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lot 13. mario merz

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lot 229. gaetano pesce

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lot 5. alighiero boetti

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lot 111. ruth orkin

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contentS

Simon de pury

The Chairman writes on the taste, style, passion and class of ITALIA ...page 12

patrizia Sandretto re rebaudengo An invitation to a stylish palazzo in Turin ...page 14

franceSco bonami

Seeing Italy through the eyes of a top international curator ...page 26

lapo elkann

A creative free spirit shows off his Independent style ...page 30

giulio paolini

Observing the future with an Arte Povera original ...page 36

carla Sozzani

The temptations of 10 Corso Como ...page 40

franca Sozzani

The editor-in-chief of Italian Vogue on what’s next ...page 48

i ragazzi are alright

A panoramic view of Rome’s hip young artists and stylists ...page 52

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Contents

martino gamper

In the hot seat with the iconoclastic designer ...page 58

giulio di gropello

The Rome-based collector focuses his enthusiasm for Italian contemporary art ...page 66

Object lesson A colourful spin on Lot 67 ...page 76

News

What’s happening in the international art world ...page 78

10am: italia Lots 1 – 235 ...page 88

artist biographies About the artists in the ITALIA sale ...page 316

index

The complete sale at a glance ...page 318

Buyers guide

How to buy and whom to contact at Phillips de Pury ...page 325

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ITALIA – just the mention of this country's name makes my heart beat faster. It is synonymous with most of the best things that life has to offer, whether it is in the areas of art, music, cinema, architecture, design, fashion, food or football. In my nearly forty years of activity in the art market, I have seen the market go through many ups and very few downs. What always amazed me in those much shorter periods of market re-adjustment is that there was never any weakening of demand for acquiring works of art by Italian collectors. In Italy art comes as part of your DNA and it would be unthinkable for an Italian entrepreneur to make a lot of money without spending some of that wealth on acquiring works of art. Our theme sales are focusing on contemporary culture as a whole and, in doing so, are trying to eliminate the artificial borders that exist between different disciplines. ITALIA lends itself ideally to this type of sales and will become an annual event. It is great personalities that contribute to Italian culture radiating around the world. Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, through her fabulous foundation and her annual prize given to a female star, is unquestionably one of them. Carla and Franca Sozzani have for years each in their own way not only held up the flag for Italian culture but acted as important taste makers. Lapo Elkann is the ultimate Italian style icon of the 21st century. Taste, Style, Passion and Class are together the common denominator between these and the other great personalities covered in our editorial section. For this and much much more, we say Grazie ITALIA!

SIMON de PURY ChaIRMaN, PhIllIPS de PURY & COMPaNY

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patrizia sandretto re rebaudengo an art-full life words karen wright | PhotograPhs Peter rigaud

Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo photographed in her home in Turin, 14 April 2010

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I am talking with Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo while photographer Peter Rigaud buzzes around her. She poses graciously, assuming some difficult stances, including squatting down and looking up at the Maurizio Cattalan neon work. I ask if her eye-catching shoes, navy blue with high transparent heels, are comfortable. She sighs and says, ‘ish’, highlighting the sacrifices to be made for style. Today she is wearing a beautifully cut if sombre navy blue dress enlivened by a sparkling teal and crystal necklace, one she tells me selected from her large collection of costume jewellery that she plans to display in a show to coincide with Artissima next year. When we meet later she has changed into a crisply tailored suit in the same colour, with a small broach substituting for the glamorous necklace. Her demeanour has changed as well, leaving the image of the gracious chatelaine at home and transforming into a more powerful, business-like woman. It is at her Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo in Turin and Guarene d’Alba that you appreciate the full measure of one who has, in a relatively brief time, amassed a large international art collection, overseen the design and opening of a dedicated non-profit foundation space, developed programmes and exhibitions and become engaged in producing the works of artists who challenge our perceptions both within and outside her native Italy.

KW [Laughs] PSrr I said that if one day I had my own museum, everybody should understand. When we started in Guarene, we began working with children, organising courses. Guarene is one hour from Turin – it’s in the country, so in the winter it’s not so accessible, so I started to try to find a place in Turin. The area in which we are now was an ex-industrial area that the European Community wanted to develop. It belongs to the City of Turin, which rented it to us – we have a lease for 99 years. We had a competition in which we invited architects from all over Europe to submit designs [for the foundation’s building]. Hans Ulrich Obrist, Francesco [Bonami] and Flamino Gualdoni, then director of the Galleria Civica in Modena, were on the jury. We chose the project of Claudio Silvestrin. His design was the most ‘minimal’ of the 30 architects who participated in the competition. We started to build from scratch. KW That’s an amazing experience to go through. PSSr Yes, it was a fantastic experience. I had spent years visiting museums, galleries, restaurants, cafeterias, because I wanted to get ideas of what we might need. I remember at the beginning the exhibition area was to be divided in three different spaces. And then when we started to divide the space, we said: no – maybe it’s better to leave just one big space. And that obviously is more expensive because now every time we have to rebuild.

Above: Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo with Maurizio Cattelan's Catttelan, 1993 Opposite, clockwise from top left: Maurizio Cattelan, Untitled (Natale 95) Stella con BR, 1995; Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo with Marzia Migliora installation; Patrick Tuttofuoco, Map 05, 2005; Tony Cragg, European Myth, Annunciation, 1984, with chair by Ron Arad

Photos by Peter Rigaud. Images from the collection courtesy Collezione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo

Karen Wright Let’s talk about the foundation. You have a young foundation, you’re working with Francesco Bonami. When did you decide to do the building? Patrizia Sandretto re rebaudengo Between 1996–97, we opened Guarene. I needed to have a space in which to show the collection and organise exhibitions. What was very important for me from the beginning was the idea to involve people. I’ve been lucky that I can buy work, that I can meet artists. But for me, art is not an elite world. Art has to be for everybody. And so I needed a place, a space in which to show the artist, produce the work, but also a space in which everybody could come and see, and know more about contemporary art. I remember when I started to collect and used to go to the museum. There would just a small label there on which the name of the artist was written alongside ‘Untitled’.

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KW You have to rebuild… PSRR But this is good, because it gives us the flexibility to stage different exhibitions. For the artists, it’s easier, too. In 2002 we opened this new space. What I have tried to do with this space is to put in all of my experience as a collector, as a visitor of museums. It was very important to work with our mediators [gallery guides who engage with visitors and run educational activities]. When I started to visit museums, nobody explained anything to me. When you don’t know so much, you don’t have the courage to ask some things that you think are stupid. KW And I think the mediator programme is so good because it can cater to the individual. If the person knows a lot, the mediator can pull back. But if they don’t, they can engage. PSRR Exactly. KW But I hate these audio guides. It prevents you from using the looking part of your brain. PSRR If you know everything maybe you don’t need one. But here’s a fantastic example: once a man came to visit us, he was a plumber from Turin. There was an exhibition of Doug Aitken about water, the ocean. It was fascinating, because he spoke with one of our mediators and said, ‘They explained to me everything, and for me art is so far from my life, and it was fantastic.’ KW It’s very touching. That sounds like psychiatry! PSRR Yes! I think that art is also this! Art is not just to hang or to decorate your home. Art is part of our life. It’s to talk about that. If you are a plumber, you can say, ‘Hey, let’s look at the work…’ KW When did you become a collector? PSRR I started to collect in 1992, without any experience, really. I have a degree in business. I worked in a factory, in my father’s industry. I married, had two children, and then I understood that I wanted to do something different. I started to travel with a friend of mine, an older lady who was a collector. I went to London. I didn’t know anything about art! And I went to Nicholas Logsdail’s [Lisson] gallery. We spent a week with Nicholas visiting artists’ studios. For me, it was a new world. I’ll never forget being in Anish Kapoor’s studio: I remember this huge loft with all the works of the 1980s. I bought one of the small works with the red, yellow, blue pigment – ah! KW Was that the first studio you went to? PSRR Yes. Then I went to Julian Opie’s studio. It was a fantastic experience. If I have to say what is really important for me it is that with contemporary art, you can know the artist. You can meet them. KW You bought your first piece then – the Kapoor? PSRR Yes. I had bought three or four Italian works before, like a painting of [Mario] Merz, but before I went to London, I bought sculpture. I started to buy Tony Cragg. All of these works are in storage – just that Tony Cragg is here. KW Did you buy that? That’s early 1980s, isn’t it? PSRR I bought Anish Kapoor and Tony Cragg, but obviously it’s impossible to install it all. The work I have in the dining room is by Allan McCollum. They were the first works that I bought at the Lisson. I remember it was 1992, May, and just a few days after there was the Venice Biennale. Then Documenta. So I really could start to be involved with the art world. At the beginning, the collection was divided by themes. British art was first. And then Los Angeles – I went with Francesco [Bonami], who had said, ‘Come on, let’s just go to Los Angeles.’ We visited many artists’ studios – Catherine Opie, Doug Aitken, Paul McCarthy, Sharon Lockhart. I met the artist. It’s not that I want the artist to tell me everything about the work, but I like to talk, to know more, to understand what they’re thinking and doing. And so Los Angeles art was the second theme. I bought some paintings by Lari Pittman. Then I bought some Opie photos. I bought Aitken and then Lockhart. Then I met Charles Ray. I went to his home.

Top: Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo with Damien Hirst, Love is Great, 1994, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Untitled (A Love Meal), 1992, and Alan McCollum, Plaster Surrogates, 1989; opposite: Annette Messager, Mes Voeux, 1994 18

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ÂŤwhat is really important for me it is that with contemporary art, you can know the artist. you can meet themÂť

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KW I’ve never gone. I’ve tried many times. PSRR Really?

Photos by Peter Rigaud. Images from the 21x21 exhibition at the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo – Pivi: courtesy Galleria Massimo De Carlo, Milano. Tweedy: courtesy Studio Dabbeni, Lugano

KW I might have to go through you next time! PSRR I went to his home and then we went together to the university where he was teaching. It was really great. He wanted to show us his work; we went to see him in the studio. He was working on the car that had the accident. Then he wanted us to come to the university to see his students. This is a very open way, no? Then, another part of the collection, obviously Italian artists. KW Well, you’re sitting in front of this wonderful [Rudolf] Stingel…You’ve got a Cattelan up, too. We’re going right back to meeting Francesco. How did you meet Francesco? PSRR Francesco: 1995. At the Galleria Civica di Modena, there was a director who did a project to invite private and public works from classical and contemporary collections. He invited me, because in 1994, my father had a factory in Sant’Antonino, about 40 minutes outside of Turin, and I kept a part of one big space to display all my British collection. It was a place that place my father used to produce televisions. It was really an abandoned part of the factory. We put the white on the wall, and we showed the first part of my collection – sixteen British artists, Tony Cragg, Anish Kapoor and the youngest was Damien Hirst. It was the first time that I had ever shown the collection. The director of the city art gallery of Modena came and invited me to show my collection there in 1995. It was on then that I met Francesco. He came to the show and wanted to organise an exhibition with 23 international artists working on photography. We started to work together. I realised quickly that I wanted to be more involved in contemporary art – that, for me, the really important idea is to produce work. I wanted to be involved in the production of new works. That’s what is behind the creation of the foundation… Production doesn’t mean that the work belongs to the fondazione, to my collection. KW They’re completely separate things. PSRR This is very important. The collection is my private collection, but it’s on permanent loan to the foundation. Sometimes we buy works for the fondazione – not so many, because I prefer to spend the fondazione money to produce work, organise exhibitions and catalogues. We have special projects like the curatorial residency, we have a prize… The main aim of the fondazione is not to buy. The first aim of the fondazione is to work with the artist to produce work; the second is to give opportunities to everybody: for that we have the students, we have programmes and workshops for families, adults and children, as every museum does. Our mediators, of course… KW Coming back to one of the themes of the collection – women. Tell me what you do with women! [Laughs] PSRR It was in Cologne when I met Monica Sprüth of Sprüth Magers. She did fantastic work in the 1980s in Cologne with Cindy Sherman, Barbara Kruger, Louis Lawler, and so on. I started to talk with her, to understand more about how it was so difficult in the 1970s for women to become artists. I started to buy many of them, not because I am a feminist – I was born in 1959, so I was too young – but because I was really interested, I tried to know what there was behind the work of a woman. In 1996, when the Castello di Rivoli organised an exhibition with five Italian collections, I decided to exhibit and to show only women. KW Good for you! PSRR Another important part of the collection – there are five parts – is photography. Because when I started, I really liked photography. My collection is all from the 1980s up until today. In the case of photography, I have photographs from Gursky, Ruff, Struth, but part of the collection is devoted to Italian photography from 1850 until now.

Previous spread: Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo with Joseph Kosuth's Finnegan's Wake, 1998, and Untitled (Not Ugly Enough), 2007, by Barbara Kruger. Opposite, clockwise from top left: installation view of Ian Tweedy’s Collapse, 2010, at the Fondazione’s exhibition 21x21; a view of one of the Fondazione’s galleries; Have you seen

KW I wonder if this is what has inspired the exhibition that Francesco was telling me about. A lot of this photography is about the grand tour, isn’t it?

me before?, 2008, by Paola Pivi; Patrizia at work with colleagues 23

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«we ask [ the young curators ] to try to invite young artists. not Maurizio cattelan, not vanessa Beecroft, not francesco vezzoli, not to worry!»

PSRR Yes, yes. Yes, because it will be 150 years of Italian unification, and this exhibition will open March 2011. We would produce it all – even in this case, like the exhibition that we have now at the fondazione. And the third aim – if we want to say the three important aims of the fondazione – is we try to work with other institutions, as we do with the Foundation of Arts for a Contemporary Europe [FACE]. KW So we come to FACE. PSRR Yes, but before FACE we produced the work of Doug [Aitken] in 1999 for the Venice Biennale, electric earth, which he won the international prize for. When he had the exhibition at the Serpentine, we produced the show. It was a good moment. We co-produced Zidane, the film about footballer Zinedine Zidane, made by Douglas Gordon and Philippe Parreno, and we also co-produced the work of Steve McQueen for the [2007] Venice Biennale and last year we produced the work of Goshka Macuga for Venice. I started to think, that we have to try a way to work together. We are all collectors, but with private foundations. And all of us had space, so that we are open to people. I started to talk to Dakis [Joannou] about this project, then Antoine de Galbert from La Maison Rouge, and David Neuman, director of Magasin 3 in Stockholm. We started to meet in London during Frieze, in Venice during the Biennale, in New York during the Armory. Finally we decided to establish this, but it’s not a foundation, it is an organisation of five foundations. The first important moment has been the Turin exhibition. It will open in May in Ellipse in Portugal, and then in October during FIAC in Paris. KW Are you looking for new foundations to join you in FACE? PSRR Yes, yes… quietly initially, we have to pay attention because many people have said it’s not easy. It’s already difficult with five! KW Five personalities! PSRR And quite strong personalities! KW Talking of strong personalities, tell me about your prize for women? PSRR Not just artists involved in the art world. It’s a prize for a woman who’s really done a lot in the last year. We asked Maurizio Cattelan to make the prize; he made a huge ring – like an engagement ring. The first year, we gave the prize to Franca Sozzani; another year, we gave it to Sheikha Lubna Al Qasimi. She comes from Sharjah, one of the seven United Arab Emirates. At the moment, she is a minister of foreign trade of the UAE.

PSRR Yes, because it’s an edition. KW Can you imagine how jealous you’d be if there was only one ring? PSRR I have to say that I asked Maurizio, ‘May I have one for me?’ He said, ‘No. Only for the winner!’ KW Tell me about the young curators project – and why you think it is important. PSRR After Arte Povera, we still had Transavanguardia. But then Transavanguardia moved to America, to New York. And then, from the 1980s until today, it was quite difficult for the artists. For the galleries, it’s difficult, for the artists it’s not easy to have the possibility to show their work, to be known. So, it’s also for that we decided four years ago to make this project with curators. Because we thought, what can we do for young Italian artists? And I think that just to send them for some months to London, or New York – it’s obviously important, but it’s not enough. We have to do something more specific. And so we thought a lot about what to do, and then we decided with Francesco Bonami that one idea would be to invite the curator to come to Italy. Because there’s a double opportunity: for the artist, the Italian artist, and also for the curator to have an opportunity to know a country, to visit a country. Our curators – you will meet them later – they come to Turin in January, they start to travel from Turin: Milan, Venice, Bolzano, Florence, Bologna, to Sicily. KW And they come from all over? PSRR They visit a lot of artists’ studios – a huge number. And they make an archive, you know – it’s run a certain way, now they come back and finish their tour. And now they work on the exhibition. This is quite particular. For example, one year they made different shows. Another year they decided to do the show together. So it depends on the curators, how they are… But choosing the curators is also very important, because we send application invitations to all the most important schools all over the world.. For example, you will see this year, two curators come from the Whitney school, and one from a school in Belgium.

KW You do a ceremonial presentation? PSRR Yes! Last year, we gave the prize to Lisa Phillips, the director of the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, and Kazuyo Sejima, the architect. We were very happy, when a few months later, Kazuyo was invited to be a curator of the Venice Architecture Biennale, and won the Pritzker Architecture Prize.

KW That’s Jens Hoffmann’s school, he told me about it. PSRR Now they are working on their exhibition. They have a budget, and with this money they have to pay for the transport, to produce a few works, and, if they have money left – to pay the insurance and produce the catalogue. It’s a good opportunity for the young curator, and also an opportunity for us to get to know the young curator. And then obviously it’s a fantastic opportunity for many young Italian artists to be known – because what we ask them is just to try to invite young artists. Not Maurizio Cattelan, not Vanessa Beecroft, not Francesco Vezzoli, not to worry! This is in collaboration with the Fondazione Garrone in Genoa, and so the exhibition, after Guarene, goes to the Palazzo Ducale in Genoa. And now we are thinking to go to Sicily for the first time and to show it in Catania. The curators invited, because this year will be quite large, 24 artists and three are from Sicily. This is a project in which I believe a lot, like I believe in a lot of other projects! n

KW But did they each get a ring?

www.fondsrr.org

KW And will they always get the same prize – the ring? PSRR Yes, it’s the same. The name of the winner and the fondazione are written inside the ring.

Opposite: Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo with a group of young curators

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francesco bonami a cool, clear vision words karen wright | PhotograPhs sebastiano Pellion di Persano

Francesco Bonami photographed at CafĂŠ Trussardi, Milan, on 12 April 2010

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Installation view of Alberto Garutti's Special Project for 21x21 at Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin

FRANCESCO BONAMI HAS been coming regularly to New York City since 1973; long enough, you would think, to be considered a native of the US – indeed, he is an American citizen. Yet, paradoxically, he is still considered to be an Italian curator. He travels regularly from his flat on New York’s East 15th Street to Italy, basing himself in Milan, to fulfil his commitments as the Artistic Director of the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo in Turin, the Fondazione Pitti Immagine Discovery in Florence, and formerly the Centro di Arte Contemporanea Villa Manin in Passariano di Codroipo. He is also the Manilow Senior Curator-at-Large for the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago (MCA). One of the world’s most ubiquitous curators, he has been at the helm of several high-profile events including the 50th Venice Biennale in 2003 and, most recently, the Whitney Biennial 2010. I meet Francesco at the fashionable Café Trussardi in Milan to discuss his recent installations in Turin, and in Italy in general. Francesco was born in Florence in 1955 to parents who, he says bluntly, ‘were not interested in the arts’. At the age of 17, he decided to enrol at the Florence Academy of Fine Arts to study stage design, but although he graduated, he never did any theatre work. ‘It was more about appeasing the parents,’ he says, ‘but you have to remember that in the seventies in Italy, to be an artist one had to be interested in classical art.’ Instead, he naturally gravitated towards antiques and got his first job in the furniture department of Sotheby’s in Florence, where he remained for a few years. But he admits he was not happy selling antiques, so he quit his job and moved to NewYork to pursue his dream of becoming a painter. It was the moment of the Italian invasion – Sandro Chia, Enzo Cucchi, Francesco Clemente, Mimmo Paladino, and the Transavanguardia painters were at the forefront of the much-vaunted ‘new spirit in painting’. After a short stay he returned to Florence to continue painting. He recalls his first show at Vivita, the Florentine gallery, and says he was somewhat surprised that people started buying his paintings. He admits that he thought his career as an artist was made, particularly after his first show in Milan, when Deborah Sharpe, a New York dealer, brought the entire show. It was a moment when he ‘saw his life was changing’, so in 1987 he moved back to New York to find that his work, which he describes as ‘figurative classic painting’, was ‘completely oblivious to the art world’, looking provincial in comparison to the new art emerging in the city. He recalls sombrely how he had his first show in a

gallery next door to where Jeff Koons was showing his chrome Rabbit (1986), and his Equilibrium Tank (1985) featuring suspended basketballs. He remained in New York for a year, but realised that he was ‘behind the scene’ and he stopped being an artist. Instead he turned to art criticism, writing for Flash Art magazine. He started to understand the contemporary art scene and tells me that, at this point, ‘curators and critics were terrified of artists, and a lot of artists were not good.’ The turning point for him was an interview with artist and composer John Cage. ‘It was his last interview,’ Francesco recalls, ‘probably a year or two before he died and I met a guy who was such an important historical figure, but one who was such an ordinary guy.’ In 1993, while still working for Flash Art, he was invited to curate part of the Aperto section of Achille Bonito Oliva’s Venice Biennale, and showed his curatorial potential by choosing a list of artists including Matthew Barney, Rudolf Stingel, Charles Ray, Gabriel Orozco, Damien Hirst and Paul McCarthy, many of whom have since become international art-world stars. He points out to me that at this time nobody really considered them as being serious artists. He recalls how difficult it was to install Charles Ray’s 7½ Ton Cube (1990) – described by Ray as ‘a solid steel cube painted white that looks like it weighs about twenty pounds’ – and how this was also the first international exposure for Orozco, who showed his now famous Empty Shoe Box (1993) – a white shoe box, opened up, with the base sitting in the lid. The Biennale brought other curatorial assignments including Truce: Echoes of Art in the Age of Endless Conclusion, the second iteration of Site Santa Fe in 1997, in which Francesco selected a strong group of Italian artists, including Massimo Bartolini, Vanessa Beecroft, Giuseppe Gabellone, Maurizio Cattelan and Rudolf Stingel. I ask Francesco about being an Italian curator and he is clear that he needed to get away from Italy to have a voice. He points to the insidious connections between Italian politics and culture and says that the younger generation were not encouraged to participate in the cultural scene. He argues that this was the case not only for him, but also for artists including Cattelan and Stingel, his regular collaborators, both of whom had moved to New York at about the same time that he did. I point out that Italy did not always have this low profile. ‘Yes, it had this amazing moment, Arte Povera, which had an international exposure,’ he

«Arte PoverA wAs five yeArs thAt chAnged the Art world… but [the Artists] were exiled without museums»

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Installation views of 21x21 at Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo: above, Roberto Cuoghi's Il Coccodeista, 1997, and below, Patrick Tuttofuoco's Christine, 2009

this show,’ he admits. A review in La Repubblica said merely ‘Revisionism, exclusions and disputes.’ earlier, Francesco’s shows, such as the Venice Biennale he masterminded in 2003, also attracted negative press which criticised the show for its lack of focus. Like so many others I have talked to in Italy, Francesco bemoans the unnecessary and often damaging involvement of politics in cultural institutions in Italy, which he feels is reflected in the recent appointment of Andrea Bellini, former director of the Artissima art fair, as director of the Castello di Rivoli in Turin. He questions the decision to have a show by sensual minimalist John McCracken at the venue: ‘It is nothing personal but it seems oblivious to the context and to a place already with a problem of attendance,’ he says. ‘It seems a strange choice, not that they should have trashy shows just to bring in people.’ In an attempt to turn the conversation to a more positive note, I ask about his plans for the future at the Fondazione sandretto Re Rebaudengo. He becomes momentarily animated. ‘We are doing a show of young Russian artists in september,’ he explains, ‘and then I am working on a big show to celebrate twenty years of the foundation for the new year. It will be presented in both Turin and Florence and will include twenty international artists to represent the twenty regions of Italy. All of them will make a new work for the show – they will be young or mid-career artists, not superstars. There will be no Italians, it is to be about how a foreign visitor perceives Italy.’ No doubt there will be more rumbles among the Italian press at an expat curating a show of foreign artists. But what is Francesco’s view of Italian artists today? ‘There are lots of interesting younger artists but it is a problem of how to develop this talent with the lack of both Italian institutions, and nurturing galleries,’ he says. But then he qualifies his approval. ‘They have an ambition and then they stop,’ he says. For Francesco, Piero Manzoni and Lucio Fontana were both seminal figures, but they shared a common weakness that he views as particularly Italian and which he feels is still endemic today. ‘This is that the art tends to be both overly aesthetic and overly humorous,’ he explains. ‘The artist is serious, but finds he has problems manifesting the seriousness. It is a hypocritical, self-effacing attitude.’ I point out the materiality that I have seen recurring in Italian art. ‘Yes, Italian artists like Michelangelo Pistoletto and those of the Arte Povera school have a crafty attachment to materials,’ he says quickly. ‘Italians like to focus on materials, they are craftsman. Materials are not just a vessel to say something else – it is the vessel.’ n

Garutti: courtesy the artist. Cuoghi: courtesy the artist, Galleria Massimo De Carlo. Tuttofuoco: courtesy the artist and Pilar Corrias Gallery, London. All images courtesy Fondazione sandretto Re Rebaudengo

says. ‘It was five years [1967–72] that changed the face of the art world. They had everything going – performance, etcetera – but they didn’t have the advantage of other countries. They were exiled without museums.’ He firmly points the finger of blame to curators like Germano Celant and Achille Bonito Oliva who didn’t allow the movement to expand, trying to maintain control over it. He laments that these artists suffered in terms of value, never attaining the market of minimalists like Dan Flavin and Carl Andre, or artists of the same generation like Bruce Nauman. He says shows like Zero to Infinity, held at the Walker Arts Center in Minneapolis and Tate Modern in London in 2001 and curated by Richard Flood and Frances Morris, introduced the current generation to Arte Povera. Including the works of all the key Arte Povera figures, such as Giovanni Anselmo, Giuseppe Penone, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Mario Merz and Jannis Kounellis, the show was a revelation, bringing into the gallery that rich mix of antiquities and historical layers. HIs CONNeCTION TO Patrizia sandretto Re Rebaudengo of the Fondazione sandretto has been a long-standing one. They met in Turin in 1995, when she decided to finance his show Campo 95 which was first shown in Venice during the Venice Biennale, as well as Campo 96 which she also financed and which was shown in the GAM museum inTurin before travelling to Maastricht. The Fondazione’s building, created by Italian minimalist architect Claudio silvestrin, was finished in 2002, and houses a fine collection of more than 800 works. More specifically, when it opened, the Fondazione was the first kunsthalle-style institution in Italy, focusing exclusively on contemporary art. By contrast, Francesco is not impressed by MAXXI, the much-celebrated new Zaha Hadid-designed museum which opened in Rome in May. According to him, its collection is poor, and that the committee that acquires work for it is oblivious to good art. ‘They brought the Hammer and Sickle by AndyWarhol to spearhead the 21st-century collection,’ he snorts. Francesco goes on to say that, of the 300 works of art in total in MAXXI’s small collection, only two per cent would be considered of good enough quality to show in other museums. Warming to his theme, he points to his ambitious 2008 show, Italics: Italian Art between Tradition and Revolution, 1968–2008, which brought together over 100 artists, first at the Palazzo Grassi in Venice and later at the MCA Chicago, lamenting that an important show about Italian art over a 40-year period was not accepted by MAXXI – not even considered, he says – and thus had to be shown at the Grassi, ‘a private institution owned by a French collector, François Pinault, in Venice’. The show itself attracted a hostile response, particularly in the Italian press. ‘There was a big stink over

21x21. 21 artisti per il 21° secolo, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, until 31 August 2010; www.fondsrr.org 29

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lapo elkann state of independence words helen weaver | PhotograPhs christoPh ferstad

Lapo Elkann photographed in London on 27 April 2010

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We photograph Lapo Elkann in London. I am expecting someone who is comfortable with the cameras and he does not disappoint. I am disarmed, however, by his friendliness and frankly in awe of his stylish attire, something that he tells me is 'all him'. He removes his covetable blue fedora (redoing a Borsalino has been a project of his), he shows me the detail on his beautiful fitted jacket, not yet in production but maybe soon, and takes off his stylish specs (another project of his, in which he using the colours of his passion, the Italian flag), he smooths down his trousers (his again) and waggles his soft-looking, flirty tasselled blue loafers (his again). More admirably, when a bottle of aqua frizzante explodes in his hands, soaking him with an unexpected shower, he laughs. ‘So cooling,’ he says. He certainly has energy to spare. Tapping the table, jumping up to look at nearby exhibits from the Design sale. It is therefore no surprise to hear that he loves anything fast, from skateboards to cars. When I say I would love to explore Fiat’s Lingotto factory building, with its famous rooftop test track, he bemoans the fact that there are too many pot-holes to take his cars up and give them a run. Karen Wright

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Lapo ELkann dEscribEs himself as ‘a creative entrepreneur and a designer’. He is best known as a member of the agnelli dynasty behind the Fiat car empire, often dubbed italy’s unofficial royal family. While he has contributed to the enhancement of the family brand throughout the world, it’s telling that he also has a tattoo which reads ‘independent’, and, far from being restricted to just cars (for which he has an understandable passion), he has contributed design flair and business acumen to everything from furniture and clothing to sunglasses brands. Lapo was born in new York in 1977. His great-great-grandfather senatore Giovanni agnelli founded Fiat (Fabbrica italiana automobili Torino) in 1899, but it was Giovanni’s pioneering grandson and namesake, widely known as Gianni, who, as chairman from the mid-1960s on, would turn the family business into the most important company in italy and the leading European car manufacturer. Lapo is one of the three children of Gianni’s daughter Margherita, and his father is the journalist and writer alain Elkann. schooled in France and England, Lapo aptly describes himself as ‘a global italian’ – he has spent most of his life travelling the world. Handsome, energetic and always full of enthusiasm, Lapo describes his grandfather Gianni agnelli as ‘one of the most curious human beings i have ever met’. it was his grandfather who not only encouraged Lapo’s love for cars but who also introduced him to art and antiques, taking him to galleries, museums and auction houses from an early age. His father, meanwhile, introduced him to literature as well as to prominent intellectuals. Lapo was tipped to enter the family business and make that his full-time career, but that path was followed by his older brother John, who studied engineering at Turin polytechnic, and who has been on the board of

the company from an early age and has recently taken over as chairman. Lapo’s career has followed a more unusual course. He worked as pa to Henry kissinger just after the september 11 attacks on new York city in 2001, which was not the easiest of times to be starting out in america. He subsequently worked for the Ferrari car company on the launch of their revolutionary 348 model and later for Maserati (one of the brands under the Fiat umbrella) as they were about to launch a new range of cars. His adoration of cars is part of a wider passion for ‘product and everything that moves’. and, what he most loves about product, he says, is the thrill and satisfaction of ‘making something that someone dreams of into an object they can actually see, touch and feel.’ Today, Lapo has a number of companies of his own. although he is based in Milan, he acknowledges that Turin holds a special place in his heart. ‘creative is in Milan and money, financial and legal is in Turin,’ he states, ‘and when i’m not travelling, i divide my time between the two.’ Turin is the site of the most visible evidence of the family’s industrial achievements, and an emblem of their interest in cutting edge design and art – their revolutionary productionline plant, the acclaimed futuristic Lingotto factory. built by young architect Giacomo Mattè-Trucco in Turin in 1923, it was described by Le corbusier as ‘one of the most impressive sights in industry’. it most famous feature was on its roof, where there was – and still is – a test track which Michael caine ‘tested’ during the famous getaway scene in the 1969 film The Italian Job. Following Lingotto’s closure in the early 1980s, there was much debate about its future while italy pondered how to recover from the general industrial decline of the time. architect renzo piano was responsible for rebuilding it into the modern complex it is today – it reopened

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in 1989 with concert halls, a theatre, a convention centre, shopping arcades and prestigious hotels. The cherry on this impressive layer cake came from Gianni agnelli, when, just a year before he died in 2003, he opened the pinacoteca Giovanni e Marella agnelli to the public. The organisation is now run by Lapo’s sister Ginevra. Lapo speaks proudly of the gallery and stresses what a great job his sister is doing in running it: ‘she has a great eye,’ he says. Like a small silver space station parked in the middle of the rooftop test track, the art gallery is again the work of renzo piano and houses part of the family collection masterpieces spanning from the 1700s to the mid-1900s. among its jewels are a Tiepolo, several canalettos, a couple of picassos, some remarkable Matisse paintings, and, fittingly given the modernist setting, works by the futurists balla and severini. as well as the collection, the pinacoteca agnelli also has a temporary exhibition space where they recently presented the acclaimed touring exhibition The Museum of Everything. Lapo Has WHaT he calls his ‘creative factory’ in Milan, containing his two main businesses: independent ideas, specialising in marketing, communications, events and web design, and the italia independent brand, which operates in a range of sectors, from clothing, accessories, and sportswear to tailor-made cars. as well as all this, he has his own exhibition space in Milan, where he regularly organises exhibitions and events. at the moment, he is in the middle of hosting an event for Jake and dinos chapman whose show is opening at project b gallery in Milan. The first artwork that Lapo bought was a roy Lichtenstein print of the rising sun, and he subsequently received from his brother John the original painting which led to the prints. ‘i’m a fan of certain symbols,’ he says. ‘i like palm

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trees, the sun, i like flags. a flag is a symbol that people died and fought for.’ He also owns works by personal favourites such as photographers Helmut newton and Wayne Maser, and tells of his penchant for collecting cars, furniture and toys. He doesn’t like to call himself a collector though, referring to the fact that he ‘only’ owns six or seven unique cars, despite his enormous passion for them. ‘i use them, or what’s the point in buying them?,’ he says. He also has a collection of motorcycles. Lapo prizes his own form of creativity in his design activities. He clearly thrives on his work and has said that there is nothing he likes better than to have ‘a blank piece of paper in front of me and to create’. He stresses the fact that what he creates must have the essential element of ‘being useful and at its best. if not, i don’t do it, i don’t put it on the market. For me, things have to be real, they have to have a soul.’ italia independent is enjoying steady success from collaborations with another Fiat brand alfa romeo on the über-chic alfa brera italia independent – a limited edition sports car, which was launched in Europe and more recently in Japan. produced for the centenary of alfa romeo, the car has been styled with innovative techniques, from its opaque-finish titanium paintwork, to its aluminium fuel cap. Lapo worked on materials for the car with internationally acclaimed Turin-based designer Giorgetto Giugaro, the original designer of the brera model. Lapo’s other projects include designing and producing an eyewear line and a jewellery collection out of what seems to be his choice material: lightweight carbon fibre. He teamed up with the French jeweller dinh Van to design a series of bracelets, cuffs and pendants blending carbon fibre with black diamonds. He remains a shareholder of Fiat Group along with his brother and sister, and one of his most notable ideas to date was his

«If you want to make a country grow today, you need to be open and you need to be InternatIonal and you cannot afford to be provIncIal. there are too many people In power who are not only provIncIal but medIocre – I mean, there’s a lot of medIocrIty and no merItocracy»

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«I don’t buy [ desIgn ] to make busIness out of It. I buy for pleasure» ITALIA_Lapo_30-35.indd 35

revival of the vintage Fiat logo, which he branded on clothing items and accessories. He was also instrumental in the launch of the revitalised classic Fiat 500 in 2007, which he describes as his chance ‘to give Fiat all the love possible at a very complicated moment, and to arrive at the Fiat 500 and create affection around the brand, make it into a “love brand”.’ And although he admits his favourite car is ‘always the next one I’m working on’, he clearly has a soft spot for the 500. He sees it as a ‘fuel efficient’ symbol of his country and describes it as ‘nimble, aggressive and sexy, but at the same time sweet and comfortable.’ A lifetime surrounded by cars and beautiful things has no doubt influenced his release of the Officina Collection (Officina means ‘mechanic’s workshop’ in Italian), for which Lapo developed furniture items with Italian designer Gaetano Pesce in a co-production entitled Lapo Meat Pesce, for furniture company Meritalia. Officina is an apt title – the collection consists of furniture items made from recycled automotive engine parts. Lapo describes the objects as ‘bewitching because of their technological beauty’, possessing ‘brutal and yet fascinating aesthetics, which states that even a bolt can be as sophisticated and rich as a piece of jewellery.’ He adds: ‘To me, all objects live and have a soul.’ I ask which designers he himself admires. He mentions Ettore Sottsass, Alessandro Mendini and Mario Bellini. Lapo is an instinctive buyer and doesn’t look for names, relying more on what catches his eye at the time. ‘I don’t buy to make business out if it,’ he says, ‘I buy for pleasure.’ Hailing from a country that is renowned for its taste and history for all things beautiful yet functional, Lapo has a lot to say about young artistic talent in Italy and the all-toorelaxed approach those in power have towards promoting it. He describes Italy as having ‘a humongous creative energy’, but expresses disappointment in ‘people in power who are not brave enough to give a new wave to the country.’ He can’t fathom how a country like Italy, with such potential in so many areas, is still so behind the times. ‘If you want to make a country grow in an era such as today, you need to be open and you need to be international and you cannot afford to be provincial,’ he explains. ‘And there are too many people in power who are not only provincial but mediocre – I mean, there’s a lot of mediocrity and no meritocracy.’ Among the whirlwind of chic designer products and glamorous collaborations, Lapo is also working on a distinctly personal endeavour, which reveals a different side to the man – a photography book, showing what he describes as ‘the sweet and sour moments of my life’. n

