a life of its own. He says we owe the place we are in to Andy Warhol who, by co-opting the Brillo box, took an opportunity away from the artist forever. It is indeed a Warhol construct, a nod towards the artist who convinced the public that people’s lives made good stories, and in his co-option of real people like Edie Sedgwick, persuaded generations of gallery-goers that it was all right to watch people self-destruct in front of our eyes. When I point this out to Josh, he says this was going on long before Warhol. He points to the story of Buffalo Bill Cody, who was said to be the most famous person on the entire planet. Nowadays he is the kind of character who would appear on both Facebook and YouTube. Josh is, he says, ‘like Warhol, tapping into the gestalt of celebrity – the history of celebrity including film material. It is not a new thing.’ Josh says that what attracted him to Gigi was the question of what keeps a celebrity in the public eye. That dynamic is a certain something that is out of synergy with the media. He admits cheerfully that he drew up such a dark history because ‘I am interested in the train wreck. For instance, we admire Courtney Love more for the train wreck of her life than for the music.’ The project ‘is part of an exploration of fame,’ Josh tells me. ‘Everyone seems to go looking for some kind of fame and they end up hating fame. Or at least, the part of fame which leads to the reporting of your life the way you don’t want to be reported.’ Josh tells me that the research was as meticulous as it needed to be. He points to the images in which Giorgio and Gigi are portrayed proudly showing off their newborn son. ‘I needed to collect many Josh Gosfield at work on his different variations of the covers of these next creation, Fathom Butterfly magazines. I wanted to make something that was convincingly right for ici Paris. It had to look right, as if it was meant to be there.’ He quickly learned that there was a particular way that young families are portrayed as they display their newborn. He beams. ‘It’s as if they are all styled by the same stylist.’ Josh himself started not as a designer but as a painter. He showed with Bridgewater in New York and with La Luz de Jesus in Los Angeles, but he was 'not that active in the artworld.’ After leaving New York Magazine years ago, he became a producer designer for music videos and did covers for New Yorker magazine. It seems as if Gigi has given Josh a new lease of life. He tells me he will let me have a sneak peak on the new character, based in London. ‘Fathom Butterfly’ will be based on ‘Julie Christie with soul, loosely,' – very loosely from the sound of it – 'modeled on Madonna, a girl from the working class willing to do anything she needs to do to get to the top.’ He has already started shooting with his model, Petra Hanson who he says is more outrageous than the images of Gigi. Is it a coincidence that the next character will also be female, I ask? No, says Josh. ‘Women are more appealing and they make more beautiful pictures.’ Before I finish talking to Josh, I admit to my own part in one of the most notorious art farces – Nat Tate, by British writer William Boyd. I conspired with William to construct a character from photographs that he had found in a flea market. We launched the book with a reading by David Bowie at a party in Jeff Koons’ studio in 1998. I tell Josh that after creating the character, I had become totally convinced of his existence, to the point of scanning book indexes, outraged when he did not appear. Josh emails me later to ask how I had got our Wikipedia page up and running. I say to him firmly, you have to let Gigi go and fend for herself, BASTA! n

I hope by now you have been completely captivated by the tragic life and times of Gigi and will not be too annoyed to discover that, far from being real, ‘Gigi’ is a totally fictional construct from the inventive mind of Josh Gosfield. Gosfield's conceit was not intended to be harmful or deceptive, but was a quest to create something so credible that people would immediately accept her as real. Josh is a long-time New Yorker, having been the Art Director of New York Magazine for ten years before turning his attention to specific projects based on his knowledge and skill as a graphic director. Gigi is the result of a year-long gestation period which culminated in his recent show at the Steven Kasher gallery in Chelsea. As a casual observer during the opening week, I realized immediately that most viewers accepted Gigi as a real, if forgotten persona, a tribute to the care and attention to detail with which Josh had invested the project. When I meet the pixie-like Josh shortly after the opening of his show, he tells me that the character of Gigi evolved gradually over a period of time. He was with his family walking near Joshua Tree, California, when he became interested not in the infamous trees that give the spot its name, but in the bulbous rock formations. He quickly saw the possibility of posing a rock group there, in his mind’s eye a psychedelic folk group from the 1960s garbed in bright costumes, one member on each rock. He would shoot it and this would be the first in a series of imaginary rock covers. He hired a model but when he went to shoot her, he realized that her face was not right for a pop picture. Her face had too dark a cast. In his quest to place her in the right context, he started what he now cheerfully admits was obsessive research, gathering materials, memorabilia and the ephemera of the period, much of it found on eBay. Josh admits that the persona arose from the model he had selected. He needed to create a character in whom people would believe, so he chose the Yay Yay music popular in the 1960s across Europe (each country had its own proponent, notably Dusty Springfield in England and Sylvie Vartan and Françoise Hardy in France). It was universally popular but also instantly

and they end up hating fame» forgettable, Josh says happily. He set about giving his Gigi character a life story, with enough incident to attract media attention. There are three cycles, he explains. First, her tragic childhood, witnessing her mother’s death as a result of a politically motivated murder; her subsequent adoption into a wealthy family; her early discovery of her talent and her first success; the tragic death of her first lover on his way to her concert, followed by a long period of mourning. Second was her love affair with the notorious philanderer Giorgio Fortuna, her marriage and motherhood. Last came the murder and her self-imposed exile. It is exhausting just to recount. I ask Josh if he was tempted to bring Gigi out of exile for one last concert. He laughs and says, ‘Yes indeed, the idea was for another comeback, but quite frankly I was just exhausted – and I had run out of time. I had also run out of steam and thought enough was enough. Besides, I had moved on to the next character. I want to do one of these per year for the rest of my life.’ Steven Kasher had heard about Josh’s work and came to the studio. It was the perfect match, says Josh. Kasher had just moved into his new ground-floor space, and Josh fitted into his stable of archival and documentary photographers. Kasher also recognised the authenticity that Josh had managed to capture in his meticulous recreation of the chanteuse’s brief career. That authenticity is not, however, all that it seems. It is ironic, Josh tells me, that he could only do the work digitally, as this was the means which allowed him to achieve the pre-digital look – the work looks off register and pixilated in parts, the result of careful computer manipulation. Josh says, ‘The work had to be well constructed – good enough to give people an entry point. It turns it from being a loose joke into being something credible that can be entered into.’ Not content with simply exploiting his graphic expertise in his quest for the life of Gigi, Josh also turned to video and music. He enjoyed making her video in the style of Godard and also the documentary, which, he tells me, included a cast of both real and imaginary characters. These include Anthony DeCurtis, 41


object lesson: Lot 305 text cary leibowitz

ERWIN WURM IS NOT FAT! The Guggenheim is round even without his help. He is probably the only straight white male artist that can get away with making a funny sculpture using a broomstick and a buttocks (yes you are picturing it correctly – ‘look Ma no hands!’) Erwin’s performance-photography-actionisms are fast, immediate and thankfully esoteric. He is Austrian and through osmosis (no fault of his own) grew up with Vienna Actionism as the official national art history. Rather than revisiting the impossible extremes of Rudolf Schwarzkogler (please google – I’d rather not explain). Vienna Actionism is serious stuff. Erwin is not serious – in a good way – No blood no flesh no angst no pain... as they say in 21st century Vienna ‘Pformalism ein Schmormalism.’

Or have a friend model a GAP box top. I don’t know if he watches any reality shows or corny game shows (I remember being in Germany around 1990 and the premise of the show I was watching was a girl had to identify her classmates by their belly buttons (I don’t speak German but it transcended any language barrier)). Ed Ruscha’s Road Test meets Sylvie Fleury’s shopping spree meets Gilbert & George singing sculptures – in a good way. n Erwin Wurm, Guggenheim, 2005, lot 305

The Guggenheim Museum, Frank Lloyd Wright's masterpiece of visionary architecture, opened fifty years ago. The architect wanted ‘to make the building and the painting a beautiful symphony such as never existed in the world of Art before.’

The British artist Richard Hamilton also drew inspiration from the Guggenheim in his series of multiples, enjoying every sensual curve and inverting the shiny white surface into a dark mysterious puddle. Guggenheim (black) (1970)

Hyper-realist painter, Richard Estes’ work The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (1979) looks paradoxically more real than the real thing.

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Erwin Wurm has played with buildings before. In his series of ‘fat’ sculptures (including fat cars), the bloated house is strangely human. Inside, a video piece asks ‘Am I a House? Am I a Work of Art?’ Fat House (2003)

Photograph: David Heald © The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York. Richard Estes, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (1979) © Richard Estes, courtesy Marlborough Gallery, New York. Erwin Wurm Fat House (2003) courtesy Galerie Krinzinger

Just watch him try and get his head out of a sweater.


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NEW YORK

An exciting and varied body of work is presented in a mid-career retrospective of one of Mexico's most highly collected and successful artists: Gabriel Orozco at MoMA (December 13 – March 1, 2010). Orozco’s back-catalogue includes drawing, photography, painting and sculpture, and a surgically adapted Citroën (pictured) shrunk to two-thirds its normal width. 44

Gabriel Orozco. La DS.1993. ©2009 Gabriel Orozco. Photo: Florian Kleinefenn

news


news

SYDNEY

Olafur Eliasson, One-way colour tunnel, 2007. © 2007 Olafur Eliasson. Photo: Ian Reeves. Chris Ofili, Blossom, 1997. © Chris Ofili. Jackson Pollock, Guardians of the Secret, 1943. © Pollock-Krasner Foundation/ ARS, New York. Vincent Van Gogh, Cypresses, June 1889. Photo © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Olafur Eliasson is an artist renowned for his participatory art. Lights, sound and space are transformed by the elements – fog, water, ice, and rock to make the viewer rethink their surroundings, in Take your time: Olafur Eliasson at the Museum of Contemporary Art (December 10, 2009 – April 11, 2010). Enter a walk-in kaleidoscope (pictured) or a room of light in the biggest exhibition of Eliasson’s work in Australia to date.

LONDON

Elephant dung and Technicolor brighten up January in Chris Ofili at the Tate (January 27 – May 16, 2010). Ofili recently moved from London to Trinidad, giving new inspiration to his work; from landscape to mythology. In Blossom (pictured) we can see Ofili’s use of layered color and mixed media in a rich and now distinctive blending of culture and nature. The show includes many such paintings alongside less well-known graphite works on paper.

SAN FRANCISCO

LONDON

In 1945, SFMOMA hung Jackson Pollock’s first solo museum exhibition. This December in an anniversary show, a series of exhibitions, celebrates the museum’s constant dialogue with groundbreaking art in 75 Years of Looking Forward (December 19, 2009 – January 16, 2011). Not only is the show a collection of great art from the Twentieth Century, but it explores the story of the museum’s development through artists, curators and collectors.

See in the New Year with The Real Van Gogh: The Artist and His Letters at the Royal Academy (January 23 – April 18, 2010). The exhibition takes the artist’s letters as its focus, and includes drawings and paintings written about in the correspondence. The show will be a unique chance to read letters between the great painter and others, such as Gauguin, alongside some of his most iconic images. 45


new york new york 12 pm 12 december 2009 new york

editions Lots 1 - 88

ACCONCI, V. 48 AFTOGRAF 27 ANTHONY, W. 27 ARMAN 27 ARTSCHWAGER, R. 27 BAECHLER, D. 59, 60 BAJ, E. 27 BASQUIATJ-M, (After) 53 BASQUIATJ-M. 54 BATTAN, J. 27 BATTERTON, W. 27 BEREAL, E 27 BERGTOLD, P. 27 BIBEL, L. 14, 15 BOCHNER, M. 28, 88 BOSMAN, R. 3, 32 BRADEN, S. 27 BRAVO, C. 18 BRYANT, W. 27 BURROUGHS, W. 44 BURY, P. 24 byars, j.l. 27 CAGE, J. 27 CALAS, N. 27 CATTELAN, M. 30 CHRISTO 19, 27 Chryssa, 76 CHUNN, N. 31 CLEMENTE, F 40, 42 CONGO 27 CONNER, B. 27 COPLEY, W. 27 CURRIN, J. 64

DAVIS, S. 77 DICKSON, J. 32, 71 DODSON, B. 27 DUCHAMP, M. 26, 27

JACQUET, A. 27 JACQUETTE, Y. 11, 12, 13, 17 JENNEY, N. 27 JOHNS, J. 74 JOHNSON, R. 27

ESTES, R. 20 FAUNCE, J. 58 FERRI, R. 27 FINKELSTEIN, N. 41 FITZGERALD, E. 27 FLEURY, S. 21 FRAMPTON, H. 27 GIONI, M. & Subtonick, a. 30 GIORNO, J. 27 GORNIK, A. 32 GOTTLIEB, A 82, 83 GRAHAM, D. 65 grooms, r. 2, 4, 5, 7, 22 HAMILTON, R. 23, 27 HAMMOND, J. 6 HARING, K. 54 HERSCOVITZ, M. 27 HIGGINS, D. 27 HOLZER, J. 29 HOPPER, D. 39 INDIANA, R. 43

KATZ, A 62, 67, 68 KAWARA, O. 27 KELLY, E. 84 KITAJ, R.B. 33 KOENING,K. 27 KOONING, W. de 80 KOONS, J. 25 KOSUTH, J. 27 LANDFIELD, R. 27 LEVY, J. 27 L e WITT, S. 85 LICHTENSTEIN, R. 27, 54, 66 LONGO, R. 50, 51 LOZANO, L. 27 M ac LISE, A. 27 MAN RAY 27 MARIA, W. de 27 MARIN, J. 16 MARSH, R. 63 M c EWEN, A. 30 MEDNICK, S. 27 MUNIZ, V. 35 MUSSMAN, T. 27 NAUMAN, B. 27, 52 NUTBEEM, A. 27

46

OLDENBERG, C. 27 ONO, Y. 27, 54 OPPENHIEM, M 27 PENROSE, R. 27 PETLIN, I. 27 PETROV, M. 27 PEYTON, E. 30 PFREIM, B. 27 PICARD, L. 27 PRINCE, R. 61 PRINCESS WINIFRED 27 RAMOS, M. 27 RAUSCHENBERG, R. 70 REAVEY, G. & TROUILLE, C. 27 REAVEY, J. & VENET, B. 27 REITKOPF, N. 27 RIOPELLE, J-M. 81 ROHM, R. 27 ROSENQUIST, J. 34 ROTELLA, D. 27 ROTH, D. 27 SALLE, D. 72 SCHARF, K. 55, 56 SCHER, P. 8, 9 SCHWEDLER, W. 27 SHAPIRO, J. 86 SONFIST, A 10 SPERO, N. 32 STANLEY, R. 27 STELLA, F. 78, 79 SUGIMOTO, H. 49 SUVERO, M. di 1 SWOON 69

VARIOUS ARTISTS 27, 30, 32, 54 WAKOSKI, D. & WEINER, L. 27 WARHOL, A. 37, 38, 45, 46, 47, 54 WESTERMAN, H.C. 27 WATTS, R. 27 WEINER, H. & RILEY, T. 27 WILEY, K. 57 WINTERS, T. 87 WOLFE, S. 36 WOOL, C. 73, 75 YOUNG, L. & ZAZEELA, M. 27


1

Property sold to benefit creative time, new york

1 MARK DI SUVERO b. 1933 Roebling’s Arch, 1983. Lithograph in colors, on two sheets. Each: 31 x 25 in. (78.7 x 63.5 cm). Signed and numbered 15/20 in pencil on the lower sheet, published by Creative Time Editions, New York, unframed. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 47


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5 RED GROOMS b. 1937 Saskia Down in the Metro/Subway Riders, from New York, New York Portfolio, 1983. Screenprint in colors with die-cut collage, on Rives tan paper. 23 1/8 x 30 1/8 in. (58.7 x 76.5 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 151/250 in pencil (there were also 25 artist’s proofs), published by the New York Graphic Society, Ltd., Greenwich, Connecticut, unframed. literature Walter Knestrick 97 Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

2 RED GROOMS b. 1937 On Your Mark, Get Set, Go!, 2002. Lithograph in colors, on Somerset Velvet paper. 30 x 22 3/8 in. (76.2 x 56.8 cm). Signed and numbered ‘P.P. 1/5’ in pencil (a printer’s proof, the edition was 75 and 10 artist’s proofs), published by Marlborough Graphics, New York, unframed. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 3 RICHARD BOSMAN b. 1944 Bridges I-IV, 1997. The complete set of four woodcuts in colors, on Mulberry paper. All: 18 x 25 in. (45.7 x 63.5 cm). All signed and annotated ‘T.P.’ in pencil (trial proofs, the edition was 50), published by John Szoke Graphics, Inc., New York, all unframed. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

I was intrigued by the French film Zazie Dans Le Metro and wanted to do an image of my daughter Saskia in a similar predicament. While commuting by subway to her junior high school in New York, Saskia and her girlfriends had to avoid the known creeps who always hung out in the same spots like trolls. Red Grooms

4 RED GROOMS b. 1937 Brooklyn Bridge Bustle, 2002. Lithograph in colors, on Somerset paper. 21 1/2 x 29 3/4 in. (54.6 x 75.6 cm). Signed and numbered ‘P.P. 5/5’ in pencil (a printer’s proof, the edition was 75 and 15 artist’s proofs), published by Marlborough Graphics, New York, unframed. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 48


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6 JANE HAMMOND b. 1950 The Wonderfulness of Downtown, 1997. Lithograph and screenprint in colors with collage, on hand-torn Kasuiri, Nepalese and Cortlea Text paper. 59 1/4 x 62 in. (150.5 x 157.5 cm). Signed, dated, titled and numbered ‘PP 3/3’ in black marker (a printer’s proof, the edition was 50 and 10 artist’s proofs), published by Universal Limited Art Editions, West Islip, New York (with their blindstamp), framed. Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

7 RED GROOMS b. 1937 Ruckus Tugboat, 2006. Hand-cut 3-D lithograph in colors. 21 x 24 1/4 x 17 in. (53.3 x 61.6 x 43.2 cm). Signed, dated ‘2006’ and numbered 32/45 in pencil (there were also artist’s proofs), published by Shark’s Ink, Lyons, Colorado, contained in original Plexiglas case. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 49


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8 PAULA SCHER b. 1948 NYC Transit, 2008. Hand-pulled screenprint, on Deluxe Lana Quarelle paper. 60 x 33 1/2 in. (152.4 x 85.1 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 38/90 in pencil (there were also 10 artist’s proofs), published by Stendhal Gallery, New York, framed. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

10 ALAN SONFIST b. 1946 Views of Manhattan: plates 10; and 12, 1980. Two lithographs in colors with photo collage. Both: 26 3/8 x 26 3/8 in. (67 x 67 cm). Both signed and numbered ‘72/100 10’ and ‘88/100 12’ in pencil, unframed. Estimate $ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0

9 PAULA SCHER b. 1948 Manhattan at Night, 2008. Hand-pulled screenprint, on Deluxe Lana Quarelle paper. 60 x 33 1/2 in. (152.4 x 85.1 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 20/90 in pencil (there were also 10 artist’s proofs), published by Stendhal Gallery, New York, framed. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 50


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14 LEON BIBEL 1913-1995 New York City Bridge Scene, 1937. Linocut. 4 x 6 in. (10.2 x 15.2 cm). The only known impression, created in preparation for a painting of the same subject, with the artist’s estate stamp on the reverse, with accompanying authentication certificate issued by the estate, framed. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

11 YVONNE JACQUETTE b. 1934 Two Bridges III St. II, 2008. Woodcut, on Japanese paper. 26 x 20 in. (66 x 50.8 cm). Signed, titled and numbered 3/20 in pencil (there were also 6 artist’s proofs), published by Mary Ryan Gallery, New York, framed. Estimate $ 7 0 0 - 9 0 0 12 YVONNE JACQUETTE b. 1934 Lights and Towers, Lower Manhattan, 2005. Woodcut, on Japanese paper. 38 x 27 in. (96.5 x 68.6 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 10/50 in pencil (there were also 8 artist’s proofs), published by Mary Ryan Gallery, New York, unframed. Estimate $ 9 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

15 LEON BIBEL 1913-1995 Upper Harlem River, 1938. Linocut. 10 x 7 in. (25.4 x 17.8 cm). Signed, dated and numbered ‘/6’ in pencil, published by the artist, framed. Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 6 0 0

13 YVONNE JACQUETTE b. 1934 [Manhattan Harbor], 2003. Woodcut, on Japanese paper. 44 3/4 x 32 3/4 in. (113.7 x 83.2 cm). Signed and numbered ‘P.P. 2/2’ in pencil (a printer’s proof), unframed. Estimate $ 7 0 0 - 9 0 0

Leon Bibel was inspired by the industrial riverfront landscapes near his home by the Harlem River in the Bronx and their active power plants, coal loading docks, boats and bridges, all encouraging signs of progress during the Depression. In the far distance in New York City Bridge Scene is High Bridge in the Bronx, the oldest bridge in New York City, which like many of the industrial elements pictured is still recognizable on the waterfront today. 51


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16 JOHN MARIN 1870-1953 St. Paul’s, New York, 1925. Etching with plate tone, on Whatman paper. 8 1/3 x 6 1/2 in. (21.2 x 16.5 cm). Signed in pencil, from the edition of about 20, published by Alfred Stieglitz, New York, framed. provenance Howard Putzel, The

18 CLAUDIO BRAVO b. 1936 New York Still Life, 1993. Lithograph in colors, on Somerset Soft White paper. 28 7/8 x 42 5/8 in. (73.3 x 108.3 cm). Signed, dated ‘MCMXCIII’ and numbered ‘P.P. 1/2’ in pencil (a printer’s proof, the edition was 33 and 7 artist’s proofs), published by Marlborough Graphics, New York, unframed. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

Print Rooms: Rare Etchings and Engravings, Los Angeles literature Carl Zigrosser 141

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 17 YVONNE JACQUETTE b. 1934 22nd Street, 1974. Lithograph with hand-coloring in pastel, on gray wove paper. 19 x 22 1/4 in. (48.3 x 56.5 cm). Signed and numbered ‘A.P. #34’ in pencil (the edition was 46 artist’s proofs with unique hand-coloring in various media), published by Brooke Alexander Editions, New York, unframed. literature Hilarie

19 CHRISTO b. 1935 Wrapped Building Project for #1 Times Square, 42 Street and Broadway, NYC, 2003. Lithograph and screenprint in colors with various hand additions. 30 5/8 x 23 1/2 in. (77.8 x 59.7 cm). Signed and numbered 171/200 in pencil, published by Landfall Press, Inc., Chicago, unframed. Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0

Faberman 6

Estimate $ 9 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 52


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20 RICHARD ESTES b. 1932 Holland Hotel, 1984. Screenprint in colors, on Rives paper. 44 5/8 x 71 3/8 in. (113.3 x 181.3 cm). Signed in gold ink, a proof apart from the numbered edition of 100 and 15 artist’s proofs, published by Petersburg Press, New York and London, framed. literature John Arthur p. 127 Estimate $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 - 2 5 , 0 0 0

21 SYLVIE FLEURY b. 1961 Untitled (Yes to All), 2004. Gold-plated waste basket multiple. 28 1/2 x 22 3/8 x 22 3/8 in. (72.4 x 56.8 x 56.8 cm). Engraved with artist’s name, dated and numbered 8/8 on a plaque affixed to the underside (there were also 2 artist’s proofs), published by BEYER, New York. Estimate $ 14 , 0 0 0 -1 8 , 0 0 0 53


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22 RED GROOMS b. 1937 Masters at the Met, 2002. Lithograph in colors, on Somerset Velvet paper. 21 1/2 x 29 7/8 in. (54.6 x 75.9 cm). Signed and numbered ‘WKSHP 1/2’ in pencil (a workshop copy, the edition was 75 and 10 artist’s proofs), published by Marlborough Graphics, New York, unframed. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

24 POL BURY 1922-2005 Guggenheim, 1972. Lithograph in colors. 24 3/4 x 34 1/2 in. (62.9 x 87.6 cm). Signed and numbered 63/250 in white pencil, published by Maeght Editions, Paris, unframed. Estimate $ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0 25 JEFF KOONS b. 1955 Untitled, 2001. Photo-reproduction in colors with hand-drawn flower in silver, on textured vinyl. 19 7/8 x 19 7/8 in. (50.5 x 50.5 cm). Signed and dated with silver marker, from the edition of 500, published by the artist to benefit the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, shrink-wrapped. Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

23 RICHARD HAMILTON b. 1922 Guggenheim (a) Black, 1970. Vacuum formed Plexiglas multiple in black (repainted). 23 3/8 x 23 1/4 x 4 in. (59.4 x 59.1 x 10.2 cm). Signed and numbered 45/750 in black ink on a label affixed to the reverse (106 were made in black), published by xartcollection, Zurich, framed. literature Etienne Lullin M3 Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 54


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other side

one side

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26 MARCEL DUCHAMP 1887-1968 Rotoreliefs (Optical Disks), 1938-1965. The complete set of twelve offset lithographs in colors, on both sides of six cardboard disks. Each: 8 in. (20.3 cm) diameter. From the total edition of 1755 (the editions were 500, 1000, 100, 5 and 150 published in 1938, 1953, 1959, 1963 and 1965 respectively), contained in original black plastic circular holder. literature Arturo Schwarz 441 Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

29 JENNY HOLZER b. 1950 Under A Rock. Three-color LED sign. 4 x 5 x 1 1/2 in. (10.2 x 12.7 x 3.8 cm). Edition 15/100, in working order. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 30 VARIOUS ARTISTS The Wrong Gallery Model and two Exhibitions, 2005. Metal, glass and plastic multiple with lighting, two static cling window signs in black and red and one photo-screenprint in colors on glass with resin frame. Model: 18 1/4 x 11 1/4 x 6 5/8 in. (46.4 x 28.6 x 16.8 cm); McEwan: 2 x 1 1/2 in. (5.1 x 3.8 cm); Peyton: 13 x 6 1/2 in. (33 x 16.5 cm). The model numbered 31/2500, the McEwan from the open edition and the Peyton from the edition of 500, published by Cerealart, LLC, Philadelphia, the exhibitions contained in their original cardboard boxes with printing and velcro closures. Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

27 VARIOUS ARTISTS SMS Portfolio #1-6, 1968. The complete set of six portfolios of ephemera in various media. 10 x 13 7/8 x 7 5/8 in. (25.4 x 35.2 x 19.4 cm). From the edition of 200, published by The Letter Edged in Black Press, Inc., New York, contained in original cardboard boxes. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 28 MEL BOCHNER b. 1940 Untitled, from Couples, 1996. Aquatint in colors. 12 x 18 in. (30.5 x 45.7 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 37/75 in pencil (there were also 17 artist’s proofs), published by Parasol Press, New York, shrink-wrapped. Estimate $ 5 0 0 -7 0 0

Including: Maurizio Cattalan, Massimilano Gioni and Ali Subotnick, Wrong Gallery Model; Adam McEwen, Wrong Gallery Exhibition: Untitled (Closed) and Untitled (Sorry); and Elizabeth Peyton, Wrong Gallery Exhibition: 593 Napoleon After His Bath 55


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31 NANCY CHUNN b. 1941 The New York Times, May 8, 1996, 1996. Lithograph in colors. 22 x 13 5/8 in. (55.9 x 34.6 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 58/115 in pencil, published for the Bill Clinton Presidential Campaign, shrink-wrapped. Estimate $ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0

33 R.B. KITAJ 1932-2007 Lou Gehrig, from In Our Time: Covers for a Small Library After the Life for he Most Part, 1969. Screenprint in colors. 7 1/8 x 18 in. (18.1 x 45.7 cm). Signed with initials in pencil, from the edition of 150, published by Marlborough AG Schellenberg, London, framed. Literature Jane Kinsman 37 Estimate $ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0

32 VARIOUS ARTISTS Ten Commandments: plates IV, VI, VIII and X, 1987. Four lithographs in colors, one with letterpress, all on Dieu Donne Handmade paper. All approx: 24 x 18 in. (61 x 45.7 cm). All signed, numbered 71/84 or 81/84 and some dated in pencil (there were also 15 artist’s proofs), published by Art Issue Editions, New York, all unframed. Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

34 JAMES ROSENQUIST b. 1933 Henry’s Arrival on the Art World Causes Gravity, from the Geldzahler Portfolio, 1998. Lithograph in colors, on Arches Cover paper. 30 1/4 x 22 1/4 in. (76.8 x 56.5 cm). Signed, dated ‘1997’ and numbered 71/75 in pencil (there were also 15 artist’s proofs), published by The Estate Project for Artists with AIDS, New York, unframed. Estimate $ 7 0 0 - 9 0 0

Including: April Gornik, Remember the Sabbath (VI); Nancy Spero, Thou Shalt Not Kill (VI); Jane Dickson, Thou Shalt Not Steal (VIII); and Richard Bosman, Thou Shalt Not Covet Thy Neighbors Goods (X)

35 VIK MUNIZ b. 1961 Personal Articles, 2000. Offset lithograph, on newspaper. 11 1/2 x 4 7/8 in. (29.2 x 12.4 cm). Signed and numbered 5/6 in pencil on the reverse, published by the artist, framed. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 56


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36 STEVE WOLFE b. 1955 The Andy Warhol Diaries, 1991-1992. Wood multiple with composite ink and varnish, in plastic shrinkwrapping (as issued). 9 1/4 x 8 1/8 x 2 in. (23.5 x 20.6 x 5.1 cm). Numbered 7/20 on a label affixed to the reverse, published by Brand X Editions, New York, contained in original foam lined solander box with title printed on the front in black. Estimate $ 9 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0

37 ANDY WARHOL 1928-1987 Myths: Santa Claus, 1981. Screenprint in colors with diamond dust, on Lenox Museum Board. 38 x 38 in. (96.5 x 96.5 cm). Signed and numbered 131/200 in pencil (there were also 30 artist’s proofs), published by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, Inc, New York, framed. literature Frayda Feldman and JÜrg Schellmann 266 Estimate $ 1 2 , 0 0 0 -1 8 , 0 0 0 57


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38 ANDY WARHOL 1928-1987 Bodley Gallery Annoucement, ca. 1957. Offset lithograph with stamping in pink. 6 3/4 x 5 3/4 in. (17.1 x 14.6 cm). With the Andy Warhol Art Authentication Board, Inc. Authentic Stamp and issue number ‘A225.042’ in pencil on the reverse, unframed. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

41 NAT FINKELSTEIN 1933-2009 A Catalogue as Multiple: Andy Warhol, 1992. The complete set of a screenprinted mirror, bottle (with ball), and catalogue printed on photocopied sheets (as issued). 12 3/4 x 12 3/8 x 3 in. (32.4 x 31.4 x 7.6 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 12/200 in silver ink, published by Antiquariaat Parade, Amsterdam, contained in original wooden box screenprinted on the top and bottom. Estimate $ 5 0 0 -7 0 0

39 DENNIS HOPPER b. 1936 Andy Warhol, David Hockney, Henry Geldzahler and Jeff Goodman, “Out of the 60’s”, from the Geldzahler Portfolio, 1998. Photolithograph, on Somerset Satin paper. 19 3/4 x 29 3/4 in. (50.2 x 75.6 cm). Signed, dated ‘1963’ and numbered 71/75 in pencil (there were also 15 artist’s proofs), published by The Estate Project for Artists with AIDS, New York, unframed. Estimate $ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0

42 FRANCESCO CLEMENTE b. 1952 Untitled (Self-Portrait as a Cat), 1999. Etching and aquatint in colors. 12 1/4 x 7 1/8 in. (31.1 x 18.1 cm). Signed and numbered 17/400 in pencil, framed. Estimate $ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0 43 ROBERT INDIANA b.1928 Eternal Hexagon, from Ten Works x Ten Painters, 1964. Screenprint in colors. 17 1/2 x 16 1/8 in. (44.5 x 41 cm). From the edition of 500 (there were also 10 artist’s proofs), published by the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut, framed. literature Susan Sheehan 33 Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

40 FRANCESCO CLEMENTE b. 1952 Untitled, from the Geldzahler Portfolio, 1998. Digital inkjet print in black and brown, on Arches Hot Press paper. 12 1/2 x 10 1/2 in. (31.8 x 26.7 cm). Signed and numbered 71/75 in pencil (there were also 15 artist’s proofs), published by The Estate Project for Artists with AIDS, New York, unframed. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

44 WILLIAM BURROUGHS 1914-1997 “Will he have 3-D on Time?” T-Shirt, 1997. Screenprint in colors, on cotton T-shirt, with small plastic bag filled with five bullets stapled to the neckline. 13 3/4 x 11 in. (34.9 x 27.9 cm). Signed and dated ‘5/11/1997’ in black marker, from the edition of unknown size, with the Erotica copyright printed, framed. Estimate $ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0 58


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45 ANDY WARHOL 1928-1987 Eric Emerson (Chelsea Girls), 1982. Unique screenprint in colors. 21 x 15 7/8 in. (53.3 x 40.3 cm). A unique proof apart from the edition of 75 and 13 artist’s proofs, published by Anthology Film Archives, New York, with the Andy Warhol Art Authentication Board, Inc., inkstamp and issue number ‘A170.056’ in pencil on the reverse, framed. literature Frayda Feldman and Jörg Schellmann 287 Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0

46 ANDY WARHOL 1928-1987 Ladies and Gentlemen: one plate, 1975. Screenprint in colors. 37 1/2 x 25 5/8 in. (95.3 x 65.1 cm). Signed, dated and numbered ‘XLIII/L a.p.’ in pencil on the reverse (an artist’s proof, the edition was 250), published by Mazotta Editore, Milan, unframed. literature Frayda Feldman and Jörg Schellman 127 Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 59


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47 ANDY WARHOL 1928-1987 Merce Cunningham, 1974. Screenprint, on white paper. 30 x 20 in. (76.2 x 50.8 cm). aside from the edition of 100 and 30 artist’s proofs on Japanese gift wrapping paper and 4 trial proofs on various colored Cockerell papers, published by Castelli Graphics, New York, for the portfolio Cunningham I to raise funds for the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, New York, with the Estate of Andy Warhol inkstamps and initialed in pencil by the estate on the reverse, framed. literature Frayda Feldman and

48 VITO ACCONCI b. 1940 Thou Shalt Not Commit Adultery, from The Ten Commandments Suite, 1987. Lithograph in colors with Mylar collage, on Rives paper. 23 3/8 x 18 in. (59.4 x 45.7 cm). Signed with initial, dated and numbered 81/84 in pencil (there were also 15 artist’s proofs), published by Art Issue Editions, New York, unframed. Estimate $ 7 0 0 - 9 0 0

Jörg Schellmann 124

Estimate $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 - 3 0 , 0 0 0 60


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49 HIROSHI SUGIMOTO b. 1948 U.A. Walker Theatre, New York, 1978. Photogravure. 11 5/8 x 15 in. (29.5 x 38.1 cm). Signed in pencil, stamp numbered 0423/one thousand on a label affixed to the metal case, co-published by Eyestorm, London and Sonnabend Sundell Editions, New York, unframed, contained in original metal case. Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0

51 ROBERT LONGO b. 1953 Cindy, 2002. Lithograph in colors, on Somerset Velvet paper. 46 x 30 in. (116.8 x 76.2 cm). Signed and numbered ‘WKSHP 2/2’ in pencil (a workshop copy, the edition was 120 and 20 artist’s proofs), published by Hamilton Selway Fine Art, West Holywood, unframed. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

50 ROBERT LONGO b. 1953 Max, 2002. Lithograph in colors, on Somerset Velvet paper. 46 x 30 in. (116.8 x 76.2 cm). Signed and numbered ‘WKSHP 2/2’ in pencil (a workshop copy, the edition was 120 and 20 artist’s proofs), published by Hamilton Selway Fine Art, West Hollywood, unframed. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

52 BRUCE NAUMAN b. 1941 Life Mask, 1981. Lithograph, on Arches Cover paper. 25 1/4 x 34 3/4 in. (64.1 x 88.3 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 35/50 in pencil (there were also 13 artist’s proofs), published by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles (with their blindstamps), framed. literature Christopher Cordes 41; Gemini G.E.L. 941

Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 61


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53 after jEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT 1960-1988 Untitled (Head), 1983-2001. Screenprint in colors, on Museum Board. 40 x 40 in. (101.6 x 101.6 cm). Numbered 13/85 in pencil, with the estate stamp, and signed and dated by the executor Gerard Basquiat on the reverse, published by DeSanctis Carr Fine Art, Los Angeles, with the accompanying Basquiat Editions Catalogue, framed. Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0

55 Kenny Scharf b. 1958 Check Fest, 1998. Screenprint in colors. 29 x 22 in. (73.7 x 55.9 cm). Signed, dated and numbered ‘A.P. 15/18’ in pencil (the edition was 108), published by Lincoln Center List Poster and Print Program, New York, framed. literature Charles Riley p. 186 Estimate $ 3 0 0 - 5 0 0 56 Kenny Scharf b. 1958 Thou Shalt Have No Other Gods Before Me, from the Ten Commandments Suite, 1987. Lithograph in colors. 24 x 18 in. (61 x 45.7 cm). Signed, dated and annotated ‘P.P I’ in pencil (a printer’s proof, the edition was 84 and 15 artist’s proofs), published by Art Issue Editions, New York, unframed. Estimate $ 3 0 0 - 5 0 0

54 VARIOUS ARTISTS Rain Dance Benefit Poster, 1985. Offset lithograph in colors, on smooth wove paper. 31 x 22 in. (78.7 x 55.9 cm). Signed by all artists in black or silver ink, from the edition of unknown size, published by Keith Haring, with Jean-Michel Basquiat, Roy Lichtenstein, Yoko Ono and Andy Warhol for the benefit of the United States Committee for UNICEF, unframed. literature Mary Lee Corlett III.33 Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 Including: Keith Haring, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Roy Lichtenstein, Yoko Ono and Andy Warhol 62


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57 KEHINDE WILEY b. 1977 Passing/Posing, 2003. Pigment print in colors. 29 3/4 x 29 3/4 in. (75.6 x 75.6 cm). Presumably signed, dated and numbered 15/35 on the reverse (there were also 3 artist’s proofs), signed in black ink on a label affixed to the back of the frame, co-published by MS Editions and Downtown Arts Projects, New York, framed in original gold frame selected by the artist. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

59 DONALD BAECHLER b. 1956 Coney Island, 1994. Screenprint in colors, on heavy wove paper. 29 x 29 in. (73.7 x 73.7 cm). Signed, dated and numbered ‘HC 3/4’ in pencil (a hors commerce impression, the edition was 75), published by Lococco Fine Art, St. Louis, Missouri, framed. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 60 DONALD BAECHLER b. 1956 Tulips, 1994. Screenprint in colors with collage, on heavy wove paper. 31 3/8 x 23 1/2 in. (79.7 x 59.7 cm). Signed and annotated ‘TP’ in pencil (a trial proof, the edition was 98), unframed. Estimate $ 6 0 0 - 9 0 0

58 JUSTIN FAUNCE b. 1980 Thanks for all the Memories, 2006. Screenprint in colors, on heavy wove paper. 36 x 22 in. (91.4 x 55.9 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 6/60 in pencil, unframed. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 63


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61 RICHARD PRINCE b. 1949 It’s a Free Concert From Now On, 2004. Ektacolor print, on Fujifilm Photo paper. 30 x 33 1/2 in. (76.2 x 85.1 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 31/66 in black marker on the reverse (there were also 26 artist’s proofs in Roman numerals), published by Parkett Editions, Zurich and New York, framed. literature Edition for Parkett 72 Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

62 ALEX KATZ b. 1927 Ada four times: one plate, 1979-1980. Screenprint and lithograph in colors, on Arches Cover paper. 30 x 22 1/2 in. (76.2 x 57.2 cm). From the edition of 120 and 25 artist’s proofs, published by GHJ Graphics, Inc., New York, unframed. literature

Woodstock 1969. I took this picture Friday evening around seven thirty. I had just turned nineteen. It was the only picture I took that weekend. I had gone to Woodstock with only one exposure in my camera. I thought I could buy film in the nearest town. Not knowing what I was getting into, I thought I could get out of it. You know, “come and go.” Coming was hard enough (it took six hours to travel the last twenty miles) and “leaving” was impossible. Anyway, realizing I was there to stay, I decided not to save my only exposure but rather get rid of it as fast as I could. So I just stood up, whirled around and (click) took it. Richard Prince

63 REGINALD MARSH 1898-1954 Coney Island Beach, 1942. Engraving. 7 7/8 x 9 7/8 in. (20 x 25.1 cm). Signed in pencil, from the edition of 12 (presumably from the posthumous printing, signed by the estate), unframed. literature Norman Sasowsky 220 Estimate $ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0

Nicholas Maravell 118

Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

64 JOHN CURRIN b. 1962 The Beggar’s Alm, 2002. Etching with aquatint, on Somerset paper. 10 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. (26.7 x 21.6 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 58/70 in pencil (there were also 25 artist’s proofs in Roman numerals), published by Parkett Editions, Zurich and New York, framed. literature Edition for Parkett 65 Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 64


65

67

66

68

65 DAN GRAHAM b. 1942 View Interior, New Highway Restaurant, Jersey City, NJ, 1967. Two color coupler prints, on photo paper mounted to one sheet of wove paper (as issued). Both: 20 x 30 in. (50.8 x 76.2 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 14/30 in pencil, published by Patrick Painter Editions, Los Angeles, framed. Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

67 ALEX KATZ b. 1927 Beach Sandals, 1987. Aquatint in colors. 14 3/4 x 20 in. (37.5 x 50.8 cm). Signed and numbered 44/60 in pencil (there were also 10 artist’s proofs), published by Crown Point Press, San Francisco, unframed. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 68 ALEX KATZ b. 1927 Reclining Figure, 1987. Aquatint in colors. 35 1/4 x 41 1/2 in. (89.5 x 105.4 cm). Signed and numbered 28/60 in pencil (there were also 10 artist’s proofs), published by Crown Point Press, San Francisco (with their ink stamp on the reverse), framed. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

66 Roy Lichtenstein 1923-1997 Soda and Sandwich, from Ten Works x Ten Painters, 1964. Screenprint in colors, on clear Mylar. 19 x 23 in. (48.3 x 58.4 cm). From the edition of 500 (there were also 10 artist’s proofs), published by the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut, framed. literature Mary Lee Corlett 35 Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

65


69

70

71

72

69 SWOON b. 1978 Study of a Construction Worker, 2005, 2005. Linocut with hand-painting in grey, on semi-transparent Mylar. S. 83 1/4 x 36 1/4 in. (211.5 x 92.1 cm). A unique variant (no edition size was recorded), published by the artist, minor creasing and a short tear at the lower right sheet, otherwise in very good condition, unframed. Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0

71 JANE DICKSON b. 1952 Untitled, and Blue Dust, 1988. Two etchings and aquatints in colors with carborundum, on Somerset paper. Both approx: 23 7/8 x 13 7/8 in. (60.6 x 35.2 cm). Both signed and numbered 14/50 and 14/14 in pencil, Untitled published by Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts, one framed. Estimate $ 6 0 0 - 9 0 0

70 ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG 1925-2008 Tribute 21 (Art): one plate, 1994. Lithograph in colors, on Arches Infinity paper. 41 x 27 in. (104.1 x 68.6 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 9/22 in pencil, published by Felissimo, New York, framed. Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

72 DAVID SALLE b. 1952 Paper Lanterns, from the Geldzahler Portfolio, 1998. Solar etching and aquatint in colors, on Arches paper. 16 1/4 x 10 7/8 in. (41.3 x 27.6 cm). Signed, dated ‘98’ and numbered 71/75 in pencil (there were also 15 artist’s proofs), published by The Estate Project for Artists with AIDS, New York, unframed. Estimate $ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 66


73

74

75

73 CHRISTOPHER WOOL b. 1955 My House III, 2000. Screenprint in colors, on matte custom art paper. 39 x 29 in. (99.1 x 73.7 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 66/100 in pencil (the series consists of three color combinations, each with an edition of 100), published by Counter Editions, London, unframed. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

75 CHRISTOPHER WOOL b. 1955 Untitled portfolio, 1997. The complete set of six heliogravures, on Zerkall paper. 26 1/2 x 21 in. (67.3 x 53.3 cm). All signed, dated and numbered 17/30 in pencil on the reverse (there were also 10 artist’s proofs), published by Portfolio Knust AG, Vienna, loose, contained in original gray fabric-covered folder. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

74 JASPER JOHNS b. 1930 Untitled, from the Geldzahler Portfolio, 1998. Aquatint and etching, on Hahnemühle Copperplate paper. 17 3/4 x 12 in. (45.1 x 30.5 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 71/75 in pencil (there were also 15 artist’s proofs), published by The Estate Project for Artists with AIDS, New York and Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles (with their blindstamp and stamp on the reverse), unframed. Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

In 1996, a fire burned through Christopher Wool’s 9th street studio destroying all of the artwork inside. The source material for the images in this portfolio were the insurance claim photographs taken after this tragic event.

67


76

77

78

79

76 CHRYSSA b. 1933 Gates to Times Square: three prints, 1978. Three screenprints in gray and silver, on handmade HMP paper. 40 x 30 in. (101.6 x 76.2 cm). All signed and numbered 55/100 in pencil, published by Prestige Art, Ltd., Mamaroneck, New York, unframed. Estimate $ 7 0 0 - 9 0 0

78 FRANK STELLA b. 1936 Coxuria, from the Geldzahler Portfolio, 1998. Screenprint in colors, on Lana Mouldmade paper. 30 x 22 1/8 in. (76.2 x 56.2 cm). Signed, dated ‘97’ and numbered 71/75 in pencil (there were also 15 artist’s proofs), published by The Estate Project for Artists with AIDS, New York, unframed. Estimate $ 1, 8 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

77 STUART DAVIS 1892-1964 Untitled, from Ten Works x Ten Painters, 1964. Screenprint in colors. 11 1/8 x 14 1/8 in. (28.3 x 35.9 cm). From the edition of 500, published by Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut, framed. literature Sylvan Cole 27 Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

79 FRANK STELLA b. 1936 Untitled (Rabat), from Ten Works x Ten Painters, 1964. Screenprint in colors. 18 x 18 in. (45.7 x 45.7 cm). From the edition of 500 (there were also 10 artist’s proofs), published by the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut, framed. literature Richard Axsom Appendix 1A

Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 68


80

81

82

83

80 Willem de Kooning 1904-1997 Untitled, 1980. Offset lithograph in colors. 31 1/4 x 28 in. (79.4 x 71.1 cm). Signed, dated and numbered ‘a.p. 47/50’ in pencil (an artist’s proof, the edition was 100), framed. Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

82 ADOLPH GOTTLIEB 1903-1974 Untitled (For the Benefit of Phoenix House), 1972. Etching and aquatint in colors. 23 1/2 x 17 3/4 in. (59.7 x 45.1 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 27/125 in pencil, published by Brooke Alexander Editions, New York, framed. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

81 JEAN-PAUL RIOPELLE 1923-2002 Triptych, ca. 1967. Lithograph in colors. 29 5/8 x 47 in. (75.2 x 119.4 cm). Signed and numbered 45/75 in pencil, framed. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 0 0 0

83 ADOLPH GOTTLIEB 1903-1974 Red Ground—Maroon Disc, 1966. Screenprint in colors. 20 x 15 in. (50.8 x 38.1 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 44/50 in pencil, published by Marlborough Graphics, New York, framed. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 69


84

86

85

87

88

84 ELLSWORTH KELLY b. 1923 Untitled, from the Geldzahler Portfolio, 1998. Lithograph in gray. 16 3/4 x 16 5/8 in. (42.5 x 42.2 cm). Signed and numbered 71/75 in pencil, published by The Estate Project for Artists with AIDS, New York and Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles (with their stamp on the reverse), unframed. Estimate $ 1, 8 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

87 TERRY WINTERS b. 1949 The Paris Review, 1988. Lithograph in colors. 38 5/8 x 26 3/4 in. (98.1 x 67.9 cm). Signed with initials in pencil, published by the Paris Review, New York, unframed. Estimate $ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0 88 MEL BOCHNER b. 1940 Untitled, 1984. Screenprint in colors. 41 1/2 x 34 1/2 in. (105.4 x 87.6 cm). Signed, dated and numbered ‘RP 2/10’ in pencil (the edition was 144 and 18 artist’s proofs), published by the Lincoln Center List Poster and Print Program, New York, unframed. literature Charles Riley p. 157 Estimate $ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0

85 SOL LEWITT 1928-2007 Untitled (Red), 1985. The complete set of five screenprints in red. All: 6 x 6 in. (15.2 x 15.2 cm). All signed and numbered 1/2 in pencil, all framed. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 86 JOEL SHAPIRO b. 1941 Untitled, 2006. Screenprint in colors. 32 x 24 3/8 in. (81.3 x 61.9 cm). Signed and numbered ‘R.P. 2/10’ in pencil, (the edition was 118 and 18 artist’s proofs), published by Lincoln Center List Poster and Print Program, New York, unframed. literature Charles A. Riley p. 202

Estimate $ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0

70


editions Lots 1 - 88

lot 1 MARK DI SUVERO Est $2,000-4,000

lot 2 RED GROOMS Est $800-1,200

lot 3 RICHARD BOSMAN Est $2,000-3,000

lot 4 RED GROOMS Est $800-1,200

lot 5 RED GROOMS Est $1,000-1,500

lot 6 JANE HAMMOND Est $5,000-7,000

lot 7 RED GROOMS Est $3,000-4,000

lot 8 PAULA SCHER Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 9 PAULA SCHER Est $3,000-4,000

lot 10 ALAN SONFIST Est $ 400-600

lot 11 YVONNE JACQUETTE Est $700-900

lot 12 YVONNE JACQUETTE Est $900-1,200

lot 13 YVONNE JACQUETTE Est $700-900

lot 14 LEON BIBEL Est $800-1,200

lot 15 LEON BIBEL Est $1,200-1,600

lot 16 JOHN MARIN Est $2,000-3,000

lot 17 YVONNE Est $900-1,200

lot 18 CLAUDIO BRAVO Est $2,000-3,000

lot 19 CHRISTO Est $6,000-8,000

lot 20 RICHARD ESTES Est $20,000-25,000

lot 21 SYLVIE FLEURY Est $14,000-18,000

lot 22 RED GROOMS Est $800-1,200

lot 23 RICHARD HAMILTON Est $3,000-5,000

lot 24 POL BURY Est $ 400-600

lot 25 JEFF KOONS Est $1,000-1,500

lot 26 MARCEL DUCHAMP Est $2,500-3,500

lot 27 VARIOUS ARTISTS Est $2,000-3,000

lot 28 MEL BOCHNER Est $500-700

lot 29 JENNY HOLZER Est $2,000-3,000

lot 30 VARIOUS ARTISTS Est $1,000-1,500

lot 31 NANCY CHUNN Est $ 400-600

lot 32 VARIOUS ARTISTS Est $1,000-1,500

lot 33 R.B. KITAJ Est $ 400-600

lot 34 JAMES ROSENQUIST Est $700-900

lot 35 VIK MUNIZ Est $3,000-5,000

lot 36 STEVE WOLFE Est $9,000-12,000

71

JACQUETTE


editions Lots 37 - 72

lot 37 ANDY WARHOL Est $12,000-18,000

lot 38 ANDY WARHOL Est $2,000-3,000

lot 39 DENNIS HOPPER Est $600-800

lot 40 FRANCESCO CLEMENTE Est $800-1,200

lot 41 NAT FINKELSTEIN Est $500-700

lot 42 FRANCESCO CLEMENTE Est $ 400-600

lot 43 ROBERT INDIANA Est $800-1,200

lot 4 4 WILLIAM BURROUGHS Est $ 400-600

lot 45 ANDY WARHOL Est $10,000-15,000

lot 46 ANDY WARHOL Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 47 ANDY WARHOL Est $20,000-30,000

lot 48 VITO ACCONCI Est $700-900

lot 49 HIROSHI SUGIMOTO Est $1,200-1,800

lot 50 ROBERT LONGO Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 51 ROBERT LONGO Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 52 BRUCE NAUMAN Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 53 after jEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT Est $10,000-15,000

lot 54 VARIOUS ARTISTS Est $2,000-3,000

lot 55 Kenny Scharf Est $300-500

lot 56 Kenny Scharf Est $300-500

lot 57 KEHINDE WILEY Est $1,500-2,500

lot 58 JUSTIN FAUNCE Est $1,500-2,500

lot 59 DONALD BAECHLER Est $2,000-3,000

lot 60 DONALD BAECHLER Est $600-900

lot 61 RICHARD PRINCE Est $3,000-5,000

lot 62 ALE X KATZ Est $800-1,200

lot 63 REGINALD MARSH Est $600-800

lot 64 JOHN CURRIN Est $1,200-1,800

lot 65 DAN GRAHAM Est $5,000-7,000

lot 66 Roy Lichtenstein Est $2,500-3,500

lot 67 ALE X KATZ Est $1,500-2,000

lot 68 ALE X KATZ Est $3,000-5,000

lot 69 SWOON Est $6,000-9,000

lot 70 ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG Est $2,500-3,500

lot 71 JANE DICKSON Est $600-900

lot 72 DAVID SALLE Est $600-800

72


Department Lots 73 - 88

lot 73 CHRISTOPHER WOOL Est $2,000-3,000

lot 74 JASPER JOHNS Est $5,000-7,000

lot 75 CHRISTOPHER WOOL Est $3,000-5,000

lot 76 CHRYSSA Est $700-900

lot 77 STUART DAVIS Est $1,200-1,500

lot 78 FRANK STELLA Est $1,800-2,500

lot 79 FRANK STELLA Est $800-1,200

lot 80 Willem de Kooning Est $2,500-3,500

lot 81 JEAN-PAUL RIOPELLE Est $800-1,000

lot 82 ADOLPH GOTTLIEB Est $2,000-3,000

lot 83 ADOLPH GOTTLIEB Est $1,500-2,500

lot 84 ELLSWORTH KELLY Est $1,800-2,500

lot 85 SOL LEWITT Est $ 4,000-5,000

lot 86 JOEL SHAPIRO Est $ 400-600

lot 87 TERRY WINTERS Est $ 400-600

lot 88 MEL BOCHNER Est $ 400-600

73


new york new york 1.30 pm 12 december 2009 new york

photographs Lots 89 - 211

Abbott, B. 92, 98, 104, 108, 109, 111, 140 Arbus, D. 96, 197 Baril, T. 90, 183, 205 Beard, P. 125 Bing, I. 99 Breitenbach, J. 136, 137 Brenner, F. 189 Burckhardt, R. 91 Callahan, H. 141, 157 Carter, K. 186 Chien-Hsing Liao, J. 175 Clark, L. 130, 131, 132 Croner, T. 190, 196 Deruytter, W. 106 Eisenstaedt, A. 89 Engel, M. 97, 110 Erwitt, E. 117, 188, 193, 200 Ethridge, R. 112 Evans, W. 116, 119, 121, 182 Faurer, L. 124, 129, 139, 185, 201, 204 Fein, N. 101 Feininger, A. 103, 120, 127, 187 Fink, L. 168, 169, 170

Newhall, B. 155 Nixon, N. 154

Ginsberg, A. 161 Glinn, B. 162 Goldin, N. 173 Grostein, M. 176 Guther, V. 102

Orkin, R. 180, 181, 192, 198, 199

Haas, E. 105 Himmel, P. 95 Hunstein, D. 118

Paulin, F. 128 Peterman, S. 156 Pierson, J. 167 Pronin, A. 158, 159, 160

Jacobson, B. 191

Ruzicka, D. 100

Kellner, T. 133 Kennedy Santos, S. 174 KertĂŠsz, A. 115 Klein, W. 145, 146, 147

Steichen, E. 148 Steiner, R. 202 Stettner, L. 123, 184 Stieglitz, A. 107 Stock, D. 126 Sugimoto, H. 134, 135

Larrain, G. 93 Leatherdale, M. 206, 208, 209 Lee, N.S. 171, 172 Leipzig, A. 113 Levinstein, L. 149, 150, 151, 152, 195 Lyon, D. 122 Mallo, L. 94 Michals, D. 153, 163, 203 Morath, I. 138 Morell, A. 177 Muniz, V. 164, 165, 166, 210

74

Tarbox Beals, J. 114 Tice, G. 207 Weston, E. 178, 179 White, T. 211 Winogrand, G. 142, 143, 144, 194


89

89 ALFRED EISENSTAEDT 1898-1995 Farewell to Servicemen, Clock at Pennsylvania Station, NYC, 1943. Gelatin silver print, printed 1994. 17 1/4 x 13 5/8 in. (43.8 x 34.6 cm). Signed and numbered 236/250 in ink in the margin. literature O’Neil, Eisenstaedt: Remembrances, p. 62

Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0 75


90

91

90 TOM BARIL b. 1952 New York. Boston: Robert Klein Gallery, 2001. Ten photogravures. Each: 14 5/8 x 11 1/8 in. (37.1 x 28.3 cm). Each signed, titled, dated and numbered 29/50 in pencil in the margin. Title page. Colophon. Contained in a linen clamshell case. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

91 RUDY BURCKHARDT 1914-1999 Brooklyn Window, 1954. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 12 1/8 x 10 3/8 in. (30.8 x 26.4 cm). Signed in pencil on the mount; titled and dated in pencil on the reverse of the mount. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