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giulio paolini

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art at room temperature

all photos courtesy archivio Giulio Paolini. Immacolata Concezione. Senza titolo / Senza autore: photo © Ken adlard; Esposizione Universale: photo © Paolo Mussat Sartor

words barry schwabsky

1982, before i’d even thought of Giulio Paolini, who was born in becoming an art critic. it was at the 1940 and is most associated with Padiglione d’arte Contemporanea arte Povera, has written that ‘Every in Milan, an exhibition called La work of art is already in itself a Caduta di Icaro (The Fall of Icarus), museum.’ Perhaps that’s why it felt whose resonances are still with me, important to me to encounter at and which initiated a fascination least once the artist in his studio: with Paolini’s work that i’ve never because (it seemed logical) if every lost. i remember thinking that the work is a museum, then every studio use of mythology reminded me of must already be a work of art. in Joseph Cornell – only here the exhieach case, it is (as Paolini once bition space itself was the box and i recalled what he glimpsed on his was inside it. i was fascinated by first museum visit) ‘a closed – but how the whole thing felt so cool, also unlimited – universe from precise and analytical, and yet the which i would have been neither theme of the fall – of death meted able nor willing to separate myself’. out to ambition – was grandiose and and the studio, like the museum, tragic. Gradually, as i got to know like the work itself would be an more about his work, i began to see almost closed-off world, almost but La Caduta di Icaro as one moment in not quite sheltered in itself. a gradual unfolding that had begun But what i found on entering some 20 years earlier, an unfolding Paolini’s studio, situated in a courtthat has continued without interrupyard not far from the piazza Vittorio tion until this day. Veneto in central Turin, hardly Opposite: Immacolata Concezione. Senza titolo / Senza autore, 2007– 08 The artist agreed that his oeulooked like a studio (and therefore, Above: Esposizione universale, 2005. vre has been built with this sense, one might argue, still left like a work not of repetition, but of continuity. of art). Rather, it is an office, per‘i make reference to the parabola of my work,’ he said. This i had to ponder: haps something like that of an architect with a small-scale practice. a pair in italian, the word parabola has two meanings, being both a mathematical of desks, many books, files, archives. a place for thinking more than for term, as in English, referring to a conic section, a curve describing the tralooking. i think of what Paolini wrote about his exhibition at the Fondazione jectory of an object in motion (under the influence of a gravitational field but Prada in 2003: ‘The object’s there, but it can’t be seen because we aren’t without friction), but the word can also be translated as parable, the literary allowed to see it’ so that ‘the gaze closes, finding itself the object of itself.’ form we associate with the new Testament , as well as with Franz Kafka, an The true object is the invisible nucleus of what we do see. extended metaphor that conveys a hermetic truth. which sense was Paolini Thus, in the studio, there was next to nothing to see, and i began by using? My immediate thought was that he was talking about the movement asking Paolini about this. ‘i become visible, you might say, only when there of his work through time. and yet i could not shake the other overtone – the is an exhibition,’ he explained. ‘i don’t show things already made which are idea that he was alluding to the idea of the development of an artist’s work then gathered together to form the exhibition. i scrutinise the situation and as a narrative with symbolic significance. ‘The work is a continuum,’ Paolini create the exhibition with that space in mind. and then the things i show are resumed. ‘when i make an exhibition, i’m not only projecting what i am not made here in the studio. if i need a photograph, i have a photographer doing now, but my whole trajectory. Being an artist means belonging to take it, i don’t take it myself. This studio is not a place for “touching” things.’ something that continues, something remains. Maybe by predetermination.’ So what happens in such a studio? ‘nothing,’ he laughed. ‘it’s not a factory. he laughed, adding, ‘not that i’m superstitious!’ But i’m rooted in this space. it’s a place where i can take a distance, a place in spite of his links with arte Povera, as Germano Celant named the for concentration.’ movement in 1967, Paolini has always been an odd man out when you conas we’d begun to converse, i pulled out my notebook and began scribsider how most of the other poveristi were fascinated with the poetics of bling – the hand’s mad race to keep up with the ear. its notable lack of materials, the politics of the ephemeral, and the breakdown of the boundasuccess constitutes the first round of editing. The artist expressed his surries between art and everyday life. Paolini was immune to all this; in 2003 he prise (and i think he was pleased) that i still use this antiquated technology even cited a document from Cittadellarte, the fondazione set up by instead of a digital recording device. i explained to him my theory of in-theMichelangelo Pistoletto, as a summation of what he finds impracticable in moment editing, but neglected to mention my fear that although i could contemporary art: its search for ‘an innovative relationship between art and understand his italian perfectly in person, in the abstract form of a disemthe social framework’; the idea that ‘the artist has the duty to connect the bodied voice i might make out almost nothing. various human activities, from economy to politics, from science to religion‘ Paolini asked what brought me to Turin. The answer was easy: to see – making clear the distance between his position and that of another of the him, no other reason. i explained that i’d first seen his work as long ago as 37

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are part of its essence. Again and again, Paolini has turned to classical myths – to the tales of narcissus, Mnemosyne, Apollo and Daphne – as well as to the myth of art itself as embodied in its protagonists, from Raphael and Lorenzo Lotto to contemporaries like Jasper Johns. ‘But my work doesn’t present narratives,’ he corrected me. ‘It carries reverberations of narratives and myths. I feel a need to avoid closing myself into a purely theoretical discourse on art. These ancient narratives produce an echo that fills the void left by theory. I show the elements of artistic representation. Each work is the answer to its own question. It demonstrates the fact that it exists. But this existence is not exhausted in showing itself; it always conveys a further reference. compared to the Anglo-American understanding of conceptual art, I think this is a less rigid or categorical discourse. The work is not the thing we are looking at but a mirror in which we glimpse something of the history of art. It not only shows its uniqueness but its part in history.’ A certain abstract art, and following it a certain conceptual art, wished to eliminate anything anecdotal from the work. Paolini puts the anecdote at a distance, yet its shadow continues to fall over the work, if only, sometimes, by way of a title. Art’s history extends forward as well as backward. sensing that I’ve taken up enough of the artist’s time here in the studio where his art’s future invisibly and intangibly starts to take form, I finish with the obvious question: what’s next on his agenda? ‘I want to do several shows all using the same theme,’ he responded. ‘I want to concentrate my attention on exhibitions that one central element in common – that they seem to evoke the necessity to realize a work and also its impossibility. They should have a title in common: Senza piú titolo – not “untitled”, but rather “no more title” or “no longer titled”.’ I’ve encountered works that were Not Yet Titled – the first one I remember was by cady noland, though I’ve since come across examples by Banks Violette and others – but No Longer Titled is new to me. It seems to point to the idea of a work that is in the process of losing its identity, of dissipating. ‘You know it’s a work, but you don’t know why,’ said Paolini. ‘It’s lost its memory. It occupies a space which it no longer understands or recognises. It’s losing its aura.’ The risk of art losing its memory, its identity, its aura, is inevitable once it refuses that other great risk, that it becomes hermetically sealed off, complete, and sterile. Art may refer to the eternal but it exists in time. Like Icarus, it’s always heading for a fall. for a classicist, this idea of an amnesiac work must be the greatest nightmare. It seems that Paolini’s art is moving into a dark phase. But there’s no arguing with the timeliness of his concern. It sounds like his ‘no longer titled’ works will offer an immediate diagnosis of the situation of art today. Yet I suspect they will also offer the possibility of an inoculation against the condition they identify. There is anguish in Paolini’s vision of art, as represented by that fall that caught my imagination in Milan in 1982, but also serenity. It is, as he says, an art at room temperature. This tension or even self-contradiction, for all the composure with which Paolini seems to contemplate it, is crucial. It’s the reason why his art – as spare and minimal as it may seem – is never simply tautological. The work never coincides with itself, and this why (against the precepts of the very classicism it proclaims) it never achieves closure, never becomes what Descartes called a clear and distinct idea; this is the reason why it has, not only a past, but a future. n

great exponents of Arte Povera. Paolini’s endeavour has always been to analyse the conventions of art more than to overcome them. Rather than seeking to innovate, he has looked for the eternal in art – to find that which might always already have been there, and which the individual artist need only unveil. This analytical bent, along with an inclination toward visual and material austerity – so different from the sensual engagement offered by a work by, say, Mario Merz or Giuseppe Penone – makes it tempting to think of Paolini as something more like a conceptual artist than a poverista. But the artist himself is sceptical of this connection. ‘The singularity of my work,’ he told me, ‘comes from the fact that – in contrast to a conceptual position, at least in the Anglo-American sense – it does not equate language and art.These are two polarities that my work seeks to respect. My work is always the vehicle of an image. And I don’t think of my work as cold. It has two poles, hot and cold. As a result there is, you might say, a work at room temperature’ – at least I think that is the most appropriate way to translate Paolini’s phrase: ‘un lavoro tiepido’. At this point I needed clarification. It’s easy to feel the coolness of Paolini’s work. But where is its ‘hot’ side? In Paolini’s view, it’s in the ardour with which the work is realised, ‘in my attention to its formal aspect. Every artist has his own obsession. This is mine, the passion that the works be composed in a certain way and no other.’ It’s a passion that is undemonstrative, undramatised, but constant. ‘Even with the works where the classical image seems to be ruined, like the works in broken plaster, still, there is always a fascination for the classical.’ IT’s ThIs fAscInATIon with the classical that sets Paolini apart from other artists of his generation – even or especially his fellow Italians, the nation who invented classicism. I can’t help but be curious about what it signifies and what its origins might be – this tropism toward, say, Poussin over caravaggio, canova over Rodin. ‘for me,’ he explained, ‘the classical means the continuous mode of art – the formal, composed element that’s always there, art’s destiny and permanence. I recognise that there is another side to art, the romantic, but it’s less congenial to me. That’s not to say I refuse the romantic altogether. I’d rather say that the classicists are my family – the romantics, honoured guests.’ Likewise, Paolini’s work – from the very beginning, with Disegno Geometrico (1960), a white canvas divided by four lines, two from corner to corner and two from the centre of each side to the opposing side – has always concerned the act of measurement and the theory of proportions. ‘Artistic language in general – whether referring to music, visual art, or any other – is free, it enters into unknown territories. But to be grasped, this unknown must find its rule. not in the way of science or politics or other human activities in which the rule must be universally observable – instead, every must find his or her own. for each artist there exists a secret code, which even he doesn’t know but which he nonetheless possesses and applies and renders perceivable.’ Perhaps this sums up the contradiction that constitutes Paolini’s own secret code: the idea of an idiosyncratic classicism, a universal ideal that is peculiar to the artist who conceives it. Paolini’s is an analytical art, but not a reductive one. That’s why its continuity is not that of mere repetition; his oeuvre is a universe in constant, steady expansion. Among the things that make this possible is the fact that his analysis of the pure idea of art has never entirely eliminated its narrative element. The stories, the legends that art has illustrated and rendered vivid in human memory are not external to it; they, as much as its formal elements,

Barry Schwabsky is the author of The Widening Circle: Consequences of Modernism in Contemporary Art. He is art critic of The Nation and writes regularly for the London Review of Books and Artforum.

«The work is noT The Thing we are looking aT buT a mirror in which we glimpse someThing of The hisTory of arT» 38

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Apoteosi di Omero: photo © Paolo Vandrasch; La caduta di Icaro: photo © nanda Lanfranco; Disegno geometrico: photo Mario sarotto

Opposite: Apoteosi di Omero, 1970–71, installation view at Galleria Giò Marconi, Milan, 2007 Above: La caduta di Icaro, 1981, installation view at Documenta 7, Kassel, 1982; below: Disegno geometrico, 1960

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carla sozzani shop! in the name of love words karen wright | PhotograPhs grant scott

Carla Sozzani photographed in her office in Milan on 15 April 2010

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10 Corso Como includes a bookstore (top left), the 3 Rooms Hotel (top right), and a fashion and design store (below)

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«10 corso como is a place of temptation: expensive, unobtainable objects juxtaposed with more affordable mass-produced rainbow displays of good cheap design» She wanted to go and study design at Accademia di belle Arti di brera in milan, but her father was not keen. ‘At that time it was not considered appropriate for a good family girl to go to brera art school,’ she says. ‘It was dangerous, dangerous! This was the 1960s, and a girl who was going to art school was a girl ready for perversion. So I stayed with the nuns until I was 18.’ carla went on to university where she studied foreign languages and spent a lot of time in london. chuckling, she recalls: ‘It was 1968 and everyone was into the revolution. my father wanted me back so I came home to Italy and went to Sardinia. he sent me a telegram – can you believe it? – saying, “come back and work. You can’t spend your life doing nothing!” eventually, I came back to milan where my mother’s friend had a few magazines and, voilà! That’s how I started in magazines and I worked in magazines for nineteen years.’ carla went from Vogue to Elle as an editor and was fired after three issues. She blames the fashion industry for her dismissal, saying she was including too many international brands like Jean-Paul Gaultier and Rei Kawakubo and the Italian fashion companies threatened to stop advertising in Elle unless she was removed. ‘I decided that, despite having lots of offers, nineteen years was enough for magazines and I wanted to do something different,’ carla says. ‘So I opened a small company for editions. To do fashion or photography books, which is what I thought I knew better, and I opened a gallery. The gallery has now been going for 20 years.’ At that time, art was in new York. milan had no photography galleries, except for a small one called Diaframma. ‘That was it – photography was not considered art at that time. In 20 years, things change,’ she says.

When I clImb InTO a taxi at the milan train station and ask for 10 corso como, the driver takes off at speed saying, ‘I cannot take you there. It is a street for walking, but I will drop you nearby. At night’ – he gesticulates – ‘it is crazy.’ carla Sozzani is late for our interview. It is the middle of design week in milan so it is not surprising. The city is swarming with foreign visitors. I sit sipping tea in the leafy courtyard, where waiting is definitely no hardship. It is a perfect people-watching spot. colourful groups of stylish shoppers, many sporting brightly coloured converse AllStars, the subject of a topical ubiquitous eye-catching advertising campaign, merge into a kaleidoscopic scene. I stroll round 10 corso como’s shop. It is a place of temptation: expensive, unobtainable objects juxtaposed with more affordable mass-produced rainbow displays of good cheap design. I relent and buy a black-and-white Op Art watch within my budget and discover later that, although it is produced by Alessi, the Italian design house, it is in fact designed by the jeweller Kris Ruhs, who is showcased upstairs where there is a well-stocked art and photography bookstore and a room for a small exhibition of design for milan’s design week. The show there features some mishappen ceramic wall pieces, which are early works by the late ettore Sottsass. When carla enters the courtyard, she’s dressed in black, her long blonde hair giving her identity away. She walks slowly up the black stairs to the second-floor gallery, leaving me time to speculate as to whether she will have time to see me. I allow the photographer to shoot first, talking to her over his shoulder. She apologises for her lateness, saying she has been to the elections for the the camera nazionale della moda Italiana (The national chamber for Italian Fashion) that morning and she has been re-elected. She smiles, and takes a call from the artist whose jewellery she is wearing and which is on show nearby, beautifully presented in black boxes: the simple silver designs make me instantly covetous. I ask whether growing up in Italy helped inform her choice of careers. ‘Of course,’ she shrugs. ‘I grew up in mantua, my mother was taking us to everything. All the museums. And those churches, all those churches. but not for religion! not for religion – for art. ‘my father wasn’t into modern art at all,’ she recalls. ‘he was completely into Piero della Francesca and mantegna. he had an amazing sensibility when it came to colour.’ carla’s father was an engineer and an architect who encouraged his children in their artistic interests. ‘We travelled widely as a family,’ carla says. ‘he took us, me and my sister Franca who is two years younger than me, with my mother to many places to see things.’ her mother is soon to celebrate her 98th birthday. ‘I remember one time we were in Urbino in the beautiful duomo there and we were looking at the amazing architecture. We turned to look at some postcards for friends and – pam! – my father slapped me. “You are in front of this amazing scene and you look for a postcard? You idiot!” ’

cARlA SOOn ReAlISeD that there could be a money issue. ‘I wasn’t a millionaire and I was missing fashion and I needed to support the gallery. I wanted to give photography the space it needed in milan. I thought of opening a store in a way that was like making a magazine, which was the only way I knew. Yes, it’s about editing and curating. I opened without any experience in retail, zero retail experience.’ The area around 10 corso como at the time had social problems, plus the store had no windows and was in a courtyard. It has since become a fashionable destination. ‘I never understood why, if I liked a certain sweater, I shouldn’t like a glass or a chair or a painting or photography,’ carla says. ‘People wouldn’t understand. And to do this it has to be authentic. You really have to be that way, because otherwise it doesn’t work. It looks strange. You need one eye, it could be good, it could be bad. Taste, you don’t discuss. but somebody has to be editing.’ She admits that, given her interest and support of photography as an art form, people constantly ask her why she hasn’t become a photographer herself. ‘because I am an editor!’, she says tartly. ‘I don’t want to be a photographer. People ask why I don’t make clothes? because I edit clothes! It’s another story. because when you spend your whole life editing looking at

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«this floor is all about love. [at 10 corso como] there is a real communication between the visitors, customers and myself»

wear the dress! Alaïa is a very, very strong designer, probably one of the most important designers. I like his approach: he likes women, he respects women. he loves their shape. It’s very important.’ I ask about her nike trainers, black with silver flashes. ‘It’s difficult to find black nikes that fit me,’ she admits ruefully. ‘Actually, these are two sizes bigger than mine. They are men’s shoes, but I don’t care!’ So does she love her shop? She smiles. ‘This floor is all about love,’ she says. Does she miss magazines? ‘There is a real communication between the visitors, customers and myself. When I was working for Vogue, for all those years, you really didn’t know… They aren’t even readers, the people who look. You don’t know them, there is no contact.’ I tell her that I love the bookshop and ask if it makes money. Of course not,’ she sighs. And does she have a huge collection of books at home and time to read them? ‘Yes, of course. I don’t read so much anymore. I mean, I look at books. I have lots of images – books on design, art books. You know what is good, sometimes it’s even too much for me. It can happen to you, I guess. If you think things are too beautiful, your mind goes somewhere else. You have the feeling you can never catch that beautiful moment.’ So is Italy a place about families? She smiles. ‘Well, my sister Franca is still in magazines.’ She texts her to see me later, and gets an instant response. ‘Yes, she will see you. my daughter works for her now. She needed a more powerful minder. She worked for me for a while and said I was too nice to her.’ Our time is rapidly coming to an end. her appointments are backing up – a woman has come from Dubai to talk about the possibility of opening a shop there. carla opened a branch of 10 corso como in Japan in 2002 and another in Korea in 2004. ‘They are all different and in order for them to work, they have to be all different,’ she says. ‘I love the fact of opening in a place where there is a different culture. I would never do it in Paris or london, which are too similar. That would be really worthless.’ So is she bringing Italy to Korea and Japan? ‘Yes, because I love Asia, and I love to mix the cultures’. On the table, there is a pile of copies of her latest book, a beautiful edition about Kris Ruhr, the jeweller she is showing. She is now working on a book commemorating 20 years of 10 corso como. I ask about the Italian photographer Ugo mulas and why we don’t know his work outside Italy and she jumps up and grabs a photograph off the desk. ‘I want to buy this work from auction,’ she says. ‘It is that whole group at corso como, including Alfa castaldi [who was married to style icon Anna Piaggi] and mulas. You should try and get hold of that book he did in the sixties of artists in their studios. It is really hard to get and really expensive if you find it. They should really reprint it.’ carla looks pensive: the germ of a future project has lodged in her mind. n

things, you are also very impatient. If you want to become a photographer, you have to dedicate yourself. If you want to make a jacket, you have to dedicate yourself. If you want to make a painting… if you’re an artist, it is a world of solitude.’ It is the mixture at 10 corso como that is so instantly captivating. carla modestly credits her editorial skills. ‘I was used to working on projects – working for a magazine is not working for myself. So I grew up working for a project. I never had a big ego. In a sense, naturally it’s the way I am. but that’s also how I was trained, to work for a whole picture. Of course, now I work for corso como.’ her learning came via travelling, reading and looking, she says. ‘I need to see lots,’ she states. She admits that she has been looking at fashion magazines less frequently recently. ‘A lot of magazines all look the same.’ looking around 10 corso como, a space pleasantly crammed with beautiful objects, I point to a variety of vases that appear to be from the sixties and ask if there is an affinity with this period. ‘I love all the shapes – they have a certain sexuality to them,’ she replies, ‘but at the same time I am completely fascinated by the Shiro Kuramata square Plexiglas.’ She gestures at a pink transparent piece sitting close to a sixties-looking etruscan owl. ‘I like those angles… There are objects that really talk to you. It’s a private conversation between your eye and the object.’ And the jewellery? I say that I love the silver jewellery that’s displayed outside the office and the simple silver necklace that she is wearing. She says it is by Kris Ruhs, ‘the artist of the exhibition’. ‘It’s great, great, great. We did a retrospective of Kris’ work from when he started in 1985 to now. Twenty-five years of work. We wanted to see the evolution, and we also mixed some pieces together. I met him in 1980? 1988? 1989. he’s done a lot with corso como. he is a painter and sculptor, he was making pieces of jewels. I bought one piece, which in the exhibition. And since then we have become friends. he makes special pieces that we can actually live with, not simply put on your walls. It’s something you can use also, not only look at.’ I Am veRY happy sitting in this office surrounded by so much covetable work, both contemporary and 1960s. I ask again what carla likes about that period. ‘There was a softness and spontaneity, something that was very, very real. People were experimenting. nobody was afraid. nobody was losing anything.’ carla continues: ‘In 20 years we have shown many photographers and also a lot of design. Albini, Prouvé, Kuramata, Scandinavian and sixties design. I work at a table which is Italian with a Fontana fabric on top; the chairs are sixties American ones. You know, the shapes are very primitive. That’s what I like about the sixties. The shapes are pure. I love [Arne] Jacobsen.’ I comment on her beautiful dress, black and deceptively simple, set off by a encircling necklace of silver by Ruhs. ‘[Azzedine] Alaïa for me is a sculptor. I like clothes that have a personality by themselves, but at the same time that can adjust to me. I don’t want the dress to wear me, I like to

For the shop, visit www.10corsocomo; at Galleria Sozzani: Eikoh Hosoe – Estasi e Memorie, 17 June–1 August 2010, www.galleriasozzani.com

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franca sozzani family values words karen wright | PhotograPhs PierPaolo Ferrari

Franca Sozzani, editor-in-chief of italian Vogue since 1988, meets me in her office in Milan. The office, in a gracious italian building, is reached by a black, old-fashioned cage lift, strangely reminiscent of the lift at 10 corso como, the shop/gallery run by her elder (by two years) sister carla Sozzani. Superficially, Franca’s long curly blonde hair gives her a striking resemblance to her sister, but i soon realise that her eyes, while as beautiful as her sister’s, are different in shape and her manner of speaking is very different. i was expecting her to be dressed in identifiable high fashion, but today she is in efficiency mode – sharp, business­like clothes, neat trousers and a simple jumper. She is also a multitasker. i wait while she makes a phone call which i understand in my limited menu italian is an order for chicken and lettuce (‘Fresca! Molta fresca!’) for a dinner that she is preparing that evening. in all my discussions within italy it is clear that the family still reigns as a powerful force. i ask Franca if she feels this is true. ‘You are right,’ she replies. ‘italy is very family oriented and this you can see not only with myself and carla, but you can see it in all the fashion industry. and not just the fashion industry, because i can even talk about Barilla, they make pasta, or with cars. it’s always a matter of family. You see it with Max Mara – they are two brothers and one sister; you see the Della Valle family. Diesel, Ferretti, armani – his niece, his nephew, it’s all about the family. Prada is a family affair. Where there’s no family, it means that the brand, the name, the factory has been sold.’ Family-run businesses aren’t simply the big names, either, Franca says. ‘Everywhere, in every field, it’s really family. in design, it’s the same. The companies are all in the hands of the big families.’ in my discussions with the italian collector Giulio di Gropello, he has claimed that this is the result of ‘sedimentation’, the layers of history and tradition that make italy culturally so unique. Franca immediately points to something different. ‘Basically, italy is an artisanal place, and this is very important, because it doesn’t happen in any other country,’ she says. ‘This is psychologically an artisanal country, not only because we have the manufacturers, the families, the traditions and production, but also because these people really care about what they do. it’s not just for the money, it’s for the tradition too.’ She is also quick to point out that this is not a long-standing tradition, ‘it’s not like we are talking abut two centuries ago, i mean it’s all made in the last 40, 50, 60 years. This is, i think, the creativity of italy – to use every single member of the family for what they are good at.’

Franca is clear that this sense of family is not limited to being just about fashion, or pasta. She points out: ‘Mondadori was the same before Berlusconi bought it. it was run by the grandfather, the son, and then the grandson. rizzoli was a family power, too. of course, not today, it’s a different kind of reality.’ i remember my meeting with carla, her sister, less than a week before, and ask Franca if growing up in Mantua, surrounded by the cultural richness of italy, has helped her develop into the creative person she is now. ‘When you grow up in the middle of beautiful things, you travel a lot, see a lot of people,’ she replies. Franca is clear that it was more the international quality of the places she studied in – France, Switzerland and London. ‘Everybody does this now, but for that time, we were a very avantgarde family,’ she says. iT WaS noT a dynastic choice that propelled her elder sister carla into fashion, for no Sozzanis at that time had ever worked at a fashion magazine – carla was at university when she decided that she wanted to work in that field. The trajectory of Franca’s career was different. She credits her initiation into magazines to her sister: ‘She started before me and she found me my first job. i wanted to work and because i got married very, very young, i got divorced at a young age too. and so i went to Milan’s Corriere della sera – the newspaper was looking for a young university girl to do some work. carla answered for me. i went, of course, to the meeting, but she answered for me. i got the job and afterwards, my life changed completely.’ Franca didn’t realise that she was embarking on a long career. ‘i never thought it was my life. i honestly thought it was just for a while. i was married, i was playing golf, i was travelling, i went to india. i didn’t think that i’d spend the next 30 years in magazines.’ i ask if she was really interested in fashion before she came to Vogue and she says, not really. She says firmly that she had no career plan. ‘i got married when i was 20. The only thing i was sure about was that i loved to study. i loved being at the university. i was always quite good in my studies. i did classics, lots of ancient Greek, Latin. i like people with culture.’ after all that travelling and such a sophisticated education, i ask her if she likes living in italy and Milan in particular. ‘i love to work in Milan,’ she affirms. ‘i love to live in italy, because i think we have a quality that no other country in the world could have – in terms of culture. if you think about how small is italy, and how big it is in terms of architecture, painting, the production that we have, there is no other country in the world.’ She clearly hasn’t given up

her love of travel though. ‘at the same time, i love to go to new York, to stay there, and to see how dynamic it is. i think that you need to open your mind all the time.’ This is the first time i have ever interviewed sisters and it is almost a mirror conversation of many of the things that i had discussed with carla. i say to Franca that carla calls 10 corso como an act of editorialising. She agrees. ‘What carla does with the shop, i do with the magazine.’ Was she interested in fashion when she was growing up? ‘i loved to dress up, i was very keen to have dresses and to change, and to find a way to be. So i always did. i have always tried to have my own way to do,’ she replies. Unlike carla, however, she does not have a favourite designer. ‘i don’t want to be recognisable in any of the dresses. i don’t want to say – this is from this person, this is from that person. i think it’s better to get things from everybody, but to find your own way to be.’ That surprises me, so i ask if she ever wanted to be the muse in that traditional sense? ‘i didn’t want to be the label of something. i’m not a brand-y person. When i’m asked where i got something, to me, it is the best compliment. it means, on me, the dress is completely different. That’s what i like.’ i aSk aBoUT living in the same city as the fashion designer Miuccia Prada and Donatella Versace. She smiles. ‘With Miuccia and even with Donatella – they really like each other. So when we meet, we laugh a lot, because Donatella is such a funny person.’ i am surprised by this: the two women, Miuccia and Donatella, have such different styles. ‘it doesn’t matter,’ replies Franca. ‘When you are intelligent you can match anybody! and both of them are very intelligent, very smart and very ironic.’ Miuccia, she points out, ‘has always had a passion for art’. Says Franca: ‘i have known her for 30 years, since the days before the Miuccia Prada brand. She’s always loved fashion, she’s always loved art. as does Patrizio Bertelli [Miuccia’s business partner and husband]. That’s why they are a very strong couple.’ Franca has also worked with visual artists, including a project with Michelangelo Pistoletto at his cittadellarte foundation in Biella. i had been to the foundation last year and seen the work he was doing with young fashion designers, although i hadn’t known that Franca was involved. ‘You know in italy if there is anything to do with young talent – it’s always me,’ she says. ‘Did he show you the opera – the work of art, he did inspired by the Last Supper?’ When i reply in the negative, Franca jumps up to show me the image on her computer. ‘We chose

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Photos courtesy Franca Sozzani

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Michelangelo Pistoletto, Prima scena - La presentazione, 2009

Pistoletto: courtesy cittadellarte

these eleven eco-designers, who only use fabric or anything that is ecological. He arranged us infront of a mirror. He is Jesus of course, i am San Giovanni – St John – the blonde, with long hair, who you don’t know whether it’s really a woman or a man. it’s quite beautiful and strong.’ The work of these designers i had seen in the shop in Biella had been strong and eye-catching, too – making it more sculpture than fashion. cittardellarte is not the only foundation that Franca has been involved with. i say that i had met Patrizia Sandretto re rebaudengo in Turin recently, and she had told me that her foundation had recently given its Stellare prize to Franca recently. Franca says that she received her prize ‘because i am the person who works most on “the image,” on the photographers of today. They all start with me. Some of them are not artists in the strict sense of art, but they are great artists.’ The list of photographers she works with are ‘truly international’, as befits a magazine as important as Vogue, but she also has a stable of italian photographers including the more established Paolo roversi and Mario Sorrenti. She is also excited about a younger group of italians – Pierpaolo Ferrari, Francesco carrozzini (her son) and Lorenzo Bringheli. WHEn i aSk about the future stars of fashion, she smiles. ‘The press always want the miracolo,’ she says. ‘Somebody has to come out of the blue to immediately become one of the most important designers in the world. But you need time. if we are talking about Dolce & Gabbana and Miuccia, for example, we are talking about more than 20 years! ‘You mustn’t think that a designer can become famous in one or two seasons. it’s true that the media is quick, but it doesn’t matter. You need to produce, you need to invest, you need money, publicity, credibility, you need to deliver. it’s a long process to become famous. of course, we have a lot who are young and good, but you need time. You really need time.’ Franca is proud of the contribution and time she puts in to help find and develop younger talent. ‘We do prizes for young talent. and i also do a lot of programmes in schools but i always do it as a private person.’ i ask her whether she has been as frustrated by the lack of public support, as others i have spoken to in the last week seem to be. Her response is resolutely upbeat. ‘Everybody is negative about everybody else,’ she says. ‘i’m not negative. For example, we do a competition to promote young talent. alta roma [a company which promotes rome in the high-fashion industry] gave us a little bit of

money. Just like Pitti did for us for men’s fashion. But we’re talking about time, you know.’ Franca says that the competition winners are put in contact with factories to realise their work. ‘otherwise, they are the winner of what? This is the sense of a contest. otherwise it becomes self-satisfaction.’ When i ask her about her passion at the moment and what’s exciting her in the schedule for the next six months, she speaks enthusiastically about the recently launched website, www.vogue.it. ‘it is a great, huge satisfaction. in the first four weeks since we opened, we got almost 70,000 fans on Facebook, 70,000!’ she says. ‘That means 2,500 people every day became fans of vogue.it. it is huge! There is no other magazine that did such a thing’ – and she makes a noise that rises in pitch to emulate the escalating figures. ‘That’s what i am looking for in the future – what the site means; how to increase users; how to get in touch with them more and more.’ The site is innovative and user-friendly. Franca says: ‘Even at the beginning i did different sections. That’s aside from the ordinary sections – fashion, trend, celebrity… all these kind of obvious things that you could find on vogue.it. But i also did a section for curvy women who are not so slim. i did a section for black women, because when we did the black issue two years ago, it was very successful.’ She is justifiably proud that it was a top-selling issue which attracted a lot of attention. initially, she recalls that she was criticised for creating a ‘ghetto,’ but the issue was a response to the lack of beauty products for black women in fashion magazines and the scarcity of black models in fashion editorials, just as curvy was a reaction to the lack of clothing for women who were ‘only three kilos’ heavier that herself. ‘in italy, it just sold as it does all the time,’ she reminds me ‘but in the Uk, in the US, and in Germany, we reprinted for the first time in the history of the magazine and we sent back 50,000 copies in america.’ as i leave, thanking Franca for her generosity of time in an obviously busy day, others are lining up to see her. i recall her description of working in a magazine: ‘To be in a magazine is to have an eye on the world. Every day it’s like i’m looking at a movie. information is coming in all day long. You never feel isolated or that you’re doing just one job. You feel like you’re doing a thousand jobs every single day.’ Before i say goodbye, i remember to ask about carla’s daughter. ‘Yes, she works for me here at Vogue – in fashion. She is very talented.’ Family reigns again. n

«you mustn’t think that a designer can become famous in one or two seasons. you need to produce, you need to invest, you need money, publicity, credibility, you need to deliver. you really need time»

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i ragazzi are all right

words iggy cortez | PhotograPhs ilaria Magliocchetti loMbi

We asked a young Roman photographer to capture the people and places around the San Lorenzo and Pigneto neighbourhoods in Rome. Defying the stereotype that Rome’s ‘young areas’ are merely aesthetic exercises in boho chic and partying, these neighbourhoods’ creative inhabitants bring art, design and social work into dynamic encounters. With the opening of the Zaha hadid-designed MAXXi in May and with other contemporary art initiatives in Rome, there will no doubt be much attention given to the rejuvenation of italy’s capital city which, from the outside, can appear a little less in sync with a dynamic contemporary culture than northern italian cities like turin and Milan. But while Rome might appear to be absorbed in its glorious past, it also has a character that is part palimpsest, part Chinese box. these emerging alternative cultures might not be immediately obvious to the untrained eye, because in Rome they aim to coexist with, rather than eclipse, the established local customs and characters within the neighbourhoods. the San Lorenzo and pigneto neighbourhoods are the best known examples of areas where these alternative cultures thrive, as the dramatic, sprawling street art for which both neighbourhoods have become famous testifies. numerous boutiques, design studios, and cultural centres have opened up here, reflecting an underground scene which is unavailable elsewhere – ‘cineclubs’ screen art-house and foreign films, pop-up art performances abound, and impromptu parties are advertised through photocopied leaflets. But there is also important social work done here, with social centres like eSC offering italian lessons to immigrants and information sessions for job seekers. While the interiors of these spaces could at times be mistaken for any space in Shoreditch or Brooklyn, what distinguishes the San Lorenzo and pigneto counterculture is the absence of the bohemian laziness or practiced indifference so commonly cultivated in other capital cities. through initiative and risk, their creative residents have developed a hub for like-minded individuals interested in fostering contemporary culture in Rome. this is an achievement that is all the more important given the lack of public funding to help sustain such projects. in the end, these Roman pioneers revitalizing the eternal City share an affinity with its timeless character: passionate, yes, but also incredibly defiant, proud and tough. n Opposite, top: ROTA-LAB are an artisanal art studio in San Lorenzo that experiments with wood, metal and resin; bottom: STEN&LEX are internationally recognized street artists whose pioneering experimentation with stencil graffiti has developed the vocabulary and techniques of street art internationally. This page, top: mixed-media artist Jonathan Ted Pannacciò’s projects have been exhibited in underground art circuits and in TV advertisements; bottom: Tuba, in the heart of the Pigneto’s ‘isola pedonale’, is a femimist sex-shop and bookstore.

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Opposite: LUCAMALEONTE began cutting stencils in 2001 in Rome This page, above and right: despite the masculine name, the design studio Arturo is a collective of five women creating innovative graphic designs, illustrations and animations in S. Lorenzo; below: Carlo Nannetti is one-half of Mook Design who specialize in transforming discarded wood and metal into sculptures and designs – their work has ranged from set and theatre designs and installations for art exhibitions to tutorials for children on art and recycling

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Top left: Alexandra Mazzanti runs the Dorothy Circus gallery that specializes in low-brow art and limited edition toys; top right: Rat Creatives an art and new media studio which specializes in audio-visual work; bottom left: Valerio Ciampicacigli is the Creative Director of Paula, a furniture design studio that fuses design with street art; bottom right: the fashion duo Bunka create unique hand-made fashion and accessories Opposite: ESC is a social centre that serves as an interface between university students and the city – their activities include hosting art events and concerts as well as running an Italian language school for foreigners and offering information sessions on substance abuse and immigrants’ rights

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martino gamper from the chair man words alex coles | portraits peter rigaud

Martino GaMper is one of the leading furniture designers of

and the reinvigoration of the handmade in design. at the same

his generation. He was born in italy in 1972 and he began his

time, Gamper has developed a high degree of self-reflexivity in

education as an apprentice to a joiner and continued it in Vienna

relation to each of these trends, thus ensuring that he clearly

in the mid-1990s, when he was brought into contact with the

belongs to none of them. these trends will, of course, inevitably

leading italian designer Matteo thun of the Memphis Group, and

pass, but his work will continue to evolve and engage.

one of the foremost italian artists today, Michelangelo pistoletto

When we spoke, it was at a crucial stage in his develop-

of arte povera. Gamper moved to London in 1997 to study at the

ment, as his first two attempts at industrial design, with the

royal College of art with the product designer ron arad. since

design companies Magis and established & sons, were being

his graduation in 2000, Gamper has worked on many exhibitions

prototyped and showcased. the first half of the interview took

and projects including 100 Chairs in 100 Days at 5 Cromwell

place in March in his studio – a modest space completely cus-

place, London, in 2007, If Gio Only New at DesignMiami/Basel in

tomized by Gamper – in Hackney in London. the second half

2007, and Martino with Carlo Molino at Frieze art Fair in 2008. the

happened in Milan in april over drinks during the salone interna-

series of works devoted to reworking the designs of italian mod-

zionale del Mobile, the international furniture fair. Due to the

ernists such as ponti and Molino have been particularly effective

unexpected intervention of the icelandic volcano, instead of hap-

in reigniting the debate about the place of modern italian prod-

pening in either place, the photo shoot in the end took place in

uct design in a now globalised design world.