Titles Include: Brooklyn Bridge, 1993; Smokestacks, 1994; Verrazano Narrows, 1993; Manhattan Bridge, 1993; New York Public Library, 1995; Woolworth Building, 1997; Empire State Building, 1999; Chrysler Building, 1995; Brooklyn Bridge, 1999; Factory, NJ, 1994 76


92

93

94

92 BERENICE ABBOTT 1898-1991 Walkway, Manhattan Bridge, New York, 1936. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 19 x 15 in. (48.3 x 38.1 cm). Signed in pencil on the mount; ‘Changing New York’ and ‘Commerce Graphics Ltd., Inc.’ copyright credit stamps on the reverse of the mount. literature O’Neal, Berenice Abbott: American Photographer, p. 147;

94 LUIS MALLO b. 1962 In Camera No. 50, 2003-2004. Color coupler print. 37 1/2 x 47 1/2 in. (95.3 x 120.7 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 4/5 in ink on a gallery label affixed to the reverse of the mount. Provenance Praxis International Art, New York; to the

Yochelson, Berenice Abbott: Changing New York, pl. 22

Estimate $ 3 , 5 0 0 - 4 , 5 0 0

present Private Collection

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 93 GILLES LARRAIN b. 1938 Portrait of Robert Mapplethorpe, New York, 1984. Gelatin silver print, printed 1996. 14 x 12 7/8 in. (35.6 x 32.7 cm). Signed and dated in ink on the recto; signed, titled ‘N.Y.’ and dated in pencil on the verso. One from an edition of 3. provenance Hyperion Press Limited, New York

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 77


95

96

97

98

95 PAUL HIMMEL 1914-2009 Coney Island Parachute Jump, ca. 1950. Oversized gelatin silver print, printed later. 52 1/2 x 40 1/2 in. (133.4 x 102.9 cm). Provenance Keith de Lellis Gallery, New York

97 MORRIS ENGEL 1918-2005 Water Fountain, Coney Island, 1938. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 11 5/8 x 10 3/8 in. (29.5 x 26.4 cm). Signed in ink in the margin; signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. provenance Ruth Orkin Photo Archive, New York

Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0

literature Ruth Orkin Photo Archive, Morris Engel: Early Work, p. 28

Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 96 DIANE ARBUS 1923-1971 Woman on the Boardwalk, Coney Island, N.Y., 1957. Gelatin silver print, printed later by Neil Selkirk. 8 1/4 x 5 1/2 in. (21 x 14 cm). Stamped ‘A Diane Arbus photograph’, signed, titled, dated, numbered 3/75 by Doon Arbus, Executor, in ink, copyright credit and reproduction limitation stamps on the verso. literature Arbus, Sussman, Phillips, Selkirk and Rosenheim, Diane Arbus: Revelations, p. 139

98 BERENICE ABBOTT 1898-1991 Tri-Boro Barber School, 264 Bowery, New York, 1935. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 19 x 14 5/8 in. (48.3 x 37.1 cm). Signed in pencil on the mount; ‘Changing New York’ and ‘Commerce Graphics Ltd. Inc.’ copyright credit stamps on the reverse of the mount. literature Commerce Graphics, Berenice Abbott, n.p.; Dover,

Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

New York in the Thirties: as Photographed by Berenice Abbott, pl. 27; O’Neal, Berenice Abbott: American Photographer, p. 161; Yochelson, Berenice Abbott: Changing New York, pl. 34

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 78


99

100

101

99 ILSE BING 1899-1998 Barber College, New York City, 1936; Shave, 5 Cents, New York City, 1936. Two gelatin silver prints, printed later. (i) 12 3/8 x 9 3/8 in. (31.4 x 23.8 cm); (ii) 12 1/4 x 8 1/4 in. (31.1 x 21 cm). Each signed and dated in ink on the verso. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

100 DRAHOMIR RUZICKA 1870-1960 World’s Fair, New York, 1939. Gelatin silver print. 13 5/8 x 10 3/4 in. (34.6 x 27.3 cm). Signed, dated and annotated ‘From the World’s Fair, the Trylon and the Perisphere’ in pencil on the verso; signed, titled and dated in pencil on the overmat. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 101 NAT FEIN 1914-2000 Babe Bows Out, 1948. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 10 x 12 3/8 in. (25.4 x 31.4 cm). Signed in ink on the recto. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0 79


103

102

104

102 VERENA GUTHER b. 1957 New York XIII, 2003. Mixed media print, Diasec mounted. 60 x 12 in. (152.4 x 30.5 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 4/7 in ink on the verso. provenance Galerie Christine Rother, Wiesbaden

104 BERENICE ABBOTT 1898-1991 Esso Station, Bronx, New York, 1936. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 36 1/2 x 29 in. (92.7 x 73.7 cm). Signed and numbered 3/24 in pencil on the mount; ‘Abbott, Maine’ credit stamp on the reverse of the mount.

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0

literature Commerce Graphics, Berenice Abbott, n.p.; Photo Poche, Berenice Abbott, pl. 40

Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 103 ANDREAS FEININGER 1906-1999 Westside Highway, 1951. Gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1970. 7 3/8 x 9 5/8 in. (18.7 x 24.4 cm). Signed in ink and credit stamp on the verso. literature von Hartz, Andreas Feininger: New York in the Forties, pp. 176 - 177 for a variant

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 80


105

106

105 ERNST HAAS 1921-1986 Billboard Painter, Broadway, NYC, 1952. Dye transfer print, printed 1992. 17 5/8 x 26 5/8 in. (44.8 x 67.6 cm). Signed, titled, dated, numbered 5/30 by Alexander Haas, the photographer’s son, in pencil and Ernst Haas copyright credit stamp on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the Estate of Ernst Haas Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0

106 WOUTER DERUYTTER b. 1967 Billboards, NY: 5th Avenue & 56th Street (Abercrombie #2), August 6, 2005. Kodak Endura Archival print, Diasec and flushmounted. 59 x 59 in. (149.9 x 149.9 cm). Signed, titled, dated, numbered 2/3 and copyright in ink on the reverse of the flush-mount. Signed and dated ‘2008’ in ink on a Certificate of Authenticity accompanying the work. provenance Torch Gallery, Amsterdam literature Caermersklooster Museum, Billboards, New York – Wouter Deruytter, p. 56

Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0 81


107

108

109

110

107 ALFRED STIEGLITZ 1864-1946 Old & New, New York, 1910. Photogravure from Camera Work. 8 x 6 1/4 in. (20.3 x 15.9 cm). literature Greenough, Alfred Stieglitz, Vol. 1 1886-1922, pl. 344; Norman, Alfred Stieglitz: An American Seer, pl. XVIII; Taschen, Alfred Stieglitz:

109 BERENICE ABBOTT 1898-1991 Battery, Foot of West Street, May 12, 1936. Gelatin silver print. 9 5/8 x 7 7/8 in. (24.4 x 20 cm). Titled, dated by a Federal Arts Project employee and ‘Changing New York’ credit stamp on the verso; signed in pencil on the overmat.

Camera Work, p. 587

literature Yochelson, Berenice Abbott: Changing New York, pl. 4

Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

108 BERENICE ABBOTT 1898-1991 Exchange Place from Broadway, 1936. Gelatin silver print, printed circa 1955, mounted. 13 1/2 x 3 1/4 in. (34.3 x 8.3 cm). Signed in ink in the margin. literature Commerce Graphics, Berenice Abbott, n.p.; O’Neal, Berenice Abbott:

110 MORRIS ENGEL 1918-2005 Comics, NYC, 1946. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 10 3/4 x 10 1/4 in. (27.3 x 26 cm). Signed in ink in the margin; signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. provenance Ruth Orkin Photo Archive, New York Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0

American Photographer, p. 130

Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 82


111

112

113

114

111 BERENICE ABBOTT 1898-1991 Lyric Theatre, 100 Third Avenue, New York, 1936. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 28 5/8 x 37 in. (72.7 x 94 cm). Signed and numbered 1/24 in pencil on the mount; ‘Changing New York’ and ‘Commerce Graphics, Ltd., Inc.’ copyright credit stamps on the reverse of the mount. literature Commerce Graphics, Berenice Abbott, n.p.;

113 ARTHUR LEIPZIG b. 1918 Divers, East River, 1948. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 14 5/8 x 18 7/8 in. (37.1 x 47.9 cm). Signed in pencil, copyright credit and reproduction limitation stamps on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

Dover, New York in the Thirties: as Photographed by Berenice Abbott, pl. 33; O’Neal, Berenice Abbott:

114 JESSIE TARBOX BEALS 1870-1942 MacDougal Alley, Greenwich Village, NYC, ca. 19061910. Gelatin silver print. 7 3/8 x 9 1/2 in. (18.7 x 24.1 cm). Annotated ‘MacDougal Alley, in New York City, where stables were first transformed into studios’ in ink and credit stamp on the verso; credit reproduction limitation stamp on the reverse of the mount.

American Photographer, p. 160; Photo Poche, Berenice Abbott, pl. 47; Yochelson, Berenice Abbott: Changing New York, pl. 37

Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 112 ROE ETHRIDGE b. 1969 Gas Station, 2005. Color coupler print. 21 7/8 x 28 1/4 in. (55.6 x 71.8 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 5/5 in ink on the reverse of the backing board. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

provenance Acquired from the Estate of Alexander Alland

Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

83


115

116

117

118

115 ANDRÉ KERTÉSZ 1894-1985 Washington Square, 1978. Gelatin silver print. 9 3/4 x 6 3/4 in. (24.8 x 17.1 cm). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso.

117 ELLIOTT ERWITT b. 1928 New York City, 1946. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 12 x 17 1/2 in. (30.5 x 44.5 cm). Signed in ink in the margin; signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. literature Phaidon, Elliott Erwitt: Shapes, pp. 232-233 Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0

literature Greenough, Gurbo and Kennel, André Kertész, pl. 109 there titled and dated Glass Sculpture with World Trade Center, 1979

Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 118 DON HUNSTEIN b. 1928 Bob Dylan & Suze, NYC, 1960. Color coupler print, printed later. 16 x 16 in. (40.6 x 40.6 cm). Signed in ink on the verso. provenance Acquired

116 WALKER EVANS 1903-1975 Union Square, 1934. Gelatin silver print. 6 1/2 x 8 1/4 in. (16.5 x 21 cm). Titled in pencil on the mount; credit and ‘Life Picture Collection’ stamps on the reverse of the mount. provenance Acquired from the Fortune Magazine Archive Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0

directly from the artist

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 This image appeared on the cover of Bob Dylan’s 1963 album The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan. 84


119

120

122

121

119 WALKER EVANS 1903-1975 Lunchroom Buddies, New York City, 1931. Gelatin silver print from Walker Evans: Selected Photographs, printed 1974. 12 x 9 1/4 in. (30.5 x 23.5 cm). Signed and numbered 56/75 in pencil on the embossed mount. literature Harper &

121 WALKER EVANS 1903-1975 New York Subway Portrait, 1940. Gelatin silver print, printed 1960. 6 7/8 x 10 1/8 in. (17.5 x 25.7 cm). Credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

Row, Walker Evans: First and Last, pl. 60; Keller, Walker Evans: The Getty Museum Collection, pl. 169;

122 DANNY LYON b. 1942 I.R.T. # 2, South Bronx, New York City, 1979. Gelatin silver print, printed 1980. 8 3/4 x 13 1/4 in. (22.2 x 33.7 cm). Signed in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 8 0 0 - 2 , 2 0 0

Morris Hambourg, Rosenheim, Eklund and Fineman, Walker Evans, pl. 23; Museum of Modern Art, Walker Evans: American Photographs, pl. 40

Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0 120 ANDREAS FEININGER 1906-1999 El Train, Ninth Avenue, 1940. Gelatin silver print, printed 1970s. 9 1/2 x 7 5/8 in. (24.1 x 19.4 cm). Signed in ink and credit stamp on the verso. literature von Hartz, Andreas Feininger: New York in the Forties, p. 146

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 85


123

124

123 LOUIS STETTNER b. 1922 Girl Playing in Circles, Penn Station, New York, 1958. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 17 1/2 x 11 3/4 in. (44.5 x 29.8 cm). Blindstamp credit in the margin; signed, titled ‘Penn Station’ and dated in pencil on the verso. provenance

124 LOUIS FAURER 1916-2001 Penn Station, N.Y.C., 1948. Gelatin silver print, printed 1990. 12 7/8 x 8 3/8 in. (32.7 x 21.3 cm). Signed, titled, dated, numbered 4/20 and copyright in pencil on the verso. literature Wilkes-Tucker, Louis Faurer, p. 84 Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

Acquired directly from the artist literature Flammarion, Louis Stettner: Wisdom Cries Out in the Streets, p. 171

Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0 86


125

125 PETER BEARD b. 1938 Mick Jagger at Madison Square Garden (after Montauk Point), July, 1972. Gelatin silver collage with paint, blood and affixed photos, sticker and key, printed later. 22 1/2 x 15 1/4 in. (57.2 x 38.7 cm). Signed, titled dated and extensively annotated in paint on the recto. provenance The Time is Always Now Gallery, New York; to the Gert Elfering Collection; to the present Private Collection

Estimate $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 - 3 0 , 0 0 0 87


126

127

128

126 DENNIS STOCK b. 1928 James Dean in Times Square, New York City, 1955. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 18 7/8 x 13 1/4 in. (47.9 x 33.7 cm). Signed in pencil on the verso.

128 FRANK PAULIN b. 1926 Playland, Times Square, 1955. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 12 7/8 x 19 1/2 in. (32.7 x 49.5 cm). Signed, titled ‘Times Sq.’ and dated in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

provenance Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 127 ANDREAS FEININGER 1907-1999 New York – 42nd St. Theatre, 1940. Gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1950. 9 7/8 x 8 in. (25.1 x 20.3 cm). Signed, dated in ink, titled in pencil and credit stamp on the verso. literature von Hartz, Andreas Feininger: New York in the Forties, p. 95 for a variant

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 88


129

130

131

132

129 LOUIS FAURER 1916-2001 Tulips on Broadway, NYC, 1949. Gelatin silver print, printed 1980-1981. 6 5/8 x 9 7/8 in. (16.8 x 25.1 cm). Signed, titled, dated and copyright in pencil on the verso. literature Wilkes-Tucker, Louis Faurer, p. 120 Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

131 LARRY CLARK b. 1943 Untitled from 42nd Street Boys, ca. 1980. Gelatin silver print. 12 x 8 in. (30.5 x 20.3 cm). Signed in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0 132 LARRY CLARK b. 1943 Untitled from 42nd Street Boys, ca. 1980. Gelatin silver print. 12 x 8 in. (30.5 x 20.3 cm). Signed in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

130 LARRY CLARK b. 1943 Untitled, 1980. Gelatin silver print, printed 1981. 12 x 8 in. (30.5 x 20.3 cm). Signed in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 89


133

134

133 THOMAS KELLNER b. 1966 New York, Times Square at Night, 2003. Color coupler print. 16 1/2 x 54 in. (41.9 x 137.2 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 14/20 +3 in ink on the verso. provenance Schneider Gallery, Chicago Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0

134 HIROSHI SUGIMOTO b. 1948 Rockefeller Center, 2001. Gelatin silver print. 23 x 18 1/2 in. (58.4 x 47 cm). Blindstamp number 22/25 969 in the margin; signed in pencil on the mount. Estimate $ 4 0 , 0 0 0 - 6 0 , 0 0 0 90


135

135 HIROSHI SUGIMOTO b. 1948 Empire State Building, 1997. Gelatin silver print. 23 x 18 1/2 in. (58.4 x 47 cm). Blindstamp number 22/25 918 in the margin; signed in pencil on the mount. Estimate $ 3 5 , 0 0 0 - 4 5 , 0 0 0 91


136

137

138

139

136 JOSEF BREITENBACH 1896-1984 New York Nights, 1946. Gelatin silver print, printed 1951. 16 1/4 x 16 in. (41.3 x 40.6 cm). Credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

138 INGE MORATH 1923-2002 Window Washers, 48th Street, New York, 1958. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 19 x 13 in. (48.3 x 33 cm). Signed in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

137 JOSEF BREITENBACH 1896-1984 New York Daytime, 1948. Gelatin silver print, printed 1951. 16 1/8 x 16 1/8 in. (41 x 41 cm). Credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

139 LOUIS FAURER 1916-2001 Construction site on Madison Avenue looking toward Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y., 1949. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 11 3/4 x 7 7/8 in. (29.8 x 20 cm). Signed and dated in pencil in the margin. literature Wilkes-Tucker, Louis Faurer, p. 105

Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 92


140

140 BERENICE ABBOTT 1898-1991 City Arabesque, 1936. Gelatin silver print. 13 1/8 x 9 3/4 in. (33.3 x 24.8 cm). Signed in pencil on the mount; ‘Photograph Berenice Abbott 50 Commerce St. New York City’ credit stamp on the reverse of the mount. literature Dover, New York in the Thirties: as Photographed by Berenice Abbott, pl. 21; O’Neal, Berenice Abbott: American Photographer, p. 94; Photo Poche, Berenice Abbott, pl. 11; Yochelson, Berenice Abbott: Changing New York, pl. 32

Estimate $ 2 5 , 0 0 0 - 3 5 , 0 0 0 93


141

143

142

141 HARRY CALLAHAN 1912-1999 World Trade Center, 1974. Gelatin silver print. 9 3/8 x 9 1/4 in. (23.8 x 23.5 cm). Signed in pencil in the margin. literature Szarkowski,

143 GARRY WINOGRAND 1928-1984 Untitled from Women are Beautiful, 1965-1975. Gelatin silver print, printed 1981. 8 3/4 x 13 in. (22.2 x 33 cm). Signed and numbered in pencil on the verso. One from an edition of 80. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

Callahan, p. 181

Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0 142 GARRY WINOGRAND 1928-1984 Untitled from Women are Beautiful, 1965-1975. Gelatin silver print, printed 1981. 8 3/4 x 13 in. (22.2 x 33 cm). Signed and numbered in pencil on the verso. One from an edition of 80. literature Szarkowski, Winogrand: Fragments from the Real World, p. 104

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 94


144

144 GARRY WINOGRAND 1928-1984 New York City from Women are Beautiful, 1968. Gelatin silver print, printed 1981. 8 3/4 x 13 in. (22.2 x 33 cm). Signed and numbered in pencil on the verso. One from an edition of 80. literature TF Editors, Garry Winogrand: The Game of Photography, p. 75; Szarkowski, Winogrand: Fragments from the Real World, p. 27; Winogrand, Women are Beautiful, cover

Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 95


145

146

147

145 WILLIAM KLEIN b. 1928 Atom Bomb Sky, New York, 1955. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 12 1/4 x 18 in. (31.1 x 45.7 cm). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso.

147 WILLIAM KLEIN b. 1928 Hamburger 40 cents, New York, 1955. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 9 3/4 x 14 1/2 in. (24.8 x 36.8 cm). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. literature Dewi Lewis Publishing, William Klein: New York 1954.55, n.p. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

provenance Acquired directly from the artist literature Dewi Lewis Publishing, William Klein: New York 1954.55, n.p.

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 146 WILLIAM KLEIN b. 1928 4 Heads, New York, New York, 1955. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 16 3/4 x 12 7/8 in. (42.5 x 32.7 cm). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. literature Dewi Lewis Publishing, William Klein: New York 1954.55, n.p. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 96


148 148 EDWARD STEICHEN 1879-1973 The Maypole, Empire State Building, 1932. Gelatin silver print, printed circa 1960. 16 1/2 x 13 1/2 in. (41.9 x 34.3 cm). Signed, dated by the artist, titled, dated, annotated ‘printed 1960s’ in an unidentified hand in pencil and Museum of Modern Art label on the reverse of the mount. provenance From the Collection of Joanna Steichen; to the present Private Collection literature Doubleday, A Life in Photography: Edward Steichen, pl. 313; Photo Poche, Edward Steichen, pl. 55; Steichen, Steichen’s Legacy: Photographs, 1895-1973, pl. 198

Estimate $ 5 0 , 0 0 0 -7 0 , 0 0 0 As skyscrapers began blossoming around New York City in the early decades of the 20th century, their novelty was likewise increasing, and demand for editorials featuring architectural photography grew in tandem. It is not surprising, therefore, that Vanity Fair commissioned Edward Steichen to photograph the Empire State Building in 1932, at the time the tallest building in the world.

Further distinguishing the photograph is a label from MoMA’s “Art Lending Service”, affixed to the verso. The service, which began in 1951 and lasted for three decades, was initiated by the Museum’s Junior Council as a means of encouraging art collecting by members of the public. The works, whether consigned by galleries or picked by the museum’s roster of curators, were available for renting for up to three months, after which individuals had the option of returning the works to the museum or purchasing them. Each work was of the highest caliber, and popularity of the service, fittingly, was high. The Maypole, originally from the collection of Joanna Steichen, was surely among the most popular photographs to have passed through MoMA’s “Art Lending Service.” It is a testament of the technological advancements in architecture as much as in photography, and the iconic legacy of one of the sharpest eyes to have captured both.

The popularity of Steichen’s work was widespread, gaining him commissions by stylish socialites, Hollywood sirens, powerful politicians, and magazine editors. When Steichen was approached by Vanity Fair to photograph the iconic landmark, he approached the assignment with the sensitivity of a portraitist and the exactitude of a documentarian. Knowing that the awe-inspiring effect of the building could go amiss in a photograph, Steichen laid one negative on top of another and carefully controlled the toning. The resulting image infuses the building with a powerful sense of three-dimensionality and a high level of energy. Of the famous shoot Steichen has noted, “I conceived the building as a Maypole…to suggest the swirl of a Maypole dance.” The fear of diminishing the building’s effect, consequentially, was innovatively overcome. 97


149

150

151

152

149 LEON LEVINSTEIN 1913-1988 Handball players, Houston Street, New York, 1969. Gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1980. 18 1/4 x 15 5/8 in. (46.4 x 39.7 cm). Credit stamp on the verso. literature Shamis, The Moment of Exposure: Leon Levinstein, p. 74; Stourdzé,

151 LEON LEVINSTEIN 1913-1988 Couple, Lower East Side, NYC, ca. 1970. Gelatin silver print. 13 1/4 x 10 1/8 in. (33.7 x 25.7 cm). Credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

Leon Levinstein: Obsession, p. 105

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

152 LEON LEVINSTEIN 1913-1988 Coney Island, 1980. Gelatin silver print. 15 5/8 x 19 3/8 in. (39.7 x 49.2 cm). Credit stamp on the verso. literature Stourdzé, Leon Levinstein:

150 LEON LEVINSTEIN 1913-1988 Untitled, 1954. Gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1980. 17 3/4 x 15 1/2 in. (45.1 x 39.4 cm). Credit stamp on the verso. literature Shamis, The

Obsession, p. 53

Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

Moment of Exposure: Leon Levinstein, p. 32 for a variant; Stourdzé, Leon Levinstein: Obsession, p. 124

Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0 98


153

154

155

156

153 DUANE MICHALS b. 1932 Moments before the tragedy, 1969. Gelatin silver print, printed 1970s. 4 5/8 x 6 3/4 in. (11.7 x 17.1 cm). Signed in ink on the mount. Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

155 BEAUMONT NEWHALL 1908-1993 Chase National Bank, New York, 1928. Gelatin silver print, printed before 1955. 13 3/4 x 10 3/4 in. (34.9 x 27.3 cm). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the mount; signed in pencil on the overmat. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

154 NICHOLAS NIXON b. 1947 West view of 53rd Street from Third Avenue, New York, 1975. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 17 3/4 x 22 3/4 in. (45.1 x 57.8 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 33/50, 2/10 in pencil on the verso. provenance From the Collection of the

156 SCOTT PETERMAN b. 1968 NY_10D, 2007. Archival pigment print, Diasec mounted. 51 1/2 x 39 1/2 in. (130.8 x 100.3 cm). Signed, titled and numbered 7/10 in ink on a label affixed to the reverse of the aluminum flush-mount. Provenance Higher Pictures,

literature Livingstone, The Essential Duane Michals, p. 29

Artist

New York

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

From the total edition of 50, 10 of the prints were printed in the 20 x 24 in. size as indicated by the dual numbering on the verso. 99


157

158

159

160

157 HARRY CALLAHAN 1912-1999 New York, 1977. Dye transfer print. 8 3/4 x 13 1/2 in. (22.2 x 34.3 cm). Signed in pencil in the margin. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

159 ANATOLY PRONIN b. 1939 Evening, Manhattan skyline, New York, USA, 1982. Gelatin silver print. 14 1/5 x 19 3/8 in. (36.1 x 49.2 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/8 in pencil on the verso. provenance Private Collection, New York Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 0 0 0

158 ANATOLY PRONIN b. 1939 Bryant Park at Night, Manhattan, New York, USA from Dark Side of New York, 1998. Gelatin silver print. 17 1/2 x 13 1/2 in. (44.5 x 34.3 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/2 in pencil on the verso. provenance Private Collection, New York Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 0 0 0

160 ANATOLY PRONIN b. 1939 52nd Street and 2nd Avenue, Manhattan, New York, USA from Dark Side of New York, 1999. Gelatin silver print. 10 x 10 in. (25.4 x 25.4 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/2 in pencil on the verso. provenance Private Collection, New York Estimate $ 5 0 0 -7 0 0 100


161

162

163

161 ALLEN GINSBERG 1926-1997 Midsummmer Leafage, June 6, 1993. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 10 1/2 x 7 in. (26.7 x 17.8 cm). Signed, titled, dated and extensively annotated in ink in the margin. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

163 DUANE MICHALS b. 1932 Andy Warhol Eats a Birthday Banana, 1994. Six gelatin silver prints. 5 1/4 x 7 7/8 in. (13.3 x 20 cm) overall. Signed, titled and inscribed ‘For Merce Cunningham on His Seventy Fifth Birthday’ in ink on the mount. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

162 BURT GLINN 1925-2008 Andy Warhol with Edie Sedgwick and Chuck Wein, New York, 1965. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 18 7/8 x 12 3/8 in. (47.9 x 31.4 cm). Signed in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 101


164

164 VIK MUNIZ b. 1961 Explosion from Pictures of Ink, 2000. Dye destruction print. 29 x 39 1/8 in. (73.7 x 99.4 cm). Signed, titled and numbered in ink on a gallery label affixed to the reverse of the backing board. One from an edition of 5. Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0 102


165

166

167

165 VIK MUNIZ b. 1961 The Museum of Modern Art Portfolio, 1995. Ten gelatin silver prints. Each: 6 7/8 x 5 in. (17.5 x 12.7 cm) approximately. Nine prints signed, titled, dated, numbered and annotated I-IX in pencil on the mount; one print mounted to inside back cover of portfolio case. Each from an edition of 10. Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0

167 JACK PIERSON b. 1960 Sorrow, 1997. Unique color coupler print. 20 x 16 in. (50.8 x 40.6 cm). Signed, titled, dated and annotated ‘unique’ in ink on the verso. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

166 VIK MUNIZ b. 1961 Paper Boat from Pictures of Soil, 2002. Gelatin silver print. 13 x 10 1/8 in. (33 x 25.7 cm). Signed in ink on the reverse of the mount. Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0 103


168

170

169

168 LARRY FINK b. 1952 Regines, N.Y.C., 1977. Gelatin silver print, printed 1983. 18 x 14 in. (45.7 x 35.6 cm). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the reverse of the mount. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

170 LARRY FINK b. 1952 Studio 54, N.Y.C., 1977. Gelatin silver print, printed 1983. 13 3/4 x 14 1/8 in. (34.9 x 35.9 cm). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the reverse of the mount. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

169 LARRY FINK b. 1952 Club Cornich, N.Y.C., 1978. Gelatin silver print, printed 1983. 14 x 14 in. (35.6 x 35.6 cm). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the reverse of the mount. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 104


171

172

173

171 NIKKI S. LEE b. 1970 The Hip Hop Project (25), 2001. Fujiflex Crystal Archive print. 24 x 34 in. (61 x 86.4 cm). Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 2/3 on a gallery label affixed to the reverse of the mount. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

173 NAN GOLDIN b. 1953 Joey and Andres in bed, Hotel Anschisfer Hof, Berlin, 1992. Dye destruction print. 25 7/8 x 38 1/2 in. (65.7 x 97.8 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered AP1 in ink on the verso. One from an edition of 25 plus artist’s proofs. literature Korinsha Press, Nan Goldin: Couples and Loneliness, p. 65; Sussman, Nan Goldin: I’ll Be Your Mirror, pp. 340 - 341

172 NIKKI S. LEE b. 1970 The Exotic Dancers (20), 2000. Fujiflex Crystal Archive print, flush-mounted. 23 1/2 x 15 5/8 in. (59.7 x 39.7 cm). Printed title, date and number 4/5 on a gallery label affixed to the reverse of the frame. provenance Leslie Tonkonow Artworks +

Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

Projects, New York literature Cantz, Nikki S. Lee: Projects, p. 70

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 105


174

175

174 SEAN KENNEDY SANTOS b. 1963 Mist over Manhattan, New York City, 2005. Color coupler print. 36 1/4 x 94 3/4 in. (92.1 x 240.7 cm). Signed, titled, numbered AP 3/3 and annotated with artist’s birth year ‘1963’ in pencil on the verso. One from an edition of 3 plus 3 artist’s proofs. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

175 JEFF CHIEN-HSING LIAO b. 1977 LIRR, Hunters Point, 2004. Pigment ink print. 20 x 48 in. (50.8 x 121.9 cm). Signed in ink on a label affixed to the reverse of the mount. Number 10 from an edition of 12 plus 3 artist’s proofs. provenance Julie Saul Gallery, New York literature Nazraeli Press, Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao: Habitat 7, n.p.

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 106


176

177

176 MARCIA GROSTEIN b. 1949 Brooklyn Bridge, 2005. Color coupler print. 24 3/4 x 35 in. (62.9 x 88.9 cm). Signed, dated in ink, printed title, date and number APII on a Certificate of Authenticity accompanying the work. One from an edition of 5 plus artist’s proofs.

177 ABELARDO MORELL b. 1948 Camera obscura image of the Chrysler Building in hotel room, 1999. Gelatin silver print. 18 x 22 3/8 in. (45.7 x 56.8 cm). Signed, titled dated and numbered 5/30 in pencil on the verso. literature Bulfinch Press, Camera Obscura:

provenance Leon Tovar Gallery, New York exhibited Curious and Furious, Vernon Gallery,

Photographs by Abelardo Morell, p. 37

Prague, 2005; Where Fashion Meets Art, Issey Miyake and Remy Toledo Gallery, New York, 2005

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 107


178

179

180

181

178 EDWARD WESTON 1886-1958 New York, 1941. Gelatin silver print, printed circa 1952 by Brett Weston. 9 1/2 x 7 3/4 in. (24.1 x 19.7 cm). Titled, dated and annotated ‘Book 30, #34’ in an unidentified hand in pencil on the verso. provenance From Cole Weston;

180 RUTH ORKIN 1921-1985 Woman shaking pebble from her shoe, MOMA Garden, Gaston Lachaise sculpture, NYC, late 1940s. Gelatin silver print, printed 1982. 12 7/8 x 9 in. (32.7 x 22.9 cm). Signed, titled and dated in ink in the margin; signed, titled, dated and copyright in pencil on the verso. provenance Ruth Orkin Photo Archive, New York Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

to Lee D. Witkin, The Witkin Gallery, Inc., New York; to the present Private Collection, New York literature Conger, Edward Weston: Photographs from the Collection of the Center for Creative Photography, fig. 1666/1941; Mora, Edward Weston: Forms of Passion, p. 331

181 RUTH ORKIN 1921-1985 Cop in front of Saks, Easter Sunday, NYC, 1948. Gelatin silver print, flush-mounted. 13 3/8 x 10 1/2 in. (34 x 26.7 cm). provenance Ruth Orkin Photo

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 179 EDWARD WESTON 1886-1958 David McAlpin, New York, 1941. Gelatin silver print from 50th Anniversary Portfolio, printed 1952 by Brett Weston. 9 5/8 x 7 5/8 in. (24.4 x 19.4 cm). Initialed and dated in pencil on the mount. Estimate $ 1, 8 0 0 - 2 , 2 0 0

Archive, New York

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

108


182

ACTUAL SIZE

183

184

182 WALKER EVANS 1903-1975 Untitled (Architectural, New York), ca. 1929. Gelatin silver print. 2 1/2 x 1 1/2 in. (6.4 x 3.8 cm). Credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0

184 LOUIS STETTNER b. 1922 Elbowing Out of Town Newsstand, NYC, 1954. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 11 x 16 5/8 in. (27.9 x 42.2 cm). Blindstamp credit in the margin; signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist literature Flammarion, Louis Stettner: Wisdom Cries Out in the Streets, p. 57

183 TOM BARIL b. 1952 Chrysler Building, 1997. Gelatin silver print, printed 1998. 23 1/4 x 18 3/8 in. (59.1 x 46.7 cm). Signed and dated in pencil on the mount; signed, titled, dated ‘1998’, numbered 5/25 in ink and copyright credit stamp on the reverse of the mount. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

109


185

186

187

188

185 LOUIS FAURER 1916-2001 Looking Towards the RCA Building, N.Y.C., 1949. Gelatin silver print, printed 1990. 12 x 7 7/8 in. (30.5 x 20 cm). Signed, titled, dated, numbered 13/20 and copyright in pencil on the verso. literature Wilkes-Tucker, Louis Faurer, p. 121 Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

187 ANDREAS FEININGER 1907-1999 NY Midtown Manhattan Chrysler & Daily News Buildings, 1940. Gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1950. 10 x 7 3/4 in. (25.4 x 19.7 cm). Signed, dated in pencil and credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

186 KEITH CARTER b. 1948 Squirrel Tree, New York, 1998. Split-toned gelatin silver print. 14 5/8 x 14 5/8 in. (37.1 x 37.1 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 22/50 in pencil on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

188 ELLIOTT ERWITT b. 1928 New York City, 1955. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 12 x 8 in. (30.5 x 20.3 cm). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. literature Phaidon, Elliott Erwitt: Shapes, p. 328

Estimate $ 3 , 5 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 110


189

190

191

189 FREDERIC BRENNER b. 1959 Installation, Ellis Island, 1996. Gelatin silver print. 6 1/2 x 18 in. (16.5 x 45.7 cm). Signed in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

191 BILL JACOBSON b. 1955 Untitled #3830, 2000. Color coupler print. 19 1/2 x 22 1/2 in. (49.5 x 57.2 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 4/12 in ink on the reverse of the mount. Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

190 TED CRONER b. 1922 Taxi, New York, 1947. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 19 1/4 x 19 1/4 in. (48.9 x 48.9 cm). Signed in pencil on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 This image appeared on the cover of Bob Dylan’s 2006 album Modern Times. 111


192

193

194

195

192 RUTH ORKIN 1921-1985 Floating Over Sheep Meadow, Central Park, 1971. Color coupler print, printed later. 14 1/2 x 20 in. (36.8 x 50.8 cm). Signed, titled ‘Balloon over Sheep Meadow’, dated and copyright in ink on the verso; signed, titled, dated and copyright in pencil on the overmat. provenance Ruth Orkin Photo Archive, New York Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

194 GARRY WINOGRAND 1928-1984 Untitled from Women are Beautiful, 1965-1975. Gelatin silver print, printed 1981. 8 3/4 x 13 in. (22.2 x 33 cm). Signed and numbered in pencil on the verso. One from an edition of 80. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 195 LEON LEVINSTEIN 1913-1988 Central Park, 1974. Gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1980. 18 1/8 x 14 1/4 in. (46 x 36.2 cm). Credit stamp on the verso. literature Shamis, The

193 ELLIOTT ERWITT b. 1928 New York City, 1974. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 11 3/4 x 17 1/2 in. (29.8 x 44.5 cm). Signed in ink in the margin; signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. literature Phaidon, Elliott Erwitt: Shapes, p. 205 Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

Moment of Exposure: Leon Levinstein, cover and p. 97; Stourdzé, Leon Levinstein: Obsession, p. 147

Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 112


196

197

198

199

196 TED CRONER b. 1922 Central Park South, 1948. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 18 5/8 x 22 7/8 in. (47.3 x 58.1 cm). Signed in pencil on the verso. provenance Acquired

198 RUTH ORKIN 1921-1985 Mist Over the Sheep Meadow, NYC, 1971. Color coupler print, printed later. 12 3/4 x 19 1/4 in. (32.4 x 48.9 cm). Signed, titled, dated, annotated ‘from the book A World Through My Window’ and copyright in ink on the verso. provenance

directly from the artist literature Livingston, The New York School: Photographs, 1936-1963, cover

Ruth Orkin Photo Archive, New York

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

197 DIANE ARBUS 1923-1971 Elderly couple on a park bench, N.Y.C., 1969. Gelatin silver print, printed later by Neil Selkirk. 14 1/2 x 14 1/2 in. (36.8 x 36.8 cm). Stamped ‘A Diane Arbus photograph’, signed, titled, dated by Doon Arbus, Executor, in ink and reproduction limitation stamp on the verso. One from an edition of 75. provenance Zabriskie Gallery,

199 RUTH ORKIN 1921-1985 5:00 pm, Winter, Central Park South, ca. 1955. Color coupler print, printed later. 13 x 19 5/8 in. (33 x 49.8 cm). Signed, titled, dated and copyright in ink on the verso; signed, titled and copyright in pencil on the overmat. provenance Ruth

New York literature Aperture, Diane Arbus, n.p.; Arbus, Sussman, Phillips, Selkirk and

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

Orkin Photo Archive, New York

Rosenheim, Diane Arbus: Revelations, p. 258

Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 113


200

201

202

203

200 ELLIOTT ERWITT b. 1928 Metropolitan Museum, New York, 1949. Gelatin silver print, printed 1977. 9 1/2 x 6 3/8 in. (24.1 x 16.2 cm). Signed and numbered 90/100 in pencil on the verso. literature Phaidon, Elliott Erwitt: Shapes, p. ,500 Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

202 RALPH STEINER 1899-1986 Vanderbilt Garage, 1924. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 3 5/8 x 4 3/4 in. (9.2 x 12.1 cm). Signed in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0 203 DUANE MICHALS b. 1932 A woman dreaming in the city, 1968. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 4 3/4 x 7 in. (12.1 x 17.8 cm). Signed, titled and numbered 5/25 in ink in the margin. literature Livingstone, The Essential Duane Michals, p. 61 Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

201 LOUIS FAURER 1916-2001 New York City (Sutton Place), 1949. Gelatin silver print, printed 1990. 7 7/8 x 11 3/8 in. (20 x 28.9 cm). Signed, titled, dated, numbered 10/20 and copyright in pencil on the verso. literature Wilkes-Tucker, Louis Faurer, p. 124 Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 114


204

204 LOUIS FAURER 1916-2001 Garage, Park Avenue, New York City, 1950. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 11 5/8 x 17 in. (29.5 x 43.2 cm). Initialed in pencil on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist literature WilkesTucker, Louis Faurer, p. 133

Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 115


205

206

207

208

209

205 TOM BARIL b. 1952 Smokestacks, LIC, 1994. Gelatin silver print, printed 1995. 23 3/8 x 18 in. (59.4 x 45.7 cm). Signed in pencil on the mount; signed, titled, dated, inscribed in ink and copyright credit stamp on the reverse of the mount. One from an edition of 15 plus artist’s proofs. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

207 GEORGE TICE b. 1938 Hudson RIver Pier, New Jersey, 1979. Gelatin silver print, printed 1999. 10 3/8 x 13 1/8 in. (26.4 x 33.3 cm). Signed in pencil on the mount. provenance Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0 208 MARCUS LEATHERDALE b. 1952 Betsey Johnson- Stretch, 1986. Gelatin silver print. 11 5/8 x 13 in. (29.5 x 33 cm). Signed, titled, dated, numbered 4/10 in pencil and copyright credit stamp on the verso. literature Leatherdale, Hidden Identities: Marcus Leatherdale, p. 50 Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

206 MARCUS LEATHERDALE b. 1952 Sleeping Guard/ Mr. New York, 1986. Gelatin silver print. 13 x 11 in. (33 x 27.9 cm). Signed, titled, dated, numbered AP2 in pencil and copyright credit stamp on the verso. One from an edition of 10 plus 3 artist’s proofs. literature Leatherdale, Marcus Leatherdale 1980-1994, p. 122

209 MARCUS LEATHERDALE b. 1952 Keith Haring Santa, 1987. Gelatin silver print. 11 1/4 x 11 1/4 in. (28.6 x 28.6 cm). Signed, titled, dated, numbered 2/10 in pencil and copyright credit stamp on the verso. literature Leatherdale, Hidden Identities: Marcus Leatherdale, p. 30 Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

116


210

211

210 VIK MUNIZ b. 1961 Rochas from Pictures of Wire, 2005. Gelatin silver print. 21 7/8 x 17 1/2 in. (55.6 x 44.5 cm). Signed, dated in ink, printed title and number on a gallery label affixed to the reverse of the frame. One from an edition of 3. Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0

211 TIMOTHY WHITE b. 1956 Uma Thurman, 2006. Black and white giclÊe print on archival watercolor paper. 50 x 40 in. (127 x 101.6 cm). Signed in pencil and blindstamp credit in the margin; signed in pencil on the verso. Number AP1 from an edition of 11 plus 3 artist’s proofs. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 117


photographs Lots 89 - 124

Lot 89 ALFRED EISENSTAEDT Est $10,000-15,000

Lot 90 TOM BARIL Est $ 4,000-6,000

Lot 91 RUDY BURCKHARDT Est $ 4,000-6,000

Lot 92 BERENICE ABBOTT Est $3,000-5,000

Lot 93 GILLES LARRAIN Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 94 LUIS MALLO Est $3,500-4,500

Lot 95 PAUL HIMMEL Est $7,000-9,000

Lot 96 DIANE ARBUS Est $ 4,000-6,000

Lot 97 MORRIS ENGEL Est $1,200-1,800

Lot 98 BERENICE ABBOTT Est $3,000-5,000

Lot 99 ILSE BING Est $3,000-5,000

Lot 100 DRAHOMIR RUZICKA Est $1,500-2,500

Lot 101 NAT FEIN Est $3,000-3,500

Lot 102 VERENA GUTHER Est $3,000-4,000

Lot 103 ANDREAS FEININGER Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 104 BERENICE ABBOTT Est $8,000-12,000

Lot 105 ERNST HAAS Est $6,000-8,000

Lot 106 WOUTER DERUYTTER Est $10,000-15,000

Lot 107 ALFRED STIEGLITZ Est $1,500-2,500

Lot 108 BERENICE ABBOTT Est $ 4,000-6,000

Lot 109 BERENICE ABBOTT Est $ 4,000-6,000

Lot 110 MORRIS ENGEL Est $1,200-1,800

Lot 111 BERENICE ABBOTT Est $8,000-12,000

Lot 112 ROE ETHRIDGE Est $ 4,000-6,000

Lot 113 ARTHUR LEIPZIG Est $1,500-2,500

Lot 114 JESSIE TARBOX BEALS Est $2,500-3,500

Lot 115 ANDRÉ KERTÉSZ Est $ 4,000-6,000

Lot 116 WALKER EVANS Est $8,000-12,000

Lot 117 ELLIOTT ERWITT Est $3,000-4,000

Lot 118 DON HUNSTEIN Est $2,000-2,500

Lot 119 WALKER EVANS Est $2,500-3,500

Lot 120 ANDREAS FEININGER Est $3,000-5,000

Lot 121 WALKER EVANS Est $1,500-2,000

Lot 122 DANNY LYON Est $1,800-2,200

Lot 123 LOUIS STETTNER Est $2,500-3,500

Lot 124 LOUIS FAURER Est $2,000-3,000

118


photographs Lots 125 - 160

Lot 125 PETER BEARD Est $20,000-30,000

Lot 126 DENNIS STOCK Est $1,500-2,500

Lot 127 ANDREAS FEININGER Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 128 FRANK PAULIN Est $1,500-2,000

Lot 129 LOUIS FAURER Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 130 LARRY CLARK Est $1,500-2,500

Lot 131 LARRY CLARK Est $1,000-1,500

Lot 132 LARRY CLARK Est $1,000-1,500

Lot 133 THOMAS KELLNER Est $8,000-12,000

Lot 134 HIROSHI SUGIMOTO Est $ 40,000-60,000

Lot 135 HIROSHI SUGIMOTO Est $35,000-45,000

Lot 136 JOSEF BREITENBACH Est $3,000-5,000

Lot 137 JOSEF BREITENBACH Est $3,000-5,000

Lot 138 INGE MORATH Est $3,000-5,000

Lot 139 LOUIS FAURER Est $1,500-2,500

Lot 140 BERENICE ABBOTT Est $25,000-35,000

Lot 141 HARRY CALLAHAN Est $7,000-9,000

Lot 142 GARRY WINOGRAND Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 143 GARRY WINOGRAND Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 14 4 GARRY WINOGRAND Est $6,000-8,000

Lot 145 WILLIAM KLEIN Est $3,000-5,000

Lot 146 WILLIAM KLEIN Est $3,000-5,000

Lot 147 WILLIAM KLEIN Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 148 EDWARD STEICHEN Est $50,000-70,000

Lot 149 LEON LEVINSTEIN Est $5,000-7,000

Lot 150 LEON LEVINSTEIN Est $2,500-3,500

Lot 151 LEON LEVINSTEIN Est $1,500-2,500

Lot 152 LEON LEVINSTEIN Est $2,500-3,500

Lot 153 DUANE MICHALS Est $1,000-1,500

Lot 154 NICHOLAS NIXON Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 155 BEAUMONT NEWHALL Est $1,500-2,500

Lot 156 SCOTT PETERMAN Est $5,000-7,000

Lot 157 HARRY CALLAHAN Est $3,000-5,000

Lot 158 ANATOLY PRONIN Est $800-1,000

Lot 159 ANATOLY PRONIN Est $800-1,000

Lot 160 ANATOLY PRONIN Est $500-700

119


photographs Lots 161 - 196

Lot 161 ALLEN GINSBERG Est $1,500-2,500

Lot 162 BURT GLINN Est $ 4,000-6,000

Lot 163 DUANE MICHALS Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 164 VIK MUNIZ Est $10,000-15,000

Lot 165 VIK MUNIZ Est $6,000-8,000

Lot 166 VIK MUNIZ Est $7,000-9,000

Lot 167 JACK PIERSON Est $ 4,000-6,000

Lot 168 LARRY FINK Est $1,500-2,500

Lot 169 LARRY FINK Est $1,500-2,500

Lot 170 LARRY FINK Est $1,500-2,500

Lot 171 NIKKI S. LEE Est $ 4,000-6,000

Lot 172 NIKKI S. LEE Est $3,000-5,000

Lot 173 NAN GOLDIN Est $ 4,000-6,000

Lot 174 SEAN KENNEDY SANTOS Lot 175 JEFF CHIENEst $5,000-7,000 HSING LIAO Est $5,000-7,000

Lot 176 MARCIA GROSTEIN Est $ 4,000-6,000

Lot 177 ABELARDO MORELL Est $5,000-7,000

Lot 178 EDWARD WESTON Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 179 EDWARD WESTON Est $1,800-2,200

Lot 180 RUTH ORKIN Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 181 RUTH ORKIN Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 182 WALKER EVANS Est $3,000-4,000

Lot 183 TOM BARIL Est $1,500-2,500

Lot 184 LOUIS STETTNER Est $2,500-3,500

Lot 185 LOUIS FAURER Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 186 KEITH CARTER Est $1,000-2,000

Lot 187 ANDREAS FEININGER Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 188 ELLIOTT ERWITT Est $3,500-4,000

Lot 189 FREDERIC BRENNER Est $1,500-2,000

Lot 190 TED CRONER Est $5,000-7,000

Lot 191 BILL JACOBSON Est $2,500-3,500

Lot 192 RUTH ORKIN Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 193 ELLIOTT ERWITT Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 194 GARRY WINOGRAND Est $1,500-2,500

Lot 195 LEON LEVINSTEIN Est $ 4,000-6,000

Lot 196 TED CRONER Est $3,000-5,000

120


photographs Lots 197 - 211

Lot 197 DIANE ARBUS Est $6,000-8,000

Lot 198 RUTH ORKIN Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 199 RUTH ORKIN Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 200 ELLIOTT ERWITT Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 201 LOUIS FAURER Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 202 RALPH STEINER Est $1,000-1,500

Lot 203 DUANE MICHALS Est $1,500-2,500

Lot 204 LOUIS FAURER Est $8,000-12,000

Lot 205 TOM BARIL Est $2,000-3,000

Lot 206 MARCUS LEATHERDALE Est $1,500-2,000

Lot 207 GEORGE TICE Est $2,500-3,500

Lot 208 MARCUS LEATHERDALE Est $1,000-1,500

Lot 209 MARCUS LEATHERDALE Est $1,000-1,500

Lot 210 VIK MUNIZ Est $8,000-12,000

Lot 211 TIMOTHY WHITE Est $ 4,000-6,000

121


new york new york 3.30 pm 12 december 2009 new york

design Lots 212 - 248

Aranda, B. 216 Aranda\Lasch 216

Lasch, C. 216 Lescaze, W. 227 Loewy, R. 224

Bouy, J. 218 Mamiye, I. 242 McArthur, W. 215, 225, 228 Mont, J. 230, 231

Chorpash, R. 236 Chroma 242 Colombo, E. 241

Noguchi, I. 213 Evans, P. 235, 239, 240 Pesce, G. 246, 248 Frankl, P. T. 220, 221 Rashid, K. 244, 245 Risley, J. 232

Guild, L. 212 Hariri & Hariri Architecture 238, 247 Hariri, G. 238, 247 Hariri, M. 238, 247

Schoen, E. 217, 219, 233 Seandel, S. 229 Sottsass Jr., E. 243

Ike Kligerman Barkley 242

Versen, K. 223 Von Nessen, W. 222

Kagan, V. 226, 237

Wright, R. 214

122


212

212 LURELLE GUILD 1898-1986 Rare cocktail shaker, model no. 5840, ca. 1934. Silver-plated metal. 15 3/4 in. (40 cm) high. Manufactured by International Silver Company, USA. Underside impressed with artist’s facsimile signature and “INTERNATIONAL GIFTWARE/5840.” literature Alastair Duncan, Modernism: Modernist Design 1880-1940, Minneapolis, 1988, p. 231; Stephen Visakay, Vintage Barware, Paducah, 1997, p. 43; Simon Khachadourian, The Cocktail Shaker, London, 2000, p. 52; J. Stewart Johnson, American Modern 1925-1940: Design for a New Age, New York, 2000, p. 62 for a similar example

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 123


213

214

215

213 ISAMU NOGUCHI 1904-1988 “Radio Nurse,” ca. 1937. Bakelite. 8 x 6 1/2 x 6 1/4 in. (20.3 x 16.5 x 15.9 cm). Manufactured by Zenith Radio Corporation, USA. Back molded with “Zenith/Radio Nurse/DESIGN BY NOGUCHI.” literature Paola Antonelli, et al.,

214 RUSSEL WRIGHT 1904-1976 Rare double tube vase, ca. 1930. Chrome-plated steel. 8 3/4 in. (22.2 cm) high. Produced by Russel Wright Inc., USA. Underside impressed twice with “RUSSEL WRIGHT.” Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

Sitting on the Edge: Modernist Design from the Collection of Michael and Gabrielle Boyd, exh. cat., San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 1998, pl. 50; Paola Antonelli, Design, Die Sammlung Des Museum

215 WARREN MCARTHUR 1885-1961 Library table, model no. 1651, ca. 1935. Tubular aluminum, painted wood. 32 1/2 x 56 5/8 x 27 3/4 in. (82.6 x 143.8 x 70.5 cm). Manufactured by Warren McArthur Corporation, USA. Underside of table with decal “WARREN MCARTHUR CORPORATION/MANUFACTURERS ROME N.Y./ANODIC ALUMINUM PATS APPLIED FOR.” literature Warren McArthur Corporation, Alexandria, 1990s, p. 63 Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0

of Modern Art, Munich, 2003, p. 250; Alexander von Vegesack, et al., eds., Isamu Noguchi, Sculptural Design, exh. cat., Vitra Design Museum, Weil am Rhein, 2001, p. 110

Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0

124


216

216 ARANDA\LASCH – BENJAMIN ARANDA AND CHRIS LASCH b. 1973, b. 1972 “Camouflage” screen, 2006. Mirror-polished and brushed steel. 72 x 76 3/4 x 20 in. (182.9 x 194.9 x 50.8 cm). Produced by Aranda\Lasch, USA. From the edition of eight. literature Julie Eakin, “Unnatural Phenomena,” Architecture, October 2006, front cover for a similar example; Benjamin Aranda and Chris Lasch, Tooling, New York, 2006, pp. 46-51

Estimate $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 - 3 0 , 0 0 0 125


217

218

219

217 EUGENE SCHOEN 1880-1957 Custom boudoir chair, ca. 1937. Lacquered wood, fabric. 38 in. (96.5 cm) high. Produced by Schmieg, Hungate and Kotzian, USA. Underside impressed with “E.S.,” “S.K.” and “6365.” provenance Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz,

218 JULES BOUY 1872-1937 Table lamp, ca. 1927. Wrought iron, glass, enameled glass, mica shade. 18 1/2 in. (47 cm) high, including shade. Base impressed with “JB/TRADEMARK.” provenance Fifty/50, New York literature Karen Davies, At Home in Manhattan, Modern Decorative

Washington, D.C. literature “A Washington Home in the Contemporary Manner,” Interior

Arts, 1925 to the Depression, New Haven, 1983, pp. 74-75 for further information on Jules Bouy and an

Decorator, November 1938, p. 35

example of his furniture designs

Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0

This chair was designed for the bedroom of Gwendolyn Cafritz. Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz’s 35-room Washington, D.C. mansion was Schoen’s largest residential commission.

219 EUGENE SCHOEN 1880-1957 Daybed, ca. 1930. Mahogany, macassar ebony-veneered wood, fabric. 33 1/4 x 90 x 27 1/2 in. (84.5 x 228.6 x 69.9 cm). Produced by Schmieg, Hungate and Kotzian, USA. provenance The estate of Mr. and Mrs. Gould, New York City literature House Beautiful, 1931, for a similar form

Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 126


220

222

221

220 PAUL T. FRANKL 1887-1958 “Big Foot” coffee table, ca. 1948. Lacquered cork, painted wood, stained wood. 14 1/4 x 72 x 35 1/2 in. (36.2 x 182.9 x 90.2 cm). Manufactured by Johnson Furniture Company, USA. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

222 WALTER VON NESSEN 1889-1943 Table lamp, ca. 1938. Painted aluminum, chromeplated tubular metal. 17 in. (43.2 cm) high, including shade. Underside with metal label printed with “Northeast Missouri State University 019287.” Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

221 PAUL T. FRANKL 1887-1958 Pair of “Skyscraper” end tables, ca. 1927. Lacquered wood, mahogany-veneered wood. Manufactured by Frankl Galleries, USA (2). Each: 26 x 32 x 10 in. (66 x 81.3 x 25.4 cm). literature Paul T. Frankl, New Dimensions, New York, 1928, p. 47 for a similar desk; Alastair Duncan, American Art Deco, New York, 1986, pp. 36 and 42 for similar examples from the Skyscraper series; J. Stewart Johnson, American Modern 1925-1940: Design for a New Age, New York, 2000, pp. 28 and 52-53 for similar examples from the Skyscraper series

Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 127


223

224

225

223 KURT VERSEN 1901-1997 Table lamp, model no. M1006, ca. 1935. Brushed chromeplated tubular metal, brass-plated copper, parchment shades. 23 3/4 in. (60.3 cm) high, including shades. Manufactured by Lightolier, USA. literature Herman Miller Furniture

225 WARREN MCARTHUR 1885-1961 Sideboard, ca. 1935. Tubular aluminum, oak, rubber. 40 x 60 x 24 in. (101.6 x 152.4 x 61 cm). Manufactured by Warren McArthur Corporation, USA. Underside with decal “WARREN MCARTHUR CORPORATION/ONE PARK AVE NEW YORK CITY.” Estimate $ 1 2 , 0 0 0 -1 8 , 0 0 0

Company sales catalog, 1935-1936, n.p.; Herman MIller Furniture Company sales catalog, 1939, n.p.