Vienna in an antique furniture shop Gamper had come to know

one reason Gamper’s practice has proved to be so compel-

as a student in the city. the images reference his keen interest in

ling is because of the way his work is located at the intersection

historical furniture design, albeit laced with his own unique

of numerous trends, including designart, the performative turn,

sense of humour. 58

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Martino Gamper photographed in Vienna on 26 April 2010

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ÂŤmy interest in art was not so much in its physical form,

000

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or its status as a unique object, with its conceptual base» Opposite: Installation view of 100 Chairs in 100 Days, 2007

Alex Coles After a week spent trying to procure information for my preview article for the Financial Times on this year’s Salone Internazionale del Mobile I’m feeling a little frustrated with the product design world. MArtino GAMper The product design world is more like the fashion world than the art world. Everything is last minute. Things are always subject to change. Prototyping can bring up all kinds of complex issues that hadn’t arisen at an earlier stage of the process. What you ran into is typical, so don’t take it personally. AC Instead of going to college, to begin with you did an apprenticeship with a joiner. This seems unusual for a contemporary designer and was obviously important, given how your work is predominately constructed by hand out of wood. MG Doing an apprenticeship with a Master for five years may seem quite an old-fashioned thing to do, but it’s typical in that part of Italy [Trentino-Sudtirol, in the Italian Alps close to the Austrian border]. The skills I picked up during the course of the apprenticeship have been absolutely crucial to my development as a designer. AC Following the apprenticeship, you went to Vienna to study sculpture – not design – with Michelangelo Pistoletto. Why? MG In actual fact I shuttled back and forth between the Academy of Fine Arts with Pistoletto and the University of Applied Arts with Matteo Thun of the Memphis group. Running the two in parallel created a tension that I fed off. But it was even more complicated than that. At that time, Pistoletto was involved in a design orientated project of his own, Progetto Arte. Part of the course’s curriculum was to ensure his students engage with certain aspects of design, but many of his students – myself included – were confused by this. Not until years later did I come to understand what he was asking of us. Pistoletto was trying to initiate something that was quite new: a more conceptual, yet socially engaged, approach to design, using the less restricted palette an artist has available to them. AC But didn’t it feel odd travelling between the two institutes? MG It did feel odd until I opted to take a class with one of the other Professors at the University of Applied Arts: Ron Arad. Where the rest of the curriculum seemed quite rigid, Ron’s class was much more flexible – grappling with elements from both art and design in a way that I could instantly relate to. This allowed me to explore the full range of my ideas within the context of one institute and, ultimately, even one class.

AC Was it this encounter with Arad that took you to London? MG No. First I spent some time in Milan working for Matteo designing products. After a year and a half I left to go to the Royal College of Art. When I arrived at the RCA in 1997 Ron was new there. One of his first actions was to bring the Furniture Department together with the Industrial Design Department to make one new large department: Design Products. As a result, within Design Products there was an incredible range and degree of flexibility. Platforms were established to pursue different aspects of the subject. One Platform was devoted to exploring socially engaged design; another focused on interactive design; another on furniture design; and another, still, developed the discourse around design’s dialogue with art. The last of these was a particularly important one for me. AC Why were you so drawn to this aspect of the subject? MG Having just recently come from Matteo’s studio in Milan it was clear to me that I wasn’t particularly interested in industrial design per se. By comparison, the area of investigation in which art engages with design seemed refreshing. Remember the context of the time: the Dutch design group Droog hadn’t yet taken off and industrial product design was still very much the core of the design world. My interest in art was not so much in its physical form, or its status as a unique object, but in entering into dialogue with its conceptual base. If something I produce happens to be a one-off then that is a direct result of the process established for fabricating the work rather than for the sake of its strategic positioning in the market place. In the early days, I used readymade elements because they were freely available to me in skips. Due to both their condition and their limited availability, each of these elements was inevitably unique. Splicing them together by using hand-made joints could only result in a one-off. AC Why did you seek out these readymades instead of buying cheap raw materials and fabricating afresh? MG The type of designer who shapes their work according to their utopian vision of the world doesn’t interest me. Their work can remain the same for decades even when the world around them is changing. No running room is left free to develop. By using found elements, I am constantly making use of things that are in the world. Even if the elements that people discard are a few years old, over time the elements available will have changed. This is not simply about recycling, but about constantly developing your language in response to new material challenges.

AC Another key element of your practice is the performative process of its fabrication. Where most designers deem it necessary to hide this, you actively seek to put it on display. Other designers are also pursuing this approach – as evidenced in the exhibition Design by Performance at Z33 – but, for now, it’s still quite a distinct act within the contemporary design world. MG That aspect of my trajectory began in collaboration with Rainer Spehl in response to an invitation to participate in the Victoria and Albert Museum’s second Village Fete in 2001. Rather than fabricate a series of objects in the studio and then delivering them, we decided to establish a workshop and construct the furniture live in front of people. The resulting workshop, which we titled Furniture While You Wait, had very different outcomes to my usual designs – more like jamming than producing finished songs. AC Again, this is still a radical gesture within the world of product design. Did the idea come from the nature of the invitation from the V&A or was it an active decision you both made? MG The invitation was quite open so it was definitely a conscious decision. Partly, we did it to entertain the people attending the fair; food was also provided for people while they waited. At the same time, we didn’t want to do something too cute: the spectacle of the performance had to be a direct result of the process of fabrication. The next year we were invited back but with major restrictions. As a result of cutting myself badly the previous year, the health and safety department came down hard on the fair. Food and power tools were banned and construction was not permitted. There was nothing left for us to do... AC Following on from this experience how did the performative element develop? MG A year later we did a show at Retrouvious in East London. Again we fabricated work live and fed people. AC Did some of the objects from those early performances circulate in commercial design galleries? They are rough, I know, but with ‘rough luxe’ temporarily being in vogue I can imagine people liking them... MG Not to my knowledge. I haven’t a clue where they are. We sold them for very small sums, like twenty quid. From this point on, the food element of the performances matured into the Total Trattoria concept [in which the performance involved not just food but the workings of a complete restaurant], developed with the graphic design group Åbäke. Together we also started an independent publishing company, Dent-De-Leone, based in London.

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ÂŤit is not simply about recycling, but about constantly

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developing your language in response to new material challenges»

AC By providing food at these exhibitions and events, in a way you were attempting to overtly nurture a discursive space. Contemporary artists like Rirkrit Tiravanija come to mind here, but also earlier examples such as the infamous Food restaurant that Gordon Matta-Clarke co-opened in New York in the early 1970s. MG Food has been an important precedent for us. Åbäke have actually taken a series of photographs of themselves where they restage some of the photos taken in the 1970s to advertise and document Food. They are hilarious but also develop a knowing dialogue with this history. Another aspect to the Total Trattoria performances is a very practical one: at that time in London there were few good affordable places to eat. After growing up in Italy this was a real problem for me! There is a way the owner of a restaurant in Italy uses their restaurant to engage in dialogue with others over all kinds of subjects – including food and wine – with a view to nurturing a community. AC This performative dimension is not just a technique, then, to enable you to fabricate designs. By acting as a social tool, it actually has much broader consequences... MG Exactly. AC In a theoretical sense, this desire to use design to develop a discursive space that decentres the object is a typical trope associated with postmodernism. But compared with art and architecture, postmodern product design missed out on this to such a degree that it never really developed its own form of a critical postmodernism. Perhaps only with your designs does this come into play in furniture and product design. Where many postmodern designers engaged with postmodern tropes such as appropriation by literally quoting earlier designs – I would include Thun in this group – your work actually provides a more convincing take on it by getting to grips with the actual fabric of modern design rather than just engaging with it through surface appearance. Call it critical construction winning over surface styling. Of course your work devoted to the designs of the Italian modernists Gio Ponti and Carlo Molino are particularly pertinent here... MG Arriving at the point where I could use Ponti and Molino actually took some time and was part of a gradual process. Hundreds of individual chairs had been fabricated before I arrived at that point. Also, the period in which I was excited by using unwanted furniture reclaimed from skips had come to an end. The exhibition 100 Chairs in 100 Days was the furthest I could take that idea. Now it was time to make a more provocative gesture. One way to do this was by using furniture that people felt they had a stake

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Clockwise from top: Off-Cut Table (2008), chair from the series Martino with Carlo Mollino (2008), Console (2007) from the series Martino translates Gio Ponti, Trumeau(2007) from the series Martino translates Gio Ponti 64

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«some people were outraged. they owned and cherished pieces by ponti and my act seemed disrespectful to them. a few people actually liked them!» in. In part, it was my response to Design Miami/ Basel, which really held sway over the design world upon its inauguration in 2005. For their Basel-based fair in the summer of the following year they invited me and a number of other designers to do a series of performances to coincide with the opening night. Three designs from what became If Gio Only New and later the Gio Ponti Translated by Martino Gamper series were completed then. In the booth at the fair, a pile of unwanted debris left over from the process of fabrication sat next to the finished designs. AC But how did you come upon that much of Ponti’s work that you could destroy? Did you buy things at auction? That must have cost a fortune! MG That was precisely the effect I wanted when people saw those pieces: it made the gesture seem all the more violent. But in truth the raw materials I worked with for the Ponti were discarded doors and panels from his hotel in Sorrento – the Parco dei Principi – which had been sold off due to their poor condition. They were bought at auction by the leading Milan based design gallery I work with, Nilufar. As raw material they are so charged. And graphically they are so very appealing – the pattern produced by the bold alternations in colour between the laminate doors and panels lends them an inherent visual dynamic. If Gio Only Knew also comments on how, in its first phase, Design Miami/Basel predominantly consisted of secondary market dealers. This left little space for galleries representing emerging designers producing new designs. Literally destroying examples of antique or classic design to produce new designs was a way of forcefully articulating my point. AC What was the tenor of the response to these pieces? MG Some people were outraged. They owned and cherished pieces by Ponti and my act seemed disrespectful to them. Other people felt like I was just trying to create a sensation. A few people actually liked them! [Laughs] A year after the second Design Miami/Basel I did a further performance with the same material at Nilufar gallery. The raw material is now almost used up. The series has come to a natural end. AC When was the Molino series? MG In 2008. Again I started a conversation with a gallery, Salon 94. As a result of their connection with Casa Molino in Italy they had a series of chairs Molino originally designed for the Lutrario Ballroom in Turin. Technically they couldn’t really be called true Molino chairs because over the years they had been fixed-up by different hands and so were no longer in their original state.

AC Was the fact that both Molino and Ponti were icons of modern Italian design important? MG Absolutely. There was one further series based on this premise working with Franco Albini shelving. But that will probably be the final one. To simply repeat the idea doesn’t interest me. It’s time to move on. AC The Molino series was also exhibited at Frieze Art Fair in 2008. That is a very different context to Design Miami/Basel since it is purely fine art based. And this shift in context surely changes the way your work is perceived. As I see it, there are two ways of looking at this. Either it makes your designs look more like design because everything else in its vicinity is art. Or else it renders your designs closer to the condition of art since nobody notices the difference between them and what’s in the next-door booth. MG We live in a world where these things are not always so clearly defined. Despite shifts in context and content I firmly conceive of myself as a furniture designer. Any fear there is about borders crumbling is more on behalf of institutions since it challenges the way they operate. Of course institutions and practitioners are often closely related, but they are also quite separate. AC Extending your engagement with not only art but also the discourse of the art world in 2008 you also contributed to Manifesta 7. What was the precise nature of what you did there? MG The aspect of Manifesta 7 I was invited to exhibit in was actually the result of a collaborative venture on behalf of the four curators involved. The designated space was to be devoted to audio and video art. They asked me to design furniture that would have an ambiguous relationship to both the space and to the work of the artists exhibited in it. Despite the intention that my designs remain ambivalent, in one case I found myself attempting to aid a sound artist, so that their work operated in a more dynamic way within the given setting. In response to the speaker they had simply set on the floor, I decided to create a furniture system that both hid the raw technology of the speaker and also enabled people to engage with the work for an extended period of time by simply making them comfortable. AC Despite the precise nature of your engagement with art, which I appreciate is conceptual in flavour, over the past decade walking the border between art and design has turned into something of a lucrative phenomenon. MG That’s true enough. As the designart trend continues to ebb, I think that it becomes clearer who are the designers and the galleries truly interested in this discursive field and who are the ones just surfing a trend. To me it would be like being a wine maker and instead of owning a

vineyard and developing the vine you just bought in a particular type of specialist grape to make a highly priced cuvée. Because this cuvée is not the result of a thorough process premised on producing wine from a given vineyard it rings hollow. When designers cast an object in bronze or make a unique design which doesn’t derive from the process of fabricating the work it seems false to me. A few years ago I was asked if I would be prepared to cast my chairs form 100 Chairs in 100 Days in bronze. My immediate thought was: what’s the point? What difference would it make? Although, because it was such a bad idea, at one stage it did actually interest me! [Both laugh.] But to destroy the chairs just to form a cast to produce the chairs in a different material makes no real sense. Again it’s not true to the process by which they were fabricated. AC Do you think it’s fair to say that your practice is actually a circuitous discourse on avoiding having to design a chair? MG [Laughs.] But I do design chairs! I like to think of it more as a necessary detour crucial to the process of designing a chair. AC In relation to this, and to bring us right up to date, can you say something about the chairs you have designed for Magis and Established & Sons for the Salone Internazionale del Mobile 2010? The Sessel chair for Established reads like a synthesis of a thread that runs through a number of your designed thus far. Was it difficult, letting go: designing, prototyping, and finally seeing the mass-produced thing? MG So far, it’s not so different. The chair still went through the hands of a craftsman to arrive at a prototype. What you saw at the Salone was still very much in the world of the artisan. The manufacture comes next. AC If the difference between your earlier work and these new pieces is not due to the absence of the index of your hand, it must be due to how you are now trying to arrive at one final design rather than many... MG Yes, that was different. The design for both chairs had to be exactly right. You also have to consider the fact that the chair has to work for a wider range of people rather than just for one person. But one similarity with my usual working process was its collaborative nature. The final design for the two new chairs was only arrived at through a process of continual negotiation with a number of different people. In the future, I would like for all of the specialists involved in the design and manufacture of the work to question and challenge each other more – and that process of questioning starts with me. n Alex Coles is the author of Designart (Tate Publishing, 2005) and Design and art (MIT Press/ Whitechapel, 2007).

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Giulio di Gropello photographed in his home in Rome, 16 April 2010 Background left, Diego Perrone, Come suggestionati da quello che dietro di loro rimane fermo, 2001; background right, Cai Guo-Qiang, Stage on the hillside, 2006; foreground, Carlo Bach, Make a living by selling sand castles, 1998

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giulio di gropello home is where the art is words karen wright | PhotograPhs sebastiano Pellion di Persano

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Above: (on wall) Yan Pei Ming, Petite sudanaise, 2006; (on floor) Ai Weiwei, Bowls of pearls, 2006; (foreground right) Luigi Ontani, ermestetica Zaratustrasso, 1996 Opposite: (background) Luigi Ontani, Cainabele, 2002; (foreground) Alberto Garutti, gropello table (from the series What happens in the rooms when people leave?), 2008; (on table) Corobla mask, Senufo people, Mali, e. 20th century

Being stranded in rome courtesy of an icelandic volcano could be stressful, but sitting in the sunshine in sant’angelo, more commonly called the Jewish ghetto, watching a touching scene of a family celebrating the 95th birthday of its patriarch and talking to art collector giulio di gropello is ample compensation. it is a beautiful, hot spring day and giulio points at the sky. ‘this is why i live in rome,’ he says. ‘i went away and worked in London and new York, but i missed the light too much. it’s unique to rome, look at the colours on the buildings!’ He asks, ‘shall we stroll?’, and takes me into the nearby Piazza Mattei to admire the Fontana delle tartarughe – the turtle fountain or so-called Bernini fountain (i discover later that only the turtles were designed by gian Lorenzo Bernini). giulio says, ‘i tried to draw the turtles when i was younger. it’s much harder than it looks!’ Crossing back into the area around the Ponte sisto, he takes me to a square nearby and points to a work by an artist, giuseppe ducrot, whose work is in his collection, albeit literally under the stairs. He tells me ducrot is the artist who imitates the ancient sculptors – he is a craftsman, but he refuses to become modern. He replaced a sculpture here that was stolen. ‘i applaud him, but wonder about his future, though i don’t think he’ll starve.’ giulio gestures into a shop as we walk by. it is small and crowded with junk, and on the walls are paintings. ‘they are probably painted by the family,’ he says. But that is italy. You can buy art anywhere and everyone does. You don’t need to starve if you are an artist here.’ i have already been to see giulio’s collection, or at least the part of it that is in his roman house, and spoken to him about both the advantages and disadvantages of living in italy. Yes, there is the light, but there is also the lack of proper funding for artists. there’s a lack of tax breaks for collectors who want to give to museums and to artists; a lack of a cohesive plan to elevate the profile of italians outside their own country. there are a few curators who are well known, but they are also protective of their patch, as i have already heard from Francesco Bonami whom i met earlier in the week. When i go to MaXXi, rome’s national Museum of the 21st Century, to have a look round the new Zaha Hadid museum, due to open at the end of May, i ask giulio why it took six years to complete. it was six governments, i am told, so there was no continuity of funding. But it is finally about to open and i sit through a fund-raising pitch in order to meet the flamboyant artist Luigi Ontani, unmistakable in his blue silk suit and careful coiffure, and whose work features heavily in giulio’s collection. 68

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«I don’t thInk there’s any other country In the world that has the level of collectors that you have In Italy» 69

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Karen Wright I have been talking to lots of curators in institutions and everybody is getting a bit frustrated about the lack of financial support worldwide for cultural programmes. giulio di gropello I think the other problem is that everybody is just gardening their own gardens, and they don’t care. KW That’s a great expression! gdg It’s a cultural issue, no? And it has to do with the country itself. The Italians are very much individualistic – there’s a nice expression that says that one Italian is better than ten Americans. But ten Americans are better than 100 Italians. Because they can and will work in a team together, and they can, therefore, use the strength of each other. So, by himself, an Italian is really very smart and knows how to do things, but he doesn’t know how to work with another person. So, at the end, it’s very difficult in a country like this, with the budget that this country has, and the fact that we have a historical heritage so, so large. We still have to preserve Pompeii and the Colosseum. KW And also, in a sense, there hasn’t been the appetite for contemporary art for a long time. I think this comes back to your cultural heritage. People come to Italy to see the historical sites. gdg The Italians are some of the best contemporary art collectors on the planet. The Italians have a big appetite for art. KW Yes, but it’s interesting that the man in the street hasn’t been converted. In many other countries, there’s a popular appetite for contemporary art. People may not understand what they’re seeing and they may call it garbage, but they still come and see it. I think that’s the difference here. gdg But you create the appetite if you do something excellent. If you do something that is mediocre, it doesn’t work, no? I don’t think there’s any other country in the world that has the level of collectors that you have in Italy: these are expert collectors, they are not naive, trendy buyers. They buy the good stuff. KW Absolutely. gdg And they buy the good stuff in Sicily, in Naples, in Lombardy…

Top: Giuseppe Ducrot, San Girolamo, 2004; above: Simone Berti, Untitled, 2000 (on wall), and Lara Favaretto, detail of E’ uno spettacolo, 2004 (in foreground); right: Pascale Marthine Tayou, David Crossing the Moon, 2007

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KW That’s the other interesting thing: there are 20 regions in Italy. Italy’s a very long, big country, and there’s a terrific variety in the kind of art, even from the schools that these people came from. gdg Right now in Milan, we have design week. There was an interview with Patrizia Moroso, who owns a good furniture firm. She made a speech saying that in Milan there are ten design schools, and none of them are good.

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«ItalIans are IndIvIdualIstIc. there’s an expressIon that says that one ItalIan Is better than ten amerIcans. but ten amerIcans are better than 100 ItalIans»

KW Really? She said that? gdg In London, there are two design schools. They are considered two of the best in the world. Why? Because there are only two, they get the best professors, they select the students, they work for excellence. That doesn’t happen in Italy. Take, for example, the best academy in Italy – without doubt, the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera. Out of the 70 or 100 courses at Brera, five are good; the rest are a mess. All the other academies are a mess. KW It’s so depressing, because you have such amazing historical precedence. gdg It doesn’t exploit the full potential. KW Exactly. gdg This is a fact. It’s undisputable. I don’t think it’s depressing. I think it’s frustrating. We have so many good artists. Once we did the first two years of the Italian student programme at PS1 in New York [which di Gropello financed and helped to formulate], we came out with this new generation – there was Massimo Bartolini, and Simone Berti, Paola Pivi and Lara Favaretto – a new generation, who were then aged between 25 and 30 years old. Michelangelo Pistoletto was the president of the jury and we did the first show at his foundation, Cittadellarte. Pistoletto said, ‘We just saw the first generation, as good as the Arte Povera in Italy, for the first time exploited.’ There is quality, there is excellence. The point is that instead of concentrating the resources on promoting excellence, everything gets dispersed. So we have 25 museums that won’t work with each other. KW Each one grabs for themselves. I think the curatorial thing is very interesting. Francesco Bonami said that, because a lot of curators think he is very… ‘piggy’, he is locked in Italy for the younger curators. Yet a lot of the younger generation really resent Francesco. gdg But Francesco is not here… KW So you know, so why – gdg No, I mean the block to young curators is Achille [Bonito Oliva] and Germano [Celant], because Francesco lives in the States and young curators know that what they have to do to be successful is that they have to go away. It’s like the artist. It doesn’t make any difference. But you have Massimiliano [Gioni], you have people like Carlos Basualdo, a lot of people who are actually capable and they go away! KW I think what Carlos is doing is really interesting. He is curating a Pistoletto show in Philadelphia next year. He’s also doing a show of Cittadellarte, where he has got to recreate the events, workshops, whatever they do. I went there when I came over for Artissima and I was

blown away. I think that you can fault him for certain things, but when you get to that foundation and you see the kind of generosity of spirit that is there, where he is trying to also incorporate the products of Biella, the designers, it’s very generous. gdg It’s like a fabbrica [factory]. KW It is wonderful. I was impressed by him and by the whole idea behind it. gdg When Pistoletto did the opening at Biella, he asked me to make a speech. I spoke on the theme ‘Biella is not Bilbao’. It was not by chance. The concept is either you spend the money on building the big cathedral, or you spend the money on trying to do something else. If you want to produce great shows and you want to promote great artists, you need a budget to promote the artist, you don’t need a cathedral. But if you start building a cathedral, you have to use your money to maintain it. It’s very simple. You also have to acknowledge the fact that as there is no tax, there are no tax-deductibles, so everything costs double because you have to spend the net money that you earn after taxes. Everything becomes very expensive. It’s exactly the opposite of what happens in the US. When you do something in art it’s tax-deductable, so it costs you 50 per cent. Here, it costs 200 per cent! KW How did you get interested in art? What is your background? gdg My mother was a poet. We had Pasolini and Moravia at home. She was part of that milieu. As a child, I lived in Tuscany, very close to Arezzo, where there are a lot of works by Piero della Francesca. I was exposed to Piero when I was six, and that was it. It definitely changed me. I studied finance, not art, but art was a passion for me. I always went to see shows. I read. I studied up to Futurism, so I knew almost all the history of art to 1920. And then one night I was introduced to Giorgio Franchetti, whose sister married Cy Twombly. Giorgio was a very, very important collector of contemporary art. KW His sister married Twombly? gdg Yes. So Giorgio introduced me to Malevich, and that was it. I filled the gap from 1920 to 1970. I started collecting, in 1987 or 1988. I was introduced to Gino de Dominicis, and we became really good friends. This is the basic route. Usually what happens is that the good artist knows who the other good artists are. The merchants come afterwards. Since I was a friend of Gino, I met Alighiero Boetti, and after that, things snowballed. And, believe it or not, from Gino, you arrive at Ai Weiwei. KW I spent a day with Ai Weiwei a few weeks ago. I’m scared for him. I think his anti-state

stance is making him more of a target. gdg You mean you’re worried? KW Yes, scared for him. gdg I think he’s got the right strategy. I think he has found a solution [to protect himself] because with Twitter, he’s basically exposed 24 hours a day. It’s worldwide. If the [Chinese] authorities touch him… KW I interviewed him with the Swiss collector Uli Sigg, and I had never realised before how important Uli was to Ai Weiwei. It’s one of the cases where the collector made the artist. When Weiwei returned [to China] from New York to see his dying father, he didn’t consider himself an artist. He hadn’t gone to school, because he’d been doing hard labour and he’d never really had the opportunities… gdg He was the son of a poet. KW He was the son of a famous poet who was cleaning toilets when Ai Weiwei was a child and so he went to New York. He was an illegal immigrant who became a painter and he used to throw his paintings away. He said that he didn’t consider himself an artist. Weiwei was collecting all these historical Chinese pots and one day he saw a chipped ashtray with Coca-Cola on it. He wrote the Coca-Cola logo onto his huan pot. Uli came that day, saw the pot and took it away, and suddenly Ai Weiwei thought. ‘I’m an artist.’ It was an empowered moment for him. gdg I met Ai Weiwei in 2006 in Beijing, and the only piece that I had seen of his before was one that Uli had in his show in his Mahjong exhibition of contemporary Chinese art. It was made of this very strange material which is like wood, but becomes like concrete because it’s so old. I was struck by that piece … KW The materiality of it. gdg The materiality of it, yes, but the whole concept was as old as China. Clearly this is a very contemporary artist; he knows that in his environment he cannot just produce these pieces of art and become a billionaire. He has a duty towards society – something that a real artist always has. So when this mess of being beaten up happened, I wrote to him and I thanked him because he was doing all these things. He replied, ‘You know, Giulio, I have to do it. There is no alternative. I have to do it.’ He’s not doing it for himself, he’s actually doing it for us. If you have children, he’s doing it for all of us. I think he is a very special person. KW And such a beautiful person. At one point, he looked like he was sleeping. I said to Uli that I had put him to sleep. Ai Weiwei then said he was very tired, because he’d just been interviewed and then this big smile went across his face and he said, ‘I’m listening to you!’

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This page: Massimo Bartolini, Gropello house project – I, 2002 Opposite: Massimo Bartolini, Gropello house project – II, 2002; on wall, Luigi Ontani, TreRazzEtà, 2002

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«UsUally what happens is that the good artist knows who the other good artists are. the merchants come afterwards»

So sweet, it was just that moment. You know he just gives off that aura of something. GdG There are a lot of Italian artists who are very special, very special. KW You mentioned something that is key in Italian art when you were talking about Ai Weiwei and material. One of the key things that Francesco [Bonami] said to me was that Italians have a certain – what’s the word for it? – sensibility to the material which goes all the way through from Arte Povera… GdG In a way, Ai Weiwei is an Italian artist – what is the difference? The difference is that we have to confront ourselves with a very strong past, a historical past of about 2,500 years. China is the same: it has a very long history. We are different from, say, the Americans. This is the biggest gap; we have to confront ourselves with the concept of sedimentation. What I like about Ai Weiwei is that he builds up pieces that are part of a sedimentation. In order to do this work, you need to be a master in porcelain first of all. KW That’s what it is! I didn’t even know that. I was looking at it, thinking how beautiful it was before. What’s this called? GdG This is called Bowls of Pearls. I call it Bowls of Rice, but this is China, no? What you have is the female and male; you have this capacity of these huge porcelain pieces that are handmade, this is not a factory material. This is filled up with river pearls, which express the weight, the power, but also the image of what makes people live, which is rice, no? This is clearly rooted in a Chinese heritage. You invent the shape, but it’s based on something already existing, it’s not out of the blue. I think it’s the same problem that Italian artists have: they have to confront themselves with 2,500 years of history and a material manipulation to create a sensitivity. The difficult thing is to move forwards from there. KW To now. Exactly. GdG To do the jump. And actually this is an extremely refined. It’s not something that can be just glamorous, it has to be intellectually very refined and then it has to be very well made, too. I don’t know if you know the work of Luigi Ontani, but basically this is the same idea. KW I met Luigi through Lorcan O’Neill [the Roman gallerist]. GdG If you come and see these works here, they start from a philosophical space. This is called Ermestetica ZaratustrAsso. It starts from Nietzsche’s Also sprach Zarathustra. One of the most important events in Nietzsche’s life happened when he saw a man in the street beating his horse with a stick. Nietzsche took

away the stick and started beating the man. [ZarathustrAsso] is a mix between Zarathustra and the word ‘Picasso’. The whole concept of this piece starts from a word. ‘Asso’ means the first, because it’s ‘ace’, so it’s Nietzsche, that’s where this piece started from. Then how do transform this into a piece? If you go into the Roman rooms in any museum, you usually have a bust of a Roman emperor, and there is nothing underneath, but this is the shape. You start with that, you go to the best ceramic factory in Italy, which is in Faenza in northern Italy, and is the best studio there. You start working with the materials and you build the shape. But you are using a technology here that has been used for thousands of years, and then you do an experiment because this doesn’t exist or hasn’t been invented. This colouring on the face was invented by Luigi, so you go ahead with something that already exists. This concept is similar to most of the works of the Italians, because if you look at that piece of Giuseppe Gabellone, this is one of the works that was in the Biennale. KW So what’s it made of? GdG It’s the same material that you put between walls to insulate rooms. It’s an industrial material that’s been used to create a new shape. KW Tell me about the work in the niche. Francesca [Giulio's wife] said that the house was built around it. GdG It is called Untitled (Asta) and it is by Gino de Dominicis. I don’t know how much you about Gino’s work, but basically it’s about the equilibrium that does not exist in nature. KW This is Ai Weiwei? GdG It is Ai Weiwei, but not Ai Weiwei. They are the chairs from a market and we went and bought them together and later he made the piece with the chairs for the Documenta in 2007. This piece is made by Alberto Garutti. He is in the current show at the Foundazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo. KW Yes. I love that lightning piece, the chandelier that flashes when there is lightning anywhere in Italy. GdG He is the teacher of all the good Italians – he is at Brera. He’s a good artist, but he’s an incredible teacher. This Gropello table is part of his series, What Happens in the Rooms when People Leave? Alberto asks, what do the furniture pieces do when you’re not there? This is made with a special varnish, so during the night, the light comes out of the piece. KW But you’re responding in that Italian way to materials, because you are Italian. n

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object lesson: lot 67 Patrick tuttofuoco’s work has never been the result of a single school of thought or a unique experience. His multifaceted research is born of his travels across the world as well as emerging from cinema, music, radical architecture, city life, design and socially-engaged art. His references draw from pop to 1980s culture, from modernism to Memphis, from the elegance of designer Joe colombo to the utopian visions of Yona friedman and the ‘relational aesthetics’ of Nicolas Bourriaud. Yet each of his works bears his own unmistakable imprint. among the artist’s most ambitious projects was revolving Landscape, an exhibition presented at fondazione sandretto re rebaudengo in 2006. inspired by an epic journey he made through asia, tuttofuoco attempted to bind together his experiences in the world and his art ever more closely in a series of sculptures, an animation and a video installation. From West to East is one of the fifteen sculptures that formed the centrepiece of the show. From West to East is a tall three-dimensional diagram in which primary coloured Plexiglas paddles indicate the height of the tallest skyscrapers around the world, from the earliest such as pioneering examples in chicago. Each paddle points in the direction of the skyscraper whose name it bears on the handle, creating a direct spatial relationship with it. the entire structure evolves chronologically from the base and extends in a spatial and temporal progression to its full height. the resulting sculpture calls attention to the heliocoidal evolution of time and is at the same time a grotesque reflection of a society which evolves in an excessive and hyperbolic fashion. it also brings to mind the imaginary constructions of children, the three-dimensional manifestation of a virtual structure, and even a parody of an important design piece. tuttofuoco is also interested in interactive art and in relational aesthetics. for Hamster (1999), his first performance, the artist ran on a human-scaled hamster wheel in search of perfect equilibrium. in Velodream (2001), tuttofuoco brought together a series of incongruous-looking mini-vehicles reminiscent of modernist design objects in which the audience was invited to ride around a velodrome. However fun-filled tuttofuoco’s works appear, they have serious aims. ‘i like the notion of “play”, but not as an end in itself, but rather as an element which releases energy.’ this epitomizes Patrick’s approach. n Patrick Tuttofuoco b. 1974, From West to East, 2005

Joe Colombo’s Continental bookself, in production since 1965, elegantly combines the ubiquitous Modernist grid into a harmonious circular form, synthesizing timeless geometric forms with a futuristic design.

In 2000, Tuttofuoco created Skyscraper, a structure composed of five towers which are morphologically alien to each other, each one conceived with a different person, thus resulting in an eccentric and surreal construction.

The Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, at 452 metres, surpassed Chicago’s Sears Tower in height when completed in 1998, signalling the shift of monumental architecture from the West to the East.

Ron Herron’s Cities: Moving New York (1964) typifies the avant-garde Utopian project of Archigram. In this drawing, Herron proposed a ‘mobile’ city that would not bind urban dwellers within the same location.

colombo: industrie carnovali s.r.l. tuttofuoco: courtesy the artist and Pilar corrias Gallery, London. Petronas towers: photo sarah Pasetto. Herron: © ron Herron and courtesy the Herron archives

words laura garbarino

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ROME

The grand opening of the Zaha Hadid-designed MAXXI in Rome (30 May) is one of the most eagerly anticipated events of the season. Alongside the dynamic contemporary art initiatives at MACRO, MAXXI’s opening is set to make Rome a major player in the contemporary art scene. The museum kick-starts its first-ever season with shows that place Italian art within an international context. Alongside a presentation of the collection entitled SPAZIO, the opening will also feature the most comprehensive exhibition of Gino de Dominicis’ work, and Mesopotamian Dramaturgies, a selection of works by the Turkish artist Kutlug Ataman.

Photo courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects

news

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news

Chernysheva: courtesy Galerie Volker Diehl, Berlin and Foxy Production, New York, © Olga Chernysheva. Burchfield: courtesy the Charles Rand Penney Collection of Works by Charles E. Burchfield at the Burchfield Penney Art Center, Buffalo State College. Baldessari: courtesy LACMA. Horn: Tate, purchased with assistance from The Art Fund and the Friends of the Tate Gallery 1999, ©Tate, London 2010, © DACS 2010

LOs aNgELEs

Arriving at LACMA from Tate, John Baldessari’s long-awaited retrospective Pure Beauty (27 June – 12 September 2010) celebrates the long career of the influential American artist. A pioneer of conceptual art, Baldessari plays on tropes of language, place and mass-culture through painting, collage, photography and installation. Works like the painting Cigar Smoke to Match Clouds That are the Same (By Sight – Side View), 1972 – 73, show Baldessari’s signature wit and intellectual precision.

LONDON

Calvert 22 brings the largest retrospective of Olga Chernysheva’s work (1 July – 29 August 2010) to London. The exhibition will include the Russian artist’s photographic series Guards, which captures fleeting moments in the working hours of public transport attendants and security guards throughout contemporary Moscow. Works like On Duty, 2007, above, exemplify Chernysheva’s naturalistic yet poetic style that seems to spy on her subjects whose thoughts and judgements remain impenetrable.

LONDON

NEW YORK

Poltergeists, women in attics and Miss Havisham-style decrepitude will undoubtedly all spring to mind in the Barbican Art Gallery’s ambitious show The Surreal House (10 June – 12 September 2010) that gathers Surrealist film, sculpture and painting in a labyrinthine installation by acclaimed architects Carmody Groarke. Through works such as Magritte’s The Lovers and Rebecca Horn’s Concert for Anarchy, 1990, pictured here, the exhibition rejects the Modernist definition of the house as a rational machine for living in, presenting in its place a counter-narrative of the house as a psychic analogue to memory, melancholia and libidinal drives.