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 224 RAYMOND LOEWY 1893-1986 “Discovery” flatware service for 12, ca. 1957. Spoons and forks: sterling silver; knives: sterling silver, stainless steel. Dinner knife: 9 1/2 in. (24.1 cm) long. Manufactured by Wallace Silversmiths, USA. Each spoon and fork impressed with “WALLACE STERLING,” each knife impressed with “WALLACE STAINLESS” and master butter impressed with “STERLING.” Comprising 12 dinner forks, 12 table spoons, 12 dinner knives, 12 salad forks, 12 teaspoons, 12 butter knives, two serving spoons, one ladle, one olive fork and one master butter (77). Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 128


226

227

228

226 VLADIMIR KAGAN b. 1927 “Tri-Symetric” coffee table, ca. 1955. Walnut, glass. 16 1/4 x 68 1/2 x 30 in. (41.3 x 174 x 76.2 cm). Manufactured by Kagan-Dreyfuss, USA. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

228 WARREN MCARTHUR 1885-1961 Dining table and set of seven chairs, ca. 1935. Table: tubular aluminum, oak, rubber; each chair: tubular aluminum, vinyl, rubber. Table: 28 1/4 x 60 x 36 in. (71.8 x 152.4 x 91.4 cm); each chair: 34 3/4 in. (88.3 cm) high. Manufactured by Warren McArthur Corporation, USA. Underside of table with decal “WARREN MCARTHUR CORPORATION/MANUFACTURERS ROME N.Y./ANODIC ALUMINUM PATS APPLIED FOR” (8). literature Warren McArthur Corporation,

227 WILLIAM LESCAZE 1896-1969 Counter-balance table lamp, ca. 1934. Chrome-plated metal, fabric shade. 15 1/4 in. (38.7 cm) high, excluding shade. Literature Alastair Duncan, Modernism: Modernist Design 1880-1940, Minneapolis, 1988, p. 222

Alexandria, 1990s, p. 56 for the side chair and p. 57 for the armchair

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0

129


229

231

230

229 SILAS SEANDEL b. 1937 Coffee table, 1975. Brass, steel, glass. 16 x 60 x 24 in. (40.6 x 152.4 x 61 cm). Self-produced, USA. Base incised with “75/Silas Seandel.” Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

231 JAMES MONT 1904-1978 Table lamp, ca. 1963. Carved silvered wood, silver-leaf covered wood, silk shade. 42 1/2 in. (108 cm) high, including shade. literature Todd

230 JAMES MONT 1904-1978 Console, ca. 1950. Patinated, silver-leaf covered painted wood, painted wood, gold-leaf covered wood. 28 x 77 x 19 in. (71.1 x 195.6 x 48.3 cm). Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

Merrill and Julie V. Iovine, Modern Americana: Studio Furniture from High Craft to High Glam, New York, 2008, p. 171 for a similar example

130


232

233

234

232 JOHN RISLEY b. 1919 Lounge chair, ca. 1952. Painted wrought iron, cane, wood. 36 1/2 in. (92.7 cm.) high. literature Roberto Aloi, L’Arredamento Moderno, Modern

234 UNKNOWN DESIGNER Coffee table, ca. 1963. Walnut, glass. 16 3/4 x 45 x 45 in. (42.5 x 114.3 x 114.3 cm). provenance Estate of Dr. Alfred L. Jones, New York City Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

Furnishing, Milan, 1964, p. 195

Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 233 EUGENE SCHOEN 1880-1957 Side table, ca. 1929. Rosewood-veneered wood, nickelplated brass. 22 3/4 x 25 1/4 x 13 1/4 in. (57.8 x 64.1 x 33.7 cm). Produced by Schmieg, Hungate and Kotzian, USA. provenance The estate of Mr. and Mrs. Gould, New York City literature J. Stewart Johnson, American Modern 1925-1940: Design for a New Age, New York, 2000, p. 55 for a similar example

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 131


235

235 PAUL EVANS 1931-1987 “Argente” sideboard, 1968. Welded, painted, sculpted and polished aluminum, slate, painted wood, welded and patinated steel. 32 1/4 x 84 1/4 x 21 in. (81.9 x 214 x 53.3 cm). Produced by Paul Evans Studio, USA. Front behind door welded with “Paul Evans 68.” provenance Estate of Sanford Glanzrock, New York City literature David Rago and John Sollo, Collecting Modern, a Guide to Midcentury Studio Furniture and Ceramics, Salt Lake City, 2001, pp. 98 and 100 for similar examples; Todd Merrill and Julie V. Iovine, Modern Americana: Studio Furniture from High Craft to High Glam, New York, 2008, p. 96 for other examples from the Argente series

Estimate $ 3 0 , 0 0 0 - 5 0 , 0 0 0

Detail of interior showing drawer fronts and welded artist’s signature

132


236

237

236 RAMA CHORPASH “Topo” rug, 2004. Hand-dyed New Zealand wool. 96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm). Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

237 VLADIMIR KAGAN b. 1927 Daybed, model no. 6718, ca. 1970. Plexiglass, stained wood, fabric. 23 1/8 x 80 3/4 x 39 1/2 in. (58.7 x 205.1 x 100.3 cm). Manufactured by Vladimir Kagan, Inc., USA. Underside with paper label “VLADIMIR KAGAN DESIGNS INC.” literature

This rug is a topographical representation of the Great Mall in Central Park.

Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0

Vladimir Kagan, The Complete Kagan: A Lifetime of Avant-Garde Design, New York, 2004, p. 185

133


238

239 239 PAUL EVANS 1931-1987 “Cityscape” coffee table, ca. 1975. Chrome-plated metalveneered wood, lacquered wood, glass. 15 7/8 x 42 x 42 in. (40.3 x 106.7 x 106.7 cm). Manufactured by Directional, USA. literature Todd Merrill and Julie V. Iovine, Modern

238 HARIRI & HARIRI ARCHITECTURE – GISUE HARIRI AND MOJGAN HARIRI b. 1956, b. 1958 Unique “Cloud Light Tower #1,” 1991. Hand-formed wire mesh cloth, fabric, blackened steel. 82 1/2 in. (209.6 cm) high. Produced by H 3, Inc. One of five unique works from the Cloud series. Underside with paper label printed with “HARIRI & HARIRI/ARCHITECTURE/Cloud Tower, 1991/Wire mesh cloth, blackened steel base” and signed in marker with artist’s signatures. Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0

Americana: Studio Furniture from High Craft to High Glam, New York, 2008, pp. 108-109 for other examples from the Cityscape series

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

134


240

241

240 PAUL EVANS 1931-1987 “Skyscraper” coffee table, 1972. Painted and welded steel, glass. 15 3/4 x 44 x 21 3/4 in. (40 x 111.8 x 55.2 cm). Produced by Paul Evans Studio for Directional, USA. Side of base welded with “Paul Evans 72.” Estimate $ 1 6 , 0 0 0 -1 8 , 0 0 0

241 ELENA COLOMBO b. 1962 “Firebowl,” 2009. Patinated lathe-spun 7-gauge Corten ‘Weathering’ steel. 53 3/4 in. (136.5 cm) diameter, 8 3/4 in. (22.2 cm) high. Produced by Colombo Construction Corp., USA. literature “Bonfire Night Revisited,” Architectural Record, May 2004, p. 221 for a similar example; “Fireplaces Step Out for Air,” The New York Times, February 26, 2009 p. D1-2 for a similar example

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 Less than ten examples of the present size and design have been produced. 135


242

242 CHROMA – IRENE MAMIYE AND IKE KLIGERMAN BARKLEY “Chroma D” console, 2009. Dura Clear archival C print, glass. 36 x 80 x 18 in. (91.4 x 203.2 x 45.7 cm). Manufactured by Ike Kligerman Barkely, USA. Number three from the edition of eight. From the Chroma series. Estimate $ 1 2 , 0 0 0 -1 8 , 0 0 0 136


243

244

245

243 ETTORE SOTTSASS JR. 1917-2007 “Park” table, ca. 1983. Marble, glass, painted wood. 15 1/2 x 40 x 40 in. (39.4 x 101.6 x 101.6 cm). Produced for Memphis, Italy.

245 KARIM RASHID b. 1960 “Soft” floor lamp, ca. 2000. Chrome-plated tubular metal, hand-blown clear glass and frosted glass, painted iron. 70 in. (177.8 cm) high. Manufactured by George Kovacs, USA. From the Soft Collection. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

literature Charlotte and Peter Fiell, eds., Domus Vol. IX 1980-1984, Cologne, 2006, p. 452

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 244 KARIM RASHID b. 1960 Unique dining table, ca. 1997. Colored mirrored glass, powder-coated tubular aluminum, brushed steel. 30 x 72 x 48 in. (76.2 x 182.9 x 121.9 cm). Produced by Zeritalia, Italy. Together with six “Oh” chairs. provenance Acquired directly from the artist literature Lucie Young, “Plugging the Present,” Metropolitan Home, March 2001, illustrated p. 164

Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 137


246

247

248

246 GAETANO PESCE b. 1939 Set of ten “543 Broadway” chairs, ca. 1993. Tubular stainless steel, epoxy resin, plastic. Each: 29 in. (73.7 cm) high. Manufactured by Bernini, Italy. Underside of each reverse-molded with “DES. GAETANO PESCE BERNINI ITALY” From the edition of 30 in this color combination. Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 247 HARIRI & HARIRI ARCHITECTURE – GISUE HARIRI AND MOJGAN HARIRI b. 1956, b. 1958 Unique protoype “Ryoanji” side table, 1991. Carbon steel bar grate, blackened steel. 26 x 19 1/8 x 19 1/4 in. (66 x 48.6 x 48.9 cm). Produced by H 3, Inc., USA. Prototype for the subsequent edition produced in aluminum of which only five were produced. Underside with paper label printed with “HARIRI & HARIRI/ARCHITECTURE/Ryoanji Side Table, 1991/Carbon Steel bar grate, blackened steel base” and signed in marker with artist’s signatures. Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

248 GAETANO PESCE b. 1939 Door, from the TBWA/Chiat/Day advertising agency, New York City, 1994. Resin, steel, aluminum. 85 1/2 x 34 x 7 in. (217.2 x 86.4 x 17.8 cm). provenance TBWA/Chiat/Day advertising agency, New York City literature Marisa Bartolucci, Gaetano Pesce, San Francisco, 2003, pp. 84-87 for a discussion of this project

Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

138


Design Lots 212 - 248

lot 212 LURELLE GUILD Est $3,000-5,000

lot 213 ISAMU NOGUCHI Est $6,000-8,000

lot 214 RUSSEL WRIGHT Est $1,500-2,500

lot 215 WARREN MCARTHUR Est $6,000-8,000

lot 216 ARANDA\LASCH Est $20,000-30,000

lot 217 EUGENE SCHOEN Est $2,500-3,500

lot 218 JULES BOUY Est $7,000-9,000

lot 219 EUGENE SCHOEN Est $8,000-12,000

lot 220 PAUL T. FRANKL Est $3,000-5,000

lot 221 PAUL T. FRANKL Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 222 WALTER VON NESSEN Est $1,500-2,000

lot 223 KURT VERSEN Est $2,000-3,000

lot 224 RAYMOND LOEWY Est $5,000-7,000

lot 225 WARREN MCARTHUR Est $12,000-18,000

lot 226 VLADIMIR KAGAN Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 227 WILLIAM LESCAZE Est $2,000-3,000

lot 228 WARREN MCARTHUR Est $10,000-15,000

lot 229 SILAS SEANDEL Est $5,000-7,000

lot 230 JAMES MONT Est $5,000-7,000

lot 231 JAMES MONT Est $1,500-2,000

lot 232 JOHN RISLEY Est $1,500-2,000

lot 233 EUGENE SCHOEN Est $5,000-7,000

lot 234 UNKNOWN DESIGNER Est $2,000-3,000

lot 235 PAUL EVANS Est $30,000-50,000

lot 236 RAMA CHORPASH Est $2,000-3,000

lot 237 VLADIMIR KAGAN Est $8,000-12,000

lot 238 HARIRI & HARIRI ARCHITECTURE Est $6,000-8,000

lot 239 PAUL EVANS Est $5,000-7,000

lot 240 PAUL EVANS Est $16,000-18,000

lot 241 ELENA COLOMBO Est $2,000-3,000

lot 242 CHROMA Est $12,000-18,000

lot 243 ETTORE SOTTSASS JR. Est $5,000-7,000

lot 24 4 KARIM RASHID Est $6,000-8,000

lot 245 KARIM RASHID Est $1,500-2,000

lot 246 GAETANO PESCE Est $8,000-12,000

lot 247 HARIRI & HARIRI ARCHITECTURE Est $5,000-7,000

lot 248 GAETANO PESCE Est $ 4,000-6,000

139


new york new york 4 pm 12 december 2009 new york

jewels Lots 249 - 285

On view 4 - 8 December 2009 The Mark Hotel 992 Madison Avenue at 77th Street New York 8 -12 December 2009 Phillips de Pury & Company 450 West 15 Street New York

Angela Cummings 280 David Webb 278, 279, 281 Oscar Heyman 284 Raymond Yard 285 Seaman Schepps 262, 263, 264, 265, 266 Tiffany & Co. 268, 272, 282, 283 Tiffany & Co., Schlumberger 250, 251, 252, 253, 261, 269, 271, 272 Trianon 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259, 267, 270, 273 Tito Pedrini 260, 276, 277 Taffin 274, 275

140


249

249 A Diamond ‘Chrysler Building’ Pendant Necklace Designed as a pavĂŠ-set diamond Chrysler building, extending a baguette and circular-cut diamond tassel, to the circular-cut diamond bail, from a fine link chain, mounted in 18K white gold, pendant length 4 1/2 inches, chain length 20 inches. Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 141


250

251

252

253

254

255

250 A Pair of Red Enamel and Gold Earclips TIFFANY & CO., SCHLUMBERGER Each designed as a red enamel and gold sand dollar, mounted in 18K yellow gold, 5/8 inch diameter. Signed ‘Tiffany & Co., Schlumberger’. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 0 0 0

252 A Pair of Green Enamel and Gold Earclips TIFFANY & CO., SCHLUMBERGER Each designed as a green enamel and gold sand dollar, mounted in 18K yellow gold, 3/4 inch diameter. Signed ‘Tiffany & Co., Schlumberger’. Estimate $ 1, 4 0 0 -1, 6 0 0

Jean Schlumberger began designing for Tiffany & Co. in 1956. His own workshop was stationed at the company until his retirement in the late 1970s. Schlumberger’s designs are featured exclusively at Tiffany & Co. His pieces are notable for their whimsical interpretations of natural forms. Schlumberger was particularly inspired by the sea.

253 A Pair of Gold Earclips TIFFANY & CO., SCHLUMBERGER Each designed as an 18K gold sand dollar, 3/4 inch diameter. Signed ‘Tiffany & Co., Schlumberger’. Estimate $ 1, 4 0 0 -1, 6 0 0 254 A Pair of Lapis Lazuli and Onyx Cufflinks TRIANON Each designed as a fluted lapis lazuli or onyx sphere, set alternately with a cabochon lapis lazuli or onyx, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 1 inch. Signed ‘Trianon’. Estimate $ 5 0 0 - 8 0 0

251 A Pair of Blue Enamel and Gold Earclips TIFFANY & CO., SCHLUMBERGER Each designed as a blue enamel and gold sand dollar, mounted in 18K yellow gold, 5/8 inch diameter. Signed ‘Tiffany & Co., Schlumberger’. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 0 0 0

255 A Pair of Hematite and Pearl Cufflinks TRIANON Each double link designed as a cushion shaped hematite plaque, accented by a cultured pearl, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 1/2 inch. Signed ‘Trianon’. Estimate $ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0 142


256

257

258

259

260

261

259 A Pair of Shell and Hematite Cufflinks TRIANON Each set with a beige seashell, accented by a cabochon hematite, to the hematite bar link, mounted in 18K white gold, length 3/4 inch. Signed ‘Trianon’. Estimate $ 6 0 0 - 9 0 0

256 A Pair of Walnut Wood, Citrine and Gold Earclips TRIANON Each designed as a square walnut wood bombé plaque, centering upon a cushion-cut citrine, accented by collet-set citrine and polished gold pyramid-shaped studs, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 1 inch. Signed ‘Trianon’, no. 24488. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

260 A Multi-Gem and Gold ‘Eva’ Ring TITO PEDRINI Designed as a cluster of colletset, multi-colored gemstones, to the tapered polished gold band, mounted in 18K yellow gold, size 6 3/4. Signed ‘TP’ for Tito Pedrini. Estimate $ 3 , 5 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

257 A Mammoth Tusk and Diamond bracelet TRIANON The mammoth tusk cuff centering upon a geometric openwork pavé-set diamond plaque, mounted in 18K white gold, 2 1/4 inches diameter. Signed ‘Trianon’. Estimate $ 4 , 5 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

261 An Enamel and Gold Bangle TIFFANY & CO., SCHLUMBERGER Designed as a purple pailloné enamel hinged bangle, decorated with sculpted gold bands and pyramidshaped gold detail, mounted in 18K yellow gold, 2 1/4 inches diameter. Signed ‘Tiffany & Co., Schlumberger’. Estimate $ 14 , 0 0 0 -1 8 , 0 0 0

258 A Pair of Walnut Wood, Agate and Citrine Cufflinks TRIANON Each double link designed as a cushion shaped walnut wood or white agate plaque, accented by a circular-cut citrine, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 1 inch. Signed ‘Trianon’. Estimate $ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0

143


262

263

264

265

266

267

262 A Pair of ‘Turbo Shell’ and Coral EarClips SEAMAN SCHEPPS Each set with a white turbo shell, terminating in two cabochon coral, accented by gold wire, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 1 inch. Signed ‘Seaman Schepps’ no. 3511. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

265 A Pair of Amber and Gold ‘Cage’ Earclips SEAMAN SCHEPPS Each set with a cushion shaped amber plaque, acceted by gold ropework, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 1 inch. Signed ‘Seaman Schepps’, with maker’s mark. Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

Seaman Schepps uses intriguing combinations of textures and materials, such as seashells, and coral to create beautiful, unique pieces.

266 A Turquoise and Gold ‘Button’ Bracelet SEAMAN SCHEPPS Designed as an articulated collet-set turquoise chain, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 8 inches. With maker’s mark for Seaman Schepps, no. P20454. Estimate $ 7, 5 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0

263 A Turbo Shell and Coral Brooch SEAMAN SCHEPPS Set with a white turbo shell, set to the top with two carved coral koi fish, accented by textured gold seaweed, mounted in gold, length 2 1/2 inches. Signed ‘Seaman Schepps’. Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 0 , 0 0 0

267 A Pair of Turquoise and lapis Lazuli Cufflinks TRIANON Each double link set with a carved turquoise sphere, set with a cabochon lapis lazuli, mounted in 18K white gold, length 1 1/4 inches. With maker’s mark for Trianon. Estimate $ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0

264 A Pair of Rock Crystal, Mother-of-Pearl and Gold Earclips SEAMAN SCHEPPS Each designed as a rock crystal heart, backed by mother-of-pearl, wrapped by gold wire, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 1 inch. Signed ‘Seaman Schepps’, no. 1719. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 144


268

269

270

271

272

273

268 A Yellow Gold Dress Set TIFFANY & CO. Comprising a pair of cufflinks, each double link designed as a textured gold knot, and three shirt studs en suite, mounted in 18K yellow gold, cufflinks length 1 inch, shirt stud length 1/4 inch. Signed ‘Tiffany & Co.’, with a blue leather Tiffany & Co. box. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 -1, 8 0 0

271 A Pair Of Lapis Lazuli and Gold Cufflinks TIFFANY & CO., SCHLUMBERGER Each double link designed as a fluted gold oval plaque, set with a cabochon lapis lazuli, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 1 inch. Signed ‘Tiffany & Co., Schlumberger’. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

269 A Pair of Gold Cufflinks TIFFANY & CO., SCHLUMBERGER Each double link designed as a textured gold sphere, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 1 inch. Signed ‘Tiffany & Co., Schlumberger’. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

272 A Pair of Cultured Pearl and Gold Cufflinks TIFFANY & CO., SCHLUMBERGER Each double link designed as a textured gold acorn, set with a white cultured pearl, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 1 inch. Signed ‘Tiffany & Co., Schlumberger’. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

270 A Pair of Shell and Aquamarine Cufflinks TRIANON Each double link set with a brown and white seashell, accented by a cabochon aquamarine, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 1 inch. Signed ‘Trianon’. Estimate $ 9 0 0 -1,1 0 0

273 A Pair of Jade, Ruby and Sapphire Cufflinks TRIANON Each double link designed as a fluted jade sphere, accented by cabochon rubies and sapphires, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 1 1/4 inches. Signed ‘Trianon’. Estimate $ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0

145


274

275

276

277

274 A Pair of Cultured Pearl, Diamond, Steel and Platinum Ear Pendants TAFFIN Each suspending a white cultured pearl drop, measuring approximately 10.75 and 10.95 mm, from a blackened steel cylinder-shaped link and circular-cut diamond surmount, mounted in steel and platinum, length 2 inches. Signed ‘Taffin’, no. 2734. Estimate $ 9 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0

276 A Chrysoprase and Gold ‘Elba’ Bracelet TITO PEDRINI Designed as a polished gold bangle, centering upon a cabochon chrysoprase, mounted in 18K yellow gold, 2 1/4 inches diameter. Signed ‘T Pedrini’ for Tito Pedrini. Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

James de Givenchy of Taffin has quickly established himself as an emerging talent, whose work, steeped in Art Deco motifs, is prized for its classic design and stunning originality.

Tito Pedrini is a renowned New York specialist in jewelry and gemstones. As a designer, his inspiration comes from his understanding of gemstones, creating bold, original pieces.

275 A Pair of Venetian Glass Bead and Gem-Set Cufflinks TAFFIN Each double link, set with a multi-colored glass Venetian bead, accented by various gem stones, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 1 1/2 inches. Signd ‘Taffin’, no. 2569. Estimate $ 3 , 5 0 0 - 4 , 5 0 0

277 A Rock Crystal and Gold ‘Margherita’ Ring TITO PEDRINI Set with a crystal bombé plaque, the reverse decorated with carved flowers, to the polished gold band, mounted in 18K yellow gold, size 7. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 146


278

279

280

281

278 A Pair of Diamond and Platinum Earrings DAVID WEBB Each designed as a brushed platinum hoop, accented by circular-cut diamonds, length 1/4 inch. Signed ‘Webb’ for David Webb. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

280 A Pair of tri-Colored Gold Earclips ANGELA CUMMINGS Each designed as a square plaque, accented by geometric motifs, mounted in 18K yellow, rose and white gold, length 1/2 inch. Signed ‘Angela Cummings’. Estimate $ 7 0 0 -1, 0 0 0

279 A Diamond and Gold Ring DAVID WEBB Designed as a polished gold openwork band, accented by circular-cut diamonds, mounted in 18K yellow gold and platinum, size 4 3/4. Signed ‘Webb’ for David Webb. Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 2 0 0

281 A Gold, Diamond and Emerald Lion Bracelet DAVID WEBB Designed as a textured gold hinged bangle, terminating with two lion heads, accented by circular-cut diamond collars and cabochon emerald eyes, mounted in 18K yellow gold and platinum, 2 1/2 inches. Signed ‘Webb’ for David Webb Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 0 , 0 0 0 David Webb is especially noted for his representation of animal figures in his jewelry. 147


282

283

284

285

282 A Cultured Pearl and Diamond Choker TIFFANY & CO. Designed as four rows of white cultured pearls, measuring from approximately 4.00 to 4.50 mm, accented by pavé-set diamond flower heads, to the pavé-set diamond bar clasp mounted in platinum, length 13 1/2 inches. Signed ‘Tiffany & Co.’, with a Tiffany & Co. black suede pouch. Estimate $ 3 , 5 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

284 A Diamond Bracelet OSCAR HEYMAN 1928 Designed as a series of interlocking oval shaped pavé-set diamond links, spaced by twin baguette-cut diamond bar links, mounted in platinum, length 7 inches. With maker’s mark for Oscar Heyman, no. 29-191. Estimate $ 1 5 , 0 0 0 - 2 0 , 0 0 0

283 An ART DECO Platinum and White Gold Watch TIFFANY & CO. 1925 Of mechanical movement, the white dial of square outline, with black Arabic numerals and blued steeled hands, within a polished bezel, to the mesh bracelet, mounted in platinum and white gold, length adjustable. Signed ‘Tiffany & Co.’ Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0

Oscar Heyman, founded in 1912, is a family owned manufacturer that takes pride in its European-style craftsmanship and hand made fabrication. 285 An Art Deco Ruby and Diamond Ring RAYMOND YARD circa 1920 Designed as a vari-cut diamond navette-shapd plaque, centering upon an oval-cut ruby, accented by old-European-cut diamonds, mounted in platinum, size 5 1/4. Signed ‘Yard Inc’ for Raymond Yard. Estimate $ 17, 5 0 0 -1 9 , 0 0 0

Tiffany’s flagship store opened in 1940 on Fifth Avenue. Tiffany designs were worn by such prominent NY families as the Astors and the Vanderbilts. Tiffany designs range from the Art Deco and Art Nouveau periods to modern styles. These iconic compositions are some of the most recognized in the world.

Raymond Yard opened his first salon on Fifth Avenue in 1922, which served many prominent families in New York. This ring, a wonderful example of his early work, is featured in the book Yard: The Life and Magnificent Jewelry of Raymond C. Yard, by Natasha Kuzmanovic and David Rockefeller. 148


jewels Lots 249 - 285

lot 249 A Diamond ‘Chrysler Building’ Pendant Necklace Est $10,000 - $12,000

lot 250 a pair of red enamel and gold earclips est $800 - 1,000

lot 251 a pair of blue enamel and gold earclips est $800 - 1,000

lot 252 a pair of green enamel and gold earclips est $1,400 - 1,600

lot 253 a pair of gold earclips est $1,400 - 1,600

lot 254 a pair of lapis lazuli and onyx cufflinks est $500 - 800

lot 255 a pair of hematite and pearl cufflinks est $ 400 - 600

lot 256 a pair of walnut wood, citrine and gold earclips est $2,000 - 3,000

lot 257 a mammoth tusk and diamond bracelet est $ 4,500 - 6,000

lot 258 a pair of walnut wood, agate and citrine cufflinks est $ 400 - 600

lot 259 a pair of shell and hematite cufflinks est $600 - 900

lot 260 a multi-gem and gold ‘eva’ ring est $3,500 - 5,000

lot 261 an enamel and gold bangle est $14,000 - 18,000

lot 262 a pair of ‘turbo shell’ and coral earclips est $2,000 - 3,000

lot 263 a turbo shell and coral brooch est $8,000 - 10,000

lot 264 a pair of rock crystal, mother-of-pearl and gold earclips est $3,000 - 4,000

lot 265 a pair of amber and gold ‘cage’ earclips est $2,500 - 3,000

lot 266 a turquoise and gold ‘button’ bracelet est $7,500 - 9,000

lot 267 a pair of turquoise and lapis lazuli cufflinks est $ 400 - 600

lot 268 a yellow gold dress set est $1,500 - 1,800

lot 269 a pair of gold cufflinks est $800 - 1,200

lot 270 a pair of shell and aquamarine cufflinks est $900 - 1,100

lot 271 a pair of lapis lazuli and gold cufflinks est $800 - 1,200

lot 272 a pair of cultured pearl and gold cufflinks est $800 - 1,200

lot 273 a pair of jade, ruby and sapphire cufflinks est $ 400 - 600

lot 274 a pair of cultured pearl, diamond, steel and platinum ear pendants est $9,000 - 12,000

lot 275 a pair of venetian glass bead and gem-set cufflinks est $3,500 - 4,500

lot 276 a chrysoprase and gold ‘elba’ bracelet est $5,000 - 7,000

lot 277 a rock crystal and gold ‘margherita’ ring est $3,000 - 5,000

lot 278 a pair of diamond and platinum earrings est $1,500 - 2,000

lot 279 a diamond and gold ring est $2,500 - 3,200

lot 280 a pair of tricolored gold earclips est $700 - 1,000

lot 281 a gold, diamond and emerald lion bracelet est $8,000 - 10,000

lot 282 a cultured pearl and diamond choker est $3,500 - 5,000

lot 283 an art deco platinum and white gold watch est $1,200 - 1,800

lot 284 a diamond bracelet est $15,000 - 20,000

lot 285 an art deco ruby and diamond ring est $17,500 - 19,000

149


new york new york 5 pm 12 december 2009 new york

contemporary art Lots 286 - 358

1939 World’s Fair Committee 358 AVAF 356, 357 Baechler, D. 312, 314 Bogin, G. 320 Bovasso, N. 327 Bove, C. 302 Brannon, M. 299, 300, 301 Condo, G. 309, 311 Conge, B. 352 Cope2 (Fernando Carlo) 343, 344, 345, 346 Crash (Juan Martos) 340 Crewdson, G. 329 Deutsch, D. 339 Draeger, C. 328 Freeman, E. 324 Ghost 353, 354 Gober, R. 313 Gonzales, W. 341, 342

Haberny, G. 332 Halley, P. 317 Halsband, M. 287 Holstad, C. 296, 297 Howey, N. 319 Kolk, D. 315 LeWitt, S. 336 Lipski, D. 330, 331 Mantello, L. 355 Maripol 288, 289, 290, 291 Masnyj, Y. 298 McCaslin, M. 318, 338 Minter, M. 337 Moskowitz, R. 325 Mr. Ewokone 350 Muniz, V. 306, 326 Nares, J. 334 Nelson, J. 322 Nesterova, N. 323 Parrino, S. 333

150

Quik (Lin Felton) 351 Rabinowitch, D. 321 Ray, C. 308 Reeves, J. 335 Scharf, K. 295 Seliger, J. 303, 304 Smith, R. 316 Sonnier, K. 305 Sucklord (morgan phillips) 347 Taaffe, P. 310 The Velvet Underground & Nico 292, 293 T-KID 170 (julius cavero) 348, 349 Warhol, A. 294 Wurm, E. 307 Young, R. 286