Curated by the artist Robert Gober, the exhibition Heat Waves in a Swamp: The Paintings of Charles Burchfield, at the Whitney Museum (24 June – 17 October 2010), brings together the American landscape artist’s oil paintings, watercolours, drawings and journal doodles. Although Burchfield’s career focused on the American pastoral, his artwork is far from tranquil and idyllic. Works such as Pyramid of Fire, 1929, shown here, exemplify the artist’s signature style in which a superficial faux naïveté belies an almost mystical passion for sudden outbursts of light, fire and destruction in nature. 79

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This work will bE offErEd for salE in ThE ConTEmporary arT EvEning salE 29 JunE 2010, 7pm Please refer to the contemPorary art evening sale catalogue for comPlete catalogue entry

Salvatore Scarpitta  1919–2007  Trapped Canvas, 1958. Bandages and mixed media on board. 111 × 181 cm (43 3/4 × 71 1/4 in). Signed and dated ‘Scarpitta – 1958’ on the reverse.   Estimate  £250,0 0 0 –  3 50,0 0 0  82

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83

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This work will bE offErEd for salE in ThE ConTEmporary arT EvEning salE 29 JunE 2010, 7pm Please refer to the contemPorary art evening sale catalogue for comPlete catalogue entry

ARNALDO POMODORO  b. 1926  Sfera con sfera, 2002. Bronze with gold patina. Diameter  50 cm (19 3/4 in). Number 7 from an edition of 8 plus 2 artist’s proofs. This work is  accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist and is registered in the  Arnaldo Pomodoro Archives, Milan, under number 776. Estimate  £250,0 0 0 –  3 50,0 0 0 84

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85

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This work will bE offErEd for salE in ThE ConTEmporary arT EvEning salE 29 JunE 2010, 7pm Please refer to the contemPorary art evening sale catalogue for comPlete catalogue entry

Emilio VEdoVa  1919 – 2006  Ciclo 60– 62, 1960–62. Oil and collage  on canvas. 145 × 185 cm (57 1/8 × 72 3/4 in). Signed, titled, dated and  annotated ‘Ciclo ’60 ’62 Vedova, Venezia’ on the reverse. Estimate  £40 0,0 0 0 –  6 0 0,0 0 0  86

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italia wednesday 30 june 2010 london

CONtEMPORaRY aRt lOts 1 - 100

Abramovic´, M. 95 Accardi, C. 37 Adami, V. 50 Airo, M. 53 Angeli, F. 41, 42 Anselmo, G. 15 Arienti, S. 55, 56 Baj, E. 49 Bartolini, M. 72 Beecroft, V. 92, 93 Berti, S. 61, 62 Boetti, A. 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 14, 23 Bonvicini, M. 74, 75, 77, 81 Bulloch, A. 88 Burri, A. 4 Cattelan, M. 68, 69 Cecchini, L. 99 Chia, S. 27 Clemente, F. 26, 28 Cucchi, E. 29, 30 Cuoghi, R. 63, 66 di Robilant, T. 98 Dorazio, P. 38

HĂśller, C. 64

Paladino, M. 31, 32 Paolini, G. 12, 16, 22 Pascali, P. 18, 45 Penone, G. 21 Perrone, D. 65 Pessoli, A. 96, 97 Piacentino, G. 24 Pietroniro, G. 87 Pistoletto, M. 25 Pivi, P. 57, 58 Pomodoro, A. 3, 52

Kounellis, J. 9, 17, 20

Rotella, M.

Linke, A. 84

Schifano, M. 33, 46 Serse 79 Sighicelli, E. 85

Favaretto, L. 59, 94 Festa, T. 40 Fleury, S. 90 Fontana, L. 1, 2 Galegati, S. 60 Garutti, A. 54 Gilardi, P. 44 Griffa, G. 43

Marisaldi, E. 71, 78 Melotti, F. 51 Merz, M. 13, 19 Moro, L. 76

48

Toderi, G. 89 Tuttofuoco, P. 67

Niedermayr, W. 91 Nitsch, H. 47

Vedovamazzei 80, 83 Vezzoli, F. 70, 73, 100

Ontani, L. 34, 35, 36, 39

Wearing, G. 86 Zuffi, I. 82

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1

1 LuCIO FONTANA 1889 –1968 Teatrino bianco III, 1968. Screenprinted and perforated  cardboard relief. 69.9 × 69.9 cm (27 1/2 × 27 1/2 in). Signed and numbered in pencil ‘l. Fontana  24/75’ on the reverse. This work is from an edition of 75. PRoVenanCe Editions Plus,  Baden-Baden Estimate £8,0 0 0 – 12,0 0 0 $11,9 0 0 – 17,9 0 0 €9,40 0 – 14,0 0 0 † 89

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2

2  LUCIO FONTANA   1899–1968  Untitled, 1962. Foil laid on canvas. 26.7 × 27.9 cm (10 1/2 × 11 in). Signed ‘l. Fontana’ lower right. PROVENANCE  Ezio Gribaudo, Turin Estimate  £20,0 0 0 –  3 0,0 0 0  $29,8 0 0 –  4 4,70 0  €23,40 0 –  3 5,10 0 

90

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3

3  ArNALdO POmOdOrO  b. 1926  Orizzonte I, 1957. Lead and concrete. 57 × 131 cm (22 1/2 × 51 1/2 in). This work is unique and is registered in the Arnaldo Pomodoro Archive, Milan, under number 27. PROVENANCE Private Collection, Chicago litERAtuRE Arnaldo Pomodoro. Catalogue raisonné of sculpture, Milan, 2007, Volume II, no. 1047, p. 339, pl. 66 Estimate  £25,0 0 0 –  3 5,0 0 0  $37,3 0 0 –  5 2,20 0  €29,3 0 0 –  4 1,0 0 0  ♠  ‡ 91

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92

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4  Alberto burri  1915–1995  Cellotex, 1982. Acrylic on fibreboard in artist’s frame. 47 × 54 cm (18 1/2 × 21 1/4 in). Signed and dated ‘Burri 82’ on the reverse.  PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner   litERAtuRE Burri: Contributi al Catalogo Sistematico 1945–1989, Fondazione Palazzo Albizzini, Citta di Castello, pp. 372–73, pl. 1620 (incorrectly catalogued as ‘tempera on paper’) Estimate  £70,0 0 0 –  9 0,0 0 0  $104,0 0 0 –  1 34,0 0 0  €81,9 0 0 –  1 05,0 0 0 93

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5

6

5  ALIGHIERO BOETTI   1940–1994   Una Brillante Idea, c. 1991. Embroidery. 18 × 18 cm (7 1/8  × 7 1/8 in). This work is registered in the Archivio Alighiero Boetti, Rome under number  6413. PROVENANCE  Galerie Nelson, Paris Estimate  £10,0 0 0 –  1 5,0 0 0  $14,9 0 0 –  2 2,40 0  €11,70 0 –  1 7,6 0 0  ‡

6  ALIGHIERO BOETTI   1940 – 1994  Normale e anormale, 1989. Embroidery. 18.5 × 18.5 cm  (7 1/4 × 7 1/4 in). This work is accompanied by a photo-certificate from the Archivio  Alighiero Boetti and signed by Caterina Boetti and dated ‘27.01.03’. PROVENANCE  Caterina Boetti, Fondazione Boetti, Rome  Estimate  £10,0 0 0 –  1 5,0 0 0  $14,9 0 0 –  2 2,40 0  €11,70 0 –  1 7,6 0 0 

7  ALIGHIERO BOETTI   1940–1994  Un pozzo senza fine, 1991. Embroidery. 22.9 × 22.9 cm (9 ×  9 in). Signed ‘Alighiero Boetti’ on the reverse. PROVENANCE Private Collection, Italy Estimate  £15,0 0 0 –  1 8,0 0 0  $22,40 0 –  2 6,8 0 0  €17,6 0 0 –  2 1,0 0 0  7 94

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8  ALIGHIERO BOETTI   1940–1994  Una parola al vento due parole al vento tre parole al vento, 100 parole al vento, 1989. Embroidery. 91 × 21.5 cm (35 7/8 × 8 1/2 in). Signed ‘Alighiero  Boetti’ on the overlap. This work is registered in the Archivio Alighiero Boetti, Rome,  under number 5248.   Estimate  £35,0 0 0 –  4 5,0 0 0  $52,20 0 –  6 7,0 0 0  €41,0 0 0 –  5 2,70 0  8 95

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000

96

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000

9 JANNIS KOUNELLIS b. 1936 Simboli, 1960. Ink on paper collage on paper.  70 × 99 cm (27 1/2 × 39 in). Signed and dated ‘Kounellis 18.7.60’ on the reverse. PROVENANCE Galleria Lucio Amelio, Naples; Galleria Mazzoli, Modena Estimate £40,0 0 0 – 6 0,0 0 0 $59,6 0 0 – 8 9,40 0 €46,8 0 0 – 70,20 0 ♠

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10

10 ALIGHIERO BOETTI 1940 – 1994 12 Forme dal 10 giugno 1967, 1967–71. Twelve  screenprints on cardboard, contained in original artist’s box. Each: 58.9 × 42.4 cm (23 1/8  × 16 7/8 in). Each signed and numbered ‘73/99 Boetti’ lower right. This work is from an  edition of 99. PROVENANCE Edizioni Grafiche Artestudio, Macerata Estimate £12,0 0 0 – 18,0 0 0 $17,9 0 0 – 26,8 0 0 €14,0 0 0 – 21,0 0 0 98

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11

11 ALIGHIERO BOETTI 1940 – 1994 Untitled, c. 1986. Watercolour, ink, pencil and rubber  stamp on paper. 67.8 × 48 cm (26 3/4 × 18 7/8 in). Signed ‘Alighiero Boetti’ lower edge.  PROVENANCE Private Collection, Italy Estimate £12,0 0 0 – 18,0 0 0 $17,9 0 0 – 26,8 0 0 €14,0 0 0 – 21,0 0 0 99

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12 GIULIO PAOLINI b. 1940 Une matinée: la danse des Nymphes vers 1850-Paris-Musée du Louvre, 1975.  Colour photographs and pencil on paper laid on board. Triptych: overall 21 × 81 cm (8 1/4 × 31 7/8 in).  This work is accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity signed by the artist. PROVENANCE Studio Marconi, Milan ExhibitEd Milan, Studio Marconi, Exposition Anthologique, 1976; Brussels,  Artiscope, Amici Miei, 1999; Brussels, Artiscope, Accelerato Torino–Napoli, 20 February–20 March 2004 Estimate £25,0 0 0 – 35,0 0 0 $37,3 0 0 – 52,20 0 €29,3 0 0 – 41,0 0 0 ♠ 100

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13 Mario Merz 1925 – 2003 Untitled, c. 1980s. Wood, taxidermy bird, wire, neon  light and transformer. 228.6 × 243.8 × 61 cm (90 × 96 × 24 in). PROVENANCE Galerie Pietro Sparta, Chagny Estimate £20 0,0 0 0 – 3 0 0,0 0 0 $29 8,0 0 0 – 447,0 0 0 €234,0 0 0 – 351,0 0 0

Mario Merz was one of the leading figures in the Arte Povera movement. His  work combines a fascination with the material and metaphorical qualities of  natural objects with concepts of infinity and repetition. Characteristic of his  employment of humble materials, the present lot comprises bundles of twigs  crowned by a blue neon tube and a stuffed bird. There is an evocative contrast  between these materials, with the twigs and the bird suggesting the simplicity  of rural life, and the neon light and the electricity seeming to suggest the  urbanised, technological world. “The bundles of twigs represent wood, but at the same time they are interesting  in their own right since they represent a quantity, a sequence of numbers.  Furthermore, they are closely joined, which has a touching effect. If you take a  single tree and isolate it, it becomes something evocative and fantastic. If you  create an assemblage, you concentrate power, which transmits a naturally more  visual emotion, but also a feeling of presence… The bundles of twigs are not in  theory, but in feeling.”  (The artist, quoted in ‘Interview with Suzanne Pagé and Jean-Christophe  Ammann’ in Mario Merz, exh. cat., Trento, Galleria Civica di Arte  Contemporanea, 1995, p. 200) “Science tells us that, in nature, the elements all pass into one another; the  meaning of nature is transformation. This led to the idea of creating a sculpture  that was not fixed, that was not geometric – a construction that would be a  transformation rather than a construction. Since neon light actually has electric  power as one of its own object qualities, it turns into light when it fully and  perceptibly transfixes the glass object, that is, the tube. Piercing the car, the  bottle, the glass, the water, or the plant with the neon tube meant physically  carrying the action of transformation from one element to another.” (The artist in conversation with Germano Celant, in Mario Merz, New York,  1989, p. 109)

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14  Alighiero Boetti   1940–1994   E piove sempre sul bagnato, 1980. Ink, felt tip pen,  graphite and ten collaged Polaroids on paper. 69.5 × 99.7 cm (27 3/8 × 39 1/4 in). Signed,  titled and dated ‘Alighiero Boetti il 29 gennaio mille 900 ottanta a Rome E piove sempre  sul bagnato’ upper right.   Estimate  £20,0 0 0 –  3 0,0 0 0  $29,8 0 0 –  4 4,70 0  €23,40 0 –  3 5,10 0  ‡

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15  Giovanni anselmo   b. 1934  Grigi che si alleggeriscono verso oltremare, 1990. Granite blocks,  metal bolts and acrylic on canvas. Installation dimensions variable. This work is accompanied by a  photo-certificate of authenticity signed by the artist. PROVENANCE  Private Collection; anon.  sale, Sotheby’s, London, 25 October 2000, Lot 53; acquired at the above sale by the previous owner  ExhibitEd Turin, Galleria in Arco, Arte Povera, 1990 LitERAtuRE Arte Povera, exh. cat., Galleria  in Arco, Turin, 1990, no. 4 (illustrated twice, once on the back cover)  Estimate  £50,0 0 0 –  7 0,0 0 0  $74,50 0 –  1 04,3 0 0  €58,50 0 –  8 1,9 0 0  ♠

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© RMN / DR

Andrea Mantegna, Parnassus, 1496–97

16  GIULIO PAOLINI   b. 1940  Parnaso, 1978. Pencil and needles on prepared canvas and  artificial flowers. Central canvas: 40 × 60 cm (15 3/4 × 23 5/8 in); overall: 140 × 210 cm (55  × 82 5/8 in). PROVENANCE Galleria Notizie, Turin; Private Collection, Rome; Private  Collection, Milan ExhibitEd New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Recent European Painting, 20 May–8 September 1993 litERAtuRE M. Disch, Giulio Paolini, Catalogo ragionato 1960–1999, Milan, 2008, no. 394 p. 400 (illustrated) Estimate  £150,0 0 0 –  2 0 0,0 0 0  $224,0 0 0 –  2 9 8,0 0 0  €176,0 0 0 –  2 34,0 0 0  ♠

The work of Giulio Paolini is characterized by a constant interplay between various art  historical discourses and references. Using conventional painter’s materials and  technique, he breaks down the process of art making into fragments, often placing  the viewer in the role of subject and author. He constantly emphasizes the material  aspects that are involved in the means of representation whilst questioning and  inverting the roles of the viewer and artist. The viewer plays an essential role when  faced with a work by Paolini, as it is the viewer who is instrumental in projecting  meaning and his knowledge of the image onto the work.  Paolini admits his fascination with the image and its significance to the viewer:   “I was never able to renounce the mystery and also the sensuality that the image  always involves. In this sense, even if there has been a certain process which over the  last twenty years has achieved its own coherence in my work. I have never tried a priori for this consistency. But I have always, little by little, I would say, picture by  picture, searched for the immagine, the absolute image, with careful control. This has  placed me in a conceptual realm … My expression is internalized and less explicit…”  (from an interview with Susan Taylor in C. Christov-Bakargiev, Arte Povera, London,  2005, p. 258).   Paolini’s work is charged with references to, and reverence for the works of the Old  Masters, such as Lorenzo Lotto, Raphael, Ingres and Velásquez. In the present lot, an  installation from 1978 entitled Parnaso (Parnassus), Paolini pays homage to the  painting of the same title by Andrea Mantegna, now in the Louvre, which was painted  in 1496–97 to commemorate the wedding of Isabella d’Este to Francesco II. The  subject matter is a celebration of the love affair between Mars and Venus. The couple  are depicted at the top of Mount Parnassus where they are serenaded by the Muses  (in the centre foreground) and Apollo (playing a lyre at the left of the scene), and  watched by Pegasus and Mercury (at the right of the picture). By giving the work the  same title as the painting by Mantegna, and by arranging the elements so as to  present a schematic, even symbolic, version of the original (for example, by placing  flowers where the Muses are in the earlier painting, or by including blank canvases  for the figures at right and left), Paolini not only deliberately recalls the image but  requires of the viewer to do the same. In this way, Paolini disassociates himself as the  originator and instead puts the viewer in the position of the artist.  “The painter returns to the canvas from which he started out, the geometrical  squaring placed in brackets, the picture which contains all the pictures. Painting is a  totality to which nothing can be added while at the same time being a potentiality  which implies everything paintable. The photographs of this squared canvas will be  able to fill the catalogue of an imaginary picture gallery, repeated in their sameness  with, each time, the name of an invented painter and with the titles of possible or  impossible pictures which you only have to sharpen your eyes to see…”  (Italo Calvino quoted in C. Christov-Bakargiev, Arte Povera, London, 2005, p. 261)

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17  JANNIS KOUNELLIS   b. 1936  Untitled, 1979. Chalk, metal, acrylic and lampblack.  Installation dimensions variable. Largest bust: 33 × 22.2 × 17.8 cm (13 × 8 3/4 × 7 in). This  work is unique. PROVENANCE Galleria Mario Pieroni, Rome ExhibitEd Ghent,  Museum van Hedendaagse Kunst (S.M.A.K.), Twee prive verzamelingen: een dialog noord– zuid/Due collezione private; un dialogo nord–sud, July–September 1995 Estimate  £150,0 0 0 –  2 0 0,0 0 0  $224,0 0 0 –  2 9 8,0 0 0  €176,0 0 0 –  2 34,0 0 0  ♠

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Jannis Kounellis’ oeuvre is concerned with theatricality and dialectic dialogue. His works often have an aspect of tableaux vivant, opposing a ‘popular language of the senses’ with the ‘elitist language of philosophy’, according to Germano Celant. Jannis Kounellis was a prominent figure within the Arte Povera movement, and one of his first important works was Senza Titolo from 1967, in which he took a groundbreaking stance by combining inorganic, industrial elements, which he called ‘structure’, with organic and live elements, such as potted plants and a live parrot, which he referred to as ‘sensibility’. The balance and dialogue established between the elements of structure and the elements of sensibility has been a defining aspect of Kounellis’ practice. The present work is an installation from 1979 which exemplifies Kounellis’ interest in Baroque art and in the accumulation of imagery and symbols from the classical tradition of his native Greece. As the artist himself has said: “In terms of diversity,

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personally I am anchored to the tradition of Anatolian ramifications, of Levantine

of images and found objects from everyday life. In doing so, and by offering no

harbors and Baroque festivities” (M. Codognato & M. d’Argenzio, Echoes in the

explanation for the objects’ juxtaposition, the gallery is transformed into a stage on

Darkness: Jannis Kounellis, writings and interviews 1966–2002, London, 2002, pp. 154–55).

which the spectators themselves play a part in the work.

While still using the found and organic materials that defined his work in the Arte Povera movement, the present work was made after this period, when his later works

There is also an elegiac mood to his work, in the way he manages to capture the

manifested a shift towards a more theatrical and emotional impact. In his interview

essence of humanity and the universality of life. There is a sense of a “return towards

with Robin White in 1979, Kounellis stated: “The terms of the dialectic dialogue have

the light of restored consciousness, towards the lost scale, unity & totality of man. This

changed. The dialectic elements which determine my work have changed … I don’t

is the central theme in Kounellis’ work: the force behind his particular feeling of

think that my work is Surrealistic. No, my work is not Surrealistic. Its effect is

‘Return’. He progressively strengthened these themes towards the end of the 1960s

theatrical, Baroque … Obviously, I have a very different concept of radicality, less

and through the 1970s using an artistic language which became more individualized in

formal, more fluid, less dogmatic, without protective filters – rasher and less

those tension-ridden years … His identification of the artist with the hero once again

restrained.” (M. Codognato & M. d’Argenzio, Echoes, 2002, p. 177). This theatricality

opens the door of contemporary art to myth” (G. Briganti in C. Christov-Bakargiev, Arte

comes from a strategic placing, in the context of the gallery space, of an accumulation

Povera, London, 2005, p. 251).

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Due metri di armi, 1964 is a large scale work on paper in which the Arte Povera artist 

18  PINO PASCALI   1936–1968   Due metri di armi, 1964. Blueprint process on paper. 40 ×  219.7 cm (15 3/4 × 86 1/2 in). Inscribed ‘x Maurizio di Puolo con Gratitudine Maurizio  Fagiolo’ lower right. PROVENANCE Collection Maurizio Fagiolo dell’Arco, Rome;  Collection Maurizio di Puolo/Studio Metaimago, Rome; Galleria Arco d’Alibert, Rome;  Private Collection, Rome; Private Collection, New York ExhibitEd Rome,  Rapporto ’60, 1966; Rome, Galleria Arco d’Alibert, Pascali, opere su carta, 2003; Rome,  Galleria Arco d’Alibert, Roma anni ’60, 2004; Vasto, Musei Civici in Palazzo d’Avalos,  XXXVIII Premio Vasto Arte Contemporanea: Piazza del Popolo e Dintorni, 2005; New York,  Esso Gallery, Esso Gallery’s 10th Anniversary, 2006; New York, Esso Gallery, Arte Povera Now and Then (Perspectives for a New Guerrilla Art), 2007 litERAtuRE Maurizio  Fagiolo dell’Arco, Rapporto ’60, Rome, 1966; Daniela Ferraria, Pascali, opere su carta,  Rome: Galleria Arco d’Alibert, 2003; Maurizio Calvesi and Alberto Dambruoso, XXXVIII Premio Vasto Arte Contemporanea, Piazza del Popolo e Dintorni, Vasto, 2005, p. 94 Estimate  £50,0 0 0 –  7 0,0 0 0  $74,50 0 –  1 04,3 0 0  €58,50 0 –  8 1,9 0 0  ‡

Pino Pascali depicts a wide array of military equipment. This work prefigures  Piscali’s famed and acclaimed series of sculptures entitled Armi which he executed  in early 1966 at the Enzo Sperone gallery in Rome. Pascali’s sculptures in his  weapon series, assembled from found materials and painted olive-green, faithfully  recreate every detail of the weapon each sculpture mimics. However, as the  weapon cannot fire or kill, it becomes an oversized and useless, innocent toy.  Playfully satirizing the Cold War politics of the era, Soviet vs. USA Arms race and  the Vietnam War, Pascali’s Armi sculptures suggest that the men who deal with the  real thing are nothing more than overgrown children playing with guns.

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19

19  MARIO MERZ   1925 – 2003  Untitled, 1984. Chalk pastel, colour crayon and graphite on  paper laid on canvas. 55.3 × 40.6 cm (21 3/4 × 16 in). Signed ‘Mario Merz’ lower left. This  work is registered in the Archivio Mario Merz, Turin, under number 2067/1984/CT.   Estimate  £8,0 0 0 –  1 2,0 0 0  $11,9 0 0 –  1 7,9 0 0  €9,40 0 –  1 4,0 0 0  116

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20

20  JANNIS KOUNELLIS   b. 1936  Untitled, 1959–62. Ink on paper. 69 × 99 cm (27 1/8 × 39 in).  PROVENANCE  Private Collection Estimate  £35,0 0 0 –  4 0,0 0 0  $52,20 0 –  5 9,6 0 0  €41,0 0 0 –  4 6,8 0 0  ♠ 000

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21

22

21  GIUSEPPE PENONE   b. 1947  Guanto, 1972. Colour coupler print mounted on  wooden panel. 34.3 × 41.1 cm (13 1/2 × 16 1/8 in). Signed, titled and dated ‘Guanto,  Giuseppe Penone 1972’ and numbered of 50 on the reverse. This work is from an  edition of 50. PROVENANCE Edizioni Multipli, Turin; Locus Solus Gallery, Genoa;  Private Collection, Italy Estimate  £2,50 0 –  3 ,50 0  $3,70 0 –  5 ,20 0  €2,9 0 0 –  4 ,10 0  ♠

22  GIULIO PAOLINI   b. 1940  Prologo, 1993. Colour pencil, graphite and photograph  collage on paper. 60 × 80 cm (23 5/8 × 31 1/2 in). Signed, titled and dated ‘ “ Prologo”  Giulio Paolini 1993’ on the reverse. This work is an original collage on which the  edition of 150 lithographs is based and is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity  signed by the artist. PROVENANCE Paolo Tonin Arte Contemporanea, Turin  Estimate  £12,0 0 0 –  1 8,0 0 0  $17,9 0 0 –  2 6,8 0 0  €14,0 0 0 –  2 1,0 0 0  ♠

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23

24

24  GIANNI PIACENTINO   b. 1945  Black Triangle Vehicle with Gray Fender, 1969–72. Painted iron, nickel-plated bronze and brass. Work assembled in five pieces; wheels each: 19.5 cm (7 1/2 in) diameter; overall: 46 × 275 × 129 cm (17 7/8 × 108 3/8 × 50 7/8 in).  PrOVeNaNCe Paolo Tonin Arte Contemporanea, Turin exhibited Bolzano, Museo Civico, MIR. Arte nello spazio, 1999. literature MIR. Arte nello spazio, exh. cat., Museo Civico, Bolzano, 1999 (illustrated) Estimate  £40,0 0 0 –  6 0,0 0 0  $59,6 0 0 –  8 9,40 0  €46,8 0 0 –  7 0,20 0  ♠

23  ALIGHIERO BOETTI   1940–1994  Orologio Annuale, 1986. Manual winding timepiece with original card box, stainless steel box and leather strap. Watch length: 23 cm (9 in). Incised ‘Alighiero Boetti’ and numbered of 200 on the reverse of the watch case. Titled, dated, annotated ‘Orologio Annuale realizzato su mio progetto in 200 esemplari numerati e firmati, Roma Genova 1986’ and numbered of 200 on the certificate of authenticity. This work is from an edition of 200. Produced by Alessandra Bonomo, Rome and Locus Solus, Genoa. literature Alighiero Boetti 1965–1994, exh. cat., Galleria Civica d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Turin, 10 May–1 September 1996, pp. 160–61 Estimate  £2,0 0 0 –  2 ,50 0  $3,0 0 0 –  3 ,70 0  €2,3 0 0 –  2 ,9 0 0  119

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25  MICHELANGELO PISTOLETTO   b. 1933  Love Difference, 2002. Acrylic enamel on stainless steel.  102.2 × 182.9 cm (40 1/2 × 72 in). Signed, titled and dated ‘Michelangelo Pistoletto, Love Difference,  2002’ on the reverse. PROVENANCE Galleria Continua, San Gimignano ExhibitEd San Gimignano,  Galleria Continua, Love Difference, 12 October 2002–10 January 2003 litERAtuRE C. Bertola, Young Artists in Italy at the Turn of the Millennium, Milan/New York, 2005, p. 33 (illustrated) Estimate  £45,0 0 0 –  5 5,0 0 0  $67,0 0 0 –  8 2,0 0 0  €52,70 0 –  6 4,40 0  ♠

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26  FRANCESCO CLEMENTE   b. 1952  Quadrupede, 1980. Triptych: fresco on cement. Each: 25.5 ×  40 cm (10 × 15 3/4 in). Signed ‘Francesco Clemente’ on the reverse of the central fresco. This  work is accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity signed by the artist. PROVENANCE  Anthony d’Offay Gallery, London ExhibitEd Genius Loci: Acireale, Palazzo di Città, November– December 1980;  Ferrara, Palazzo dei Diamanti, January–February 1981; Brussels, Artiscope,  Accelerato Torino–Napoli, 20 February–20 March 2004  Estimate  £40,0 0 0 –  6 0,0 0 0  $59,6 0 0 –  8 9,40 0  €46,8 0 0 –  7 0,20 0  ♠ 122

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123

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27 SANDRO CHIA b. 1946 Le marchand d’art et ses oursons, 1984. Oil pastel on  paper. 152 × 180 cm (59 7/8 × 70 7/8 in). Signed and dated ‘Chia 84’ lower right. PROVENANCE Galerie Daniel Templon, Paris; Artiscope, Brussels Estimate £40,0 0 0 – 6 0,0 0 0 $59,6 0 0 – 8 9,40 0 €46,8 0 0 – 70,20 0 ♠  ‡

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125

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28  FRANCESCO CLEMENTE   b. 1952  Woman, 1991. Pigment on burlap. 51.3 × 61 cm (20 1/8 × 24 in).  This work is accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity signed by Ernst Beyeler and dated  February 2000. PROVENANCE Galerie Beyeler, Basel; Galerie Daniel Templon, Paris Estimate  £40,0 0 0 –  6 0,0 0 0  $59,6 0 0 –  8 9,40 0  €46,8 0 0 –  7 0,20 0  ♠ 126

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127

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29  ENZO CUCCHI  b. 1950  Untitled, 1989. Oil on canvas. 360 × 200 cm (141 3/4 × 78 3/4 in). This work is  accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity signed by the artist. PROVENANCE Artiscope,  Brussels; acquired directly from the above by the present owner  ExhibitEd Ostende, PMMK Museum  for Modern Art, Marines en Confrontation, 4 April–28 September 2003 litERAtuRE A. Bonito Oliva,  Il genio differente nell’arte contemporanea, Milan, 1989, p. 153 (illustrated); Les voies du silence, Liège, 1990,  pp. 30–31 (illustrated) Estimate  £70,0 0 0 –  9 0,0 0 0  $104,0 0 0 –  1 34,0 0 0  €81,9 0 0 –  1 05,0 0 0  ♠ 

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30

30  ENZO CUCCHI  b. 1950  La Mare, 1998. Charcoal on paper mounted on lightbox. 31.4 ×  31.4 × 5.1 cm (12 3/8 × 12 3/8 × 2 in). PROVENANCE Magazzino d’arte moderna, Rome  ExhibitEd Rome, Magazzino d’arte moderna, Enzo Cucchi: Disegno Doppia Vita, 1998 Estimate  £6,0 0 0 –  8 ,0 0 0  $9,0 0 0 –  11,9 0 0  €7,0 0 0 –  9 ,40 0  ♠

130

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31

31  MIMMO PALADINO   b. 1948  Eclisse, 1990. Graphite on paper collage and gouache on  cardboard. 103 × 72 cm (51 1/4 × 28 3/8 in). PROVENANCE Paolo Tonin Arte  Contemporanea, Turin ExhibitEd Munich, Galerie Bernd Klüser, 30 Jahre Transavanguardia, 11 February–30 April 2010; New York, Nohra Haime Gallery, The Lyrical, The Logical, and the Sublime: Chia, Merlino, Paladino, 1993 Estimate  £18,0 0 0 –  2 5,0 0 0  $26,8 0 0 –  3 7,3 0 0  €21,0 0 0 –  2 9,3 0 0  ♠ 131

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32

32  MIMMO PALADINO   b. 1948  Canto Andaluso, 1996. Oil on canvas. 110.5 × 90.2 cm (43 1/2  × 35 1/2 in). Signed, dated and titled ‘M. Paladino 1996 CANTO ANDALUSO’ on the  reverse. PROVENANCE Poleschi Arte, Lucca  Estimate  £40,0 0 0 –  6 0,0 0 0  $59,6 0 0 –  8 9,40 0  €46,8 0 0 –  7 0,20 0  ♠ 132

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33

33  MARIO SCHIFANO   1934 –1998  Monocromo blu, 1961. Enamel on paper laid on  canvas. 111.4 × 111.4 cm (43 7/8 × 43 7/8 in). Signed ‘Mario Schifano’ on the reverse.  This work is accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity signed by the artist.  PROVENANCE Gian Carlo D’Onofrio, Pescara Estimate  £70,0 0 0 –  9 0,0 0 0  $104,0 0 0 –  1 34,0 0 0  €81,9 0 0 –  1 05,0 0 0  133

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34

34  LUIGI ONTANI   b. 1943  Farfalla colta in fallo from the series En Route vers l’Inde, 2001.  Hand-coloured colour coupler print. 37.5 × 26 cm (14 3/4 × 10 1/4 in). Signed, titled, dated  and stamped ‘L Ontani, Farfalla colta in fallo Delhi 2001’ on the reverse. PROVENANCE  Acquired directly from the artist ExhibitEd Ghent, Museum van Hedendaagse Kunst  (S.M.A.K.), Luigi Ontani: Genthara, 12 October 2003–4 January 2004  Estimate  £6,0 0 0 –  8 ,0 0 0  $8,9 0 0 –  11,9 0 0  €7,0 0 0 –  9 ,40 0  ♠

35

35  LUIGI ONTANI   b. 1943  Puericultore androgino, 1995–96. Hand-coloured colour coupler  print. 77.5 × 49.5 cm (30 1/2 × 19 1/2 in). Signed and titled ‘L. Ontani Puericultore  Androgino’ on the reverse. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist  ExhibitEd Rome, Palazzo delle Esposizioni, Italian Studio Program 2000–2002, 26 April– 11 June 2001 litERAtuRE Italian Studio Program 2000–2002, exh. cat., Rome, Palazzo  delle Esposizioni, 2001, p. 12 Estimate  £7,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 –  1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 –  1 0,50 0  ♠ 134

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36

36  LUIGI ONTANI   b. 1943  In Gallone, 1996. Enamel on wood. 74.9 × 38.1 × 24.1 cm (29.5 ×  15 × 9.5 in). Titled, dated and annotated ‘in GALLONE Wayan Sukrya poahi 1996’ on the  reverse. PROVENANCE Private Collection, Italy  Estimate  £15,0 0 0 –  2 0,0 0 0  $22,40 0 –  2 9,8 0 0  €17,6 0 0 –  2 3,40 0  ♠

135

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37

37  CARLA ACCARDI   b. 1924  Verde, 1968. Paint on Sicofoil. 30 × 15 cm (11 7/8 × 6 in). This  work is accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity signed by the artist and is  registered in the Carla Accardi archive, Rome, under number 492.11. PROVENANCE  Galerie Greta Meert, Brussels  Estimate  £12,0 0 0 –  1 8,0 0 0  $17,9 0 0 –  2 6,8 0 0  €14,0 0 0 –  2 1,0 0 0  ♠ 136

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38

38  PIERO DORAZIO   1927–2005  Break, 1979. Oil on canvas. 54.6 × 80 cm (21 1/2 × 31 1/2 in).  Signed, titled and dated ‘PIERO DORAZIO “BREAK” 1979’ on the reverse.  PROVENANCE Marlborough-Godard, Toronto; Andre Emmerick Gallery, New York  Estimate  £12,0 0 0 –  1 8,0 0 0  $17,9 0 0 –  2 6,8 0 0  €14,0 0 0 –  2 1,0 0 0  137

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39 LUIGI ONTANI b. 1943 MistEros UniDiVerso con CleoPatria et l’EuroPupo, 2003. Oil on  board in artist’s frame. Diameter: 200 cm (78 3/4 in). Signed, titled and dated ‘MistEros  UniDiVerso con CleoPatria et l’EuroPupo L. Ontani 2003’ on the reverse. This work is  accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist. PROVENANCE Galleria  Massimo de Carlo, Milan ExhibitEd Milan, Galleria Massimo de Carlo, Luigi Ontani, 2003 Estimate £70,0 0 0 – 9 0,0 0 0 $104,0 0 0 – 134,0 0 0 €81,9 0 0 – 105,0 0 0 ♠  138

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139

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40

41

40  TANO FESTA   1938–1987  Untitled (Don Chisciotte), 1980. Acrylic on canvas. 99.1 × 78.7 cm (39 × 31 in). Signed ‘Festa’ on the reverse. This work is registered in the Archivio Tano Festa, Rome, under number 80180/P293 -Q. PROVENANCE Collection Livio Collina, Italy  Estimate  £7,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 –  1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 –  1 0,50 0 

41  FRANCO ANGELI   1935–1988  Piazza del Popolo, 1987. Acrylic on canvas. 130 × 99 cm (51 1/4 × 39 1/4 in). Signed and titled ‘Franco Angeli “P. DEL POPOLO”’ on the reverse.  PROVENANCE Galleria Pio Monti, Rome Estimate  £2,0 0 0 –  3 ,0 0 0  $3,0 0 0 –  4 ,50 0  €2,3 0 0 –  3 ,50 0 

140

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42

42  FRANCO ANGELI   1935–1988   Half Dollar, 1969–70. Enamel on canvas. 100 × 100 cm (39 3/8 ×  39 3/8 in). Signed ‘ANGELI’ on the reverse. PROVENANCE Private Collection, Italy Estimate  £8,0 0 0 –  1 2,0 0 0  $12,0 0 0 –  1 7,9 0 0  €9,40 0 –  1 4,0 0 0 

141

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43

43  GIORGIO GRIFFA   b. 1936  Untitled, 1975. Acrylic on canvas. 120 × 120 cm (47 1/4 × 47 1/4 in).  This work is accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity signed by the artist and  registered in the Giorgio Griffa archive, Bergamo, under number 75 -05Y. PROVENANCE  Galerie Greta Meert, Brussels  Estimate  £12,0 0 0 –  1 8,0 0 0  $17,9 0 0 –  2 6,8 0 0  €14,0 0 0 –  2 1,0 0 0  ♠

142

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44

44  Piero Gilardi  b. 1942  Spiaggia Sarda, 2001. Foam rubber on wooden board. 100 × 100 cm (39 3/8 ×  39 3/8 in). This work is accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity signed by the artist.  PROVENANCE Galleria Enrico Astuni, Pietrasanta ExhibitEd Pietrasanta, Galleria Enrico Astuni,  Piero Gilardi, Scoglio Bretone, June–July 2001; Lake Como, Como, Villa Grumello, Chamber of Commerce of  Como and Ratti Foundation, Open Minds, Contemporary Collections, 7 May–28 June 2008 litERAtuRE  Piero Gilardi, Scoglio Bretone, exh. cat., Galleria Enrico Astuni, Pietrasanta, June–July 2001 (illustrated);  Open Minds, Contemporary Collections, exh. cat., Lake Como, Como, Villa Grumello, Chamber of Commerce  of Como and Ratti Foundation, 7 May–28 June 2008 Estimate  £8,0 0 0 –  1 2,0 0 0  $11,9 0 0 –  1 7,9 0 0  €9,40 0 –  1 4,0 0 0  ♠ 143

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(i)