286

286 Russell Young b. 1960 Frank Sinatra New York New York (from Pig Portrait Series), 2007. Acrylic, enamel and diamond dust screenprint on canvas. 62 x 48 in. (157.5 x 121.9 cm). Signed, titled and dated “Russell Young 2007 Frank Sinatra ‘New York New York’” on the reverse. provenance Courtesy of the artist Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0 151


287

287 MICHAEL HALSBAND Jean-Michel Basquiat with Boxing Gloves, 1985. Gelatin silver print. 36 x 36 in. (91.4 x 91.4 cm). Signed, titled and dated on the reverse. This work is from an edition of seven. PROVENANCE Courtesy of the artist EXHIBITED Santander, Spain, Fundaci贸n Marcelino Bot铆n, Ahuyentado Fantasmas (To Repel Ghosts), July 10 - September 14, 2008; Rome, Palazzo Ruspoli Fondazione Memmo, Fantasmi da Scacciare (To Repel Ghosts), October 2 - February 1, 2009

Estimate $ 2 5 , 0 0 0 - 3 0 , 0 0 0 152


288 (detail)

289 (detail)

290 (detail)

291 (detail)

290 Maripol Martin, Andy Warhol and Keith Haring, 1985, printed 2009. Archival pigment print. 29 x 24 in. (73.7 x 61 cm). Signed and numbered of 15 on the reverse. This work is from an edition of 15 plus one artist’s proof. provenance Private Collection Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

288 Maripol b. 1956 Glenn O’Brien TV Party, 1980, printed 2009. Archival pigment print. 29 x 24 in. (73.7 x 61 cm). Signed and numbered of 15 on the reverse. This work is from an edition of 15 plus one artist’s proof. provenance Private Collection literature Maripol, Maripolarama, New York, 2005, n.p. (illustrated)

Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 291 Maripol Maripol and Madonna, Self-Portrait, 1983, printed 2009. Archival pigment print. 29 x 24 in. (73.7 x 61 cm). Signed and numbered of 15 on the reverse. This work is from an edition of 15 plus one artist’s proof. provenance Private Collection Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

289 Maripol b. 1956 Grace Jones, Studio 54, 1979, printed 2009. Archival pigment print. 29 x 24 in. (73.7 x 61 cm). Signed and numbered of 15 on the reverse. This work is from an edition of 15 plus one artist’s proof. provenance Private Collection literature Maripol, Maripolarama, New York, 2005, n.p. (illustrated)

Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 153


292

293

292 15 Albums by The Velvet Underground & Nico produced by Andy Warhol with Banana Stickers by Andy Warhol, ca. 1967. Each: 12 1/4 x 12 1/4 in. (31.1 x 31.1 cm). Signed on one album cover. provenance Acquired through collectors’ vinyl stores including but not limited

293 Extremely Rare The Velvet Underground & Nico Poster, ca. 1967. Poster. 15 x 29 in. (38.1 x 73.7 cm). provenance Private Collection Literature J. Kugelberg, ed., The Velvet

to Plastic Passion, London, Nostalgipalatset, Stockholm, Time Bomb, Tokyo, Record Mecca and

Estimate $ 1 5 , 0 0 0 - 2 5 , 0 0 0

Underground: New York Art, New York, 2009, pp.178 - 179, (illustrated)

Amoeba, Los Angeles, Academy Records and Finyl Vinyl, New York Exhibited New York, John McWhinnie at Glen Horowitz Bookseller and Art Gallery, c/o The Velvet Underground New York, NY, April 12 - May 12, 2007; Stockholm, Operating Place, c/o The Velvet Underground, New York, NY, November – December 2007 Literature J. Kugelberg, ed., c/o The Velvet Undergound, New York, NY, New York, 2007, n.p., (illustrated); J. Kugelberg, ed., The Velvet Underground: New York Art, New York, 2009, pp.184 - 187 (illustrated)

Estimate $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 - 2 5 , 0 0 0 154


The phenomenal collaboration between Andy Warhol and The Velvet Underground and Nico while Warhol was the band’s manager from 1965-1967 culminated in the epic debut album The Velvet Underground & Nico released by Verve Records in 1967. Recorded in 1966 during Andy Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable multimedia event tour, The Velvet Underground & Nico has since become one of the most influential and critically acclaimed albums of all time. An assemblage of fifteen original albums (lot 292), is shown as a Warhol multiple, with its inherent variations in printing and placement of the banana sticker and the Warhol signature. The back cover of the album showcases additional variations. On early copies of the album, in both the mono and stereo version, the Warhol scenester/actor/ dancer Eric Emerson appears projected onto the band in a photograph from a performance of the Exploding Plastic Inevitable. A financially strapped Emerson, who hadn’t given reproduction permission, threatened legal action against the label, Verve Records. In response, a new cover was designed and issued to replace the original and a large sticker was used to cover Emerson’s image of the existing unsold albums. All three states of the album are represented in this lot. The Velvet Underground (lot 294) is a sheet the iconic banana stickers designed by Andy Warhol for use on the cover of the groundbreaking 1967 debut album. This is one of only two known unpeeled and unpasted sticker sheets extant. The iconic banana stickers were custom applied to the album covers with intentional variable precision. Comprised of a rare Velvet Underground and Nico poster, lot 293, produced by Verve Records to promote their album as part of a promotional campaign that utilized the cutting edge Pop sensibility of the era. This is the only known surviving example of this poster. The extreme rarity of this work was most likely due to the controversy surrounding the unauthorized use of the image of Eric Emerson from the Exploding Plastic Inevitable on the album. This striking poster may have never even been distributed. 294

294 Andy Warhol 1928-1987 The Velvet Underground, ca. 1967. Silkscreen print on adhesive paper. 33 x 13 in. (83.8 x 33 cm). provenance Private Collection Exhibited Pittsburgh, The Andy Warhol Museum, All Tomorrow’s Parties: Remembering the Velvet Underground, May 18 - September 1, 1996 Literature J. Kugelberg, ed., c/o The Velvet Undergound New York, NY, New York, 2007, n.p., (illustrated)

Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0 155


295

295 Kenny Scharf b. 1958 Up & Up, 1987. Oil on canvas in the artist’s frame. 93 x 28 in. (236.2 x 71.1 cm). Signed, titled and dated “Kenny Scharf UP & UP 87” on the reverse. provenance Acquired directly from the artist; Barbara Braathen, New York; Private collection, New York exhibited New York, Tony Shafrazi Gallery, Kenny Scharf Sculptures and Paintings, April 18 - May 16, 1987

Estimate $ 2 5 , 0 0 0 - 3 5 , 0 0 0 156


296

297

296 Christian Holstad b. 1972 Woman Bathing (after Magritte), 2004. Paper collage. 15 1/4 x 21 1/4 in. (38.7 x 54 cm). provenance Daniel Reich Gallery, New York Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

297 Christian Holstad b. 1972 Trying to Make Meaningful Connections in a Commercial World (It’s Not Easy Being Green), 2004. Cardboard portfolio laid with cotton with elastic bands and felt-tip pen containing printed paper. 9 7/8 x 12 3/4 in. (25.1 x 32.4 cm). Titled “Trying to Make Meaningful Connections in a Commercial World (It’s Not Easy Being Green)” on the front portfolio cover. Signed and dated “C Holstad March 04” and numbered of five on the underside of the portfolio cover. This work is from an edition of five plus two artist’s proofs. provenance Daniel Reich Gallery, New York Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 157


298

299

300

301

298 Yuri Masnyj b. 1976 Our Chandelier, 2004. Charcoal and colored pencil on paper. 10 x 8 in. (25.4 x 20.3 cm). Dated “2004” upper center. provenance Sutton Lane, London

300 Matthew Brannon b. 1971 Prostitute, 2004. Ink on paper. 23 1/2 x 18 in. (59.7 x 45.7 cm). Signed and dated “2004” on the reverse. provenance John Connelly

exhibited London, Sutton Lane, Yuri Masnyj: On Our Black Rainbow, June 23 - July 31, 2004

Presents, New York

Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

299 Matthew Brannon b. 1971 Untitled (Table Manners), 2004. Ink on paper. 20 1/2 x 18 in. (52.1 x 45.7 cm). Signed and dated “Matthew Brannon 2004” on the reverse.

301 Matthew Brannon b. 1971 Untitled, 2004. Ink on paper. 23 1/2 x 18 in. (59.7 x 45.7 cm). Signed and dated “2004” on the reverse. provenance John Connelly

provenance John Connelly Presents, New York

Presents, New York

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 158


302

302 Carol Bove b. 1971 At Home In The Universe, 2001. Two wooden shelves with metal brackets, 10 found books, stainless steel book clips and bookends. 24 1/4 x 30 1/2 x 10 in. (61.6 x 77.5 x 25.4 cm). provenance Team Gallery, New York exhibited New York, Team Gallery, Carol Bove, July 31 - August 24, 2001; Paris, Centre Culturel Suisse, Worker Drone Queen, April 15 - July 15, 2007 literature New York Arts Magazine, ed., “Carol Bove Interview, Summer 2001”, New York Arts Magazine, September 2001, p. 67; J. Kastner, “Carol Bove”, Whitney Biennial 2008, New York, 2008, p. 104

Estimate $ 9 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 159


303

304

lot 306 sold to benefit the whitney museum’s independent study program

305

306

303 Jonathan Seliger b. 1955 Prison Garb (Real Cashmere), 2001. Oil, alkyd, acrylic and modeling paste on canvas. 15 1/2 x 16 x 6 1/4 in. (39.4 x 40.6 x 15.9 cm). Signed, titled and dated “Seliger Prison Garb (Real Cashmere) 2001” on the underside. provenance Jack

305 Keith Sonnier b. 1941 NY – LA, 1975. Gentian violet and gold spray on paper. 22 x 17 1/8 in. (55.9 x 43.5 cm). Initialed and dated “K.S. ‘75” center. provenance

Shainman Gallery, New York

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

Leo Castelli Gallery, New York

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 306 Vik Muniz b. 1961 Two works: White Shirt and Suit on Hanger, 2006. Diptych: painted shirt and c-print in the artist’s frame and painted suit. Each: 42 1/2 x 32 5/8 in. (108 x 82.9 cm) and men’s suit size 48/38. provenance Courtesy of the artist Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0

304 Jonathan Seliger b. 1955 Second Marriage, 2001. Oil, alkyd, acrylic and modeling paste on canvas. 19 x 17 1/2 x 7 1/4 in. (48.3 x 44.5 x 18.4 cm). Signed, titled and dated “Seliger Second Marriage 2001” on the underside. provenance Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 160


307

307 Erwin Wurm b. 1954 Guggenheim (Melting), 2005. Cast resin. 18 x 33 3/4 x 54 3/8 in. (45.7 x 85.7 x 138.1 cm). This work is from an edition of 12 and is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist. provenance Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 3 5 , 0 0 0 - 4 0 , 0 0 0 161


308

308 Charles Ray b. 1953 Bench, 1974. Wooden board. 11 x 139 3/4 x 1 1/2 in. (27.9 x 355 x 3.8 cm). This work is from an edition of 12. provenance Feature Inc., New York literature P. Schimmel, Charles Ray, Los Angeles, p. 69 (illustrated) Estimate $ 3 0 , 0 0 0 - 4 0 , 0 0 0 162


The year 1974 was an important moment in the career of Charles Ray, whose sculptural works had already established him as a formidable artist. Ray’s attention to the ways bodies relate with objects—marked by his interest in balance— reflected a conceptual dialogue with New York-based artists such as Richard Serra and Dennis Oppenheim. Ray was physically engaged in the production of his art, and in 1973 he began making his own body a critical element of his sculptural works. The present lot retains the investigation into balance represented in Ray’s earlier works while pushing his oeuvre toward an increased blurring of the boundary between sculpture and performance. Bench was a landmark work in this time of Ray’s career. In its completed state it both supports and is supported by the human body, as two people simultaneously sit on opposite ends of the wood plank facing away from each other. The work references Brancusi’s The Kiss, creating tension between the two iconic lovers and separating them by an object that, together, they support. Positioning the human body as visually divided by the wooden board, Bench also looks forward to Ray’s later works which relate objects on opposite sides of a plane. 163

Hudson and Charles Ray perform Untitled


309

311

310

312

314

313

315

316

309 GEORGE CONDO b. 1957 D. Bowes, 2003-2004. Watercolor on paper. 13 1/4 x 8 1/2 in. (33.7 x 21.6 cm). Signed and titled “D. Bowes CONDO” lower right. provenance Rene

313 ROBERT GOBER b. 1954 Untitled, 1999. Ink on paper collage. 4 x 5 3/4 in. (10.2 x 14.6 cm). Signed and dated “R. Gober 1999” on the reverse. provenance

Ricard, New York

Donated to Postcards from the Edge, A Visual AIDS Event, December 5, 1999; Collection

Estimate $ 7 0 0 - 9 0 0

Vernon Nikkel, Albuquerque

Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 310 Philip Taaffe b. 1955 Untitled, 1989. Crayon on paper. 23 3/4 x 19 1/4 in. (60.3 x 48.9 cm). Signed and dated “P. Taaffe 1989” lower right. provenance Acquired directly from the artist

314 Donald Baechler b. 1956 Untitled, 1986. Ink on paper collage. 21 x 16 in. (53.3 x 40.6 cm). Initialed and dated “DB 86” lower right. provenance Private

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0

Collection

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 311 GEORGE CONDO b. 1957 Untitled, 1986. Graphite and colored pencil on paper. 8 5/8 x 11 1/2 in. (21.9 x 29.2 cm). Signed “Condo” upper right; dated “86” lower right.

315 Douglas Kolk b. 1963 Untitled, 1994. Felt-tip pen, graphite, colored pencil and ballpoint pen on paper. 24 x 19 in. (61 x 48.3 cm). Signed and dated “Doug Kolk 94” on the reverse. provenance Clarissa Dalrymple, New York Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0

provenance Rene Ricard, New York

Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0 312 Donald Baechler b. 1956 Untitled, ca. 1993-1994. Acrylic and paper collage on paper. 23 3/4 x 18 1/2 in. (60.3 x 47 cm). Initialed “DB” lower right. provenance Acquired

316 Ray Smith b. 1959 Tehuana Atun (Tijuana Tuna), 1988-1989. Oil on panel in three parts. Each: 83 3/4 x 33 1/2 in. (212.7 x 85.1 cm); overall: 83 3/4 x 100 1/2 in. (212.7 x 255.3 cm). Signed and dated “Ray Smith 1989” lower left; titled and dated “Tehuana Atun 1988-89” on the reverse of the right panel. PROVENANCE Galerie Volker Diehl, Berlin Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0  

directly from the artist

Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0

164


318

317

319

320

321

317 PETER HALLEY b. 1953 Untitled, 1991. Acrylic and graphite on paper. 17 1/2 x 25 3/8 in. (44.5 x 64.5 cm). Signed and dated “Peter Halley 1991” lower right. provenance Michael Kohn Gallery, Santa Monica; Collection Vernon Nikkel, Albuquerque

320 Greg Bogin b. 1965 Untitled, 2000. Silkscreen with acrylic and enamel on canvas laid on wooden panel in two parts. 47 x 36 in. (119.4 x 91.4 cm) each. Initialed and dated “GB 2000” on the overlap of the painting that looks like an “L”. PROVENANCE Leo Koenig

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

Inc., New York

Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0   318 Matthew McCaslin b. 1957 Block Island, 1985. Formica on particle board and antifreeze. 7 x 30 x 30 in. (17.8 x 76.2 x 76.2 cm). Signed, titled and dated “Matthew McCaslin ‘Block Island’ 85” on the underside. provenance Cuttler Gallery, New York Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

321 David Rabinowitch b. 1943 Four works: (i) Three Constructions Amati Group I; (ii) Three Constructions Amati Group II; (iii) Uper Under: Construction of vision of 2 sizes Imilar group; (iv) Three Constructions Amati Group I, (i), (ii), (iv) 1975; (iii) 1974. Pencil and felt-tip marker on paper. (i), (ii) 39 x 27 1/2 in. (99.1 x 69.9 cm); (iii) 39 1/4 x 27 1/2 in. (99.7 x 69.9 cm); (iv) 39 1/8 x 27 1/2 in. (99.4 x 69.9 cm). (i), (ii), (iv) Signed and dated “David Rabinowitch 75 lower right; titled lower left; (iii) signed, titled and dated “David Rabinowitch 74 Uper Under: Construction of vision of 2 sizes Imilar group” lower right. Provenance Private

319 Nicholas Howey E Tent, 1992. Acrylic on canvas. 67 1/4 x 51 in. (170.8 x 129.5 cm). Signed, titled and dated “Nicholas Howey E TENT 1992” on the reverse. provenance Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

Collection, Italy

Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0   165


322

324

323

325

322

Joan Nelson b. 1958 Untitled, 1988. Oil on paper. 12 x 16 in. (30.5 x 40.6 cm).

324 ERIC FREEMAN b. 1970 Unvisited, 2001. Oil on canvas. 120 x 120 in. (304.8 x 304.8 cm). Signed, titled and dated “Eric Freeman ‘Unvisited’ 2001” on the reverse. provenance

provenance Fawbush Gallery, New York

Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

Acquired directly from the artist; Collection Carlos Cisneros, Venezuela

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 323

Natalya Nesterova b. 1944 Park, 2006. Oil on canvas. 50 x 58 in. (127 x 147.3 cm). 325 Robert S. Moskowitz b. 1935 The Red and Black, 1987. Pastel on paper. 30 x 71 1/2 in. (76.2 x 181.6 cm). Initialed and dated “RM 1987” upper left. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0  

Provenance Private Collection

Estimate $ 3 0 , 0 0 0 - 4 0 , 0 0 0

166


326

327

326 Vik Muniz b. 1961 Roses, after Fantin-Latour (from Pictures of Magazines), 2004. Chromogenic print. 55 x 40 in. (139.7 x 101.6 cm). Signed and dated “Vik Muniz 2004” on a label adhered to the reverse. This work is from an edition of six. provenance Brent

327 Nina Bovasso b. 1965 Flowers on a Walk, 2009. Hand-knotted wool in 36 colors. 106 x 70 in. (269.2 x 177.8 cm). Signed, titled, dated “Nina Bovasso Flowers on a Walk 2009” and numbered of 15 on a label sewn to the reverse. This work is from an edition of 15 plus two artist’s proofs and two producer’s proofs. provenance BravinLee programs, New York Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0

Sikkema, New York; Alan Koppel Gallery, Chicago

Estimate $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 - 3 0 , 0 0 0 167


328

329

330

331

328 Christoph Draeger b. 1965 Ground Zero / Sept 16 2001, 2003. Acrylic paint-jet print on 8000 piece jigsaw puzzle. 53 1/2 x 75 in. (135.9 x 190.5 cm). provenance Roebling Hall,

330 Donald Lipski b. 1947 Untitled, No.402, 1985. Rubber tube, metal drill and pump. 76 x 36 x 3 in. (193 x 91.4 x 7.6 cm) approximately as installed. provenance Acquired

New York

directly from the artist

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0

Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0

329 Gregory Crewdson b. 1962 Untitled (Rug Lady) Twilight Series, 1999. C-print. 50 x 60 in. (127 x 152.4 cm). Signed “Gregory Crewdson” on a label adhered to the reverse. This work is from an edition of 10. provenance Luhring Augustine, New York exhibited

331 Donald Lipski b. 1947 Untitled, No.161, 1986. Toothpicks and water in glass with metal. 17 x 13 x 6 in. (43.2 x 33 x 15.2 cm). provenance Germans van Eck Gallery, New York Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

New York, Luhring Augustine, Gregory Crewdson: Twilight, February 19 - March 25, 2000 (another example exhibited) literature R. Mahoney, “Close Encounters, American Transcendence in New Photographs by Gregory Crewdson,” Artnet Magazine, March 10, 2000 (illustrated)

Estimate $ 2 5 , 0 0 0 - 3 5 , 0 0 0 168


332

333

332 Greg Haberny b. 1970 The Last Party, 2009. House paint on vinyl. 34 x 58 in. (86.4 x 147.3 cm). Signed, titled and dated “Haberny G. ‘The Last Party’ 2009” on the stretcher.

333 Steven Parrino 1958 - 2005 Untitled, 1983. Charcoal and ink on paper in the artist’s enamel, spray-painted glass and wooden frame. 12 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. (31.8 x 24.1 cm) Signed and dated “SParrino 83” on the reverse of the backing board. provenance

provenance Courtesy of the artist Exhibited New York, Leo Kesting Gallery, Dirty Little Things, September 10 - 27, 2009

Nature Morte, New York exhibited New York, Nature Morte, Steven Parrino, January 1 - 31, 1984

Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

169


334 335

336

337

338

339

334 James Nares b. 1953 Untitled. Acrylic paint on acetate. 9 1/4 x 20 1/2 in. (23.5 x 52.1 cm). provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

337 Marilyn Minter b. 1948 Fingered, 1992. Silkscreen on mylar and vellum mounted to aluminum. 28 x 21 in. (71.1 x 53.3 cm). Signed, titled and dated “M. Minter ‘Fingered’ 1992” and numbered of nine on the reverse. This work is from an edition of nine. provenance Private collection, New York

335 Jennifer Reeves b. 1963 Initial Impulse: some bright red, 1999. Acrylic on birch panel. 37 x 60 in. (94 x 152.4 cm). Signed, titled and dated “Jennifer Reeves Initial Impulse: some bright red, 1999” on the reverse. provenance Gorney Bravin + Lee, New York Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 338 Matthew McCaslin b. 1957 Trident, 1987. Formica on particle board. 30 x 60 1/4 x 6 in. (76.2 x 153 x 15.2 cm). Signed, titled and dated “Matthew McCaslin ‘Trident’ 87” on the reverse. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

336 Sol Lewitt 1928-2007 Wavy Brushstrokes, 1995. Gouache on paper. 11 x 7 1/2 in. (27.9 x 19.1 cm). Signed and dated “S. Lewitt 95” lower right. Provenance Chester

339 David Deutsch b. 1943 M.I.T. Dome, 1983. Oil on canvas. 79 1/2 x 102 1/2 in. (201.9 x 260.4 cm). Signed “David Deutsch” on the stretcher. provenance Blum Helman

Gallery, Chester (Connecticut)

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

Gallery, New York; Annina Nosei, New York; Pace Gallery, New York

Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0   170


340

341

342

340 Crash (Juan Martos) b. 1961 Headliner, 1990. Acrylic and spray paint on canvas. 29 x 89 in. (73.7 x 226.1 cm). Signed, titled and dated “J. Crash Martos ‘Headliner’ 90” on the reverse. provenance Barbara Braathen Gallery, New York Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0

342 Wayne Gonzales b. 1957 Face Painting, 1995. Acrylic and metallic paint on canvas. 18 in. (45.7 cm) diameter. Signed and dated “Wayne Gonzales 1995” on the reverse. provenance Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0

341 Wayne Gonzales b. 1957 Face Painting, 1995. Acrylic and metallic paint on canvas 18 in. (45.7 cm) diameter. Signed and dated “Wayne Gonzales 1995” on the reverse. provenance Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0

171


343

344

345

343 Cope2 (Fernando Carlo) Green Throw Up, 2007. Acrylic on canvas. 18 x 24 in. (45.7 x 61 cm). provenance Alan Ket Gallery, New York Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

345 Cope2 (Fernando Carlo) NY Legend, 2009. Spray paint, paint marker and acrylic on found paper. 32 1/2 x 22 3/4 in. (82.6 x 57.8 cm). Dated “2009” lower right. provenance Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 344 Cope2 (Fernando Carlo) City of Dreams, 2009. Spray paint, paint marker and acrylic on found paper. 32 1/2 x 22 3/4 in. (82.6 x 57.8 cm). Dated “2009” upper right. provenance Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 172


346

347

348

349

350

346 Cope2 (Fernando Carlo) Custom Painted New York Subway Train Car. Acrylic paint on diecast metal and plastic. 3 1/2 x 13 3/4 x 2 1/2 in. (8.9 x 34.9 x 6.4 cm). Signed “Cope” on the side of the car. This work is unique. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

349 T-KID 170 (Julius Cavero) Cocaine Booze Car, 2005. Acrylic paint on diecast metal and plastic. 3 1/2 x 13 3/4 x 2 1/2 in. (8.9 x 34.9 x 6.4 cm). Signed and dated “Julius TKID Cavero 2005” on the top. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

347 SUCKLORD (Morgan Phillips) Super Suckway, 2004. Acrylic on plastic, found plastic toys, CO2 cartridge and syringe. 8 x 24 x 2 1/2 in. (20.3 x 61 x 6.4 cm). Signed, titled and dated “Suckadelic ‘Super Suckway’ 2004 Sucklord” on the reverse. This work is unique. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

350 Mr. Ewokone b. 1976 Custom Painted New York Subway Car. Acrylic on diecast metal and plastic. 3 1/2 x 13 3/4 x 2 1/2 in. (8.9 x 34.9 x 6.4 cm). This work is unique. provenance Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

348 T-KID 170 (Julius Cavero) b. 1961 RASE Car, 2004. Acrylic paint on diecast metal and plastic. 3 1/2 x 13 3/4 x 2 1/2 in. (8.9 x 34.9 x 6.4 cm). Signed “Julius Terrible T-Kid 170 Cavero” on the top. This work is unique. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 173


351

352

353

354

351 Quik (Lin Felton) Two works: Untitled (I Don’t Trust Him) and Untitled (My Name Is Lucifer), 1998. Paint marker and screenprint on paper. Each: 18 x 25 in. (45.7 x 63.5 cm). Untitled (I don’t trust him) signed and dated lower edge. provenance Barbara Braathen

353 GHOST Custom Painted New York Subway Sign. Acrylic on found paper. 17 x 11 in. (43.2 x 27.9 cm). provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0

Gallery, New York

354 GHOST Custom Painted New York Subway Sign. Acrylic on found paper. 17 x 11 in. (43.2 x 27.9 cm). provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 352 Bob Conge b. 1939 Indian Point Nightgamer, 2008. Acrylic on plastic with LED unit. 7 x 5 x 4 1/2 in. (17.8 x 12.7 x 11.4 cm). Signed, dated and numbered “Bob Conge Plaseebo 2008 No. 1 of 1” on the bottom. This work is unique and is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 174


355

355 Larry Mantello b. 1964 Gypsy Logo – Gogo, 1995. Fabric, metal zippers, barrettes and grommets, plastic beads, yarn, synthetic leather and synthetic feathers. 76 x 52 x 10 in. (193 x 132.1 x 25.4 cm). provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 9 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 175


356

357

358

(detail)

356 AVAF b. 1968 Two works: McCarren Swimming Pool and Chandelier (Venice), 2002. Hi-Fi prints. 39 1/4 x 33 7/8 in. (99.7 x 86 cm) and 39 1/2 x 30 in. (100.3 x 76.2 cm). These works are each from an edition of five plus one artist’s proof and are each accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist. provenance John Connelly Presents, New York Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0

358 New York World’s Fair 1939, published 1936. Book with leather bound cover. 24 1/2 x 18 7/8 x 3/4 in. (62.2 x 47.9 x 1.9 cm). Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

357 AVAF b. 1968 Two works: Untitled (Big Sur 1) and Untitled (Big Sur 2), 2002. Ink on acetate. Each: 9 x 12 in. (22.9 x 30.5 cm). Each signed “A.V.A.F” lower right. provenance John Connelly Presents, New York

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 176


contemporary Lots 286 - 357

lot 286 Russell Young Est $10,000-15,000

lot 287 MICHAEL HALSBAND Est $25,000-30,000

lot 288 Maripol Est $1,500-2,000

lot 289 Maripol Est $1,500-2,000

lot 290 Maripol Est $1,500-2,000

lot 291 Maripol Est $1,500-2,000

lot 292 Est $20,000-25,000

lot 293 Est $15,000-25,000

lot 294 Andy Warhol Est $10,000-15,000

lot 295 Kenny Scharf Est $25,000-35,000

lot 296 Christian Holstad Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 297 Christian Holstad Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 298 Yuri Masnyj Est $1,000-1,500

lot 299 Matthew Brannon Est $5,000-7,000

lot 300 Matthew Brannon Est $5,000-7,000

lot 301 Matthew Brannon Est $5,000-7,000

lot 302 Carol Bove Est $9,000-12,000

lot 303 Jonathan Seliger Est $2,000-3,000

lot 304 Jonathan Seliger Est $2,000-3,000

lot 305 Keith Sonnier Est $2,000-3,000

lot 306 Vik Muniz Est $8,000-12,000

lot 307 Erwin Wurm Est $35,000-40,000

lot 308 Charles Ray Est $30,000-40,000

lot 309 GEORGE CONDO Est $700-900

lot 310 Philip Taaffe Est $3,000-4,000

lot 311 GEORGE CONDO Est $1,000-1,500

lot 312 Donald Baechler Est $7,000-9,000

lot 313 ROBERT GOBER Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 314 Donald Baechler Est $3,000-5,000

lot 315 Douglas Kolk Est $1,200-1,800

lot 316 Ray Smith Est $8,000-12,000

lot 317 PETER HALLEY Est $5,000-7,000

lot 318 matthew mccaslin Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 319 Nicholas Howey Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 320 greg bogin Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 321 David Rabinowitch Est $7,000-9,000