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

45  PINO PASCALI   1935–1968  Four works: (i) Mucca, 1963; (ii) Arabi, 1963; (iii) Donnina (studio), 1964; (iv) Figure, 1963. (i) Inkpad ink, conté crayon, wax crayons, alcohol on cardboard; (ii) coloured pencil on paper; (iii) mixed media on wallpaper and acetate; (iv) mixed media on acetate laid on cardboard. (i) 24.7 × 35 cm (9 3/4 × 13 3/4 in); (ii) 22 × 28 cm (8 5/8 × 11 in); (iii) 24 × 30 cm (9 1/2 in × 11 3/4); (iv) 24.7 × 30 cm (9 3/4 × 11 3/4 in).   PROVENANCE (i) Giuliano Cappuzzo, Florence; Il Torchio Gallery, Milan (ii) & (iii) Sandro Lodolo, Rome; (iv) Il Torchio Gallery, Milan ExhibitEd Como, Como Chamber of Commerce, PINO PASCALI Il Disegno del Mondo, 12 April–12 May 2008 litERAtuRE A. Bonito Oliva, Pino Pascali: The drawing of the world, Milan, 2008, (i) p. 30, (ii) p. 66, (iii) pp. 64–65, (iv) p. 62 (each illustrated) Estimate  £10,0 0 0 –  1 5,0 0 0  $14,9 0 0 –  2 2,40 0  €11,70 0 –  1 7,6 0 0  144

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46

46  MARIO SCHIFANO   1934 – 1998  Paesaggio anemico, 1973. Oil enamel on paper laid on canvas. 200 × 180 cm (78 3/4 × 70 7/8 in). Signed ‘Schifano’ on the reverse. This work is accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity signed by Emilio Mazzoli.  PROVENANCE Emilio Mazzoli, Italy; Remo Palmieri, Modena; Galleria Fonte d’Abisso, Modena; acquired from the above by the present owner in 1980  Estimate  £35,0 0 0 –  4 5,0 0 0  $52,20 0 –  6 7,0 0 0  €41,0 0 0 –  5 2,70 0 

145

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47  HERMANN NITSCH  b. 1938  Untitled, 1992. Oil and T-shirt on canvas in artist’s frame. 199.4 ×  300.4 cm (78 1/2 × 118 1/4 in). Signed and dated ‘hermann nitsch 1992’ on the reverse. This work is  accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity signed by the artist. PROVENANCE Private  Collection, Europe  Estimate  £35,0 0 0 –  4 5,0 0 0  $52,20 0 –  6 7,0 0 0  €41,0 0 0 –  5 2,70 0  ♠ 146

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147

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48

49

48  MiMMo Rotella   1918 – 2006  Composizione 4, 1990. Poster décollage laid on  plywood. 68 × 48 cm (26 3/4 × 18 7/9 in). Signed and dated ‘Rotella 90’ lower right;  signed, titled and dated ‘Rotella 90 Composizione 4’ on the reverse. This work is  accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity signed by the artist.  PROVENANCE Private Collection, Italy Estimate  £10,0 0 0 – 15,0 0 0   $14,9 0 0 – 22,40 0   €11,70 0 – 17,6 0 0  

49  eNRiCo BaJ  1924–2003  The Nose Trio, 1973. Acrylic, cloth, wood, felt, metal and found  object collage on board. 45.1 × 55.2 cm (17 3/4 × 21 3/4 in). Signed ‘Baj’ lower right.  PROVENANCE Galerie Christel, Helsinki; Private Collection, Scandinavia   litERAtuRE E. Crispolti, Catologo Generale delle opere di Enrico Baj dal 1972 al 1996,  Milan, 1997, no. 1649, p.  166 (illustrated) Estimate  £18,0 0 0 –  2 4,0 0 0  $26,8 0 0 –  3 5,8 0 0  €21,0 0 0 –  2 8,0 0 0  ‡ 148

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50

50  ValeRio aDaMi   b. 1935  Kitchen, 1967. Oil on canvas. 66 × 81 cm (26 × 31 7/8 in).  Signed, titled and dated ‘Adami/Kitchen/67’ on the reverse. PROVENANCE Private  Collection, Italy Estimate  £3 0,0 0 0 –  4 0,0 0 0  $44,70 0 –  5 9,6 0 0  €35,0 0 0 –  4 6,8 0 0  ♠

149

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51 51  Fausto Melotti   1901–1986  Salomone, 1973. Stainless steel. 72.5 × 52 × 30 cm (28 1/2 × 20 1/2 × 11 3/4 in). This work is from an edition of 3. This work is accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity signed by Marta Melotti and dated 27 April 2009, and is registered in the Archivio Fausto Melotti under number 1973 68. PROVENANCE Galleria Martano, Turin  ExhibitEd Turin, Galleria Martano, Italian abstraction between the wars, 1981 litERAtuRE Giorgio Mondadori, ed., Catalogo della scultura italiana, Milan, 1983, p. 142 (illustrated); G. Celant, Melotti, Catalogo Generale Tomo Secondo Sculture 1973–1986, Milan, 1994, no. 1973 68, p. 374 (illustrated); S. Poggianella, Fausto Melotti, Rovereto, 2009, p. 89 (illustrated) Estimate  £25,0 0 0 –  3 5,0 0 0  $37,3 0 0 –  5 2,20 0  €29,3 0 0 –  4 1,0 0 0  150

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52

52  aRNalDo PoMoDoRo   b. 1926  Studio, 1960. Silvered bronze and iron. 52 × 35.5 × 10 cm (20 1/2 × 14 × 4 in). The work is from an edition of 2 plus 1 artist’s proof. This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist and is registered in the Arnaldo Pomodoro Archive, Milan, under number 142a.  PROVENANCE Galleria Numbero, Florence; Private Collection, Switzerland ExhibitEd Florence, Archivio di Stato di Firenze, Fiamma Vigo e ‘Numero’. Una vita per l’arte, 7 October–20 December 2003 Estimate  £35,0 0 0 –  4 5,0 0 0  $52,20 0 –  6 7,0 0 0  €41,0 0 0 –  5 2,70 0  ♠ 151

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53

53  Mario airo   b. 1961  Untitled (Lingua araba), 1993. Carpet, metal cable and rope. 38.1 ×  163.8 cm (15 × 64 1/2 in). This work is unique and is accompanied by a certificate of  authenticity signed by the artist. PROVENANCE Galleria Massimo De Carlo, Milan Estimate  £4,0 0 0 –  6 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 –  7,0 0 0  ♠ 152

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54

54  aLBErTo GarUTTi   b. 1948  Untitled, 1993. 10 synthetic fibre carpets on woven nylon  backing. Overall: 339.1 × 304.8 × 7.6 cm (133 1/2 × 120 × 3 in). This work is unique.  PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist Estimate  £8,0 0 0 –  1 2,0 0 0  $11,9 0 0 –  1 7,9 0 0  €9,40 0 –  1 4,0 0 0  ♠ 153

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55

55  STEFaNo ariENTi   b. 1961  Pacchetti-Ondine, 1987. Folded printed paper. Installation  dimensions variable. Largest: 21 × 16.5 × 5.1 cm (8 1/4 × 6 1/2 × 2 in). This work is unique  and is accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity signed by the artist.  PROVENANCE Private Collection, Italy  Estimate  £12,0 0 0 –  1 8,0 0 0  $17,9 0 0 –  2 6,8 0 0  €14,0 0 0 –  2 1,0 0 0  ♠ 154

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56

56  STEFaNo ariENTi   b. 1961  Turbine, 1989. Folded printed comic books in three parts.  Installation dimensions variable. Largest: 20.3 × 17.8 cm (8 × 7 in). This work is unique  and is accompanied by a photo-certificate of authenticity. PROVENANCE Private  Collection, Italy Estimate  £15,0 0 0 –  2 0,0 0 0  $22,40 0 –  2 9,8 0 0  €17,6 0 0 –  2 3,40 0  ♠ 155

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detail

57

57  PAOLA PIVI  b. 1971  Souvenir, 2005. Colour coupler tetraptych, each flush mounted on  aluminium. Three prints: 61.9 × 82 cm (24 3/8 × 32 1/4 in), one print 61.9 × 87 cm (24 3/8 ×  34 1/4 in). This work is from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. PROVENANCE Galerie  Emmanuel Perrotin, Paris ExhibitEd Paris, Galerie Emmanuel Perrotin, No problem, have a nice day, 24 June–29 July 2006  Estimate  £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0  ♠ 156

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58

58  PAOLA PIVI  b. 1971  Fffffffffffffffffff Three, 2006. Colour coupler print, flush mounted  on aluminium. 178.4 × 251.5 cm (70.25 × 99 in). Title, date and number printed on a gallery  label affixed to the reverse of the mount. This work is from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s  proofs. PROVENANCE Galleria Massimo De Carlo, Milan  Estimate  £18,0 0 0 –  2 5,0 0 0  $26,8 0 0 –  3 7,3 0 0  €21,10 0 –  2 9,3 0 0  ♠ 157

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59

60

60  STEFANIA GALEGATI   b. 1973  Untitled, 2003. Acrylic on canvas. 100.3 × 200 cm (39 1/2  × 78 3/4 in). Signed and dated ‘Stefania Galegati 2003’ and inscribed on the reverse.  PROVENANCE Pinksummer Gallery, Genoa ExhibitEd Ravenna, Museo Arte, Citta di  Ravenna, Stefania Galegati, 28 September–26 October 2008 Estimate  £7,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 –  1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 –  1 0,50 0  ♠

59  LARA FAVARETTO   b. 1973  Tiramolla #5, 2006. Pen on rubber drawing in artist’s frame.  55.9 × 45.7 cm (22 × 18 in). PROVENANCE Galleria Franco Noero, Turin Estimate  £2,0 0 0 –  3 ,0 0 0  $3,0 0 0 –  4 ,50 0  €2,3 0 0 –  3 ,50 0  ♠  ‡

158

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61

62

61  SIMONE BERTI   b. 1966  Untitled, 2009. Pencil, charcoal and pastel on paper laid on  canvas. 100 × 75 cm (39 3/8 × 29 1/2 in). PROVENANCE Galleria Vistamare, Pescara  Estimate  £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0  ♠

62  SIMONE BERTI   b. 1966  Untitled, 2009. Pencil, charcoal and pastel on paper laid on  canvas. 100 × 75 cm (39 3/8 × 29 1/2 in). PROVENANCE Galleria Vistamare, Pescara  Estimate  £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0  ♠

159

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63

63  roberto CUoGHI   b. 1973  Friendly Neighborhood, 2001. Two Lamda prints. Each: 26.7 × 22.9  cm (10 1/2 × 9 in). Signed and dated ‘Roberto Cuoghi ’01’ and numbered of 5 on the reverse of  one print. This work is from an edition of 5. PROVENANCE Galleria Massimo de Carlo, Milan  Estimate  £15,0 0 0 –  2 0,0 0 0  $22,40 0 –  2 9,8 0 0  €17,6 0 0 –  2 3,40 0  ♠ 160

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64

64  CArSteN HÖLLer  b. 1961  Giulianova Ondafun and Kong and the 1st King, 2007. Colour coupler  print, flush-mounted on aluminium. 91.4 × 124.5 cm (36 × 49 in). Signed ‘Carsten Höller’, printed  title and number on a label affixed to the reverse. This work is from an edition of 3 plus 2 artist’s  proofs. PROVENANCE Galleria Ester Schipper, Berlin Estimate  £18,0 0 0 –  2 5,0 0 0  $26,8 0 0 –  3 7,3 0 0  €21,0 0 0 –  2 9,3 0 0  ♠ 161

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65

66

65  DIEGO PERRONE  b. 1970  I Verdi Giorni, 2000. DVD. Duration: 2 minutes 30 seconds.  Signed and titled ‘DIEGO PERRONE: (“I VERDI GIORNI”)’ on the DVD. This work is from  an edition of 5 and is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity. PROVENANCE  Galleria Massimo De Carlo, Milan ExhibitEd Rome, Istituto Nazionale per la grafica,  Idea: Disegno italiano degli anni novarta, 15 December 2006–20 January 2007; Turin,  Archivio di Stato, 1–23 February 2007 litERAtuRE C. Bertola, Young Italian Artists at the Turn of the Millennium, Milan/New York, 2005, p. 161 (illustrated) Estimate  £4,0 0 0 –  5 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 –  7,50 0  €4,70 0 –  5 ,9 0 0  ♠

66  ROBERTO CUOGHI   b. 1973  The Good Griefies, 2000. DVD. Duration: 5 minutes. Signed  ‘R. CUOGHI’ on the DVD. This work is from an edition of 5. PROVENANCE Galleria  Massimo De Carlo, Milan ExhibitEd Beijing, Galleria Continua, Young Italian Artists at the Turn of the Millennium, 2006  Estimate  £6,0 0 0 –  8 ,0 0 0  $8,9 0 0 –  11,9 0 0  €7,0 0 0 –  9 ,40 0  ♠

162

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67

67  PaTRICk TUTTOfUOCO  b. 1974  From West To East, 2005. Plexiglas and  polychromed metal. 190 × 142 cm (74 3/4 × 55 7/8 in). This work is from an edition of 3  and is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity issued by Haunch of Venison,  London. PROVENANCE Haunch of Venison, London  Estimate  £25,0 0 0 –  3 5,0 0 0  $37,3 0 0 –  5 2,20 0  €29,3 0 0 –  4 1,0 0 0  ♠  ‡ 163

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68

68  MAURIZIO CATTELAN   b. 1960  Souvenir di Milano, 1994. Plastic camera with preloaded image roll and cardboard artist’s box. 6 × 11 × 10 cm (2 3/8 × 4 1/3 × 3 7/8 in).  Signed and dated ‘Cattelan ’94’ and numbered of 30 on base. This work is from an  edition of 30. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist  Estimate  £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0  ♠ 164

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69

69  MAURIZIO CATTELAN   b. 1960  Untitled, 1999. Colour coupler print. 50.8 × 61 cm (20 × 24 in).  Signed ‘Cattlelan’ and inscribed ‘To Mauricio from Maurizio’ in the margins. This work is unique.  PROVENANCE Private Collection litERAtuRE F. Bonami, N. Spector and B. Vanderlinden,  Maurizio Cattelan, London, 2000, p. 133 (another example illustrated, p. 133); Maurizio Cattelan, exh.  cat., Kunsthalle Basel, Basel, 1999 (another example illustrated, on the cover) Estimate  £20,0 0 0 –  3 0,0 0 0  $29,8 0 0 –  4 4,70 0  €23,40 0 –  3 5,10 0  ♠  165

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70  FRANCESCO VEZZOLI   b. 1971  The end of the human voice, 2001. 3 DVD doubleprojection installation. Duration: 15 minutes. Each disc signed ‘Francesco Vezzoli’.  This work is from an edition of 6 plus 2 artist’s proofs.  provenance Acquired  directly from the artist exhibited Turin, Museo d’arte contemporanea Castello di  Rivoli, Francesco Vezzoli, 2002 Estimate  £45,0 0 0 –  6 5,0 0 0  $67,0 0 0 –  9 6,9 0 0  €52,70 0 –  7 6,10 0  ♠

166

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Francesco Vezzoli’s double-projection video installation La Fine Della Voce Umana 

the tension and unrest of a subject left abandoned, a theme explored by Warhol 

(The End of the Human Voice, 2001) explores the nature of stardom through an 

in his film Lupe. Vezzoli forces the viewer, through the use of close-ups, to be 

intimate portrait of Bianca Jagger. Taking direct inspiration from Warhol’s 1965 

witness to the character’s emotional distress and inner turmoil whilst she has 

film Lupe, Vezzoli exploits the Warholian icon and examines Jagger’s heritage as 

a long and painful confessional conversation on the telephone. Jagger’s own 

the glamorous 1960s star once synonymous with the Studio 54 era. The eponymous 

status, as the glamorous star of yesteryear, parallels Vezzoli’s narrative of a 

Human Voice is taken from the theatrical text ‘The Human Voice’ written by Jean 

stricken subject made to address past horrors down the telephone. Both the 

Cocteau and filmed for the big screen by Roberto Rossellini in 1948. Vezzoli’s film, 

character in the film and the viewer are made to search through their personal 

although a reversal of Rossellini’s Neorealist work (the set becoming a decadent 

traumas and repressed memories.

and opulent atmosphere), nevertheless maintains a visual dialogue with the  original work through its dramatic use of black and white imagery. 

The second video in this piece, in which Vezzoli himself plays the role of the  faithless lover to Jagger’s ardent fidelity, sees the artist create a kind of self-

The protagonist’s expressive and commanding physical features at once convey 

portrait described in an atmosphere of almost Surrealist excess.

167

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71

71  EVA MARISALDI   b. 1966  Untitled (Lantern), 2004. Stitched cotton lampshades, light  bulbs, electrical wires, strings and metal stands. 203 × 190 × 22.2 cm (80 × 75 × 8 3/4 in).  This work is unique. provenance Private Collection, Italy Estimate  £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0  ♠ 168

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72

72  MASSIMO BARTOLINI  b. 1962  Untitled, 1995. Dye destruction print, flush-mounted on  aluminium. 99.1 × 149.2 cm (39 × 58 3/4 in). Signed and annotated ‘Massimo Bartolini Diretto  Malmo’ on the reverse. This work is an artist’s proof and is accompanied by a certificate of  authenticity signed by the artist. provenance  Galleria Gio Marconi, Milan Estimate  £6,0 0 0 –  8 ,0 0 0  $8,9 0 0 –  11,9 0 0  €7,0 0 0 –  9 ,40 0  ♠ 169

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73  FRANCESCO VEZZOLI   b. 1971  Anna Magnani, 2001. Laser print on embroidered canvas in artist’s  frame in 30 parts. Each: 30.2 × 40 cm (11 7/8 × 15 3/4 in). This work is unique and is accompanied by a  certificate of authenticity signed by the artist. PROVENANCE Anthony d’Offay Gallery, London  Estimate  £18 0,0 0 0 –  2 50,0 0 0  $26 8,0 0 0 –  3 73,0 0 0  €211,0 0 0 –  2 93,0 0 0  ♠  170

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171

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74 000

75 000

74  Monica Bonvicini  b. 1965  Blind Drunk, 2004. Ink on paper. 71.1 × 89.5 cm  (28 × 35 1/4 in). PROVENANCE Emi Fontana, Milan Estimate  £5,0 0 0 –  8 ,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  11,9 0 0  €5,9 0 0 –  9 ,40 0  ♠  ‡

75  Monica Bonvicini  b. 1965  Blind Shot, 2004. Ink on paper. 71.1 × 89.5 cm (28 × 35 1/4 in).  PROVENANCE Emi Fontana, Milan  Estimate  £5,0 0 0 –  8 ,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  11,9 0 0  €5,9 0 0 –  9 ,40 0  ♠  ‡

000

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76

76  LiLiana MoRo   b. 1961  Che idea, 1991. Aluminium, rubber, light bulbs and  electrical wire. Installation dimensions variable. This work is accompanied by a  certificate of authenticity signed by the artist. PROVENANCE  Galleria Locus Solus,  Genoa; Private Collection, Italy Estimate  £8,0 0 0 –  1 2,0 0 0  $11,9 0 0 –  1 7,9 0 0  €9,40 0 –  1 4,0 0 0  ♠ 173

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77  Monica Bonvicini  b. 1965  Three works: Untitled, 2005. Tempera and spray paint on  paper. Each: 163.2 × 149.2 cm (64 1/4 × 58 3/4 in). PROVENANCE Emi Fontana, Milan  Estimate  £45,0 0 0 –  5 0,0 0 0  $67,0 0 0 –  7 4,50 0  €52,70 0 –  5 8,50 0  ♠  ‡

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78  EVA MARISALDI   b. 1966  Fermo immagine, 1997. 11 photocopied drawings on paper in  artist’s box. Each drawing: 76.5 × 91.4 cm (30 1/8 × 36 in). Signed ‘Eva Marisaldi’ on a  label adhered to the box. This work is unique. PROVENANCE Galleria S.A.L.E.S., Rome  ExhibitEd Pescara, Associazione culturale Arte Nova, Fuori Uso, 1997 litERAtuRE  C. Bertola, Young Italian Artists at the Turn of the Millennium, Milan/New York, 2005, p. 137 Estimate  £6,0 0 0 –  8 ,0 0 0  $8,9 0 0 –  11,9 0 0  €7,0 0 0 –  9 ,40 0  ♠ 176

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177

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79

80

79  SERSE   b. 1952  Ai sali d’argento, 2001. Graphite on paper mounted on aluminium.  100 × 142.2 cm (39 3/8 × 56 in). Etched with signature and date ‘Serse 01’ on the  reverse of the mount. PROVENANCE Galleria Continua, San Gimignano Estimate  £7,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 –  1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 –  1 0,50 0  ♠

80  VEDOVAMAZZEI   founded 1991  Niagara, 2006. Colour marker on paper laid on  matboard and wooden frame. 52.7 × 26.7 × 4.4 cm (20 3/4 × 10 1/2 × 1 3/4 in). This work is  unique. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist ExhibitEd Beijing, Galleria  Continua, Young Italian Artists at the Turn of the Millennium, 1 July–20 August 2006  Estimate  £4,0 0 0 –  5 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 –  7,50 0  €4,70 0 –  5 ,9 0 0  ♠ 178

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(i)

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

81  MOnIcA BOnVIcInI   b. 1965  Four works: Ashes Watercolour, 2001. (i), (iii), Ash and  watercolour on paper; (ii), (iv), ash, watercolour and paper collage on paper. Each: 28 ×  35.5 cm (11 × 14 in). PROVENANCE Emi Fontana, Milan  Estimate  £15,0 0 0 –  2 0,0 0 0  $22,40 0 –  2 9,8 0 0  €17,6 0 0 –  2 3,40 0  ♠  ‡ 179

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82

82  ITALO ZUFFI   b. 1969  Ragazzo in affanno, 2003. Polished and cut marble. 88.6 × 41.9 × 2.5 cm  (34 7/8 × 16 1/2 × 1 in). This work is unique. PROVENANCE Private Collection, Italy Estimate  £4,0 0 0 –  6 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 –  7,0 0 0  ♠ 180

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83

83  VEDOVAMAZZEI   founded 1991  Isn’t it romantic, 2004–06. Chair, crystal. 50 × 81 × 42 cm  (19 3/4 × 31 7/8 × 16 1/2 in). PROVENANCE Galleria Umberto Di Marino, Naples  Estimate  £8,0 0 0 –  1 2,0 0 0  $11,9 0 0 –  1 7,9 0 0  €9,40 0 –  1 4,0 0 0  ♠ 181

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(i)

(ii)

84  ARMIN LINKE   b. 1966  Two works: (i) Vatican, Church of St. Peter, Ceremony for the Nomination of Bishops, Roma, Italy, 2002; (ii) The Synagogue, Church of All Nations, TV Show, Lagos, Nigeria, 2000. Colour coupler print, flush mounted on aluminium. Each:  49.5 × 59.7 cm (19 1/2 × 23 1/2 in). These works are from an edition of 5 plus one artist’s  proof. PROVENANCE Galleria Vistamare, Pescara Estimate  £7,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 –  1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 –  1 0,50 0  ♠ 182

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85

85  ELISA SIGHICELLI   b. 1968  Budapest: Armchair, 1999. Colour coupler print mounted  on lightbox. 99.1 × 99.1 × 10.2 cm (39 × 39 × 4 in). Signed, titled and dated ‘EliSa  SiGhiCElli BudaPEST: armChair 1999’ and numbered of 3 on the reverse. This  work is from an edition of 3. PROVENANCE Galleria Gio marconi, milan Estimate  £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0  ♠  183

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86

86  GILLIAN WEARING   b. 1963  Family Monument Project, 2009. Bronze on marble base.  45 × 33 × 33 cm (17 3/4 × 13 × 13 in). This work is from an edition of 5 and is accompanied by   a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist. PROVENANCE Maureen Paley, London Estimate  £7,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 –  1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 –  1 0,50 0  ♠ 184

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87

87  GIUSEPPE PIETRONIRO   b. 1968  Interno Zache¸ta, National Gallery of Art, Varsavia, 2007. Lambda print, flushmounted on aluminium. 120 × 180 cm (47 1/4 × 70 7/8 in). Signed ‘Giuseppe Pietroniro’, printed title and date on a  label affixed to the reverse of the mount. This work is one from an edition of 3. PROVENANCE Acquired directly  from the artist ExhibitEd Warsaw, Kordegarda Gallery, National Gallery of Art Zacheta, GIUSEPPE!!! IN WARSAW, December 2007–January 2008; Rome, Polish Cultural Institute, Polish Transfer Gallery in Rome, 2008  litERAtuRE M. Paderni, Johan & Levi, eds., Laboratorio Italia – la fotografia nell’arte contemporanea / photography in contemporary art, Milan, pp. 17, 68–69, 70–71; E. Grazioli and A. Polveroni, eds., European Photography, Milan,  2009; Polish Transfer Gallery in Rome, exh. cat., Polish Cultural Institute, Rome, 2008 Estimate  £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0  ♠ 185

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88

88  ANGELA BULLOCH   b. 1966  Fly-over Genoa, 1992. Pen on map and VHS video. Map: 57.5 ×  83.5 cm (22 5/8 × 32 7/8 in). Signed ‘Angela Bulloch’ inside the VHS box. This work is unique.  exhibited  Genoa, Galleria Locus Solus, Angela Bulloch, 4 December 1992  literature Flash Art, February 1993, pp. 107–08, pl. 172; Art Forum, April 1993, p. 105; Angela Bulloch, exh. cat., Centre  de création contemporaine, Tours, 1994, p. 55 (illustrated) Estimate  £6,0 0 0 –  8 ,0 0 0  $8,9 0 0 –  11,9 0 0  €7,0 0 0 –  9 ,40 0  ♠ 186

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89

89  GrAziA TOdEri  b. 1963  London, 2001. Dye destruction print mounted on Plexiglas.  69.5 × 105.5 cm (27 3/8 × 41 1/2 in). This work is from an edition of 5 and is accompanied  by a certificate of authenticity. Estimate £18,0 0 0 – 25,0 0 0  $26,8 0 0 – 37,3 0 0  €21,0 0 0 – 29,3 0 0  ♠  ‡

187

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90

90  SyLVIE FLEURy   b. 1961  Citazione da L. Fontana, 1993. Household paint on denim.  30.5 × 20.3 cm (12 × 8 in). Signed and dated ‘93 Sylvie Fleury’ on the reverse.  provenance Private Collection Estimate  £7,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 –  1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 –  1 0,50 0 

188

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91

91  WALTER NIEDERMAyR  b. 1952  Nigardsbreen V, 2002. Colour coupler diptych, flushmounted to Dibond. Each: 161 × 128 cm (63 3/4 × 50 3/8 in). Each signed ‘Walter  Niedermayr’ in ink on the reverse of the mount. This work is from an edition of 6.  provenance Acquired directly from the artist exhibited Beijing, Galleria  Continua, Young Italian Artists at the Turn of the Millennium, 1 July–20 August 2006 Estimate  £7,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 –  1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 –  1 0,50 0  ♠ 189

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92

92  VANESSA BEECROFT   b. 1969  Performance (Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1998),  1998. Vibracolour print. 63.5 × 78.7 cm (25 × 31 in). Initialled and numbered ‘VB01 A.P.’ on the  reverse, this work is an artist’s proof from an edition of 6 plus 1 artist proof. PROVENANCE   Acquired directly from the artist Estimate  £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0  ♠ 190

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93

93  VANESSA BEECROFT   b. 1969  VB45 (Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna, Austria, 2001), 2001.  DVD. Duration: 1 hour, 25 minutes and 33 seconds.  PROVENANCE Deitch Projects,  New York Estimate  £10,0 0 0 –  1 5,0 0 0  $14,9 0 0 –  2 2,40 0  €11,70 0 –  1 7,6 0 0  ♠ 191

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94

94  LARA FAVARETTO   b. 1973  Mondo Alla Rovescia, 2001–02. Colour coupler print. 183.8 × 233 cm  (72 1/4 × 91 3/4 in). This work is from an edition of 6 plus 1 artist’s proof and is accompanied by a  certificate of authenticity issued by Galleria Franco Noero, Turin. PROVENANCE Galleria  Franco Noero, Turin  Estimate  £6,0 0 0 –  8 ,0 0 0  $8,9 0 0 –  11,9 0 0  €7,0 0 0 –  9 ,40 0  ♠ 192

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95

95  MARINA ABRAMOVIC´   b. 1946  The Hero, 2001. Colour coupler print. 123 × 123 cm (48 1/2 ×  48 1/2 in). This work is from an edition of 12 and is accompanied by a certificate of  authenticity signed by the artist. PROVENANCE  Private Collection, Italy Estimate  £15,0 0 0 –  2 0,0 0 0  $22,40 0 –  2 9,80 0  €17,60 0 –  2 3,40 0  ♠

193

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96

97

96  ALESSANDRO PESSOLI   b. 1963  Naso Rosso, 2003. Painted ceramic, elastic band,  synthetic fibre. 33 × 19.6 × 14 cm (13 × 7 3/4 × 5 1/2 in). PROVENANCE Studio  Guenzani, Milan  Estimate  £3,0 0 0 –  4 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 –  6 ,0 0 0  €3,50 0 –  4 ,70 0  ♠  ‡

97  ALESSANDRO PESSOLI   b. 1963  Giallo, 2003. Painted ceramic and clay. 67.3 × 17.8 × 31  cm (25 1/2 × 7 × 12 1/8 in). PROVENANCE Studio Guenzani, Milan Estimate  £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0  ♠  ‡ 194

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98

98  TRISTANO DI RObILANT   b. 1964  Amber Stitch Garden Two, 2009. Coloured blown glass.  40.6 × 25.4 cm (16 × 10 in). This work is unique. Estimate  £3,50 0 –  4 ,50 0  $5,20 0 –  6 ,70 0  €4,10 0 –  5 ,3 0 0  ♠  195

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99

99  LORIS CECCHINI   b. 1969  Untitled (Stage evidence), 2001–02. Cast urethane rubber.  73.7 × 27.9 × 17.8 cm (29 × 11 × 7 in). PROVENANCE  Galleria Continua, San Gimignano Estimate  £2,0 0 0 –  3 ,0 0 0  $3,0 0 0 –  4 ,50 0  €2,3 0 0 –  3 ,50 0  ♠  ‡ 196

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100

100  FRANCESCO VEZZOLI   b. 1971  Poster for a remake of Gore Vidal’s Caligula, 2005. Screenprint on paper. 138.4 × 97.8 cm  (54 1/2 × 38 1/2 in). Signed and numbered ‘F Vezzoli 2/6’ in pencil lower right. This work is from an edition of 6.   ExhibitEd Stockholm, Moderna Museet, Dalí Dalí featuring Francesco Vezzoli, 19 September 2009–17 January 2010 Estimate  £8,0 0 0 –  1 2,0 0 0  $11,9 0 0 –  1 7,9 0 0  €9,40 0 –  1 4,0 0 0  ♠ 197

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italia wednesday 30 june 2010 london

photographs lots 101 - 153

Klein, W. 112, 113, 114

Abate, C. 147 Andreoni, L. 135 Argentini, G. 141 Barbieri, O. 119, 121 Basilico, G. 107 Belgiojoso, A. 122 Biasiucci, A. 130, 131 Branzi, P. 115, 126, 127, 128, 129 Cartier-Bresson, H. 137, 148 Cresci, M. 110

LaChapelle, D. 120 Lebeck, R. 118 List, H. 153 Migliori, N. 149 Orkin, R. 111 Piza, C. 104 Rivetti, F. 124

Fortugno_Maggia

136

Gardin, G. B. 116 Ghirri, L. 108, 109 Giacomelli, M. 132, 133, 134, 138 Gilden, B. 143, 144 Horvat, F. 101, 102

Salgado, S. 152 Sanchis, L. 142 Scianna, F. 146 Secchiaroli, T. 145 Sellerio, E. 103, 105, 117 Vaccari, F. 125 Ventura, P. 139, 140 Vitali, M. 123

Jodice, F. 106 Jodice, M. 150, 151

198

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101

101 FRANK HORVAT b. 1928 Rome Collections A (with spaghetti) for Harper’s Bazaar, 1962. Archival pigment print,  printed later. 50.6 × 34 cm (19 15/16 × 13 3/8 in). Signed, numbered 3/30, annotated ‘EAIJ’ in ink in the margin; signed,  titled and dated in pencil on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist literature E. Wolf,  Frank Horvat: Fifty one photographs in black and white, Rome: Dewi Lewis Publishing, 1998, p. 58; Les 75 printemps de Frank Horvat, exh. cat., Toulon, Maison de la Photographie, 2003, p. 13 Estimate £2,50 0 – 3,50 0 $3,70 0 – 5,20 0 €2,9 0 0 – 4,10 0 ♠  ‡ 199

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102

102  FRANK HORVAT   b. 1928  Rome Collections I (with newspaper) for Harper’s Bazaar, 1962.  Archival pigment print, printed later. 51 × 34.3 cm (20 1/16 × 13 1/2 in). Signed, numbered 3/30,  annotated ‘EAIJ’ in ink in the margin; signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso.  provenance  Acquired directly from the artist literature Harper’s Bazaar,  International Edition, 15 March 1962; M. Harrison, Appearances: Fashion Photography since 1945, London: Jonathan Cape, 1991, p. 111  Estimate £2,50 0 – 3 ,50 0  $3,70 0 – 5 ,20 0  €2,9 0 0 – 4 ,10 0  ♠  ‡ 200

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103

105

104

103  ENZO SELLERIO   b. 1924  Linguaglossa, 1963. Gelatin  silver print, printed later. 45.4 × 36.2 cm (17 7/8 × 14 4/16  in). Signed in ink and copyright credit stamp on the  verso. provenance  Acquired directly from the artist  literature Enzo Sellerio: per volontà o per caso, exh.  cat., Milan, Bel Vedere, 2004, p. 83; P. Morello, Enzo Sellerio Fotografo: tre studi siciliani, Milan: Leonardo Arte, pl. 19  Estimate £2,50 0 – 3 ,50 0  $3,70 0 – 5 ,20 0  €2,9 0 0 – 4 ,10 0  ♠ 

104  CRISTINA PIZA   b. 1963  ‘Pane’, Pigra Secca, Napoli,  1999. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 31.8 × 31.4 cm (12 1/2  × 12 3/8 in). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso.   provenance Acquired directly from the artist  Estimate £8 0 0 – 1 ,0 0 0  $1,20 0 – 1 ,50 0  €9 0 0 –  1 ,20 0  ♠

105  ENZO SELLERIO   b. 1924  Hugh Masekela, New York,  1966. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 47.6 × 32.1 cm (18 3/4  × 12 5/8 in). Signed in ink and copyright credit stamp on  the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the  artist Estimate £ 2,50 0 – 3 ,50 0  $3,70 0 – 5 ,20 0  €2,9 0 0 – 4 ,10 0  ♠

 201

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106  FRANCESCO JODICE   b. 1967  Euromed Marsiglia, 2007. Digital colour coupler  print. 55 × 71 cm (21 5/8 × 27 15/16 in). Accompanied by a signed certificate of  authenticity. provenance Private Collection, Europe  Estimate £3,50 0 – 4 ,50 0  $5,20 0 – 6 ,70 0  €4,10 0 – 5 ,3 0 0  ♠ 202

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203

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107

107  GABRIELE BASILICO  b. 1944  Beirut, 1991. Gelatin silver print. 100 × 127 cm (39 3/8 ×  50 in). Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 11/15 on a label affixed to the  reverse of the flush-mount. Another example of this work is held in the collections of  Castello di Rivoli, Turin, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Maison Européenne de  la Photographie, Paris and Fondazione Hariri, Beirut. provenance Private  Collection, Europe literature Basilico Beirut, Udine: Art&, 1994; Gabriele Basilico fotografie 1978–2002, exh. cat., Torino, GAM, 2002; F. Bonami et al., Beirut 1991 (2003),  Milan: Baldini Castoldi Dalai Editore, 2003 Estimate £7,0 0 0 – 9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 – 1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 – 1 0,50 0  ♠ 204

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108

109

108  LUIGI GHIRRI   1943–1992  Venezia from Paesaggio Italiano, 1986. Three colour  coupler prints. Each: 5.5 × 7 cm (2 1/8 × 2 3/4 in). provenance Acquired directly  from the estate of the artist Estimate £4,0 0 0 – 6,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 – 9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 – 7,0 0 0

109  LUIGI GHIRRI  1943–1992  Milano from Studio di Aldo Rossi, 1989–90. Three colour  coupler prints. Each: 5.5 × 7 cm (2 1/8 × 2 3/4 in). provenance Acquired directly  from the estate of the artist Estimate £4,0 0 0 – 6,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 – 9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 – 7,0 0 0

205

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110  Mario CresCi  b. 1942  Pretesti 5 and Pretesti 1 from Omaggio all’ingegno,  2005–06. Two colour coupler prints. Each: 109.2 × 109.2 cm (43 × 43 in). (i) Signed,  titled and dated in ink on a label affixed to the reverse of the flush-mount; (ii)  Signed, titled, dated and numbered in ink on the reverse of the flush-mount. Each  one from an edition of 5. provenance Galleria Nicoletta Rusconi, Milan literature Venti Inediti, exh. cat., Milan, Galleria Nicoletta Rusconi, 2006 Estimate  £7,0 0 0 – 9,0 0 0  $10,40 0 –13,40 0  €8,20 0 –10,50 0  ♠ 206

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207

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111  RUTH ORKIN  1921–1985  American Girl in Italy, Florence, 1951. Gelatin silver print, printed 1980. 30.5 × 45.7 cm (12 × 18 in). Signed, titled, dated in ink in the margin; signed, dated and annotated in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Ruth Orkin Archive, New York litERAtuRE Ruth Orkin: Above and Beyond, exh. cat., New York, Howard Greenberg Gallery/Ruth Orkin Archive, 2000, p. 9; Ruth Orkin: American Girl in Italy: The Making of a Classic, exh. cat., New York, Howard Greenberg Gallery/ Ruth Orkin Photo Archive, 2005, cover and pl. 10 ExhibitEd New York, Howard Greenberg Gallery, Ruth Orkin: Above and Beyond, 9 December 1999–22 January 2000 (another example exhibited); New York, Howard Greenberg Gallery, Jinx Allen in Florence, 16 September–22 October 2005 (another example exhibited) Estimate £8,0 0 0 – 1 2,0 0 0  $11,9 0 0 – 1 7,9 0 0  €9,40 0 – 1 4,0 0 0  ‡ 208

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209

ITALIA_PHOTO_198-247.indd 209

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112

112  WILLIAM KLEIN   b. 1928  Red Light and Vespa, Rome, 1956. Gelatin silver print, printed c. 1970s. 23.2 × 35.6 cm (9 1/8 × 14 in). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Private Collection, Italy litERAtuRE William Klein: Roma, Paris: Éditions de Seuil, 1959, n.p.; Roma & Klein, Contrasto, 2009, pp. 74–75 Estimate £1,0 0 0 – 2 ,0 0 0  $1,50 0 – 3 ,0 0 0  €1,20 0 – 2 ,3 0 0  ♠ 210

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113

113  WILLIAM KLEIN   b. 1928  Football Header, Trastevere, Rome, 1956. Gelatin silver print, printed c. 1970s. 34.3 × 26 cm (13 1/2 × 10 1/4 in). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Private Collection, Italy Estimate £1,0 0 0 – 2 ,0 0 0  $1,50 0 – 3 ,0 0 0  €1,20 0 – 2 ,3 0 0  ♠         211

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114

114  WILLIAM KLEIN   b. 1928  Campadoglio, Night, Rome, 1956. Gelatin silver print, printed c. 1970s. 21.6 × 36.5 cm (8 1/2 × 14 3/8 in). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Private Collection, Italy Estimate £1,0 0 0 – 2 ,0 0 0  $1,50 0 – 3 ,0 0 0  €1,20 0 – 2 ,3 0 0  ♠

212

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115

115  PIERGIORGIO BRANZI   b. 1928  Vicolo a Napoli, 1958. Gelatin silver print. 40 × 26.5 cm (15 3/4 × 10  7/16 in). Signed, titled, dated in ink and credit stamp on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly  from the artist litERAtuRE G. Turroni, Nuova Fotografia Italiana, Milan: Schwarz, 1959, pl. 20; S.  Phillips, P. Morello, Piergiorgio Branzi, Palermo: Istituto Superiore per la Storia della fotografia, 2003,  pl. 30; Storia d’Italia. Annali 20. L’immagine fotografica 1945–2000, Einaudi, 2004, p. 59; Piergiorgio Branzi,  Genova: Joyce & Co., 2006, p. 30 Estimate £4,0 0 0 – 6 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 – 9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 – 7,0 0 0  ♠ 213

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116

117

116  GIANNI BERENGO GARDIN   b. 1930  Napoli, 1960. Gelatin silver print. 22.5 × 32.5 cm (8 7/8 × 12 3/4 in). Signed, titled, dated in ink and credit stamp on the verso.  PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist litERAtuRE Les Italiens de Gianni Berengo Gardin, Paris: Éditions Autrement, 1998, p. 35; Gianni Berengo Gardin, Contrasto, p. 92 Estimate £3,0 0 0 – 5 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 – 7,50 0  €3,50 0 – 5 ,9 0 0   ♠

117  ENZO SELLERIO   b. 1924  Uscita dallo stadio, Palermo, 1961. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 32.1 × 47.6 cm (12 5/8 × 18 3/4 in). Signed in ink and copyright credit stamp on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist litERAtuRE Enzo Sellerio: per volontà o per caso, exh. cat., Milan, Bel Vedere, 2004, p. 43 Estimate £2,50 0 – 3 ,50 0  $3,70 0 – 5 ,20 0  €2,9 0 0 – 4 ,10 0  ♠ 214

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118

118  ROBERT LEBECK   b. 1929  Bride in Trastevere, Rome, 1959. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 35.6 × 28 cm (14 × 11 in). Signed, titled in German and dated in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Lazarus Fineprints, Hamburg Estimate £6 0 0 –  8 0 0  $9 0 0 –  1 ,20 0  €70 0 –  9 40  ♠  

215

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119

119  OLIVO BARBIERI  b. 1954  Napoli, 1982. Colour coupler print. 20 × 20 cm (7 7/8 × 7 7/8 in). Signed, titled, dated in pencil and ‘Margini’ blindstamp in the margin.  PROVENANCE Margini Collection, Italy litERAtuRE Olivo Barbieri: fotografie dal 1978, Tavagnacco: Art&, 1996, p. 26 Estimate £3,0 0 0 – 5 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 – 7,50 0  €3,50 0 – 5 ,9 0 0   ♠ 216

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120

120  DaviD LaChapeLLe  b. 1964  Statue, Los Angeles, 2007. Colour coupler print, flushmounted. 243.2 × 181.6 cm (95 3/4 × 71 1/2 in). Signed in ink, printed title, date and  number on a label accompanying the work. One from an edition of 5. PROVENANCE  Private Collection, Italy LitERAtuRE David LaChapelle, Florence: Guinti, 2007, p. 126 Estimate £50,0 0 0 – 7 0,0 0 0  $74,50 0 – 1 04,0 0 0  €58,50 0 – 8 1,9 0 0   ‡ 217

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121

121  OLIVO BARBIERI  b. 1954  Canaletto Nuovo, 2002. Colour coupler print, flushmounted. 100 × 199.4 cm (39 3/8 × 78 1/2 in). One from an edition of 6. PROVENANCE  Private Collection, Europe Estimate £5,0 0 0 – 7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 – 1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 – 8 ,20 0  ♠ 218

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122

122  ALESSANDRO BELGIOJOSO   b. 1963  Redentore #1, 2009. Digital colour coupler print,  flush-mounted. 99.4 × 149.2 cm (39 1/8 × 58 3/4 in). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 3/6  in ink on the reverse of the flush-mount. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £2,50 0 – 3 ,50 0  $3,70 0 – 5 ,20 0  €2,9 0 0 – 4 ,10 0  ♠ 219

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123

123  MASSIMO VITALI  b. 1944  A Portfolio of Figures and Landscapes. Fifty-two colour offset lithographs, printed by Steidl, 2006. Each approximately  66 × 85.1 cm (26 × 33 1/2 in) or the reverse; sheet 70 × 90 cm (27 9/16 × 35 7/16 in). Each numbered sequentially 1–52 in ink in an unidentified hand,  credit and edition stamp on the verso. Title page signed and numbered in ink. Contained in a linen clamshell case. One from an edition of 120 plus  20 artist’s proofs. PROVENANCE Private Collection, Europe Estimate £10,0 0 0 – 1 2,0 0 0  $14,9 0 0 –  1 7,9 0 0  €11,70 0 –  1 4,0 0 0  ♠ 220

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124

124  FRANCESCA RIVETTI   b. 1972  Ring, fracture, glass eye, balloon, dried blood from Broken, 2008. Five colour coupler prints. Each: 30 × 45 cm  (11 3/4 × 17 3/4 in). Each signed in ink, printed title, date and number 3/3 on a label affixed to the reverse of the flush-mount. Each one from  an edition of 3 plus 1 artist’s proof.  PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist EXHIBITED Modena, Fondazione Fotografia di  Modena, Due, September 2009 LITERATURE Due, exh. cat., Modena, Fondazione Fotografia di Modena, 2009 Estimate £5,0 0 0 – 7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 – 1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 – 8 ,20 0  ♠ 221

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125

125  FRANCO VACCARI   b. 1936  700 km di esposizione Modena Graz, 1972. Sixteen colour  coupler prints. Each: 11.7 × 16.8 cm (4 5/8 × 6 5/8 in). Signed, dated, annotated ‘In a 810 km  trip, I systematically photographed trucks that moved in my direction; so I used photography  to see what I did not know’ in Italian in ink and numbered 4/60 in pencil on the mount.  PROVENANCE Private Collection, Europe EXHIBITED Luxembourg, Centre National de  l’Audiovisuel, Kaléidoscope d’Italie, regard sur la photographie, l’art e le film d’auteur italiens des années 50 à nos jours, 2 October –5 December 2009 LITERATURE Kaléidoscope d’Italie, regard sur la photographie, l’art e le film d’auteur italiens des années 50 à nos jours, exh. cat.,  Luxembourg, Centre National de l’Audiovisuel, 2009, pp. 90–91 (variant) Estimate £2,50 0 – 3 ,50 0  $3,70 0 – 5 ,20 0  €2,9 0 0 – 4 ,10 0  ♠ 222

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126

126  PIERGIORGIO BRANZI   b. 1928  Adriatico, 1957. Gelatin silver print. 25 × 34 cm (9 7/8 ×  13 3/8 in). Signed, titled, dated in ink and credit stamp on the verso. PROVENANCE  Acquired directly from the artist litERAtuRE Mediterranée, Lausanne: La Guilde du  Livre-Clarefontaine, 1957, pp. 2–3; Piergiorgio Branzi, Genova: Joyce & Co, 2006, p. 33;  Italianskaia fotografia 1930–1970, Moscow: Movskovskii Musei Fotografii, 2007, pp. 70–71 Estimate £5,0 0 0 – 7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 – 1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 – 8 ,20 0  ♠

223

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127

128

127  PIERGIORGIO BRANZI   b. 1928  Gelataio sulla spiaggia di Senigallia, 1958. Gelatin silver  print. 22.7 × 30 cm (8 15/16 × 11 13/16 in). Signed, titled, dated in ink and credit stamp on  the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist litERAtuRE Italianskaia fotografia 1930–1970, Moscow: Moskovskii Musei Fotographii 2007, p. 77  Estimate £5,0 0 0 – 7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 – 1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 – 8 ,20 0  ♠

128  PIERGIORGIO BRANZI   b. 1928  Scogliera, Ischia, 1953. Gelatin silver print. 36 × 28.5 cm  (14 3/16 × 11 7/32 in). Signed, titled, dated in ink and credit stamp on the verso.  PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist litERAtuRE M. Cranaki, H. Grindat,  Mediterranée, Lausanne: La Guilde du libre-Clarefontaine, 1957, p. 63; Sud immagini contrapposte, Prospettive Meridionali, 1960; S. Phillips, P. Morello, Piergiorgio Branzi,  Palermo: Istituto Superiore per la Storia della fotografia, 2003, pl. 4 Estimate £5,0 0 0 – 7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 – 1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 – 8 ,20 0  ♠ 224

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129

129  PIERGIORGIO BRANZI   b. 1928  Siena la Contrada dell’Oca, 1956. Gelatin silver print. 25.1 × 30 cm  (9 7/8 × 11 13/16 in). Signed, titled, dated in ink and copyright credit stamps on the verso.  PROVENANCE Private Collection, Europe Estimate £7,0 0 0 – 9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 – 1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 – 1 0,50 0  ♠

225

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130

130  ANTONIO BIASIUCCI   b. 1961  Solfatara, 1995. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 47.3 ×  47.3 cm (18 5/8 × 18 5/8 in). Signed, titled, dated, numbered 3/17 in pencil on the verso;  signed in ink and copyright credit stamp on the reverse of the frame. PROVENANCE  Magazzino d’Arte Moderna, Rome Estimate £3,0 0 0 – 4 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 – 6 ,0 0 0  €3,50 0 – 4 ,70 0  ♠ 226

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131

131  ANTONIO BIASIUCCI b. 1961  etna, 1987. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 47.3 ×  47.3 cm (18 5/8 × 18 5/8 in). Signed, titled, dated, numbered 1/17 in pencil on the verso;  signed, annotated in Italian in ink and copyright credit stamp on the reverse of the frame.  PROVENANCE Magazzino d’Arte Moderna, Rome Estimate £3,0 0 0 – 4 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 – 6 ,0 0 0  €3,50 0 – 4 ,70 0  ♠ 227

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132

133 132  MARIO GIACOMELLI   1925–2000  untitled from Presa di coscienza sulla natura,  1970/80. Gelatin silver print. 31.1 × 40.2 cm (12 1/4 × 15 13/16 in). Signed, dated in ink,  credit stamp and ‘Immagino della Natura nell’attimo della creazione (14 Agosto 1978)’,  ‘Presa di Coscienza Sulla Natura. Il lavoro dell’uomo e il mio intervento (i segni, la  material, il caso, ecc.)’ stamps on the verso.  PROVENANCE Acquired directly from  the artist LITERATURE Mario Giacomelli, Parma: Università di Parma, 1980, p. 272 Estimate £3,0 0 0 – 5 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 – 7,50 0  €3,50 0 – 5 ,9 0 0  

133  MARIO GIACOMELLI   1925–2000  Il pittore Bastari, 1992–93. Gelatin silver print. 30.4  × 40.2 cm (11 31/32 × 15 13/16 in). Signed in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE  Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £3,0 0 0 – 5 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 – 7,50 0  €3,50 0 – 5 ,9 0 0  

228

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134

134  MARIO GIACOMELLI   1925–2000  Loreto, 1959. Gelatin silver print, printed  c. 1980s. 31 × 40.5 cm (12 1/4 × 15 15/16 in). Signed in pencil and credit stamp on  the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £3,0 0 0 – 5 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 – 7,50 0  €3,50 0 – 5 ,9 0 0  

229

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135

135  LUCA ANDREONI   b. 1961  ORR 206 from Non si fa in tempo ad avere paura (There is no time to be afraid), 2007. Lambda print, Diasec mounted. 125.1 × 98 cm (49 1/4 × 38 5/8 in). Signed  in ink, printed titled, date and number 1/3 on a label accompanying the work. One from an  edition of 3 plus 1 artist’s proof. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £3,0 0 0 – 5 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 – 7,50 0  €3,50 0 – 5 ,9 0 0   ♠ 230

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136

136  FORTUGNO_MaGGia (aNTONiO FORTUGNO and FilippO MaGGia) b. 1963, b. 1960  F_M 103-2005 from Ravensburger, 2005. Colour coupler print, printed later and flushmounted. 60.6 × 76.3 cm (23 3/4 × 30 in). Signed in ink by both artists and printed date on  a label affixed to the reverse. Number 7 from an edition of 7 plus 1 artist’s proof.  PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £3,0 0 0 – 5 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 – 7,50 0  €3,50 0 – 5 ,9 0 0   ♠ 231

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137 137  HENRI CARTIER-BRESSON   1908–2004  Midnight Mass, Scanno, Abruzzo, Italy, 1953. Gelatin silver print, printed 1974. 24.8 × 18.1 cm (9 3/4 × 7 1/8 in). Copyright credit and Magnum reproduction limitation stamps, dated ‘1974’ and annotated ‘Europeans’ in an unidentified hand in ink and pencil on the verso. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Literature Henri Cartier-Bresson: Photographe, Paris: Delpire, 1979, pl. 101; P. Galassi et al., Henri Cartier-Bresson: The man, the image and the world, London: Thames & Hudson, 2003, p. 98 Estimate £6,0 0 0 – 8 ,0 0 0  $8,9 0 0 – 11,9 0 0  €7,0 0 0 – 9 ,40 0 Please note that this lot has been authenticated by Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson, Paris  232

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138

138  MARIO GIACOMEllI 1925–2000 Scanno, 1957/59. Gelatin silver print, printed c. 1980s. 30 × 39.5 cm (11 3/4 × 15 1/2 in). Signed in pencil and credit stamp on the verso.  Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Literature Mario Giacomelli, Parma: Università di Parma, 1980, p. 130; A. Crawford, Mario Giacomelli, London: Phaidon, 2001, p. 293 Estimate £3,0 0 0 – 5 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 – 7,50 0  €3,50 0 – 5 ,9 0 0   233

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139

139  PAOLO VENTURA  b. 1968  Winter Stories #36, 2007. Digital colour coupler print.  76.2 × 101.6 cm (30 × 40 in). Signed in ink, printed title, date and number on a label  affixed to the reverse of the flush-mount. One from an edition of 10.  PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist LitERAtuRE E. Parry, Winter Stories, Rome: Contrasto, 2009, cover and pp. 26–27 Estimate £7,0 0 0 – 9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 – 1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 – 1 0,50 0  ♠ 234

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140

140  PAOLO VENTURA  b. 1968  Winter Stories #39, 2007. Digital colour coupler print. 76.2  × 101.6 cm (30 × 40 in). Signed in ink, printed title, date and number on a label affixed to  the reverse of the flush-mount. One from an edition of 10. PROVENANCE Acquired  directly from the artist LITERATuRE E. Parry, Winter Stories, Rome: Contrasto, 2009,  pp. 18–19 Estimate £2,0 0 0 – 3 ,0 0 0  $3,0 0 0 – 4 ,50 0  €2,3 0 0 – 3 ,50 0  ♠ 235

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141

141  GUIDO ARGENTINI   b. 1966  Will he ever see me for who I really am?, 2009. Lambda  print. 122 × 122 cm (48 × 48 in). Signed, dated and numbered 1/3 in ink in the margin.  Accompanied by a signed certificate of authenticity. One from an edition of 3 plus 1  artist’s proof. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £4,50 0 – 5 ,50 0  $6,70 0 – 8 ,20 0  €5,3 0 0 – 6 ,40 0  ‡ 236

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142

142  LUIS SANCHIS   b. 1964  Reflection for Gucci, November, 1998. Digital colour coupler  print, printed later and flush-mounted. 95.7 × 74.3 cm (38 3/8 × 29 1/4 in). Signed, dated  and numbered 1/5 in ink on a label affixed to the reverse of the frame. PROVENANCE  Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £2,0 0 0 – 3 ,0 0 0  $3,0 0 0 – 4 ,50 0  €2,3 0 0 – 3 ,50 0  † 237

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143

143  BRUCE GILDEN  b. 1946  Untitled from Mafia Funeral, 2005. Gelatin silver print. 39.4 ×  58.4 cm (15 1/2 × 23 in). Signed, dated, numbered 1/10 and annotated ‘N.Y.C.’ in pencil  on the verso. Provenance Magnum Photos, London  Estimate £2,0 0 0 – 3 ,0 0 0  $3,0 0 0 – 4 ,50 0  €2,3 0 0 – 3 ,50 0  ♠ 238

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144

144  BRUCE GILDEN  b. 1946  Untitled from Mafia Funeral, 2005. Gelatin silver print. 61 ×  39.4 cm (24 × 15 1/2 in). Signed, dated, numbered 1/10 and annotated ‘N.Y.C.’ in pencil  on the verso. Provenance Magnum Photos, London  Estimate £2,0 0 0 – 3 ,0 0 0  $3,0 0 0 – 4 ,50 0  €2,3 0 0 – 3 ,50 0  ♠ 239

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145  TAZIO SECCHIAROLI   1925–1998  Fellini jumping on the set of ‘8 1/2’, 1963. Gelatin silver print, printed c. 1980s. 29.5 × 39.2 cm (11 5/8 × 15 3/8 in). Titled and dated in an unidentified hand in pencil on the verso. One from an edition of 12. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the estate of the artist LitERAtuRE D. Mormorio, Tazio Secchiaroli: Dalla Dolce Vita ai miti del set, Milan: Federico Motta Editore, 1998; Tazio Secchiaroli: the original paparazzo, Milan: Photology, 1996; G. Bertelli, Storie di Cinema, 2004 Estimate £1,50 0 – 2 ,50 0  $2,20 0 – 3 ,70 0  €1,8 0 0 – 2 ,9 0 0  240

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241

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146

146  FERDINANDO SCIANNA   b. 1943  Sicilia, Enna, Processione del Venerdi Santo, 1962.  Carbon print, printed 2009. 50 × 40 cm (19 11/16 × 15 3/4 in). Signed, titled and dated in  pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist litERAtuRE  Ferdinando Scianna, Photo Poche, p. 6; Mondo Bambino, Milan: L’arte a stampa, 2002, p.  45; Ferdinando Scianna: La geometria e la passione, Contrasto, 2009, p. 31 Estimate £2,0 0 0 – 3 ,0 0 0  $3,0 0 0 – 4 ,50 0  €2,3 0 0 – 3 ,50 0  ♠ 242

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147

147  CLAUDIO ABATE   b. 1943  Giorgio de Chirico e Gino de Dominicis, 1972. Gelatin  silver print, printed later and flush-mounted. 124.8 × 61.3 cm (49 1/8 × 24 1/8 in).  Accompanied by a signed certificate of authenticity. One from an edition of 7.  PROVENANCE Vistamare Galleria, Pescara Estimate £5,0 0 0 – 7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 – 1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 – 8 ,20 0  ♠ 243

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148 148  HENRI CARTIER-BRESSON   1908–2004  Leonor Fini, Italy, 1933. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 35.6 × 23.8 cm (14 × 9 3/8 in). Signed in ink and blindstamp credit in the margin. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist  literature P. Galassi, Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Early Work, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 1987, p. 136; J-P. Montier, Henri Cartier-Bresson and the Artless Art, London: Bulfinch Press, 1996, p. 287; P. Galassi et al., Henri Cartier-Bresson: The man, the image and the world, London: Thames & Hudson, 2003, p. 130 Estimate £7,0 0 0 – 9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 – 1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 – 1 0,50 0  244

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149

149  NINO MIGLIORI   b. 1926  Il Tuffatore, 1951. Carbon print, printed later. 90 × 120 cm (35  7/16 × 47 1/4 in). Signed in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from  the artist litERAtuRE Segni: Nino Migliori, Damiani Editore, 2004, p. 11 Estimate £4,0 0 0 – 6 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 – 9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 – 7,0 0 0  ♠

245

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150

151

150  MIMMO JODICE   b. 1934  Capri, 1998. Gelatin silver print. 27 × 26.5 cm (10 5/8 × 10 1/2  in). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly  from the artist litERAtuRE Mimmo Jodice: Isolario Mediterraneo, Milan: Federico  Motta Editore, 2000, p. 99; F. Prose et al., Perdersi a Guardare, Contrasto, 2008, p. 226 Estimate £4,0 0 0 – 6 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 – 9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 – 7,0 0 0  ♠

151  MIMMO JODICE   b. 1934  Lipari, Isolario, 1999. Gelatin silver print. 27 × 33 cm (10 5/8  × 13 in). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired  directly from the artist litERAtuRE Mimmo Jodice: Isolario Mediterraneo, Milan:  Federico Motta Editore, 2000, p. 31; F. Prose et al., Perdersi a Guardare, Contrasto,  2008, p. 211 Estimate £4,0 0 0 – 6 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 – 9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 – 7,0 0 0  ♠ 246

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152

153

152  SEBASTIÃO SALGADO   b. 1944  Italia, 1991. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 29.2 ×  43.8 cm (11 1/2 × 17 1/4 in). Blindstamp credit in the margin; signed, titled and dated in  pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist litERAtuRE  Sebastião Salgado: In Human Effort, exh. cat., Tokyo: National Museum of Modern Art,  1993, pl. 97; S. Salgado: Workers, Archaeology of the Industrial Age, exh. cat., Philadelphia:  Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1993, pp. 96–97 Estimate £2,0 0 0 – 3 ,0 0 0  $3,0 0 0 – 4 ,50 0  €2,3 0 0 – 3 ,50 0  ♠

153  HERBERT LIST   1903–1974  At the Mediterranean sea, Liguria, 1936. Gelatin silver  print, printed 2001. 46.5 × 38.2 cm (18 5/16 × 15 1/16 in). Titled, dated and numbered 1/15  in ink by Peer-Olaf Richter, Executor, with Estate stamp on the verso.  PROVENANCE  Acquired directly from the artist litERAtuRE Herbert List: Lo sguardo sulla belleza,  Contrasto, cover and p. 19 Estimate £1,50 0 – 1 ,8 0 0  $2,20 0 – 2 ,70 0  €1,8 0 0 – 2 ,10 0  247

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italia wednesday  30  june  2010    london

design lots 154 - 235

Albini, F. 167 Aloi, G. 168 Amma 200 Arredoluce 198 Asti, S. 231 Aulenti, G. 175

Fontana Arte 206, 207, 209, 211 Fornasetti, P. 180

Raimondi, G. 234 Ravasio, G. 205

Gardella, I. 171 Garibaldi, G. & Buffa, P. 194 Grawunder, J. 233

Barovier & Toso 181, 199 Benevelli, G. 226 Bianconi, F. & Vignelli, M. 190 Borsani, O. 173 Branzi, A. 230 Buffa, P. & Garibaldi, G. 194 Bugatti, C. 182, 183

Lempter

Salocchi, C. 174, 208, 214 Sarfatti, G. 201, 210, 212, 217 Scarpa, C. 188, 189 Scarpa, T. 192 Sforza, O. 219, 220 Sottsass Jr., E. 222, 223, 224 Stilnovo 169 Studio Simon 235

Cardin, P. 218 Castiglioni, A. & P. 176 Ceroli, M. 179 Chiesa, P. 185, 186 Chiesa, P. attr. 184 de Carli, C. 172 de Poli, P. 155 de Poli, P. & Ponti, G. 157, 158

164

Magistretti, V. 216 Mangiarotti, A. 178, 203 Martinuzzi, N. 187 Melotti, F. 154, 159 Mendini, A. 227, 228 Mollino, C. 177 Parisi, I. 197, 202, 204, 213 Pesce, G. 229 Pistilli, M. & Venini, P. 215 Ponti, G. 156, 160, 161, 162, 163, 165, 166, 232 Ponti, G. & de Poli, P. 157, 158 Ponti, G., Pomodoro, A. & Perfetti, G. 221

Ulrich, G. attr. 196 Unknown 195 Venini 170 Venini, P. 191 Venini, P. & Pistilli, M. 215 Vignelli, M. & Bianconi, F. 190 Vigo, N. 225 Zuccheri, T. 193

 248

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154

154  FAUSTO MELOTTI   1901–1986  Rare ‘Cerchi’ sculpture, c. 1961. Glazed ceramic, brass, nylon. 42.5 × 37.5 × 6.5 cm (16 3/4 × 14 3/4 × 2 1/2 in). Together with a certificate of authenticity from the Fausto Melotti Archive. literature Flaminio Gualdoni, ed., Ico Parisi and architecture, Bologna, 1990, p. 92 for a similar example; Antonella Commellato and Marta Melotti, ed., Fausto Melotti. L’opera in ceramica, Milan, 2003, pp. 330–33 for similar examples Estimate £14,0 0 0 –  1 8,0 0 0  $20,9 0 0 –  2 6,8 0 0  €16,40 0 –  2 1,0 0 0  This work is registered in the Fausto Melotti Archive, Milan, as Archive number CE 56 249

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155

156

155  PAOLO DE POLI  1905–1984  Two bowls, 1960s. Enamelled copper. One: 9.5 cm (3 3/4 in) high, 25 cm (9 7/8 in) diameter; the other: 7 × 27 × 21 cm (2 3/4 × 10 5/8 × 8 1/4 in). Underside of one incised with ‘De Poli’ and underside of the other impressed with ‘DE POLI/MADE IN ITALY’ (2).  Estimate £2,40 0 –  3 ,20 0  $3,6 0 0 –  4 ,8 0 0  €2,8 0 0 –  3 ,70 0

156  GIO PONTI  1891–1979  ‘Casa e Giardino’ occasional table, 1940s. Rosewood-veneered wood. 48 × 100 × 47.5 cm (18 7/8 × 39 5/8 × 18 5/8 in). literature Stile, 1945, front cover for a drawing Estimate £1,8 0 0 –  2 ,40 0  $2,70 0 –  3 ,6 0 0  €2,10 0 –  2 ,8 0 0 250

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157

158

158  GIO PONTI and PAOLO DE POLI   1891–1979, 1905–1984  ‘Cat’ sculpture, c. 1956. Enamelled copper. 14 × 51 × 6.5 cm (5 1/2 × 20 1/8 × 2 5/8 in). literature Andrea Branzi and Michele De Lucchi, eds., Il Design Italiano Degli Anni ’50, Milan, 1985, p. 192; Ugo La Pietra, ed., Gio Ponti, New York, 1996, p. 312; Charlotte and Peter Fiell, eds., Domus Vol. IV 1955–1959, Cologne, 2006, p. 346 Estimate £3,0 0 0 –  5 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 –  7,50 0  €3,50 0 –  5 ,9 0 0

157  GIO PONTI and PAOLO DE POLI  1891–1979, 1905–1984  ‘Devil’ and ‘Bull’ sculptures, c. 1956. Enamelled copper (2). ‘Devil’: 16 × 21 × 11 cm (6 1/4 × 8 1/4 × 4 1/4 in); ‘Bull’: 13 × 26 × 7.5 cm (5 1/8 × 10 1/4 × 3 in). literature Ugo La Pietra, ed., Gio Ponti, New York, 1996, p. 314; Laura Falconi, Gio Ponti: Interni, Oggetti, Disegni 1920–1976, Milan, 2004, pp. 46 and 81 Estimate £3,50 0 –  4 ,50 0  $5,20 0 –  6 ,70 0  €4,10 0 –  5 ,3 0 0 251

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21/05/10 10.14


159

159  FAUSTO MELOTTI   1901–1986  ‘Peacock’ vase, c. 1960. Glazed ceramic. 32 cm (12 1/2 in) high. Underside signed in black glaze with ‘Melotti’. Together with a certificate of authenticity from the Fausto Melotti Archive. literature Domus, April 1957, p. 30 for a similar example; Die fünfziger Stilkonturen eines Jahrzehnt, exh. cat., Museum Villa Stuck, Munich, 1984, p. 24, pl. 75 for a similar example; Antonella Commellato and Marta Melotti, ed., Fausto Melotti-L’opera in ceramica, Milan, 2003, pp. 68 and 200–05 for similar examples Estimate £25,0 0 0 –  3 0,0 0 0  $37,3 0 0 –  4 4,70 0  €29,3 0 0 –  3 5,10 0 This work is registered in the Fausto Melotti Archive, Milan, as Archive number PA26. 252

ITALIA_DESIGN_252-253.indd 252

21/05/10 10.06


160

160  GIO PONTI  1891–1979  Rare pair of chests of drawers, 1950s. Walnut root-veneered wood, bronze. Each: 82 × 100 × 47 cm (32 1/4 × 39 3/8 × 18 1/2 in). Produced by Giordano Chiesa, Italy. Together with a certificate of authenticity from the Gio Ponti Archives (2). literature Ugo La Pietra, ed., Gio Ponti, New York, 1996, p. 183 for a similar example; Laura Falconi, Gio Ponti: Interni, Oggetti, Disegni 1920–1976, Milan, 2004, pp. 33 and 78 for a similar example Estimate £20,0 0 0 –  3 0,0 0 0  $29,8 0 0 –  4 4,70 0  €23,40 0 –  3 5,10 0 253

ITALIA_DESIGN_252-253.indd 253

21/05/10 10.06


161

162

161  GIO PONTI  1891–1979  Reclining armchair with ottoman, from the Hotel Parco dei Principi, Sorrento, c. 1964. Rosewood, fabric, metal. Chair: 100 cm (39 3/8 in) high; ottoman: 41.5 × 47 × 42.5 cm (16 1/4 × 18 1/2 × 16 3/4 in). Underside of seat impressed with ‘NORSK/PAT NR/96981’ (2). provenance  Hotel Parco dei Principi, Sorrento, Italy literature Ugo La Pietra, ed., Gio Ponti, New York, 1996, p. 367; Laura Falconi, Gio Ponti: Interni, Oggetti, Disegni 1920–1976, Milan, 2004, pp. 54–55 and 84 Estimate £1,8 0 0 –  2 ,40 0  $2,70 0 –  3 ,6 0 0  €2,10 0 –  2 ,8 0 0

162  GIO PONTI  1891–1979  Bed with headboard, 1950s. Walnut-veneered wood, fabric, glass, brass, painted metal. 99.5 × 204 × 155 cm (39 1/8 × 80 1/4 × 61 in).  Estimate £4,0 0 0 –  6 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 –  7,0 0 0

254

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163

164

163  GIO PONTI  1891–1971  Pair of stands, from the Hotel Royal, Napoli, c. 1964. Walnut-veneered wood, brass (2). Each: 64 × 65 × 42 cm (25 1/4 × 25 1/2 × 16 1/2 in). provenance Hotel Royal, Napoli, Italy Estimate £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0

164  LEMPTER   Standard lamp, c. 1950. Brass, chrome-plated tubular metal, painted metal. 309.5 cm (121 3/4 in) high, fully extended. Manufactured by Lempter, Italy.  Estimate £4,0 0 0 –  6 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 –  7,0 0 0

255

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165

166

165  GIO PONTI  1891–1979  Cabinet, c. 1950. Walnut-veneered wood, walnut, brass. 69.5 × 89 × 48.5 cm (27 3/8 × 35 × 19 1/8 in). Manufactured by Singer & Sons, USA.  Estimate £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0

166  GIO PONTI  1891–1979  Headboard, 1950s. Walnut-veneered wood, wood. 94 × 266 × 39 cm (37 × 105 × 15 3/8 in). Edge of each side element impressed with ‘16’.  Estimate £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0  Ω 256

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167

167  FRANCO ALBINI   1905–1977  Pair of armchairs, model no. PL 19, c. 1959. Painted tubular metal, fabric. Each: 92 cm (36 1/4 in) high. Manufactured by Poggi, Italy (2).  literature Giuliana Gramigna, Repertorio 1950/1980, Milan, 1985, p. 107 Estimate £7,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 –  1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 –  1 0,50 0 257

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168

169

168  GIAMPIERO ALOI   Chandelier, 1955. Tubular brass, painted tubular metal. 60 × 73 × 119.4 cm (23 5/8 × 28 3/4 × 47 in). Manufactured by Stilnovo, Italy. Top of central rod with decal ‘MILANO/STILNOVO/ITALY’.  Estimate £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0  ♠

169  STILNOVO   Rare chandelier, c. 1955. Brass, painted tubular metal, painted metal. 50 cm (19 5/8 in) drop, 95 cm (37 3/8 in) diameter. Manufactured by Stilnovo, Italy.  Estimate £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0 258

ITALIA_DESIGN_248-315.indd 258

21/05/10 15.51


170

170  VENINI  Carafe set, c. 1955. Canne glass. Carafe: 23.5 cm (9 1/4 in) high. Manufactured by Venini, Italy. Underside of carafe with paper label ‘VENINI/MURANO’. Comprising one carafe, twelve large glasses and eight small glasses (21).  Estimate £3,0 0 0 –  5 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 –  7,50 0  €3,50 0 –  5 ,9 0 0         259

ITALIA_DESIGN_248-315.indd 259

21/05/10 15.52


171

172

171  IGNAZIO GARDELLA   1905–1999  Standard lamp, c. 1960. Tubular brass, brass, glass. 172 cm (67 3/4 in) high. Manufactured by Azucena, Italy. literature CATALOGO AZUCENA, 1958, n.p. for a wall light version Estimate £1,50 0 –  2 ,0 0 0  $2,20 0 –  3 ,0 0 0  €1,8 0 0 –  2 ,3 0 0

172  CARLO DE CARLI   1910–1971  Table, 1960s. Mahogany-veneered wood, stack laminated wood, ebonised wood. 73 × 185 × 97 cm (28 3/4 × 72 7/8 × 38 1/8 in). Manufactured by Tecno, Italy. literature Leonardo de Luca, ed., Osvaldo Borsani, Rome, 1992, pp. 44 and 232 Estimate £1,8 0 0 –  2 ,50 0  $2,70 0 –  3 ,70 0  €2,10 0 –  2 ,9 0 0 260

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173

173  OSVALDO BORSANI   1911–1985  Adjustable lounge chair, model no. L-77, 1950s. Painted steel, rubberised webbing, fabric, brass, metal. 71 × 203 × 91 cm (28 × 80 × 36 in), fully extended. Manufactured by Tecno, Italy. Each side with Tecno roundel. literature Giuliana Gramigna, Repertorio 1950/1980, Milan, 1985, p. 114; Andrea Branzi and Michele De Lucchi, eds., Il Design Italiano Degli Anni ’50, Milan, 1985, p. 68; Aldo Colonetti, Osvaldo Borsani, Frammenti e Ricordi di un Percorso Progettuale, Milan, 1996, pp. 30–31 Estimate £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0  Ω 261

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21/05/10 14.04


174

175

174  CLAUDIO SALOCCHI   b. 1934  ‘Aloa’ standard lamp, c. 1971. Chrome-plated metal, plastic, rubber. 175 cm (68 7/8 in) high. Manufactured by Sormani, Italy. Underside with manufacturer’s paper label ‘nucleo/divisone delta sormani s.p.a/22060 arosio-italia’. literature Giuliana Gramigna, Repertorio 1950/1980, Milan, 1985, p. 355; Fulvio Ferrari and Napoleone Ferrari, Luce: Lampade 1968–1973: il nuovo design italiano, Turin, 2002, pl. 70; Charlotte and Peter Fiell, eds., 1000 Lights, Vol. 2: 1960 to Present, Cologne, 2005, p. 182 Estimate £1,50 0 –  2 ,50 0  $2,20 0 –  3 ,70 0  €1,8 0 0 –  2 ,9 0 0  ♠