177


contemporary Lots 322 - 357

lot 322 Joan Nelson Est $1,500-2,000

lot 323 Natalya Nesterova Est $30,000-40,000

lot 324 ERIC FREEMAN Est $2,000-3,000

lot 325 Robert S. Moskowitz Est $3,000-4,000

lot 326 Vik Muniz Est $20,000-30,000

lot 327 Nina Bovasso Est $6,000-8,000

lot 328 Christoph Draeger Est $2,000-4,000

lot 329 Gregory Crewdson Est $25,000-35,000

lot 330 Donald Lipski Est $6,000-8,000

lot 331 Donald Lipski Est $5,000-7,000

lot 332 Greg Haberny Est $7,000-9,000

lot 333 Steven Parrino Est $5,000-7,000

lot 334 James Nares Est $3,000-5,000

lot 335 Jennifer Reeves Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 336 Sol Lewitt Est $5,000-7,000

lot 337 Marilyn Minter Est $3,000-4,000

lot 338 Matthew McCaslin Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 339 David Deutsch Est $ 4,000-6,000

lot 340 Crash (Juan Martos) Est $10,000-15,000

lot 341 Wayne Gonzales Est $7,000-9,000

lot 342 Wayne Gonzales Est $7,000-9,000

lot 343 Cope2 (Fernando Carlo) Est $1,500-2,000

lot 344 Cope2 (Fernando Carlo) Est $600-800

lot 345 Cope2 (Fernando Carlo) Est $600-800

lot 346 Cope2 (Fernando Carlo) Est $800-1,200

lot 347 SUCKLORD (Morgan Phillips) Est $1,000-1,500

lot 348 T-KID 170 (Julius Cavero) Est $600-800

lot 349 T-KID 170 (Julius Cavero) Est $800-1,200

lot 350 Mr. Ewokone Est $800-1,200

lot 351 349 Quik (Lin Felton) Est $2,000-3,000

lot 352 Bob Conge Est $800-1,200

lot 353 GHOST Est $600-800

lot 354 GHOST Est $600-800

lot 355 Larry Mantello lot 356 AVAF Est $9,000-12,000 Est $3,000-4,000

178

lot 357 AVAF Est $2,000-3,000

lot 358 world’s fair committee Est $1,500-2,000


GUIDE FOR PROSPECTIVE BUYERS BUYING AT AUCTION The following pages are designed to offer you information on how to buy at auction at Phillips de Pury & Company. Our staff will be happy to assist you. CONDITIONS OF SALE The Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty which appear later in this catalogue govern the auction. Bidders are strongly encouraged to read them as they outline the legal relationship among Phillips, the seller and the buyer and describe the terms upon which property is bought at auction. Please be advised that Phillips de Pury & Company generally acts as agent for the seller. BUYER’S PREMIUM Phillips de Pury & Company charges the successful bidder a commission, or buyer’s premium, on the hammer price of each lot sold. The buyer’s premium is payable by the buyer as part of the total purchase price at the following rates: 25% of the hammer price up to and including $50,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above $50,000 up to and including $1,000,000 and 12% of the portion of the hammer price above $1,000,000. 1 PRIOR TO AUCTION Catalogue Subscriptions If you would like to purchase a catalogue for this auction or any other Phillips de Pury & Company sale, please contact us at +1 212 940 1240 or +44 20 7318 4010. Pre-Sale Estimates Pre-Sale estimates are intended as a guide for prospective buyers. Any bid within the high and low estimate range should, in our opinion, offer a chance of success. However, many lots achieve prices below or above the pre-sale estimates. Where “Estimate on Request” appears, please contact the specialist department for further information. It is advisable to contact us closer to the time of the auction as estimates can be subject to revision. Pre-sale estimates do not include the buyer’s premium or any applicable taxes. Pre-Sale Estimates In Pounds Sterling And Euros Although the sale is conducted in US dollars, the pre-sale estimates in the auction catalogues may also be printed in pounds sterling and/or euros. Since the exchange rate is that at the time of catalogue production and not at the date of auction, you should treat estimates in pounds sterling or euros as a guide only. Catalogue Entries Phillips may print in the catalogue entry the history of ownership of a work of art, as well as the exhibition history of the property and references to the work in art publications. While we are careful in the cataloguing process, provenance, exhibition and literature references may not be exhaustive and in some cases we may intentionally refrain from disclosing the identity of previous owners. Please note that all dimensions of the property set forth in the catalogue entry are approximate. Condition Of Lots Our catalogues include references to condition only in the descriptions of multiple works (e.g., prints). Such references, though, do not amount to a full description of condition. The absence of reference to the condition of a lot in the catalogue entry does not imply that the lot is free from faults or imperfections. Solely as a convenience to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company may provide condition reports. In preparing such reports, our specialists assess the condition in a manner appropriate to the estimated value of the property and the nature of the auction in which it is included. While condition reports are prepared honestly and carefully, our staff are not professional restorers or trained conservators. We therefore encourage all prospective buyers to inspect the property at the pre-sale exhibitions and recommend, particularly in the case of any lot of significant value, that you retain your own restorer or professional advisor to report to you on the property’s condition prior to bidding. Any prospective buyer of photographs or prints should always request a condition report because all such property is sold unframed, unless otherwise indicated in the condition report. If a lot is sold framed, Phillips de Pury & Company accepts no liability for the condition of the frame. If we sell any lot unframed, we will be pleased to refer the purchaser to a professional framer. Pre-Auction Viewing Pre-auction viewings are open to the public and free of charge. Our specialists are available to give advice and condition reports at viewings or by appointment. Electrical And Mechanical Lots All lots with electrical and/or mechanical features are sold on the basis of their decorative value only and should not be assumed to be operative. It is essential that, prior to any intended use, the electrical system is verified and approved by a qualified electrician. Symbol Key The following key explains the symbols you may see inside this catalogue. O Guaranteed Property The seller of lots with this symbol has been guaranteed a

minimum price. The guarantee may be provided by Phillips de Pury & Company, by a third party or jointly by us and a third party. Phillips de Pury & Company and third parties providing or participating in a guarantee may benefit financially if a guaranteed lot is sold successfully and may incur a loss if the sale is not successful. ∆ Property In Which Phillips De Pury & Company Has An Ownership Interest Lots with this symbol indicate that Phillips de Pury & Company owns the lot in whole or in part or has an economic interest in the lot equivalent to an ownership interest.

No Reserve Unless indicated by a , all lots in this catalogue are offered subject to a reserve. A reserve is the confidential value established between Phillips de Pury & Company and the seller and below which a lot may not be sold. The reserve for each lot is generally set at a percentage of the low estimate and will not exceed the low pre-sale estimate.

2 BIDDING IN THE SALE Bidding At Auction Bids may be executed during the auction in person by paddle or by telephone or prior to the sale in writing by absentee bid. BIDDING IN PERSON To bid in person, you will need to register for and collect a paddle before the auction begins. Proof of identity in the form of government issued identification will be required, as will an original signature. We may also require that you furnish us with a bank reference. New clients are encouraged to register at least 48 hours in advance of a sale to allow sufficient time for us to process your information. All lots sold will be invoiced to the name and address to which the paddle has been registered and invoices cannot be transferred to other names and addresses. Please do not misplace your paddle. In the event you lose it, inform a Phillips de Pury & Company staff member immediately. At the end of the auction, please return your paddle to the registration desk. Bidding By Telephone If you cannot attend the auction, you may bid live on the telephone with one of our multi-lingual staff members. This service must be arranged at least 24 hours in advance of the sale and is available for lots whose low pre-sale estimate is at least $1000. Telephone bids may be recorded. By bidding on the telephone, you consent to the recording of your conversation. We suggest that you leave a maximum bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and any applicable taxes, which we can execute on your behalf in the event we are unable to reach you by telephone. Absentee Bids If you are unable to attend the auction and cannot participate by telephone, Phillips de Pury & Company will be happy to execute written bids on your behalf. A bidding form can be found at the back of this catalogue. This service is free and confidential. Bids must be placed in the currency of the sale. Our staff will attempt to execute an absentee bid at the lowest possible price taking into account the reserve and other bidders. Always indicate a maximum bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and any applicable taxes. Unlimited bids will not be accepted. Any absentee bid must be received at least 24 hours in advance of the sale. In the event of identical bids, the earliest bid received will take precedence. Employee Bidding Employees of Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies, including the auctioneer, may bid at the auction by placing absentee bids so long as they do not know the reserve when submitting their absentee bids and otherwise comply with our employee bidding procedures. Bidding Increments Bidding generally opens below the low estimate and advances in increments of up to 10%, subject to the auctioneer’s discretion. Absentee bids that do not conform to the increments set below may be lowered to the next bidding increment. by $50s by $100s by $200s by $200s, 500, 800 (i.e. $4,200, 4,500, 4,800) by $500s by $1,000s by $2,000s by $2,000s, 5,000, 8,000 by $5,000s by $10,000s auctioneer’s discretion

$50 to $1,000 $1,000 to $2,000 $2,000 to $3,000 $3,000 to $5,000 $5,000 to $10,000 $10,000 to $20,000 $20,000 to $30,000 $30,000 to $50,000 $50,000 to $100,000 $100,000 to $200,000 above $200,000

The auctioneer may vary the increments during the course of the auction at his or her own discretion. 3 THE AUCTION Conditions of Sale As noted above, the auction is governed by the Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty. All prospective bidders should read them carefully. They may be amended by saleroom addendum or auctioneer’s announcement.

179

Interested Parties Announcement In situations where a person allowed to bid on a lot has a direct or indirect interest in such lot, such as the beneficiary or executor of an estate selling the lot, a joint owner of the lot or a party providing or participating in a guarantee on the lot, Phillips de Pury & Company will make an announcement in the saleroom that interested parties may bid on the lot. Consecutive and Responsive Bidding The auctioneer may open the bidding on any lot by placing a bid on behalf of the seller. The auctioneer may further bid on behalf of the seller up to the amount of the reserve by placing consecutive bids or bids in response to other bidders. 4 AFTER THE AUCTION Payment Buyers are required to pay for purchases immediately following the auction unless other arrangements are agreed with Phillips de Pury & Company in writing in advance of the sale. Payments must be made in US dollars either by cash, check drawn on a US bank or wire transfer, as noted in Paragraph 6 of the Conditions of Sale. It is our corporate policy not to make or accept single or multiple payments in cash or cash equivalents in excess of US$10,000. Credit Cards As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company will accept American Express, Visa and Mastercard to pay for invoices of $10,000 or less. Collection It is our policy to request proof of identity on collection of a lot. A lot will be released to the buyer or the buyer’s authorized representative when Phillips de Pury & Company has received full and cleared payment and we are not owed any other amount by the buyer. Promptly after the auction, we will transfer all lots to our warehouse located at 29-09 37th Avenue in Long Island City, Queens, New York. All purchased lots should be collected at this location during our regular weekday business hours. As a courtesy to clients, we will upon request transfer purchased lots suitable for hand carry back to our premises at 450 West 15th Street, New York, New York for collection within 30 days following the date of the auction. We will levy removal, interest, storage and handling charges on uncollected lots. Loss or Damage Buyers are reminded that Phillips de Pury & Company accepts liability for loss or damage to lots for a maximum of five days following the auction. Transport and Shipping As a free service for buyers, Phillips de Pury & Company will wrap purchased lots for hand carry only. We will, at the buyer’s expense, either provide packing, handling and shipping services or coordinate with shipping agents instructed by the buyer in order to facilitate such services for property purchased at Phillips de Pury & Company. Please refer to Paragraph 7 of the Conditions of Sale for more information. Export and Import Licenses Before bidding for any property, prospective bidders are advised to make independent inquiries as to whether a license is required to export the property from the United States or to import it into another country. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to comply with all import and export laws and to obtain any necessary licenses or permits. The denial of any required license or permit or any delay in obtaining such documentation will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot. Endangered Species Items made of or incorporating plant or animal material, such as coral, crocodile, ivory, whalebone, rhinoceros horn or tortoiseshell, irrespective of age, percentage or value, may require a license or certificate prior to exportation and additional licenses or certificates upon importation to any foreign country. Please note that the ability to obtain an export license or certificate does not ensure the ability to obtain an import license or certificate in another country, and vice versa. We suggest that prospective bidders check with their own government regarding wildlife import requirements prior to placing a bid. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to obtain any necessary export or import licenses or certificates as well as any other required documentation. The denial of any required license or certificate or any delay in obtaining such documentation will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot.


GUIDE FOR PROSPECTIVE BUYERS BUYING AT AUCTION The following pages are designed to offer you information on how to buy at auction at Phillips de Pury & Company. Our staff will be happy to assist you. CONDITIONS OF SALE The Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty which appear later in this catalogue govern the auction. Bidders are strongly encouraged to read them as they outline the legal relationship among Phillips, the seller and the buyer and describe the terms upon which property is bought at auction. Please be advised that Phillips de Pury & Company generally acts as agent for the seller. BUYER’S PREMIUM Phillips de Pury & Company charges the successful bidder a commission, or buyer’s premium, on the hammer price of each lot sold. The buyer’s premium is payable by the buyer as part of the total purchase price at the following rates: 25% of the hammer price up to and including $50,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above $50,000 up to and including $1,000,000 and 12% of the portion of the hammer price above $1,000,000. 1 PRIOR TO AUCTION Catalogue Subscriptions If you would like to purchase a catalogue for this auction or any other Phillips de Pury & Company sale, please contact us at +1 212 940 1240 or +44 20 7318 4010. Pre-Sale Estimates Pre-Sale estimates are intended as a guide for prospective buyers. Any bid within the high and low estimate range should, in our opinion, offer a chance of success. However, many lots achieve prices below or above the pre-sale estimates. Where “Estimate on Request” appears, please contact the specialist department for further information. It is advisable to contact us closer to the time of the auction as estimates can be subject to revision. Pre-sale estimates do not include the buyer’s premium or any applicable taxes. Pre-Sale Estimates In Pounds Sterling And Euros Although the sale is conducted in US dollars, the pre-sale estimates in the auction catalogues may also be printed in pounds sterling and/or euros. Since the exchange rate is that at the time of catalogue production and not at the date of auction, you should treat estimates in pounds sterling or euros as a guide only. Catalogue Entries Phillips may print in the catalogue entry the history of ownership of a work of art, as well as the exhibition history of the property and references to the work in art publications. While we are careful in the cataloguing process, provenance, exhibition and literature references may not be exhaustive and in some cases we may intentionally refrain from disclosing the identity of previous owners. Please note that all dimensions of the property set forth in the catalogue entry are approximate. Condition Of Lots Our catalogues include references to condition only in the descriptions of multiple works (e.g., prints). Such references, though, do not amount to a full description of condition. The absence of reference to the condition of a lot in the catalogue entry does not imply that the lot is free from faults or imperfections. Solely as a convenience to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company may provide condition reports. In preparing such reports, our specialists assess the condition in a manner appropriate to the estimated value of the property and the nature of the auction in which it is included. While condition reports are prepared honestly and carefully, our staff are not professional restorers or trained conservators. We therefore encourage all prospective buyers to inspect the property at the pre-sale exhibitions and recommend, particularly in the case of any lot of significant value, that you retain your own restorer or professional advisor to report to you on the property’s condition prior to bidding. Any prospective buyer of photographs or prints should always request a condition report because all such property is sold unframed, unless otherwise indicated in the condition report. If a lot is sold framed, Phillips de Pury & Company accepts no liability for the condition of the frame. If we sell any lot unframed, we will be pleased to refer the purchaser to a professional framer. Pre-Auction Viewing Pre-auction viewings are open to the public and free of charge. Our specialists are available to give advice and condition reports at viewings or by appointment. Electrical And Mechanical Lots All lots with electrical and/or mechanical features are sold on the basis of their decorative value only and should not be assumed to be operative. It is essential that, prior to any intended use, the electrical system is verified and approved by a qualified electrician. Symbol Key The following key explains the symbols you may see inside this catalogue. O Guaranteed Property The seller of lots with this symbol has been guaranteed a minimum price. The guarantee may be provided by Phillips de

Pury & Company, by a third party or jointly by us and a third party. Phillips de Pury & Company and third parties providing or participating in a guarantee may benefit financially if a guaranteed lot is sold successfully and may incur a loss if the sale is not successful. ∆ Property In Which Phillips De Pury & Company Has An Ownership Interest Lots with this symbol indicate that Phillips de Pury & Company owns the lot in whole or in part or has an economic interest in the lot equivalent to an ownership interest.

No Reserve Unless indicated by a , all lots in this catalogue are offered subject to a reserve. A reserve is the confidential value established between Phillips de Pury & Company and the seller and below which a lot may not be sold. The reserve for each lot is generally set at a percentage of the low estimate and will not exceed the low pre-sale estimate.

2 BIDDING IN THE SALE Bidding At Auction Bids may be executed during the auction in person by paddle or by telephone or prior to the sale in writing by absentee bid. BIDDING IN PERSON To bid in person, you will need to register for and collect a paddle before the auction begins. Proof of identity in the form of government issued identification will be required, as will an original signature. We may also require that you furnish us with a bank reference. New clients are encouraged to register at least 48 hours in advance of a sale to allow sufficient time for us to process your information. All lots sold will be invoiced to the name and address to which the paddle has been registered and invoices cannot be transferred to other names and addresses. Please do not misplace your paddle. In the event you lose it, inform a Phillips de Pury & Company staff member immediately. At the end of the auction, please return your paddle to the registration desk. Bidding By Telephone If you cannot attend the auction, you may bid live on the telephone with one of our multi-lingual staff members. This service must be arranged at least 24 hours in advance of the sale and is available for lots whose low pre-sale estimate is at least $1000. Telephone bids may be recorded. By bidding on the telephone, you consent to the recording of your conversation. We suggest that you leave a maximum bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and any applicable taxes, which we can execute on your behalf in the event we are unable to reach you by telephone. Absentee Bids If you are unable to attend the auction and cannot participate by telephone, Phillips de Pury & Company will be happy to execute written bids on your behalf. A bidding form can be found at the back of this catalogue. This service is free and confidential. Bids must be placed in the currency of the sale. Our staff will attempt to execute an absentee bid at the lowest possible price taking into account the reserve and other bidders. Always indicate a maximum bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and any applicable taxes. Unlimited bids will not be accepted. Any absentee bid must be received at least 24 hours in advance of the sale. In the event of identical bids, the earliest bid received will take precedence. Employee Bidding Employees of Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies, including the auctioneer, may bid at the auction by placing absentee bids so long as they do not know the reserve when submitting their absentee bids and otherwise comply with our employee bidding procedures. Bidding Increments Bidding generally opens below the low estimate and advances in increments of up to 10%, subject to the auctioneer’s discretion. Absentee bids that do not conform to the increments set below may be lowered to the next bidding increment. $50 to $1,000 $1,000 to $2,000 $2,000 to $3,000 $3,000 to $5,000 $5,000 to $10,000 $10,000 to $20,000 $20,000 to $30,000 $30,000 to $50,000 $50,000 to $100,000 $100,000 to $200,000 above $200,000

by $50s by $100s by $200s by $200s, 500, 800 (i.e. $4,200, 4,500, 4,800) by $500s by $1,000s by $2,000s by $2,000s, 5,000, 8,000 by $5,000s by $10,000s auctioneer’s discretion

The auctioneer may vary the increments during the course of the auction at his or her own discretion. 3 THE AUCTION Conditions of Sale As noted above, the auction is governed by the Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty. All prospective bidders should read them carefully. They may be amended by saleroom addendum or auctioneer’s announcement. Interested Parties Announcement 180

In situations where a person allowed to bid on a lot has a direct or indirect interest in such lot, such as the beneficiary or executor of an estate selling the lot, a joint owner of the lot or a party providing or participating in a guarantee on the lot, Phillips de Pury & Company will make an announcement in the saleroom that interested parties may bid on the lot. Consecutive and Responsive Bidding The auctioneer may open the bidding on any lot by placing a bid on behalf of the seller. The auctioneer may further bid on behalf of the seller up to the amount of the reserve by placing consecutive bids or bids in response to other bidders. 4 AFTER THE AUCTION Payment Buyers are required to pay for purchases immediately following the auction unless other arrangements are agreed with Phillips de Pury & Company in writing in advance of the sale. Payments must be made in US dollars either by cash, check drawn on a US bank or wire transfer, as noted in Paragraph 6 of the Conditions of Sale. It is our corporate policy not to make or accept single or multiple payments in cash or cash equivalents in excess of US$10,000. Credit Cards As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company will accept American Express, Visa and Mastercard to pay for invoices of $10,000 or less. Collection It is our policy to request proof of identity on collection of a lot. A lot will be released to the buyer or the buyer’s authorized representative when Phillips de Pury & Company has received full and cleared payment and we are not owed any other amount by the buyer. Promptly after the auction, we will transfer all lots to our warehouse located at 29-09 37th Avenue in Long Island City, Queens, New York. All purchased lots should be collected at this location during our regular weekday business hours. As a courtesy to clients, we will upon request transfer purchased lots suitable for hand carry back to our premises at 450 West 15th Street, New York, New York for collection within 30 days following the date of the auction. We will levy removal, interest, storage and handling charges on uncollected lots. Loss or Damage Buyers are reminded that Phillips de Pury & Company accepts liability for loss or damage to lots for a maximum of five days following the auction. Transport and Shipping As a free service for buyers, Phillips de Pury & Company will wrap purchased lots for hand carry only. We will, at the buyer’s expense, either provide packing, handling and shipping services or coordinate with shipping agents instructed by the buyer in order to facilitate such services for property purchased at Phillips de Pury & Company. Please refer to Paragraph 7 of the Conditions of Sale for more information. Export and Import Licenses Before bidding for any property, prospective bidders are advised to make independent inquiries as to whether a license is required to export the property from the United States or to import it into another country. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to comply with all import and export laws and to obtain any necessary licenses or permits. The denial of any required license or permit or any delay in obtaining such documentation will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot. Endangered Species Items made of or incorporating plant or animal material, such as coral, crocodile, ivory, whalebone, rhinoceros horn or tortoiseshell, irrespective of age, percentage or value, may require a license or certificate prior to exportation and additional licenses or certificates upon importation to any foreign country. Please note that the ability to obtain an export license or certificate does not ensure the ability to obtain an import license or certificate in another country, and vice versa. We suggest that prospective bidders check with their own government regarding wildlife import requirements prior to placing a bid. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to obtain any necessary export or import licenses or certificates as well as any other required documentation. The denial of any required license or certificate or any delay in obtaining such documentation will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot.


CONDITIONS OF SALE The Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty set forth below govern the relationship between bidders and buyers, on the one hand, and Phillips de Pury & Company and sellers, on the other hand. All prospective buyers should read these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty carefully before bidding. 1 INTRODUCTION Each lot in this catalogue is offered for sale and sold subject to: (a) the Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty; (b) additional notices and terms printed in other places in this catalogue, including the Guide for Prospective Buyers, and (c) supplements to this catalogue or other written material posted by Phillips de Pury & Company in the saleroom, in each case as amended by any addendum or announcement by the auctioneer prior to the auction By bidding at the auction, whether in person, through an agent, by written bid, by telephone bid or other means, bidders and buyers agree to be bound by these Conditions of Sale, as so changed or supplemented, and Authorship Warranty. These Conditions of Sale, as so changed or supplemented, and Authorship Warranty contain all the terms on which Phillips de Pury & Company and the seller contract with the buyer.

instructed by the bidder, execute written absentee bids on a bidder’s behalf. Absentee bidders are required to submit bids on the “Absentee Bid Form,” a copy of which is printed in this catalogue or otherwise available from Phillips de Pury & Company. Bids must be placed in the currency of the sale. The bidder must clearly indicate the maximum amount he or she intends to bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and any applicable sales or use taxes. The auctioneer will not accept an instruction to execute an absentee bid which does not indicate such maximum bid. Our staff will attempt to execute an absentee bid at the lowest possible price taking into account the reserve and other bidders. Any absentee bid must be received at least 24 hours in advance of the sale. In the event of identical bids, the earliest bid received will take precedence. (c) Telephone bidders are required to submit bids on the “Telephone Bid Form,” a copy of which is printed in this catalogue or otherwise available from Phillips de Pury & Company. Telephone bidding is available for lots whose low pre-sale estimate is at least $1000. Phillips de Pury & Company reserves the right to require written confirmation of a successful bid from a telephone bidder by fax or otherwise immediately after such bid is accepted by the auctioneer. Telephone bids may be recorded and, by bidding on the telephone, a bidder consents to the recording of the conversation.

2 PHILLIPS de PURY & COMPANY AS AGENT Phillips de Pury & Company acts as an agent for the seller, unless otherwise indicated in this catalogue or at the time of auction. On occasion, Phillips de Pury & Company may own a lot, in which case we will act in a principal capacity as a consignor, or may have a legal, beneficial or financial interest in a lot as a secured creditor or otherwise.

(d) When making a bid, whether in person, by absentee bid or on the telephone, a bidder accepts personal liability to pay the purchase price, as described more fully in Paragraph 6 (a) below, plus all other applicable charges unless it has been explicitly agreed in writing with Phillips de Pury & Company before the commencement of the auction that the bidder is acting as agent on behalf of an identified third party acceptable to Phillips de Pury & Company and that we will only look to the principal for such payment.

3 CATALOGUE DESCRIPTIONS AND CONDITION OF PROPERTY Lots are sold subject to the Authorship Warranty, as described in the catalogue (unless such description is changed or supplemented, as provided in Paragraph 1 above) and in the condition that they are in at the time of the sale on the following basis.

(e) Arranging absentee and telephone bids is a free service provided by Phillips de Pury & Company to prospective buyers. While we undertake to exercise reasonable care in undertaking such activity, we cannot accept liability for failure to execute such bids except where such failure is caused by our willful misconduct.

(a) The knowledge of Phillips de Pury & Company in relation to each lot is partially dependent on information provided to us by the seller, and Phillips de Pury & Company is not able to and does not carry out exhaustive due diligence on each lot. Prospective buyers acknowledge this fact and accept responsibility for carrying out inspections and investigations to satisfy themselves as to the lots in which they may be interested. Notwithstanding the foregoing, we shall exercise such reasonable care when making express statements in catalogue descriptions or condition reports as is consistent with our role as auctioneer of lots in this sale and in light of (i) the information provided to us by the seller, (ii) scholarship and technical knowledge and (iii) the generally accepted opinions of relevant experts, in each case at the time any such express statement is made. (b) Each lot offered for sale at Phillips de Pury & Company is available for inspection by prospective buyers prior to the auction. Phillips de Pury & Company accepts bids on lots on the basis that bidders (and independent experts on their behalf, to the extent appropriate given the nature and value of the lot and the bidder’s own expertise) have fully inspected the lot prior to bidding and have satisfied themselves as to both the condition of the lot and the accuracy of its description. (c) Prospective buyers acknowledge that many lots are of an age and type which means that they are not in perfect condition. As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company may prepare and provide condition reports to assist prospective buyers when they are inspecting lots. Catalogue descriptions and condition reports may make reference to particular imperfections of a lot, but bidders should note that lots may have other faults not expressly referred to in the catalogue or condition report. All dimensions are approximate. Illustrations are for identification purposes only and cannot be used as precise indications of size or to convey full information as to the actual condition of lots. (d) Information provided to prospective buyers in respect of any lot, including any pre-sale estimate, whether written or oral, and information in any catalogue, condition or other report, commentary or valuation, is not a representation of fact but rather a statement of opinion held by Phillips de Pury & Company. Any pre-sale estimate may not be relied on as a prediction of the selling price or value of the lot and may be revised from time to time by Phillips de Pury & Company in our absolute discretion. Neither Phillips de Pury & Company nor any of our affiliated companies shall be liable for any difference between the pre-sale estimates for any lot and the actual price achieved at auction or upon resale. 4 BIDDING AT AUCTION (a) Phillips de Pury & Company has absolute discretion to refuse admission to the auction or participation in the sale. All bidders must register for a paddle prior to bidding, supplying such information and references as required by Phillips de Pury & Company. (b) As a convenience to bidders who cannot attend the auction in person, Phillips de Pury & Company may, if so

(f) Employees of Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies, including the auctioneer, may bid at the auction by placing absentee bids so long as they do not know the reserve when submitting their absentee bids and otherwise comply with our employee bidding procedures. 5 CONDUCT OF THE AUCTION each lot (a) Unless otherwise indicated by the symbol is offered subject to a reserve, which is the confidential minimum selling price agreed by Phillips de Pury & Company with the seller. The reserve will not exceed the low pre-sale estimate at the time of the auction.