175  GAE AULENTI   b. 1927  Large dining table, c. 1975. Painted metal, smoked glass. 73.5 × 206.5 × 145 cm (29 × 81 1/4 × 57 in). Manufactured by Knoll, Italy.  Estimate £2,0 0 0 –  3 ,0 0 0  $3,0 0 0 –  4 ,50 0  €2,3 0 0 –  3 ,50 0  ♠

262

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176

176  ACHILE and PIERGIACOMO CASTIGLIONI   1918–2002, 1913–1968  Pair of ‘Sanluca’ armchairs, c. 1960. Leather, rosewood, brass. Each: 95 cm (37 5/8 in) high. Manufactured by Gavina, Italy (2). literature Paolo Ferrari, Achille Castiglioni, exh. cat., Centre Georges Pompidou/CCI, Paris, 1985, p. 54, fig. 55, p. 56, fig. 60, pp. 58–59, figs. 62–63, pp. 150–51, figs. 215–17, and p. 210, fig. 318 and p. 225 for drawings; Sergio Polano, Achille Castiglioni, Complete Works, Milan, 2001, front cover and p. 163, fig. 244, p. 164, figs. 246–47, p. 174, figs. 270–71, p. 179, fig. 286 and p. 14 for a drawing; Charlotte and Peter Fiell, eds., Domus Vol. V 1960–64, Cologne, 2006, pp. 224–25 Estimate £7,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 –  1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 –  1 0,50 0 263

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177

178

177  CARLO MOLLINO   1905–1973  Untitled, 1950. Polaroid print.  11 × 8.5 cm (4 1/4 × 5/8 in).  Estimate £4,0 0 0 –  6 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 –  7,0 0 0

178  ANGELO MANGIAROTTI   b. 1921  Unique storage unit, c. 1980. Walnut-veneered wood,   granite. 122.5 × 225 × 47 cm (48 3/4 × 88 1/2 × 36 in).  Estimate £10,0 0 0 –  1 5,0 0 0  $14,9 0 0 –  2 2,40 0  €11,70 0 –  1 7,50 0  ♠

264

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179

179  MARIO CEROLI   b. 1938  ‘Mobile Nella Valle’ wardrobe, c. 1977. Pine, mirrored glass.  201.5 × 114 × 62.5 cm (79 3/8 × 44 7/8 × 24 5/8 in). Manufactured by Poltronova, Italy.  From the Mobile Nella Valle series. literature Pier Carlo Santini, Facendo Mobili Con Poltronova, Florence, 1996, p. 48 Estimate £4,0 0 0 –  6 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 –  7,0 0 0  ♠ 265

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21/05/10 10.06


180

180  PIERO FORNASETTI   1913–1988  Large ‘Blackmoor’ bust and two heads, 1950s. Glazed ceramic. Bust: 61 cm (24 in) high. Underside of one with paper label ‘FORNASETTI·MILANO/MADE IN ITALY’ and underside of another with decal ‘FORNASETTI MILANO-MADE IN ITALY’ (3). Estimate £2,50 0 –  3 ,50 0  $3,70 0 –  5 ,20 0  €2,9 0 0 –  4 ,10 0 266

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181

181  BAROVIER & TOSO  Monumental standard lamp, c. 1940. Clear and coloured glass, tubular brass. 247 cm (97 1/4 in) high. Manufactured by Barovier & Toso, Italy. Estimate £8,0 0 0 –  1 2,0 0 0  $11,9 0 0 –  1 7,9 0 0  €9,40 0 –  1 4,0 0 0 267

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182

182  CARLO BUGATTI   1855–1940  Pair of chairs, c. 1902. Oak, painted parchment, brass. Each: 95 cm (37 5/8 in) high. One side of each seat with metal roundel ‘MARCA DEPOSITATA/BUGATTI/CARLO’ (2).  PROVENANCE Sotheby’s, Applied Arts from 1880, London, 31 March 1995, Lot 189; Sotheby’s, Important Prewar Design, New York, 14 December 2007, Lot 377 ExhibitEd I Bugatti’, Masnago Castle, Varese, 21 June–21 September 1997 litERAtuRE Gabriele Mazzotta, I Bugatti, exh. cat., Masnago Castle, Italy, 1997, p. 57; Philippe Dejean, Bugatti: Carlo, Rembrandt, Ettore, Jean, New York, 1982, p. 76 Estimate £3 0,0 0 0 –  5 0,0 0 0  $44,70 0 –  7 4,50 0  €35,10 0 –  5 8,50 0 268

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183

183  CARLO BUGATTI   1855–1940  Bench, c. 1902. Oak, painted parchment, brass. 105 × 126 × 65 cm (41 5/8 × 49 1/2 × 25 1/2 in). One side with metal roundel ‘MARCA DEPOSITATA/BUGATTI/CARLO’. PROVENANCE Sotheby’s, Applied Arts from 1880, London, 31 March 1995, Lot 189; Sotheby’s, Important Prewar Design, New York, 14 December 2007, Lot 377 litERAtuRE Philippe Dejean, Bugatti: Carlo, Rembrandt, Ettore, Jean, New York, 1982, p. 71 for a similar example Estimate £35,0 0 0 –  5 5,0 0 0  $52,20 0 –  8 2,0 0 0  €41,0 0 0 –  6 4,40 0 269

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21/05/10 10.06


184

184  Attributed to PIETRO CHIESA   1892–1948  ‘Saturn’ standard lamp, 1930s. Brass, frosted glass, glass, painted metal. 185 cm (72 3/4 in) high. Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Italy.  Estimate £7,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 –  1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 –  1 0,50 0 270

ITALIA_DESIGN_248-315.indd 270

21/05/10 10.15


185

185  PIETRO CHIESA  1892–1948  Set of four wall lights, c. 1938. Glass, brass. Each: 56.5 × 23 × 12.5 cm (22 1/4 × 9 × 5 in). Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Italy (4). literature Laura Falconi, Luci e Trasparenze: Fontana Arte, Rome, 2006, pp. 72 and 94 Estimate £4,0 0 0 –  6 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 –  7,0 0 0 271

ITALIA_DESIGN_248-315.indd 271

21/05/10 10.15


186

186  gio ponti and piEtRo CHiESa  1892–1948  Rare chest of drawers, 1930s. Ebonised wood, mirrored glass, brass. 93.5 × 89.5 × 41 cm (36 3/4 × 35 1/4 × 16 1/8 in). Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Italy. Front of one drawer with manufacturer’s paper label ‘VETRI D’ARTE FONTANA/FONTANA/MILANO’. literature Ugo La Pietra, ed., Gio Ponti, New York, 1996, p. 71, fig. 169 for a similar example; Laura Falconi, Fontana Arte: Una Storia Trasparente, Milan, 1998, pp. 72–73 and 208 for similar examples; Charlotte and Peter Fiell, eds., Domus Vol. II 1940–1949, Cologne, 2006, p. 477 for similar examples Estimate £3 0,0 0 0 –  4 0,0 0 0  $44,70 0 –  5 9,6 0 0  €35,10 0 –  4 6,8 0 0 272

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21/05/10 10.05


187

187  napoLEonE MaRtinUZZi   1892–1977  Bowl and pair of candleholders, model no. 2358, c. 1954. Coloured glass. Bowl: 17.5 cm (6 7/8 in) high; each candleholder: 23 cm (9 in) high. Manufactured by Venini, Italy. Each underside acid-etched with ‘venini/murano’. literature Emporium, October 1925, fig. 571 for a similar candleholder; Roberto Papini, Le Arti d’Oggi: Decorative Arts and Architecture of the 1920s, London, 2005, p. 231 for a drawing of a similar candleholder Estimate £4,0 0 0 –  6 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 –  7,0 0 0 273

ITALIA_DESIGN_272-273.indd 273

21/05/10 10.05


188

188  CARLO SCARPA   1906–1978  Vase, model no. 5673, c. 1926. Coloured iridescent glass. 31 cm (12 1/4 in) high. Manufactured by M.V.M. Cappellin and Co, Italy. Underside acidetched with ‘M.V.M/Cappellin/Murano’. literature Domus, December 1928, p. 59; Marino Barovier, Carlo Scarpa: Glass of an Architect, Milan, 1999, pp. 192, 225 and 246–47 Estimate £15,0 0 0 –  2 0,0 0 0  $22,40 0 –  2 9,8 0 0  €17,6 0 0 –  2 3,40 0 274

ITALIA_DESIGN_248-315.indd 274

21/05/10 10.16


189

189  CARLO SCARPA   1906–1978  Vase, model no. 11001, 1932–34. Bollicine glass. 33 cm (13 in) high. Manufactured by Venini, Italy. Underside acid-etched with ‘gi. vi. emme/Venini/Murano’.  literature Helmut Ricke and Eva Schmitt, Italian Glass Murano, Milan 1930–1970, Munich, 1997, p. 61; Marino Barovier, Carlo Scarpa: Glass of an Architect, Milan, 1999, p. 204, fig. 8; Franco Deboni, Venini Glass Vol. 2, Milan, 2007, pl. 79 for a similar example Estimate £20,0 0 0 –  2 5,0 0 0  $29,8 0 0 –  3 7,3 0 0  €23,40 0 –  2 9,3 0 0 275

ITALIA_DESIGN_248-315.indd 275

21/05/10 10.16


190

190  FULVIO BIANCONI and MASSIMO VIGNELLI   1915–1996, b. 1931  Vase, c. 1953. Spicchi glass. 37.5 cm (14 3/4 in) high. Manufactured by Venini, Italy. literature Franco Deboni, Venini Glass, catalogue 1921–2007, Vol. 2, Milan, 2007, pl. 202 Estimate £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0 276

ITALIA_DESIGN_248-315.indd 276

21/05/10 10.16


191

191  PAOLO VENINI  1895–1959  Vase, 1954–55. Lattimo glass, murrine glass. 20 cm (7 7/8 in) high. Manufactured by Venini, Italy. Underside acid-etched with ‘venini/murano/italia’. literature Glass 1959: A Special Exhibition of International Contemporary Glass, New York, 1959, pl. 197; Giovanni Mariacher, Vetri di Murano, 1967, p. 171; Marina Barovier, Rosa Barovier Mentasti, Attila Dorigato, II Vetro Di Murano Alle Biennali 1895–1972, Milan, 1995, p. 85; Helmut Ricke and Eva Schmitt, Italian Glass Murano, Milan 1930–1970, Munich, 1997, p. 142, pl. 122; Anna Venini Diaz de Santillana, Venini Catalogue Raisonné 1921–1986, Milan, 2000, p. 110, pl. 59 for a bowl version; Franco Deboni, I Vetri Venini, Turin, 2006. pl. 152 Estimate £16,0 0 0 –  2 0,0 0 0  $23,8 0 0 –  2 9,8 0 0  €18,70 0 –  2 3,40 0 277

ITALIA_DESIGN_248-315.indd 277

21/05/10 10.16


192

192  TOBIA SCARPA   1895–1959  ‘Occhi’ vase, c. 1960. Pasta vitrea murrine glass. 31 cm (12 1/8 in) high. Manufactured by Venini, Italy. Underside with manufacturer’s paper label with ‘VENINI S.A. – MURANO’. From the Occhi series.  literature Marc Heiremans, Art Glass from Murano 1910–1970, Arnoldsche, 1993, pl. 240; Marina Barovier, Rosa Barovier Mentasti and Attila Dorigato, II Vetro Di Murano Alle Biennali 1895–1972, Milan, 1995, p. 97; Marino Barovier, ed., Venetian Glass: The Nancy Olnick and Giorgio Spanu Collection, New York, 2000, p. 168, pl. 137 and p. 230, pl. 137 Estimate £12,0 0 0 –  1 8,0 0 0  $17,9 0 0 –  2 6,8 0 0  €14,0 0 0 –  2 1,0 0 0  ♠ 278

ITALIA_DESIGN_248-315.indd 278

21/05/10 10.16


193

193  TONI ZUCCHERI  1937–2008  ‘Scolpito’ vase, c. 1965. Clear and coloured glass. 29.5 cm (11 5/8 in) high. Manufactured by Venini, Italy. Underside acid-etched with ‘venini/ italia’. literature Franco Deboni, Venini Glass, catalogue 1921–2007, Vol. 2, Milan, 2007, pl 272 for a similar example Estimate £6,0 0 0 –  8 ,0 0 0  $9,0 0 0 –  11,9 0 0  €7,0 0 0 –  9 ,40 0  ♠ 279

ITALIA_DESIGN_248-315.indd 279

21/05/10 14.53


194

194  PAOLO BUFFA and GIOVANNI GARIBALDI  1903–1970  Rare cabinet, 1950s. Ebonised wood, satin wood, glass, brass. 222 × 110 × 51.5 cm (87 3/8 × 43 1/4 × 20 1/4 in). Estimate £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0 280

ITALIA_DESIGN_248-315.indd 280

21/05/10 10.16


195

195  UNKNOWN DESIGNER  Pair of monumental twelve-arm chandeliers, from the Rizzoli headquarters, Milan, 1950s. Bronze. Each: 114 cm (44 7/8 in) drop. provenance Rizzoli headquarters, Milan, Italy Estimate £8,0 0 0 –  1 2,0 0 0  $11,9 0 0 –  1 7,9 0 0  €9,40 0 –  1 4,0 0 0 281 

ITALIA_DESIGN_248-315.indd 281

21/05/10 10.16


196

197

196  Attributed to GuGlielmo ulRiCH  1904–1977  Chandelier, 1950. Brass. 40 cm (15 3/4 in) drop; 115 cm (45 1/4 in) diameter. Manufactured by Strada, Italy.  Estimate £7,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  $10,40 0 –  1 3,40 0  €8,20 0 –  1 0,50 0

197  iCo PARiSi   1916–1996  Dining Table, 1950s. Rosewood-veneered wood, ebonised wood. 75.5 × 193 × 95 cm (29 3/4 × 76 × 37 3/8 in). literature Andrea Branzi and Michele De Lucchi, eds., Il Design Italiano Degli Anni ’50, Milan, 1985, p. 122 for a similar example; Flaminio Gualdoni, ed., Ico Parisi and architecture, Bologna, 1990, p. 203 for a similar example; Giuliana Gramigna and Paola Biondi, Il Design In Italia, Dell’Arredamento Domestico, Turin, 1999, p. 84 for a similar example Estimate £4,0 0 0 –  6 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 –  7,0 0 0 282

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198

198  ARReDoluCe   Standard lamp, c. 1950. Painted metal, brass, marble. 228 cm (89 3/4 in) high. Manufactured by Arredoluce, Italy.  Estimate £3,50 0 –  5 ,50 0  $5,20 0 –  8 ,20 0  €4,10 0 –  6 ,40 0

283

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199  BARoVieR & ToSo   Set of seven ‘Fuochi d’Artificio’ wall lights, c. 1958. Coloured glass with gold inclusions, brass. Each: 70 × 60 × 28.5 cm (27 1/2 × 23 5/8 × 11 1/4 in). Manufactured by Barovier & Toso, Italy (7).  Estimate £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0 284

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285

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200

200  AmmA   Wall-mounted bookcase, 1970s. Rosewood-veneered wood, painted wood, brass. 236 × 374 × 51 cm (93 × 147 × 20 in). Manufactured by Amma, Italy.  Estimate £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0

286

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201

202

202  iCo PARiSi   1916–1996  Dining table, c. 1940. Rosewood-veneered wood, brass. 70.5 cm (27 3/4 in) high, 119.5 cm (47 in) diameter. Manufactured by MIM, Italy. Underside with manufacturer’s roundel ‘MiM/roma’.  Estimate £2,0 0 0 –  3 ,0 0 0  $3,0 0 0 –  4 ,50 0  €2,3 0 0 –  3 ,50 0

201  GiNo SARFATTi  1912–1985  ‘Moon’ ceiling light, model no. 2130, c. 1969. Painted perforated metal, plastic. 146 cm (57 1/2 in) drop, 53 cm (20 7/8 in) diameter. Manufactured by Arteluce, Italy. Ceiling plate with manufacturer’s decal ‘AL/Milano/ Arteluce’. literature Giuliana Gramigna, Repertorio 1950/1980, Milan, 1985, p. 301; Fulvio Ferrari and Napoleone Ferrari, Luce: Lampade 1968–1973: il nuovo design italiano, Turin, 2002, p. 57, fig. 77; Charlotte and Peter Fiell, eds., 1000 Lights, Vol. 2: 1960 to Present, Cologne, 2005, p. 163; Galerie Christine Diegoni, Gino Sarfatti, Paris, 2008, p. 125 Estimate £4,0 0 0 –  6 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 –  7,0 0 0 287

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288

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203  ANGelo mANGiARoTTi   b. 1921  Rare dining table, c. 1963. Enamelled copper, turned bronze. 78.5 cm (30 7/8 in) high, 130 cm (51 1/8 in) diameter. Manufactured by Bernini, Italy. literature Domus, November 1963, p. 42 Estimate £24,0 0 0 –  2 8,0 0 0  $35,8 0 0 –  4 1,70 0  €28,0 0 0 –  3 2,8 0 0  ♠ 289

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204

204  ICO PARISI   1916–1996  ‘Terni’ desk, c. 1958. Rosewood-veneered wood, rosewood, aluminium. 72 × 180 × 35.5 cm (28 3/8 × 70 7/8 × 14 in). Manufactured by MIM, Italy. One side of desktop edge with manufacturer’s roundel ‘MIM/roma’.  Estimate £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0 290

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205

205  GIUSEPPE RAVASIO Table lamp, model no. G 999, c. 1970. Painted sheet metal, methacrylate rods. 48 × 38 × 18 cm (18 7/8 × 15 × 7 1/8 in). Manufactured by New Lamp, Italy. literature Fulvio Ferrari and Napoleone Ferrari, Luce: Lampade 1968–1973: il nuovo design italiano, Turin, 2002, fig. 140 Estimate £10,0 0 0 –  1 5,0 0 0  $14,9 0 0 –  2 2,40 0  €11,70 0 –  1 7,6 0 0  ♠ 291

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206

206  FONTANA ARTE   Chandelier, c. 1958. Glass, frosted glass, brass, painted metal. 79 cm (31 1/8 in) drop. Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Italy. literature Fontana Arte sales catalogue, Italy, 1960s, pp. 22–23 for similar examples Estimate £6,0 0 0 –  8 ,0 0 0  $8,9 0 0 –  11,9 0 0  €7,0 0 0 –  9 ,40 0 292

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207

208

207  FONTANA ARTE   Mirror, c. 1950s. Mirrored glass, glass, chrome-plated metal, painted metal. 87.5 × 34 × 6.5 cm (34 5/8 × 13 5/8 × 2 1/2 in). Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Italy.  Estimate £3,0 0 0 –  5 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 –  7,50 0  €3,50 0 –  5 ,9 0 0

208  CLAUDIO SALOCCHI   b. 1934  Dining table, c. 1964. Marble, Perspex, chrome-plated metal. 73 × 180.5 × 130 cm (28 3/4 × 71 1/8 × 51 1/8 in). Manufactured by Sormani, Italy.  Estimate £3,0 0 0 –  5 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 –  7,50 0  €3,50 0 –  5 ,9 0 0  ♠ 293

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209

209  FONTANA ARTE   Pair of ceiling lights, model no. 1990, 1950s. Glass, frosted glass, painted metal, brass. Each: 49.5 × 49.5 × 17 cm (19 1/2 × 19 1/2 × 6 3/4 in). Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Italy (2). literature Fontana Arte Illuminazione, Fontana Arte catalogue, Italy, 1950s, p. 39 Estimate £6,0 0 0 –  8 ,0 0 0  $8,9 0 0 –  11,9 0 0  €7,0 0 0 –  9 ,40 0 294

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210

210  GINO SARFATTI   1912–1985  Standard lamp, model no. 1086, c. 1961. Painted metal, chrome-plated metal. 129 cm (50 3/4 in) high. Manufactured by Arteluce, Italy.  literature Giuliana Gramigna, Repertorio 1950/1980, Milan, 1985, p. 177; Galerie Christine Diegoni, Gino Sarfatti, Paris, 2008, p. 113 Estimate £3,0 0 0 –  5 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 –  7,50 0  €3,50 0 –  5 ,9 0 0 295

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211  FONTANA ARTE   Occasional table, 1950s. Coloured mirrored glass, glass, painted metal, brass. 37 cm (14 1/4 in) high, 84 cm (33 in) diameter. Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Italy. literature Laura Falconi, Luci e Trasparenze: Fontana Arte, Rome, 2006, pp. 36–37 and 86 Estimate £25,0 0 0 –  3 0,0 0 0  $37,3 0 0 –  4 4,70 0  €29,3 0 0 –  3 5,10 0 296

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297

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212

213

212  GINO SARFATTTI   1912–1985  Table lamp, model no. 589, 1960s. Tubular chromeplated metal, painted metal. 139 cm (54 3/4 in) high, fully extended. Manufactured by Arteluce, Italy. Inside rim of shade with decal ‘AL/MILANO/ARTELUCE’.  Estimate £3,0 0 0 –  5 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 –  7,50 0  €3,50 0 –  5 ,9 0 0

213  ICO PARISI   1916–1996  Pair of chairs, model no. 856, c. 1955. Chrome-plated metal, fabric, stained wood. Each: 76 cm (30 in) high. Manufactured by Cassina, Italy (2). literature Flaminio Gualdoni, ed., Ico Parisi and architecture, Bologna, 1990, p. 209; Charlotte and Peter Fiell, eds., Domus Vol. IV 1955–1959, Cologne, 2006, p. 368 Estimate £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0 298

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214

214  CLAUDIO SALOCCHI   b. 1934  ‘Tulpa’ table lamp, c. 1971. Marble, acrylic, chrome-plated metal. 84 cm (33 in) high. Produced by Lumen Form, Italy. literature Fulvio and Napoleone Ferrari, Light: Lamp 1968–1973: The New Italian Design, Turin, 2002, pl. 127 Estimate £5,0 0 0 –  7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –  1 0,40 0  €5,9 0 0 –  8 ,20 0  ♠ 299

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215

215  PAOLO VENINI and MASSIMO PISTILLI  1895–1959  ‘Palotta’ table lamp, c. 1970. Glass, coloured glass, chrome-plated metal. 31 cm (12 1/8 in) high. Manufactured by Venini, Italy.  literature Franco Deboni, Venini Glass, Its history, artists and techniques, Vol. 1, Milan, 2007, p. 254; Franco Deboni, Venini Glass, catalogue 1921–2007, Vol. 2, Milan, 2007, pl. 301 Estimate £3,0 0 0 –  5 ,0 0 0  $4,50 0 –  7,50 0  €3,50 0 –  5 ,9 0 0 300

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216

216  VICO MAGISTRETTI   1920–2006  Pair of ‘Colleoni’ standard lamps, c. 1971. Tubular chrome-plated metal, smoked glass, marble. Each: 256 cm (100 3/4 in) high. Manufactured by Knoll International, Italy. Each glass shade with glass seal ‘COLLEONI LAMP·VENICE 1971’. literature Giuliana Gramigna, Repertorio 1950/1980, Milan, 1985, p. 450 for a similar example; Charlotte and Peter Fiell, eds., 1000 Lights, Vol. 2: 1960 to Present, Cologne, 2005, p. 182 Estimate  £5,0 0 0 –7,0 0 0  $7,50 0 –10,40 0  €5,9 0 0 – 8,20 0 301

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217

217  GINO SARFATTI   1912–1985  Ceiling light, model no. 2129, c. 1971. Tubular Perspex, painted metal. 145 cm (57 1/8 in) drop. Manufactured by Arteluce, Italy. Inner rim of shade with decal with ‘AL/MILANO/ARTELUCE’. literature Galerie Christine Diegoni, Gino Sarfatti, Paris, 2008, pp. 134–35 Estimate £12,0 0 0 –  1 8,0 0 0  $17,9 0 0 –  2 6,8 0 0  €14,0 0 0 –  2 1,0 0 0 302

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218

218  PIERRE CARDIN   b. 1922  Table lamp, 1968–70. Coloured glass, chrome-plated metal. 37.5 cm (14 3/4 in) high. Manufactured by Venini, Italy. literature Franco Deboni, Venini Glass, Its history, artists and techniques, Vol. 1, Milan, 2007, fig. 300 Estimate £4,0 0 0 –  6 ,0 0 0  $6,0 0 0 –  9 ,0 0 0  €4,70 0 –  7,0 0 0  ♠ 303

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219

219  ORSINA SFORZA   b. 1960  Unique ‘Maria Antonietta’ standard lamp, 2010. Plasticcoated paper cups, beech, painted tubular metal. 160 cm (63 in) high. Each underside  of paper cups stamped with logo and ‘ART 30v’.  Estimate £2,0 0 0 –  3 ,0 0 0  $3,0 0 0 –  4 ,50 0  €2,3 0 0 –  3 ,50 0  ♠ 304

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220

221

220  ORSINA SFORZA   b. 1960  Unique ‘Maria Antonietta’ table lamp, 2010.  Plastic-coated paper, plastic. 69 cm (27 1/8 in) high.  Estimate £1,8 0 0 –  2 ,40 0  $2,70 0 –  3 ,6 0 0  €2,10 0 –  2 ,8 0 0  ♠

221  GIO PONTI, ARNALDO POMODORO and GIORGIO PERFETTI   1891–1979, b. 1926, 1932–1961  Three unique dishes, 1954. Two dishes: hammered patinated copper; one dish: hammered patinated  copper, white metal. Largest: 2.5 × 40 × 7 cm (1 × 15 3/4 × 2 3/4 in). Each dish impressed with ‘3 P’ (3).  Literature  Domus, December 1954, p. 66 for a similar example Estimate £2,0 0 0 – 3,0 0 0  $3,0 0 0 –  4 ,50 0  €2,3 0 0 –  3 ,50 0  ♠ 305

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222, 223

224

222 ETTORE SOTTSASS JR 1917–2007 ‘Rocchetto’ vase, model no. 484, 1961–62. Glazed ceramic. 12.5 cm (4 3/4 in) high. Produced by the Società Ceramica Toscana di Figline for Galleria Il Sestante, Italy. Underside signed in marker with ‘484/IL SESTANTE/SOTTSASS/ITALY’. From the Rocchetti series. literature Fulvio Ferrari, Ettore Sottsass Tutta la Ceramica, Turin, 1996, p. 91, fig. 347 Estimate £3,0 0 0 – 5,0 0 0 $4,50 0 – 7,50 0 €3,50 0 – 5,9 0 0

223 ETTORE SOTTSASS JR 1917–2007 ‘Isolatore’ vase, model no. 484, 1961–62. Glazed ceramic. 19.5 cm (7 5/8 in) high. Produced by the Società Ceramica Toscana di Figline for Galleria Il Sestante, Italy. Underside signed in marker with ‘484/IL SESTANTE/SOTTSASS/ITALY’. From the Rocchetti series. literature Fulvio Ferrari, Ettore Sottsass Tutta la Ceramica, Turin, 1996, p. 92, fig. 347 Estimate £4,0 0 0 – 6,0 0 0 $6,0 0 0 – 9,0 0 0 €4,70 0 – 7,0 0 0

224 ETTORE SOTTSASS JR 1917–2007 Coffee table, c. 1959. Rosewood-veneered wood, painted metal. 38 cm (15 in) high, 133.5 cm (52 1/2 in) diameter. Manufactured by Poltronova, Italy. literature Charlotte and Peter Fiell, eds., Domus Vol. IV 1955–1959, Cologne, 2006, p. 503 Estimate £3,0 0 0 – 5,0 0 0 $4,50 0 – 7,50 0 €3,50 0 – 5,9 0 0

306

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225

225 NANDA VIGO b. 1938 ‘Golden Gate’ standard lamp, c. 1970. Tubular chrome-plated metal. 246 cm (96 3/4 in) high. Manufactured by Arredoluce, Italy. literature Giuliana Gramigna, Repertorio 1950/1980, Milan, 1985, p. 339; Fulvio Ferrari and Napoleone Ferrari, Luce: Lampade 1968–1973: il nuovo design italiano, Turin, 2002, pl. 46; Charlotte and Peter Fiell, eds., 1000 Lights, Vol. 2: 1960 to Present, Cologne, 2005, p. 218 Estimate £8,0 0 0 – 12,0 0 0 $12,0 0 0 – 17,9 0 0 €9,40 0 – 14,0 0 0 ♠

307

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226

227

226 GIACOMO BENEVELLI b. 1925 ‘Arabesco’ wall light panel, c. 1960. Painted sheet metal, painted wood, brass. 50 × 200 × 8 cm (19 1/2 × 78 3/4 × 3 1/8 in). Produced by Gaetano Missaglia, Italy. Estimate £3,0 0 0 – 5,0 0 0 $4,50 0 – 7,50 0 €3,50 0 – 5,9 0 0 ♠

227 ALESSANDRO MENDINI b. 1931 ‘Ollo’ standard lamp, 1980s. Chrome-plated metal, painted metal. 185 cm (72 3/4 in) high. Produced for Studio Alchimia, Italy. Estimate £1,50 0 – 2,50 0 $2,20 0 – 3,70 0 €1,8 0 0 – 2,9 0 0 ♠

308

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228

228 ALESSANDRO MENDINI b. 1931 Unique ‘Bandiera’ desk, from Le Centre Culturel Français, Turin, 1988. Plastic laminate-covered wood, painted bent sheet steel. 74.5 × 199.5 × 91.5 cm (29 3/8 × 78 1/2 × 36 in). From the Légion Étrangère series. provenance Le Centre Culturel Français, Turin, Italy literature Peter Weiss, Alessandro Mendini, Milan, 2001, p. 91 for the example from the Milan Centre Culturel Français Estimate £9,0 0 0 – 14,0 0 0 $13,40 0 – 20,9 0 0 €10,50 0 – 16,40 0 ♠ 309

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Sessantuna Sessantuna is the result of the latest collaboration between internationally renowned  architect and designer Gaetano Pesce and furniture makers Cassina to celebrate the  150th anniversary of the unification of Italy. The project comprises 61 tables, representing the year 1861 in which the Unification  of Italy was achieved. Placed together, the 61 tables recreate the shape of the  Italian peninsula in a single 25 × 20 metre table. Each table is signed by Pesce and  numbered according to the sequence of events in which each territory became part  of the new state. Every Sessantuna table is produced with innovative resins, cast in the three colours  of the Italian flag using a cutting-edge production process. This advanced system  reduces the overall weight of the table and creates the random and intriguing blends  that make each table a unique work. The table legs are independent and can be  affixed to the grooves on the underside of the table and positioned wherever the  user wishes. A special edition of five tables, representing the most significant places in the  history of the Risorgimento, have been personalised by Maestro Pesce with famous  phrases and historical quotes. The first table in each of these special editions  represents Turin, first capital of the Kingdom of Italy, and has been inscribed with  the slogan, proclaimed by Charles Albert of Savoy and famous in the history of  Italian nationalism, “L’Italia farà da sè” (Italy will make itself).

229  GAETANO PESCE   b. 1939  ‘Sessantuna’ table, 2010. Resin. 72 × 197.5 × 124 cm (28 1/4 ×  77 3/4 × 38 3/4 in). Manufactured by Cassina, Italy. Number one from the edition of 61. Top  of tabletop signed in white marker with ‘Carlo Alberto: “L’Italia farà da sè”_ Gaetano Pesce’  and underside with manufacturer’s transfer including map of Italy and artist’s signature  with ‘Cassina SESSANTUNA/Gaetano Pesce/Tavolo Italia 2011/01 / 61’.  Estimate £10,0 0 0 –  1 5,0 0 0  $14,9 0 0 –  2 2,40 0  €11,70 0 –  1 7,50 0  ♠ 310

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311

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230

230  ANDREA BRANZI   b. 1938  Set of three ‘Portali’ vases, 2007. Glazed earthenware. Each: 47 × 47  × 12 cm (18 1/2 × 18 1/2 × 4 3/4 in). Manufactured by Superego Editions, Italy. Numbers two, five  and seven from the edition of 50. Underside of each transfer-printed with ‘A Branzi/Superego/ Editions’ and painted ‘no. 2 / 50’ and ‘no. 5 / 50’ and ‘no. 7 / 50’ respectively (3).  ESTIMATE £3,0 0 0 – 4,0 0 0  $4,50 0 –7,50 0  €3,50 0 – 5,9 0 0   ♠ 312

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231

232

231  SERGIO ASTI   b. 1926  Prototype ‘Katmandu’ vase, 1980. Glazed earthenware. 44 cm  (17 1/4 in) high. Underside painted with ‘Prototipo No. I/SERGIO ASTI’. ESTIMATE  £1,20 0 –1,8 0 0  $1,8 0 0 – 2,70 0  €1,40 0 – 2,10 0  ♠

232  GIO pONTI  1891–1979  Swivelling chair, from the Montecatini Building, Milan, c. 1936.  Tubular chrome-plated metal, leather, Bakelite. 86.5 cm (34 in) high. Manufactured by  Ditta Parma Antonio E Figli, Italy. Underside impressed with ‘18026’. provenance  Montecatini Building, Milan, Italy literature Ugo La Pietra, ed., Gio Ponti, New York,  1996, p. 82 ESTIMATE  £6,0 0 0 – 8,0 0 0  $8,9 0 0 –11,9 0 0  €7,0 0 0 – 9,40 0  ‡ 313

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233

233  JOHANNA GRAWUNDER   b. 1961  ‘Specchio d’Italia’ mirror, 2005. Perspex, mirrored  glass, fluorescent lighting. 200 × 120 × 5.5 cm (78 3/4 × 47 1/4 × 2 1/8 in). Produced for  Galerie Italienne, France. Number four from the edition of six. From the Street Glow series.  literature Johanna Grawunder and Galerie Italienne, Foreign Policy, Johanna Grawunder: Recent International Light and Design Projects, Paris, 2006, p. 28 Estimate £12,0 0 0 –  1 5,0 0 0  $17,9 0 0 –  2 2,40 0  €14,0 0 0 –  1 7,50 0  ♠ 314

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234

235

235  STUDIO SImON ‘Omaggio Ad Andy Warhol’ stool, designed 1973. Painted metal,  fabric. 46 cm (18 1/8 in) high. Manufactured by Gavina, Italy. Underside of seat with  label ‘OMAGGIO A: WARHOL/ULTRAMOBILE/SIMON/BOLOGNA ITALY’. From the  Ultramobile series. literature Virgilio Vercelloni, Das Abenteuer des Design: Gavina,  Milan, 1987, figs. 130 and 132 Estimate £2,0 0 0 –  3 ,0 0 0  $3,0 0 0 –  4 ,50 0  €2,3 0 0 –  3 ,50 0  ♠

234  GIUSEPPE RAImONDI   1898–1976  Unique standard lamp, c. 1975. Perspex, painted  tubular metal, painted metal, brass. 184.5 cm (72 5/8 in) high.  Estimate £10,0 0 0 –  1 5,0 0 0  $14,9 0 0 –  2 2,40 0  €11,70 0 –  1 7,6 0 0  ♠

315

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MARIO AIRO (LOt 53)

SIMONE BERtI (LOtS 61, 62)

LORIS CECCHINI (LOt 99)

Born 1961 in Pavia. Lives and works in Redda, Chianti. Mario Airo begun his career in 1989 when, with fellow artists, he became involved in an artist-run space in Milan. His delicate yet complex installations immediately caught the attention of the national and international art world. His works are the result of a variety of inspirations from history, literature and philosophy to cinema and everyday objects. Mario Airo’ has shown in many prestigious galleries and institutions including P.S.1 in New York, Museo Pecci in Prato and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Tokyo.

Born 1966 in Adria. Lives and works in Berlin and Milan. Versatile and ironic artist, Berti works with a variety of media ranging from painting and drawing to video and performance. His works address the issue of the precariousness of the present moment. Berti has shown nationally and internationally, and his works were included in the 53rd Venice Biennale.

Born 1969 in Milan. Lives and works in Prato and Beijing. Cecchini investigates the relationship between object

StEFANO ARIENtI (LOtS 55, 56) Born 1961 in Asola, Mantua. Lives and works in Milan. Arienti works with found images and printed materials which he transforms through the systematic repetition of simple manual operations like cutting, folding and puncturing. Decontextualized and manipulated, the objects assume a new identity, overturning common visions of popular culture. He has exhibited widely in important venues including the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; the Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva; the National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul; the ICA, London; and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston. Arienti has been featured in the Milano Europa 2000 Triennial, and the Third International Istanbul Biennial.

MASSIMO BARtOLINI (LOt 72) Born 1962 in Cecina. Lives and works in Cecina. Bartolini engages with a variety of materials and techniques ranging from sculpture to performance to photography. A key element in his works is determined by the viewer’s experience of Bartolini’s installations in which the environment is changed or subverted in a variety of subtle and clever ways to undermine normal expectations of the physical world. Bartolini has shown in major national and international museums, including P.S.1 in New York, MAXXI in Rome, Museum for Moderne Kunst in Frankfurt, and Museu de Arte Contemporanea de Serralves in Porto.

VANESSA BEECROFt (LOtS 92, 93) Born 1969 in Genoa. Lives and works in Los Angeles. Vanessa Beecroft’s unique and sophisticated practice finds its place somewhere between performance and documentary. Her live events, recorded through photography, are approached by the artist in a pictorial way. Internationally renowned, Beecroft’s works have been shown widely in major international art venues including the Whitney Museum and the Guggenheim in New York, and the ICA and the National Gallery in London.

ANtONIO BIASIUCCI (LOtS 130, 131) Born 1961 in Caserta. In his photographs, Biasucci plays with basic natural elements such as rock, turf, water or air producing images of graceful and classical beauty, that step out of the notion of time to remind the viewer that essential elements of the human condition never change. His works have been exhibited in various national and international museums and are part of major public and private collections, such as Collezione Sandretto Rebaudengo.