(b)The auctioneer has discretion at any time to refuse any bid, withdraw any lot, re-offer a lot for sale (including after the fall of the hammer) if he or she believes there may be error or dispute and take such other action as he or she deems reasonably appropriate. (c) The auctioneer will commence and advance the bidding at levels and in increments he or she considers appropriate. In order to protect the reserve on any lot, the auctioneer may place one or more bids on behalf of the seller up to the reserve without indicating he or she is doing so, either by placing consecutive bids or bids in response to other bidders. (d) The sale will be conducted in US dollars and payment is due in US dollars. For the benefit of international clients, pre-sale estimates in the auction catalogue may be shown in pounds sterling and/or euros and, if so, will reflect approximate exchange rates. Accordingly, estimates in pounds sterling or euros should be treated only as a guide. (e) Subject to the auctioneer’s reasonable discretion, the highest bidder accepted by the auctioneer will be the buyer and the striking of the hammer marks the acceptance of the highest bid and the conclusion of a contract for sale between the seller and the buyer. Risk and responsibility for the lot passes to the buyer as set forth in Paragraph 7 below. (f) If a lot is not sold, the auctioneer will announce that it has been “passed,” “withdrawn,” “returned to owner” or “bought-in.” (g) Any post-auction sale of lots offered at auction shall incorporate these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty as if sold in the auction. 6 PURCHASE PRICE AND PAYMENT (a) The buyer agrees to pay us, in addition to the hammer price of the lot, the buyer’s premium and any applicable sales tax (the “Purchase Price”). The buyer’s premium is 25% of the hammer price up to and including $50,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above $50,000 up to and including $1,000,000 and 12% of the portion of the hammer price above $1,000,000. (b) Sales tax, use tax and excise and other taxes are payable in accordance with applicable law. All prices, fees, charges and expenses set out in these Conditions of Sale are quoted 181

exclusive of applicable taxes. Phillips de Pury & Company will only accept valid resale certificates from US dealers as proof of exemption from sales tax. All foreign buyers should contact the Client Accounting Department about tax matters. (c) Unless otherwise agreed, a buyer is required to pay for a purchased lot immediately following the auction regardless of any intention to obtain an export or import license or other permit for such lot. Payments must be made by the invoiced party in US dollars either by cash, check drawn on a US bank or wire transfer, as follows: (i) Phillips de Pury & Company will accept payment in cash provided that the total amount paid in cash or cash equivalents does not exceed US$10,000. Buyers paying in cash should do so in person at our Client Accounting Desk at 450 West 15th Street, Third Floor, during regular weekday business hours. (ii) Personal checks and banker’s drafts are accepted if drawn on a US bank and the buyer provides to us acceptable government issued identification. Checks and banker’s drafts should be made payable to “Phillips de Pury & Company LLC.” If payment is sent by mail, please send the check or banker’s draft to the attention of the Client Accounting Department at 450 West 15th Street, New York, NY 10011 and make sure that the sale and lot number is written on the check. Checks or banker’s drafts drawn by third parties will not be accepted. (iii) Payment by wire transfer may be sent directly to Phillips de Pury & Company. Bank transfer details: Citibank 322 West 23rd Street, New York, NY 10011 SWIFT Code: CITIUS33 ABA Routing: 021 000 089 For the account of Phillips de Pury & Company LLC Account no.: 58347736 Please reference the relevant sale and lot number. (d) Title in a purchased lot will not pass until Phillips de Pury & Company has received the Purchase Price for that lot in cleared funds. Phillips de Pury & Company is not obliged to release a lot to the buyer until title in the lot has passed and appropriate identification has been provided, and any earlier release does not affect the passing of title or the buyer’s unconditional obligation to pay the Purchase Price. 7 COLLECTION OF PROPERTY (a) Phillips de Pury & Company will not release a lot to the buyer until we have received payment of its Purchase Price in full in cleared funds, the buyer has paid all outstanding amounts due to Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies, including any charges payable pursuant to Paragraph 8 (a) below, and the buyer has satisfied such other terms as we in our sole discretion shall require, including completing any anti-money laundering or antiterrorism financing checks. As soon as a buyer has satisfied all of the foregoing conditions, he or she should contact our Shipping Department at +1 212 940 1372 or +1 212 940 1373 to arrange for collection of purchased property. (b) The buyer must arrange for collection of a purchased lot within five days of the date of the auction. Promptly after the auction, we will transfer all lots to our warehouse located at 29-09 37th Avenue in Long Island City, Queens, New York. All purchased lots should be collected at this location during our regular weekday business hours. As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company will upon request transfer on a bi-weekly basis purchased lots suitable for hand carry back to our premises at 450 West 15th Street, New York, New York for collection within 30 days following the date of the auction. Purchased lots are at the buyer’s risk, including the responsibility for insurance, from the earlier to occur of (i) the date of collection or (ii) five days after the auction. Until risk passes, Phillips de Pury & Company will compensate the buyer for any loss or damage to a purchased lot up to a maximum of the Purchase Price paid, subject to our usual exclusions for loss or damage to property. (c) As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company will, without charge, wrap purchased lots for hand carry only. We will, at the buyer’s expense, either provide packing, handling, insurance and shipping services or coordinate with shipping agents instructed by the buyer in order to facilitate such services for property bought at Phillips de Pury & Company. Any such instruction, whether or not made at our recommendation, is entirely at the buyer’s risk and responsibility, and we will not be liable for acts or omissions of third party packers or shippers. Third party shippers should contact us by telephone at +1 212 940 1376 or by fax at +1 212 924 6477 at least 24 hours in advance of collection in order to schedule pickup. (d) Phillips de Pury & Company will require presentation of government issued identification prior to release of a lot to the buyer or the buyer’s authorized representative. 8 FAILURE TO COLLECT PURCHASES (a) If the buyer pays the Purchase Price but fails to collect a purchased lot within 30 days of the auction, the buyer will incur a late collection fee of $35, storage charges of $5 per day and pro rated insurance charges of .1% of the Purchase Price per month on each uncollected lot.


(b) If a purchased lot is paid for but not collected within six months of the auction, the buyer authorizes Phillips de Pury & Company, upon notice, to arrange a resale of the item by auction or private sale, with estimates and a reserve set at Phillips de Pury & Company’s reasonable discretion. The proceeds of such sale will be applied to pay for storage charges and any other outstanding costs and expenses owed by the buyer to Phillips de Pury & Company or our affiliated companies and the remainder will be forfeited unless collected by the buyer within two years of the original auction. 9 REMEDIES FOR NON-PAYMENT (a) Without prejudice to any rights the seller may have, if the buyer without prior agreement fails to make payment of the Purchase Price for a lot in cleared funds within five days of the auction, Phillips de Pury & Company may in our sole discretion exercise one or more of the following remedies: (i) store the lot at Phillips de Pury & Company’s premises or elsewhere at the buyer’s sole risk and expense at the same rates as set forth in Paragraph 8 (a) above; (ii) cancel the sale of the lot, retaining any partial payment of the Purchase Price as liquidated damages; (iii) reject future bids from the buyer or render such bids subject to payment of a deposit; (iv) charge interest at 12% per annum from the date payment became due until the date the Purchase Price is received in cleared funds; (v) subject to notification of the buyer, exercise a lien over any of the buyer’s property which is in the possession of Phillips de Pury & Company and instruct our affiliated companies to exercise a lien over any of the buyer’s property which is in their possession and, in each case, no earlier than 30 days from the date of such notice, arrange the sale of such property and apply the proceeds to the amount owed to Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies after the deduction from sale proceeds of our standard vendor’s commission and all sale-related expenses; (vi) resell the lot by auction or private sale, with estimates and a reserve set at Phillips de Pury & Company’s reasonable discretion, it being understood that in the event such resale is for less than the original hammer price and buyer’s premium for that lot, the buyer will remain liable for the shortfall together with all costs incurred in such resale; (vii) commence legal proceedings to recover the hammer price and buyer’s premium for that lot, together with interest and the costs of such proceedings; or (viii) release the name and address of the buyer to the seller to enable the seller to commence legal proceedings to recover the amounts due and legal costs. (b) As security to us for full payment by the buyer of all outstanding amounts due to Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies, Phillips de Pury & Company retains, and the buyer grants to us, a security interest in each lot purchased at auction by the buyer and in any other property or money of the buyer in, or coming into, our possession or the possession of one of our affiliated companies. We may apply such money or deal with such property as the Uniform Commercial Code or other applicable law permits a secured creditor to do. In the event that we exercise a lien over property in our possession because the buyer is in default to one of our affiliated companies, we will so notify the buyer. Our security interest in any individual lot will terminate upon actual delivery of the lot to the buyer or the buyer’s agent. (c) In the event the buyer is in default of payment to any of our affiliated companies, the buyer also irrevocably authorizes Phillips de Pury & Company to pledge the buyer’s property in our possession by actual or constructive delivery to our affiliated company as security for the payment of any outstanding amount due. Phillips de Pury & Company will notify the buyer if the buyer’s property has been delivered to an affiliated company by way of pledge. 10 Rescission by Phillips de Pury & Company Phillips de Pury & Company shall have the right, but not the obligation, to rescind a sale without notice to the buyer if we reasonably believe that there is a material breach of the seller’s representations and warranties or the Authorship Warranty or an adverse claim is made by a third party. Upon notice of Phillips de Pury & Company’s election to rescind the sale, the buyer will promptly return the lot to Phillips de Pury & Company, and we will then refund the Purchase Price paid to us. As described more fully in Paragraph 13 below, the refund shall constitute the sole remedy and recourse of the buyer against Phillips de Pury & Company and the seller with respect to such rescinded sale.. 11 Export, Import and Endangered Species Licenses and Permits Before bidding for any property, prospective buyers are advised to make their own inquiries as to whether a license is required to export a lot from the United States or to import it into another country. Prospective buyers are advised that some countries prohibit the import of property made of or incorporating plant or animal material, such as coral, crocodile, ivory, whalebone, rhinoceros horn or tortoiseshell, irrespective of age, percentage or value. Accordingly, prior to bidding, prospective buyers considering export of purchased lots should familiarize themselves with relevant export and import regulations of the countries concerned. It is solely the buyer’s responsibility to comply with these laws and to obtain any necessary export, import and endangered species licenses or permits. Failure to obtain a license or permit or delay in so doing will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot.

12 Client Information In connection with the management and operation of our business and the marketing and supply of auction related services, or as required by law, we may ask clients to provide personal information about themselves or obtain information about clients from third parties (e.g., credit information). If clients provide us with information that is defined by law as “sensitive,” they agree that Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies may use it for the above purposes. Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies will not use or process sensitive information for any other purpose without the client’s express consent. If you would like further information on our policies on personal data or wish to make corrections to your information, please contact us at +1 212 940 1228. If you would prefer not to receive details of future events please call the above number. 13 Limitation of Liability (a) Subject to subparagraph (e) below, the total liability of Phillips de Pury & Company, our affiliated companies and the seller to the buyer in connection with the sale of a lot shall be limited to the Purchase Price actually paid by the buyer for the lot. (b) Except as otherwise provided in this Paragraph 13, none of Phillips de Pury & Company, any of our affiliated companies or the seller (i) is liable for any errors or omissions, whether orally or in writing, in information provided to prospective buyers by Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies or (ii) accepts responsibility to any bidder in respect of acts or omissions, whether negligent or otherwise, by Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies in connection with the conduct of the auction or for any other matter relating to the sale of any lot. (c) All warranties other than the Authorship Warranty, express or implied, including any warranty of satisfactory quality and fitness for purpose, are specifically excluded by Phillips de Pury & Company, our affiliated companies and the seller to the fullest extent permitted by law. (d) Subject to subparagraph (e) below, none of Phillips de Pury & Company, any of our affiliated companies or the seller shall be liable to the buyer for any loss or damage beyond the refund of the Purchase Price referred to in subparagraph (a) above, whether such loss or damage is characterized as direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential, or for the payment of interest on the Purchase Price to the fullest extent permitted by law. (e) No provision in these Conditions of Sale shall be deemed to exclude or limit the liability of Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies to the buyer in respect of any fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation made by any of us or in respect of death or personal injury caused by our negligent acts or omissions. 14 Copyright The copyright in all images, illustrations and written materials produced by or for Phillips de Pury & Company relating to a lot, including the contents of this catalogue, is and shall remain at all times the property of Phillips de Pury & Company and such images and materials may not be used by the buyer or any other party without our prior written consent. Phillips de Pury & Company and the seller make no representations or warranties that the buyer of a lot will acquire any copyright or other reproduction rights in it. 15 General (a) These Conditions of Sale, as changed or supplemented as provided in Paragraph 1 above, and Authorship Warranty set out the entire agreement between the parties with respect to the transactions contemplated herein and supersede all prior and contemporaneous written, oral or implied understandings, representations and agreements. (b) Notices to Phillips de Pury & Company shall be in writing and addressed to the department in charge of the sale, quoting the reference number specified at the beginning of the sale catalogue. Notices to clients shall be addressed to the last address notified by them in writing to Phillips de Pury & Company. (c) These Conditions of Sale are not assignable by any buyer without our prior written consent but are binding on the buyer’s successors, assigns and representatives. (d) Should any provision of these Conditions of Sale be held void, invalid or unenforceable for any reason, the remaining provisions shall remain in full force and effect. No failure by any party to exercise, nor any delay in exercising, any right or remedy under these Conditions of Sale shall act as a waiver or release thereof in whole or in part. 16 Law and Jurisdiction (a) ThThe rights and obligations of the parties with respect to these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty, the conduct of the auction and any matters related to any of the foregoing shall be governed by and interpreted in accordance with laws of the State of New York, excluding its conflicts of law rules. (b) Phillips de Pury & Company, all bidders and all sellers agree to the exclusive jurisdiction of the (i) state courts of the State of New York located in New York City and (ii) the federal 182

courts for the Southern and Eastern Districts of New York to settle all disputes arising in connection with all aspects of all matters or transactions to which these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty relate or apply. (c) All bidders and sellers irrevocably consent to service of process or any other documents in connection with proceedings in any court by facsimile transmission, personal service, delivery by mail or in any other manner permitted by New York law or the law of the place of service, at the last address of the bidder or seller known to Phillips de Pury & Company.

special Conditions of sale for purchasers of jewelry Catalogue Descriptions and Condition of Property (a) As a matter of policy, Phillips de Pury & Company will obtain gemological reports from officially recognized laboratories for certain gemstones offered for sale. A summary of these reports is included in the catalogue description for a lot, and a copy of the report is available upon request. Reports from American gemological laboratories used by Phillips de Pury & Company will generally disclose heat enhancement or treatment of colored gemstones. European gemological laboratory reports will disclose heat enhancement only if specifically requested but will generally confirm when no heat enhancement or treatment has been made. Variations in approach and technology used by different gemological laboratories may result in a lack of consensus among reports as to whether any particular gemstone has been treated, the extent of treatment and whether treatment is permanent. It is not feasible for Phillips de Pury & Company to obtain such reports for all gemstones offered at auction. Prospective buyers should, therefore, bear in mind that colored gemstones offered for sale without a gemological report or a specific statement in the catalogue entry may have been treated to enhance color, transparency or clarity. Enhancement of colored gemstones may affect market value, and our pre-sale estimates reflect the assumption that any colored gemstone not described in the catalogue entry as natural may have been treated. (b) Prospective buyers acknowledge that many lots are of an age and type which means that they are not in perfect condition. As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company may prepare and provide condition reports to assist prospective buyers when they are inspecting lots. Catalogue descriptions and condition reports may make reference to particular imperfections of a lot, but bidders should note that lots may have other faults not expressly referred to in the catalogue or condition report. All weights are approximate, whether or not qualified by the terms “stated to be” or “approximate.” Illustrations are for identification purposes only and cannot be used as precise indications of size or weight or to convey full information as to the actual condition of lots. (c) While Phillips de Pury & Company attempts to obtain accurate information on the country of origin of the gemstones offered for sale, we do not guarantee the accuracy of the catalogue or other description of such information. Collection of Property The buyer must arrange for collection of a purchased lot within five days of the date of the auction. All purchased lots should be collected at our premises at 450 West 15th Street, New York, New York during our regular weekday business hours. Purchased lots are at the buyer’s risk, including the responsibility for insurance, from the earlier to occur of (i) the date of collection or (ii) five days after the auction. Until risk passes, Phillips de Pury & Company will compensate the buyer for any loss or damage to a purchased lot up to a maximum of the Purchase Price paid, subject to our usual exclusions for loss or damage to property

AUTHORSHIP WARRANTY Phillips de Pury & Company warrants the authorship of property in this auction catalogue for a period of five years from date of sale by Phillips de Pury & Company, subject to the exclusions and limitations set forth below. (a) Phillips de Pury & Company gives this Authorship Warranty only to the original buyer of record (i.e., the registered successful bidder) of any lot. This Authorship Warranty does not extend to (i) subsequent owners of the property, including purchasers or recipients by way of gift from the original buyer, heirs, successors, beneficiaries and assigns; (ii) property created prior to 1870, unless the property is determined to be counterfeit (defined as a forgery made less than 50 years ago with an intent to deceive) and has a value at the date of the claim under this warranty which is materially less than the Purchase Price paid; (iii) property where the description in the catalogue states that there is a conflict of opinion on the authorship of the property; (iv) property where our attribution of authorship was on the date of sale consistent with the generally accepted opinions of specialists, scholars or other experts; or (v) property whose


description or dating is proved inaccurate by means of scientific methods or tests not generally accepted for use at the time of the publication of the catalogue or which were at such time deemed unreasonably expensive or impractical to use. (b) In any claim for breach of the Authorship Warranty, Phillips de Pury & Company reserves the right, as a condition to rescinding any sale under this warranty, to require the buyer to provide to us at the buyer’s expense the written opinions of two recognized experts approved in advance by Phillips de Pury & Company. We shall not be bound by any expert report produced by the buyer and reserve the right to consult our own experts at our expense. If Phillips de Pury & Company agrees to rescind a sale under the Authorship Warranty, we shall refund to the buyer the reasonable costs charged by the experts commissioned by the buyer and approved in advance by us. (c) Subject to the exclusions set forth in subparagraph (a) above, the buyer may bring a claim for breach of the Authorship Warranty provided that (i) he or she has notified Phillips de Pury & Company in writing within three months of receiving any information which causes the buyer to question the authorship of the lot, specifying the auction in which the property was included, the lot number in the auction catalogue and the reasons why the authorship of the lot is being questioned and (ii) the buyer returns the lot to Phillips de Pury & Company in the same condition as at the time of its auction and is able to transfer good and marketable title in the lot free from any third party claim arising after the date of the auction. (d) The buyer understands and agrees that the exclusive remedy for any breach of the Authorship Warranty shall be rescission of the sale and refund of the original Purchase Price paid. This remedy shall constitute the sole remedy and recourse of the buyer against Phillips de Pury & Company, any of our affiliated companies and the seller and is in lieu of any other remedy available as a matter of law. This means that none of Phillips de Pury & Company, any of our affiliated companies or the seller shall be liable for loss or damage beyond the remedy expressly provided in this Authorship Warranty, whether such loss or damage is characterized as direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential, or for the payment of interest on the original Purchase Price.

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phillips de pury & company

Senior Partners Michael McGinnis Dr. Michaela Neumeister

Chairman Simon de Pury Chief Executive Officer Bernd Runge

Advisory Board Maria Bell Janna Bullock Lisa Eisner Lapo Elkann Ben Elliot Lady Elena Foster H.I.H. Francesca von Habsburg Marc Jacobs Malcolm McLaren Ernest Mourmans Aby Rosen Christiane zu Salm Princess Gloria vonThurn undTaxis Jean Michel Wilmotte Anita Zabludowicz

Partners Aileen Agopian Sean Cleary Alexander Payne Rodman Primack Olivier Vrankenne

Senior Vice President Thierry Nataf

WORLDWIDE OFFICES NEW YORK 450 West 15 Street NewYork NY 10011 USA +1 212 940 1200 +1 212 924 5403 fax

PARIS C/O Pro First 15 Rue de la Paix 75002 Paris France +33 1 42 78 67 77 +33 1 42 78 23 07 fax

BERLIN Auguststrasse 19 10117 Berlin Germany +49 30 880 018 42 +49 30 880 018 43 fax

LONDON Howick Place London SW1P 1BB United Kingdom +44 20 7318 4010 +44 20 7318 4011 fax

MUNICH Maximiliansplatz 12a 80333 Munich Germany +49 89 238 88 48 0 +49 89 238 88 48 15 fax

GENEVA 23, quai des Bergues 1201 Geneva Switzerland +41 22 906 80 00 +41 22 906 80 01 fax

SPECIALIST AND SERVICE DEPARTMENTS

CONTEMPORARY ART New York Michael McGinnis, Worldwide Director +1 212 940 1254 Aileen Agopian, New York Director +1 212 940 1255 Rodman Primack +1 212 940 1256 Jean-Michel Placent +1 212 940 1263 Timothy Malyk +1 212 940 1258 Sarah Mudge, Head of Part II, New York +1 212 940 1259 Roxana Bruno +1 212 940 1229 Sara Davidson +1 212 940 1262 Maria Bueno +1 212 940 1261 Peter Flores +1 212 940 1223 (Uli) Zhiheng Huang +1 212 940 1288 Eugenia Ballvé +1 212 940 1303 LONdON Anthony McNerney, Head of Evening Sale, London +44 20 7318 4067 Peter Sumner, Head of Day Sale, London +44 20 7318 4063 Laetitia Catoir +44 20 7318 4064 Silke Taprogge +44 20 7318 4012 Ivgenia Naiman +44 20 7318 4071 Fiona Biberstein +44 20 7318 4013 Siobhan O’Connor +44 20 7318 4093 Catherine Higgs +44 20 7318 4089 Raphael Lepine +44 20 7318 4078 Tanya Tikhnenko +44 20 7318 4065 Sarah Buchwald +44 20 7318 4085 Phillippa Willison +44 20 7318 4070

DESIGN New York Marcus Tremonto, Consultant +1 212 940 1268 Alex Heminway, New York Director +1 212 940 1269 Tara DeWitt +1 212 940 1265 Meaghan Roddy +1 212 940 1266 Stephanie Abraitis +1 212 940 1268 LONDON Alexander Payne, Worldwide Director +44 20 7318 4052 Ben Williams +44 20 7318 4027 Domenico Raimondo +44 20 7318 4016 Ellen Stelter +44 20 7318 4021 Marcus McDonald +44 20 7318 4014 PARIS Johanna Frydman +33 1 42 78 67 77 PHOTOGRAPHS New York Vanessa Kramer, New York Director + 1 212 940 1243 Shlomi Rabi + 1 212 940 1246 Caroline Shea + 1 212 940 1247 Sarah Krueger + 1 212 940 1245 Charlie Scheips, International Consulting Director + 1 212 940 1245 Carol Ehlers, Consultant + 1 212 940 1245 LONDON Lou Proud +44 20 7318 4018 Sebastien Montabonel +44 20 7318 4025 Alexandra Bibby +44 20 7318 4087 Helen Hayman +44 20 7318 4092

MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY EDITIONS New York Kelly Troester, Worldwide Co-Director +1 212 940 1221 Cary Leibowitz, Worldwide Co-Director +1 212 940 1222 Jannah Greenblatt +1 212 940 1332 Joy Deibert +1 212 940 1333

JEWELRY New York Nazgol Jahan, Worldwide Director +1 212 940 1283 Carmela Manoli +1 212 940 1302 Heather Zises +1 212 940 1290 GENEVA Carolin Bulgari +41 22 906 80 00 Veronica Lota +41 22 906 80 00 LONDON Lane McLean +44 20 7318 4032

THEME SALES New York Corey Barr, New York Manager +1 212 940 1234 Anne Huntington +1 212 940 1210 Stephanie Max +1 212 940 1301 Steve Agin, Consultant +1 908 475 1796 LONDON Tobias Sirtl, London Manager +44 20 7318 4095 Arianna Jacobs +44 20 7318 4054 George O’Dell +44 20 7318 4040

Managing Directors Charlie Horne, New York +1 212 940 1292 Finn Dombernowsky, London +44 20 7318 4034

Private sales Christina Scheublein +1 212 940 1248

International Specialists and Representatives Berlin & Munich Dr. Michaela Neumeister Belgium Katherine Van Thillo, Consultant Brussels & Paris Olivier Vrankenne Paris Leonie Moschner Tamara Corm, Consultant London Ivgenia Naiman Brooke de Ocampo Los Angeles Mimi Won Techentin, Consultant Maya McLaughlin Milan Laura Garbarino Moscow Svetlana Marich Shanghai/Beijing Jeremy Wingfield, Consultant Singapore Chin-Chin Yap

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+49 89 238 88 48 10 +32 475 68 70 11 +32 486 43 43 44 +33 6 85 53 92 03 +33 6 78 54 32 348 +44 20 7318 4071 +44 777 551 7060 +1 310 600 9192 +1 323 791 1771 +39 339 478 9671 +7 495 225 88 22 +86 135 0118 2804 +1 212 940 1260


SALE INFORMATION Auction Saturday 12 December 2009 at 12pm Viewing Saturday 5 December, 10am - 6pm Sunday 6 December, 12pm - 6pm Monday 7 December, 10am -6pm Tuesday 8 December, 10am - 6pm Wednesday 9 December, 10am - 6pm Thursday 10 December, 10am - 6pm Friday 11 December, 10am - 6pm Viewing & Auction Location 450 West 15 Street New York 10011 jewels viewing location 4 - 8 December The Mark Hotel 992 Madison Avenue New York 8 - 12 December Phillips de Pury & Company 450 West 15 Street New York Sale Designation In sending written bids or making inquiries please refer to this sale as NY000309 or NEW YORK NEW YORK. Theme sales New York Corey Barr, Manager +1 212 940 1234 Anne Huntington, Cataloguer +1 212 940 1210 Stephanie Max, Administrator +1 212 940 1301 London Tobias Sirtl, Manager +44 20 7318 4095 Arianna Jacobs, Cataloguer +44 20 7318 4054 George O’Dell, Administrator +44 20 7318 4040 Consultant Steve Agin, Toy Art +1 908 475 1796 Catalogues Allyson Melchor +1 212 940 1240 +44 20 7318 4039 catalogues@phillipsdepury.com Absentee and Telephone Bids Rebecca Lynn +1 212 940 1228 +1 212 924 1749 fax bids@phillipsdepury.com client accounting Sylvia Leitao +1 212 940 1231 Buyers Accounts Nicole Rodriguez +1 212 940 1235 Seller Accounts Barbara Doupal +1 212 940 1232 Nadia Somwaru +1 212 940 1280 Client Services +1 212 940 1200 Shipping Beth Petriello +1 212 940 1373 Jennifer Brennan +1 212 940 1372 Property Manager Robert Weingart +1 212 940 1241 Principal Auctioneer Simon de Pury 0874341 Auctioneers Aileen Agopian 1199037 Sarah Mudge 1301805 Alexander Gilkes 1308958 Ellen Stelter UK Rodman Primack UK

Editor Karen Wright Louisa Wright, Editorial Assistant Photography Kent Pell, Matthew Kroening and Clint Blowers

E-mail Addresses All Phillips de Pury & Company e-mails are first initial and last name @phillipsdepury.com (e.g. twood@phillipsdepury.com) www.phillipsdepury.com Please note that all lots are offered and sold subject to (i) the StandardTerms and Conditions, and (ii) Special Terms and Conditions applicable to this sale as described within this sale catalogue. The Standard Terms and Conditions and Special Terms and Conditions should be fully read and

lot 20. Richard estes (detail)

understood prior to bidding at the auction. All lots are sold “AS-IS.” All lots are offered subject to a reserve unless otherwise indicated.


music

DECEMBER 2009 NEW YORK

NOW sex march 2010 new york

march 2010 London

july 2010 London

november 2010 London

november 2010 new york

September 2010 LONDON

LATIN AMERICA october 2010 new york

black no & reserve white december 2010 LONDON

DECEMBER 2010 new york

NY0 0 0 3 0 9

japan music

NOW

JUNE 2010 London

N e w Yo r k

june 2010 new york

no reserve

APRIL 2010 NEW YORK

2009

80s

april 2010 London

December

MARCH 2010 NEW YORK

12

AFRICA bric FILM ITALIA

New York New York

NOVEMBER 2009 London

NEW YORK NEW YORK

new york new york 12 december 2009 new york

New York New York  

Auction 12 December 2pm New York