MONICA BONVICINI (LOtS 74, 75, 77, 81) Born 1965 in Venice. Lives and works in Berlin. The artist works with drawings, installations, videos and photographs to explore the complex relationships between gender, space and power in the contemporary world. Bonvicini has been awarded the Preis der Nationalgalerie für junge Kunst of the Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin, and the Golden Lion at the 48th Venice Biennale. Her work has been shown in prestigious private and public spaces including the Palazzo Grassi in Venice; the Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich; the Palais de Tokyo in Paris; De Appel in Amsterdam; Hamburg Kunstverein; and P.S.1 in New York. She has also shown at several biennales including those of São Paulo, Venice and Istanbul. She was Visiting Professor at the Pasadena Art Center and now teaches at the Academy of Fine Arts of Vienna.

and space working in a variety of media including photography, sculpture, drawing, and installation. Through an intense process of manipulation and assembly of everyday materials, the artist is aiming to offer the viewer a different and challenging vision of reality. His works have been shown widely in major art venues including P.S.1 in New York, Palais de Tokyo in Paris and Shanghai Duolon Moma in Shanghai. His works have also been selected for the 6th Shanghai Biennale and the 51st Venice Biennale.

ROBERtO CUOGHI (LOtS 63, 66) Born 1973 in Modena. Lives and works in Milan. Experimenting is key to the Cuoghi’s practice. He works with a wide variety of media, ranging from painting and drawing to photography, video and sound. Interested in the principle of metamorphosis, at the age of 25 he started a seven-year physical transformation that has led him to resemble his father. In his works, Cuoghi alters experiences and perceptions of daily life. In 2008 the ICA in London hosted the artist’s sound installation Šuillakku.

LARA FAVAREttO (LOtS 59, 94) Born 1973 in Treviso. Lives and works in Turin. In her movies, photographs and installations, Lara Favaretto creates theatrical settings that operate on the boundary between fantasy and reality. Although playful, her works carry with them a feeling of resignation or failure. Purposely paradoxical, these works suggest a critique the contemporary society. Favaretto’s works have been exhibited nationally and internationally. Her works have been shown in the 51st Venice Biennale in 2005.

StEFANIA GALEGAtI (LOt 60) MAURIZIO CAttELAN (LOtS 68, 69) Born 1960 in Padua. Lives and works in New York and Milan. Internationally acclaimed artist Maurizio Cattelan bases his practice on the subversion of social conventions to highlight the incongruous nature of the contemporary society. His works have been exhibited in art venues worldwide, including Tate in London, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, and the Museum Ludwig in Cologne. He has been included in five Venice Biennales. Cattelan has been awarded the Arnold-Bode prize from the Kunstverein Kassel and an honorary degree in Sociology from the University of Trento. He was also a finalist for the Guggenheim’s Hugo Boss prize in 2000.

Born 1973 in Bagnacavallo. Lives and works in Palermo. One of the most promising talents of the contemporary art scene, Stefania Galegati’s work seeks to understand human reactions to uncertain contemporary issues. She achieves this through a variety of media including video, photography, painting and installation. In 2000, the artist was awarded the Giovane Arte Italian prize, and her works have been seen nationally and internationally.

ARMIN LINKE (LOt 84) Born 1966. Lives and works in Milan and Berlin. Photographer Armin Linke blurs the boundaries between fiction and reality, in order to archive the imagery of our contemporary society. His work won an award at the 9th Architecture Venice Biennale. Linke is guest professor at the HfG Karlsruhe, at the IUAV Arts and Design University in Venice, and Research Affiliate at MIT Visual Arts Program in Cambridge, MA.

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SELECtED ARtISt BIOGRAPHIES

EVA MARISALDI (LOtS 71, 78)

GIUSEPPE PIEtRONIRO (LOt 87)

VEDOVAMAZZEI (LOtS 80, 83)

Born 1966 in Bologna. Lives and works in Bologna. Eva Marisaldi’s drawings, videos, photographs and installations of objects intrigue the viewer’s mind. Her poetic and sophisticated practice is open to interpretation and engages in intellectual games with the viewer. The artist has shown in many prestigious Italian and European museums such as MAMbo in Bologna, Mart and FRAC in France, and has participated in major art fairs such as Art Basel and Art Basel Miami.

Born 1968 in Toronto. Lives and works in Rome. Working with photographs, installations and drawings, Pietroniro focuses mainly on the notion of space and the way it is perceived. In his work the artist uses an ironic approach to deal with complex conceptual topics. Pietroniro has shown his work widely both in Italy and internationally.

Stella Scala, born 1964; Simeone Crispino, born 1962. Live and work in Milan. Since Scala and Crispino started working together as Vedovamazzei in 1991, their practice has been characterized by an experimental and challenging approach to reality. Their works, poetic and political at the same time, aim to shake our contradictory present in order to regain a new awareness of reality. Their works have been exhibited mainly in Italy, Europe, USA and Australia.

LILIANA MORO (LOt 76) Born 1961 in Milan. Lives and works in Milan. Using simple everyday materials and objects, Liliana Moro works in a variety of media, including sculpture, drawing, video and performance, to shed light on emotions and perceptions too often obscured by social and aesthetic conventions. Moro has taken part in important international art festivals, including Documenta IX, Kassel, the 45th Venice Biennale, the Valencia Biennal, and the Quadriennale d’arte di Roma, and has shown at P.S.1 in New York, CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco, and the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. Her works are also included in important public and private collections such as those at Castello di Rivoli in Turin, FNAC of Paris, FRAC of Lyon, and Centro per l’Arte Contemporanea Luigi Pecci, Prato.

DIEGO PERRONE (LOt 65) Born 1970 in Asti. Lives and works in Asti, Milan and Berlin. Influenced by artists of the Arte Povera movement, Perrone creates sculptures, photographs and films that refer to the Italian culture, creating existential metaphors and instigating reflection on human conditions. The artist has shown nationally and internationally and his works are part of the Solomon R. Guggenheim collection.

ALESSANDRO PESSOLI (LOtS 96, 97) Born 1963 in Cervia. Lives and works in Milan. Pessoli’s imaginary figures and settings take the viewer to a new dimension between fantasy and reality. Experimenting with images and materials, including ink, oil, tempera and enamel paint, the artist begins with everyday life and personal experiences and approaches the work in a free way with no preconceptions, so embarking on a journey which is the artist’s search for the meaning of life. Pessoli has shown nationally and internationally in a number of important museums, including the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo in Turin, the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, The Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. His works were also exhibited at the 53rd Venice Biennale.

PAOLA PIVI (LOtS 57, 58) Born 1971 in Milan. Lives and works in Anchorage, Alaska. Paola Pivi works with a variety of media ranging from sculpture to photography, installation, drawing and performance. Playful, familiar yet uncanny, her works challenge the viewer’s perception. Through provocative non-realistic juxtaposition of everyday objects, subjects, activities and places, Pivi’s works leave the viewer questioning on their perception of reality. She has shown her work internationally, and in 2009 she created a new performance work for UBS Openings: The Long Weekend at Tate Modern in London.

GRAZIA tODERI (LOt 89) Born 1963 in Padua. Lives and works in Milan and Turin. The video work of Grazia Toderi focuses the camera on single viewpoints, allowing the image, such as a city at night, to change and develop slowly over time. The gradual transformation of the resulting image is both captivating for the viewer and an indication of how close Toderi’s practice comes to painting. In 2001 she was awarded a fellowship from the Supporting Friends of Castello di Rivoli. Her works have been included in two Venice Biennales, in 1993 and 2009.

PAtRICK tUttOFUOCO (LOt 67) Born 1974 in Milan. Lives and works in Berlin. Inspired by his keen interest in society, cities and communities, Tuttofuoco’s innovative structures, architectural assemblages and films offer a view of contemporary urban environments as sites of constant transformation through the interaction of social and political dynamics. His practice is often characterized by the use of fluorescent colours, light and movement to create works which combine visual appeal with profound theoretical issues. The artist has exhibited internationally, including recent shows at the 2009 Havana Biennial, the 2008 Folkestone Sculpture Triennial and the 2006 Shanghai Biennial.

FRANCESCO VEZZOLI (LOtS 70, 73, 100) Born 1971 in Brescia. Lives and works in Milan. Vezzoli’s video installations bring together icons of pop culture, cinema and art history. The artist often includes in his works people who have experienced fame at some point in their life and still live trapped by the collective imagination in that image. His works challenge the notion of reality in the consumerist society. Vezzoli has been exhibited in important venues including Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea in Turin, the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, and MOCA in Los Angeles. His works have been included in biennials including the 2006 Whitney Biennial and the 49th and 51st Venice Biennales.

ItALO ZUFFI (LOt 82) Born 1969 in Imola. Lives and works in Milan. The artist works with sculpture, performance and video. After a Master’s degree in Art at Saint Martin’s College in London, in 2001 Zuffi was awarded the Wheatley Bequest Fellowship in Sculpture at the Institute of Art and Design in Birmingham. In 2003 and 2004, he was an artist-in-residence in Vienna and France. His work has been included in important publications including the monograph The mystery boy, with essays by Nicolas Bourriaud.

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contemporary art Lots 1 – 36

LOT 1 LuciO FOnTana EST £8,000 – 12,000

LOT 2 LuciO FOnTana EST £20,000 – 30,000

LOT 3 arnaLdO POmOdOrO EST £25,000 – 35,000

LOT 4 aLbErTO burri EST £70,000 – 90,000

LOT 5 aLighiErO bOETTi EST £10,000 – 15,000

LOT 6 aLighiErO bOETTi EST £10,000 – 15,000

LOT 7 aLighiErO bOETTi EST £15,000 – 18,000

LOT 8 aLighiErO bOETTi EST £35,000 – 45,000

LOT 9 JanniS KOunELLiS EST £40,000 – 60,000

LOT 10 aLighiErO bOETTi EST £12,000 – 18,000

LOT 11 aLighiErO bOETTi EST £12,000 – 18,000

LOT 12 giuLiO PaOLini EST £25,000 – 35,000

LOT 13 mariO mErz EST £200,000 – 300,000

LOT 14 aLighiErO bOETTi EST £20,000 – 30,000

LOT 15 giOvanni anSELmO EST £50,000 – 70,000

LOT 16 giuLiO PaOLini EST £150,000 – 200,000

LOT 17 JanniS KOunELLiS EST £150,000 – 200,000

LOT 18 PinO PaScaLi EST £50,000 – 70,000

LOT 19 mariO mErz EST £8,000 – 12,000

LOT 20 JanniS KOunELLiS EST £35,000 – 40,000

LOT 21 giuSEPPE PEnOnE EST £2,500 – 3,500

LOT 22 giuLiO PaOLini EST £12,000 – 18,000

LOT 23 aLighiErO bOETTi EST £2,000 – 2,500

LOT 24 gianni PiacEnTinO EST £40,000 – 60,000

LOT 25 michELangELO PiSTOLETTO EST £45,000 – 55,000

LOT 26 FrancEScO cLEmEnTE EST £40,000 – 60,000

LOT 27 SandrO chia EST £40,000 – 60,000

LOT 28 FrancEScO cLEmEnTE EST £40,000 – 60,000

LOT 29 EnzO cucchi EST £70,000 – 90,000

LOT 30 EnzO cucchi EST £6,000 – 8,000

LOT 31 mimmO PaLadinO EST £18,000 – 25,000

LOT 32 mimmO PaLadinO EST £40,000 – 60,000

LOT 33 mariO SchiFanO EST £70,000 – 90,000

LOT 34 Luigi OnTani EST £6,000 – 8,000

LOT 35 Luigi OnTani EST £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 36 Luigi OnTani EST £15,000 – 20,000

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contemporary art Lots 37 – 72

LOT 37 CarLa aCCardi EST £12,000 – 18,000

LOT 38 PiErO dOraziO EST £12,000 – 18,000

LOT 39 Luigi OnTani EST £70,000 – 90,000

LOT 40 TanO FESTa EST £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 41 FranCO angELi EST £2,000 – 3,000

LOT 42 FranCO angELi EST £8,000 – 12,000

LOT 43 giOrgiO griFFa EST £12,000 – 18,000

LOT 44 PiErO giLardi EST £8,000 – 12,000

LOT 45 PinO PaSCaLi EST £10,000 – 15,000

LOT 46 MariO SChiFanO EST £35,000 – 45,000

LOT 47 hErMann niTSCh EST £35,000 – 45,000

LOT 48 MiMMO rOTELLa EST £10,000 – 15,000

LOT 49 EnriCO Baj EST £18,000 – 24,000

LOT 50 VaLEriO adaMi EST £30,000 – 40,000

LOT 51 FauSTO MELOTTi EST £25,000 – 35,000

LOT 52 arnaLdO POMOdOrO EST £35,000 – 45,000

LOT 53 MariO airO EST £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 54 aLBErTO garuTTi EST £8,000 – 12,000

LOT 55 STEFanO ariEnTi EST £12,000 – 18,000

LOT 56 STEFanO ariEnTi EST £15,000 – 20,000

LOT 57 PaOLa PiVi EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 58 PaOLa PiVi EST £18,000 – 25,000

LOT 59 Lara FaVarETTO EST £2,000 – 3,000

LOT 60 STEFania gaLEgaTi EST £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 61 SiMOnE BErTi EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 62 SiMOnE BErTi EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 63 rOBErTO CuOghi EST £15,000 – 20,000

LOT 64 CarSTEn höLLEr EST £18,000 – 25,000

LOT 65 diEgO PErrOnE EST £4,000 – 5,000

LOT 66 rOBErTO CuOghi EST £6,000 – 8,000

LOT 67 PaTriCk TuTTOFuOCO EST £20,000 – 30,000

LOT 68 MauriziO CaTTELan EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 69 MauriziO CaTTELan EST £20,000 – 30,000

LOT 70 FranCESCO VEzzOLi EST £45,000 – 65,000

LOT 71 EVa MariSaLdi EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 72 MaSSiMO BarTOLini EST £6,000 – 8,000

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contemporary art Lots 73 – 100

LOT 73 FrAncescO VezzOLi esT £180,000 – 250,000

LOT 74 MOnicA BOnVicini esT £5,000 – 8,000

LOT 75 MOnicA BOnVicini esT £5,000 – 8,000

LOT 76 LiLiAnA MOrO esT £8,000 – 12,000

LOT 77 MOnicA BOnVicini esT £45,000 – 50,000

LOT 78 eVA MArisALdi esT £6,000 – 8,000

LOT 79 serse esT £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 80 VedOVAMAzzei esT £4,000 – 5,000

LOT 81 MOnicA BOnVicini esT £15,000 – 20,000

LOT 82 iTALO zuFFi esT £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 83 VedOVAMAzzei esT £8,000 – 12,000

LOT 84 ArMin Linke esT £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 85 eLisA sighiceLLi esT £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 86 giLLiAn WeAring esT £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 87 giusePPe PieTrOnirO esT £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 88 AngeLA BuLLOch esT £6,000 – 8,000

LOT 89 grAziA TOderi esT £18,000 – 25,000

LOT 90 syLVie FLeury esT £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 91 WALTer niederMAyr esT £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 92 VAnessA BeecrOFT esT £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 93 VAnessA BeecrOFT esT £10,000 – 15,000

LOT 94 LArA FAVAreTTO esT £6,000 – 8,000

LOT 95 MArinA ABrAMOVic´ esT £15,000 – 20,000

LOT 96 ALessAndrO PessOLi esT £3,000 – 4,000

LOT 97 ALessAndrO PessOLi esT £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 98 TrisTAnO di rOBiLAnT esT £3,500 – 4,500

LOT 99 LOris cecchini esT £2,000 – 3,000

LOT 100 FrAncescO VezzOLi esT £8,000 – 12,000

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photographs Lots 101 – 136

LOT 101 Frank HOrvaT EST £2,500 – 3,500

LOT 102 Frank HOrvaT EST £2,500 – 3,500

LOT 103 EnzO SELLEriO EST £2,500 – 3,500

LOT 104 CriSTina Piza EST £800 – 1,000

LOT 105 EnzO SELLEriO EST £2,500 – 3,500

LOT 106 FranCESCO JOdiCE EST £3,500 – 4,500

LOT 107 GabriELE baSiLiCO EST £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 108 LuiGi GHirri EST £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 109 LuiGi GHirri EST £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 110 MariO CrESCi EST £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 111 ruTH Orkin EST £8,000 – 12,000

LOT 112 WiLLiaM kLEin EST £1,000 – 2,000

LOT 113 WiLLiaM kLEin EST £1,000 – 2,000

LOT 114 WiLLiaM kLEin EST £1,000 – 2,000

LOT 115 PiErGiOrGiO branzi EST £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 116 Gianni bErEnGO Gardin EST £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 117 EnzO SELLEriO EST £2,500 – 3,500

LOT 118 rObErT LEbECk EST £600 – 800

LOT 119 OLivO barbiEri EST £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 120 david LaCHaPELLE EST £50,000 – 70,000

LOT 121 OLivO barbiEri EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 122 aLESSandrO bELGiOJOSO EST £2,500 – 3,500

LOT 123 MaSSiMO viTaLi EST £10,000 – 12,000

LOT 124 FranCESCa rivETTi EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 125 FranCO vaCCari EST £2,500 – 3,500

LOT 126 PiErGiOrGiO branzi EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 127 PiErGiOrGiO branzi EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 128 PiErGiOrGiO branzi EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 129 PiErGiOrGiO branzi EST £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 130 anTOniO biaSiuCCi EST £3,000 – 4,000

LOT 131 anTOniO biaSiuCCi EST £3,000 – 4,000

LOT 132 MariO GiaCOMELLi EST £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 133 MariO GiaCOMELLi EST £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 134 MariO GiaCOMELLi EST £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 135 LuCa andrEOni EST £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 136 FOrTuGnO_MaGGia EST £3,000 – 5,000

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photographs Lots 137 – 153

LOT 137 henri cArTier-BreSSOn eST £6,000 – 8,000

LOT 138 MAriO GiAcOMeLLi eST £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 139 PAOLO VenTurA eST £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 140 PAOLO VenTurA eST £2,000 – 3,000

LOT 141 GuidO ArGenTini eST £4,500 – 5,500

LOT 142 LuiS SAnchiS eST £2,000 – 3,000

LOT 143 Bruce GiLden eST £2,000 – 3,000

LOT 144 Bruce GiLden eST £2,000 – 3,000

LOT 145 TAziO SecchiArOLi eST £1,500 – 2,500

LOT 146 FerdinAndO SciAnnA eST £2,000 – 3,000

LOT 147 cLAudiO ABATe eST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 148 henri cArTier-BreSSOn eST £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 149 ninO MiGLiOri eST £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 150 MiMMO JOdice eST £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 151 MiMMO JOdice eST £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 152 SeBASTiAO SALGAdO eST £2,000 – 3,000

LOT 153 herBerT LiST eST £1,500 – 1,800

Design Lots 154 – 165

LOT 154 FAuSTO MeLOTTO eST £14,000 – 18,000

LOT 155 PAOLO de POLi eST £2,400 – 3,200

LOT 156 GiO POnTi eST £1,800 – 2,400

LOT 157 GiO POnTi & PAOLO de POLi eST £3,500 – 4,500

LOT 158 GiO POnTi & PAOLO de POLi eST £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 159 FAuSTO MeLOTTi eST £25,000 – 30,000

LOT 160 GiO POnTi eST £20,000 – 30,000

LOT 161 GiO POnTi eST £1,800 – 2,400

LOT 162 GiO POnTi eST £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 163 GiO POnTi eST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 164 LeMPTer eST £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 165 GiO POnTi eST £5,000 – 7,000

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Design Lots 166 – 201

LOT 166 GiO POnTi EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 167 FrancO aLbini EST £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 168 GiamPiErO aLOi EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 169 STiLnOvO EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 170 vEnini EST £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 171 iGnaziO GardELLa EST £1,500 – 2,000

LOT 172 carLO dE carLi EST £1,800 – 2,500

LOT 173 OSvaLdO bOrSani EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 174 cLaudiO SaLOcchi EST £1,500 – 2,500

LOT 175 GaE auLEnTi EST £2,000 – 3,000

LOT 176 achiLE & PiErGiacOmO caSTiGLiOni EST £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 177 carLO mOLLinO EST £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 178 anGELO manGiarOTTi EST £10,000 – 15,000

LOT 179 mariO cErOLi EST £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 180 PiErO FOrnaSETTi EST £2,500 – 3,500

LOT 181 barOviEr & TOSO EST £8,000 – 12,000

LOT 182 carLO buGaTTi EST £30,000 – 50,000

LOT 183 carLO buGaTTi EST £35,000 – 55,000

LOT 184 aTTr. PiETrO chiESa EST £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 185 PiETrO chiESa EST £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 186 PiETrO chiESa EST £30,000 – 40,000

LOT 187 naPOLEOnE marTinuzzi EST £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 188 carLO ScarPa EST £15,000 – 20,000

LOT 189 carLO ScarPa EST £20,000 – 25,000

LOT 190 FuLviO biancOni & maSSimO viGnELLi EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 191 PaOLO vEnini EST £16,000 – 20,000

LOT 192 TObia ScarPa EST £12,000 – 18,000

LOT 193 TOni zucchEri EST £6,000 – 8,000

LOT 194 PaOLO buFFa & GiOvanni GaribaLdi EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 195 unknOwn dESiGnEr EST £8,000 – 12,000

LOT 196 aTTr. GuGLiELmO uLrich EST £7,000 – 9,000

LOT 197 icO PariSi EST £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 198 arrEdOLucE EST £3,500 – 5,500

LOT 199 barOviEr & TOSO EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 200 amma EST £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 201 GinO SarFaTTi EST £4,000 – 6,000

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Design Lots 202 – 235

LOT 202 IcO ParIsI EsT £2,000 – 3,000

LOT 203 angELO MangIarOTTI EsT £24,000 – 28,000

LOT 204 IcO ParIsI EsT £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 205 gIusEPPE ravasIO EsT £10,000 – 15,000

LOT 206 FOnTana arTE EsT £6,000 – 8,000

LOT 207 FOnTana arTE EsT £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 208 cLaudIO saLOcchI EsT £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 209 FOnTana arTE EsT £6,000 – 8,000

LOT 210 gInO sarFaTTI EsT £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 211 FOnTana arTE EsT £25,000 – 30,000

LOT 212 gInO sarFaTTI EsT £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 213 IcO ParIsI EsT £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 214 cLaudIO saLOcchI EsT £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 215 PaOLO vEnInI & MassIMO PIsTILLI EsT £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 216 vIcO MagIsTrETTI EsT £5,000 – 7,000

LOT 217 gInO sarFaTTI EsT £12,000 – 18,000

LOT 218 PIErrE cardIn EsT £4,000 – 6,000

LOT 219 OrsIna sFOrza EsT £2,000 – 3,000

LOT 220 OrsIna sFOrza EsT £1,800 – 2,400

LOT 221 gIO POnTI, arnaLdO POMOdOrO & gIOrgIO PErFETTI EsT £2,000 – 3,000

LOT 222 ETTOrE sOTTsass Jr. EsT £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 224 ETTOrE sOTTsass Jr. EsT £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 225 nanda vIgO EsT £8,000 – 12,000

LOT 226 gIacOMO BEnEvELLI EsT £3,000 – 5,000

LOT 227 aLEssandrO MEndInI EsT £1,500 – 2,500

LOT 228 aLEssandrO MEndInI EsT £9,000 – 14,000

LOT 229 gaETanO PEscE EsT £10,000 – 15,000

LOT 230 andrEa BranzI EsT £3,000 – 4,000

LOT 231 sErgIO asTI EsT £1,200 – 1,800

LOT 232 gIO POnTI EsT £6,000 – 8,000

LOT 233 JOhanna grawundEr EsT £12,000 – 15,000

LOT 234 gIusEPPE raIMOndI EsT £10,000 – 15,000

LOT 235 sTudIO sIMOn EsT £2,000 – 3,000

LOT 223 ETTOrE sOTTsass Jr. EsT £4,000 – 6,000

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GUIDE FOR PROSPECTIVE BUYERS BUYInG aT aUCTIOn

Symbol Key

The following pages are designed to offer you information on how to buy at auction at

The following key explains the symbols you may see inside this catalogue.

Phillips de Pury & Company. Our staff will be happy to assist you. O Guaranteed Property COnDITIOnS OF SalE

The seller of lots with this symbol has been guaranteed a minimum price. The guarantee

The Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty which appear later in this catalogue

may be provided by Phillips de Pury & Company, by a third party or jointly by us and a

govern the auction. Bidders are strongly encouraged to read them as they outline the legal

third party. Phillips de Pury & Company and third parties providing or participating in a

relationship between Phillips de Pury & Company, the seller and the buyer and describe

guarantee may benefit financially if a guaranteed lot is sold successfully and may incur

the terms upon which property is bought at auction. Please be advised that Phillips de

a loss if the sale is not successful.

Pury & Company generally acts as agent for the seller. ∆ Property in which Phillips de Pury & Company has an Ownership Interest BUYER’S PREmIUm

Lots with this symbol indicate that Phillips de Pury & Company owns the lot in whole or in

Phillips de Pury & Company charges the successful bidder a commission, or buyer’s

part or has an economic interest in the lot equivalent to an ownership interest.

premium, on the hammer price of each lot sold. The buyer’s premium is payable by the

buyer as part of the total purchase price at the following rates: 25% of the hammer price up to and including £25,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above £25,000 up to and

no Reserve

Unless indicated by a , all lots in this catalogue are offered subject to a reserve.

including £500,000, and 12% of the portion of the hammer price above £500,000.

A reserve is the confidential value established between Phillips de Pury & Company and the seller and below which a lot may not be sold. The reserve for each lot is generally set at

VaT

a percentage of the low estimate and will not exceed the low pre-sale estimate.

Value added tax (VAT) may be payable on the hammer price and/or the buyer’s premium.

♠ Property Subject to the artist’s Resale Right

The buyer’s premium may attract a charge in lieu of VAT. Please read carefully the ‘VAT

Lots marked with ♠ are subject to the Artist’s Resale Right calculated as a percentage of

AND OTHER TAX INFORMATION FOR BUYERS’ section in this catalogue.

the hammer price and payable as part of the purchase price as follows: 1 PRIOR TO aUCTIOn

Portion of the Hammer Price (in EUR)

Catalogue Subscriptions

From 0 to 50,000

4%

If you would like to purchase a catalogue for this auction or any other Phillips de Pury &

From 50,000.01 to 200,000

3%

Company sale, please contact us at +44 20 7318 4010 or +1 212 940 1240.

From 200,000.01 to 350,000

1%

From 350,000.01 to 500,000

0.5%

Exceeding 500,000

0.25%

Pre-Sale Estimates

Royalty Rate

Pre-sale estimates are intended as a guide for prospective buyers. Any bid within the high and low estimate range should, in our opinion, offer a chance of success. However, many

The Artist’s Resale Right applies where the hammer price is EUR 1,000 or more, subject to

lots achieve prices below or above the pre-sale estimates. Where ‘Estimate on Request’

a maximum royalty per lot of EUR 12,500. Calculation of the Artist’s Resale Right will be

appears, please contact the specialist department for further information. It is advisable

based on the pounds sterling/euro reference exchange rate quoted on the date of the sale

to contact us closer to the time of the auction as estimates can be subject to revision.

by the European Central Bank.

Pre-sale estimates do not include the buyer’s premium or VAT. †, §, ‡, or Ω Property Subject to VaT Pre-Sale Estimates in US Dollars and Euros

Please refer to the section entitled ‘VAT AND OTHER TAX INFORMATION FOR BUYERS’

Although the sale is conducted in pounds sterling, the pre-sale estimates in the auction

in this catalogue for additional information.

catalogues may also be printed in US dollars and/or euros. Since the exchange rate is that at the time of catalogue production and not at the date of auction, you should treat estimates in US dollars or euros as a guide only. Catalogue Entries Phillips de Pury & Company may print in the catalogue entry the history of ownership of a work of art, as well as the exhibition history of the property and references to the work in art publications. While we are careful in the cataloguing process, provenance, exhibition and literature references may not be exhaustive and in some cases we may intentionally refrain from disclosing the identity of previous owners. Please note that all dimensions of the property set forth in the catalogue entry are approximate. Condition of lots Our catalogues include references to condition only in the descriptions of multiple works (e.g., prints). Such references, though, do not amount to a full description of condition. The absence of reference to the condition of a lot in the catalogue entry does not imply that the lot is free from faults or imperfections. Solely as a convenience to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company may provide condition reports. In preparing such reports, our specialists assess the condition in a manner appropriate to the estimated value of the property and the nature of the auction in which it is included. While condition reports are prepared honestly and carefully, our staff are not professional restorers or trained conservators. We therefore encourage all prospective buyers to inspect the property at the pre-sale exhibitions and recommend, particularly in the case of any lot of significant value, that you retain your own restorer or professional advisor to report to you on the property’s condition prior to bidding. Any prospective buyer of photographs or prints should always request a condition report because all such property is sold unframed, unless otherwise indicated in the condition report. If a lot is sold framed, Phillips de Pury & Company accepts no liability for the condition of the frame. If we sell any lot unframed, we will be pleased to refer the purchaser to a professional framer. Pre-auction Viewing Pre-auction viewings are open to the public and free of charge. Our specialists are available to give advice and condition reports at viewings or by appointment. Electrical and mechanical lots All lots with electrical and/or mechanical features are sold on the basis of their decorative value only and should not be assumed to be operative. It is essential that, prior to any intended use, the electrical system is verified and approved by a qualified electrician.

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2 BIDDInG In ThE SalE

4 aFTER ThE aUCTIOn

Bidding at auction

Payment

Bids may be executed during the auction in person by paddle or by telephone or prior to

Buyers are required to pay for purchases immediately following the auction unless other

the sale in writing by absentee bid. Proof of identity in the form of government-issued

arrangements have been agreed with Phillips de Pury & Company in writing in advance of

identification will be required, as will an original signature. We may also require that

the sale. Payments must be made in pounds sterling either by cash, cheque drawn on a UK

you furnish us with a bank reference.

bank or wire transfer, as noted in Paragraph 6 of the Conditions of Sale. It is our corporate policy not to make or accept single or multiple payments in cash or cash equivalents in excess of the local currency equivalent of US$10,000.

Bidding in Person To bid in person, you will need to register for and collect a paddle before the auction begins. New clients are encouraged to register at least 48 hours in advance of a sale to

Credit Cards

allow sufficient time for us to process your information. All lots sold will be invoiced to

As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company will accept Visa, MasterCard and

the name and address to which the paddle has been registered and invoices cannot be

UK-issued debit cards to pay for invoices of £50,000 or less. A processing fee will apply.

transferred to other names and addresses. Please do not misplace your paddle. In the event you lose it, inform a Phillips de Pury & Company staff member immediately. At the

Collection

end of the auction, please return your paddle to the registration desk.

It is our policy to request proof of identity on collection of a lot. A lot will be released to the buyer or the buyer’s authorized representative when Phillips de Pury & Company has received

Bidding by Telephone

full and cleared payment and we are not owed any other amount by the buyer. After the auction,

If you cannot attend the auction, you may bid live on the telephone with one of our

we will transfer all lots to our fine art storage facility located near Wimbledon and will so

multilingual staff members. This service must be arranged at least 24 hours in advance of

advise all buyers. If you are in doubt about the location of your purchase, please contact the

the sale and is available for lots whose low pre-sale estimate is at least £500. Telephone

Shipping Department prior to arranging collection. We will levy removal, interest, storage and

bids may be recorded. By bidding on the telephone, you consent to the recording of your

handling charges on uncollected lots.

conversation. We suggest that you leave a maximum bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and VAT, which we can execute on your behalf in the event we are unable to reach you

loss or Damage

by telephone.

Buyers are reminded that Phillips de Pury & Company accepts liability for loss or damage to lots for a maximum of five days following the auction.

absentee Bids If you are unable to attend the auction and cannot participate by telephone, Phillips de

Transport and Shipping

Pury & Company will be happy to execute written bids on your behalf. A bidding form can

As a free service for buyers, Phillips de Pury & Company will wrap purchased lots for hand

be found at the back of this catalogue. This service is free and confidential. Bids must be

carry only. We do not provide packing, handling or shipping services directly. However, we

placed in the currency of the sale. Our staff will attempt to execute an absentee bid at the

will coordinate with shipping agents instructed by you in order to facilitate the packing,

lowest possible price taking into account the reserve and other bidders. Always indicate

handling and shipping of property purchased at Phillips de Pury & Company. Please refer

a maximum bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and VAT. Unlimited bids will not be

to Paragraph 7 of the Conditions of Sale for more information.

accepted. Any absentee bid must be received at least 24 hours in advance of the sale. Export and Import licences

In the event of identical bids, the earliest bid received will take precedence.

Before bidding for any property, prospective bidders are advised to make independent Employee Bidding

enquiries as to whether a licence is required to export the property from the United

Employees of Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies, including the

Kingdom or to import it into another country. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to comply

auctioneer, may bid at the auction by placing absentee bids so long as they do not know

with all import and export laws and to obtain any necessary licences or permits. The

the reserve when submitting their absentee bids and otherwise comply with our employee

denial of any required licence or permit or any delay in obtaining such documentation will

bidding procedures.

not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot.

Bidding Increments

Endangered Species

Bidding generally opens below the low estimate and advances in increments of up to 10%,

Items made of or incorporating plant or animal material, such as coral, crocodile, ivory,

subject to the auctioneer’s discretion. Absentee bids that do not conform to the

whalebone, rhinoceros horn or tortoiseshell, irrespective of age, percentage or value, may

increments set below may be lowered to the next bidding increment.

require a licence or certificate prior to exportation and additional licences or certificates upon importation to any country outside the European Union (EU). Please note that the

UK£50 to UK£1,000

by UK£50s

ability to obtain an export licence or certificate does not ensure the ability to obtain an

UK£1,000 to UK£2,000

by UK£100s

import licence or certificate in another country, and vice versa. We suggest that

UK£2,000 to UK£3,000

by UK£200s

prospective bidders check with their own government regarding wildlife import

UK£3,000 to UK£5,000

by UK£200s, 500, 800 (i.e., UK£4,200, 4,500, 4,800)

requirements prior to placing a bid. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to obtain any

UK£5,000 to UK£10,000

by UK£500s

necessary export or import licences or certificates as well as any other required

UK£10,000 to UK£20,000

by UK£1,000s

documentation. The denial of any required licence or certificate or any delay in obtaining

UK£20,000 to UK£30,000

by UK£2,000s

such documentation will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full

UK£30,000 to UK£50,000

by UK£2,000s, 5,000, 8,000

payment for the lot.

UK£50,000 to UK£100,000

by UK£5,000s

UK£100,000 to UK£200,000

by UK£10,000s

above UK£200,000

at the auctioneer’s discretion

The auctioneer may vary the increments during the course of the auction at his or her own discretion.

3 ThE aUCTIOn Conditions of Sale As noted above, the auction is governed by the Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty. All prospective bidders should read them carefully. They may be amended by saleroom addendum or auctioneer’s announcement. Interested Parties announcement In situations where a person allowed to bid on a lot has a direct or indirect interest in such lot, such as the beneficiary or executor of an estate selling the lot, a joint owner of the lot or a party providing or participating in a guarantee on the lot, Phillips de Pury & Company will make an announcement in the saleroom that interested parties may bid on the lot. Consecutive and Responsive Bidding The auctioneer may open the bidding on any lot by placing a bid on behalf of the seller. The auctioneer may further bid on behalf of the seller up to the amount of the reserve by placing consecutive bids or bids in response to other bidders.

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VaT anD OThER Tax InFORmaTIOn FOR BUYERS The following paragraphs provide general information to buyers on the VAT and certain

Where the buyer carries purchases from the EU personally or uses the services of a third

other potential tax implications of purchasing property at Phillips de Pury & Company.

party, Phillips de Pury & Company will charge the VAT amount due as a deposit and

This information is not intended to be complete. In all cases, the relevant tax legislation

refund it if the lot has been exported within the timelines specified below and either

takes precedence, and the VAT rates in effect on the day of the auction will be the rates

of the following conditions are met:

charged. It should be noted that, for VAT purposes only, Phillips de Pury & Company is not usually treated as agent and most property is sold as if it is the property of Phillips de

• For lots sold under the Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme or the normal VAT rules,

Pury & Company. In the following paragraphs, reference to VAT symbols shall mean those

Phillips de Pury & Company is provided with appropriate documentary proof of

symbols located beside the lot number or the pre-sale estimates in the catalogue (or

export from the EU within three months of the date of sale. Buyers carrying their

amending saleroom addendum).

own property should obtain hand-carry papers from the Shipping Department to facilitate this process.

1 PROPERTY wITh nO VaT SYmBOl Where there is no VAT symbol, Phillips de Pury & Company is able to use the Auctioneer’s

• For lots sold under temporary admission, Phillips de Pury & Company is provided

Margin Scheme, and VAT will not normally be charged on the hammer price.

with a copy of the correct paperwork duly completed and stamped by HM Revenue & Customs which shows the property has been exported from the EU via the UK

Phillips de Pury & Company must bear VAT on the buyer’s premium. Therefore, we will

within 30 days of payment date. It is essential for shippers acting on behalf of

charge an amount in lieu of VAT at 17.5% on the buyer’s premium. This amount will form

buyers to collect copies of original import papers from our Shipping Department.

part of the buyer’s premium on our invoice and will not be separately identified.

HM Revenue & Customs insist that the correct customs procedures are followed and Phillips de Pury & Company will not be able to issue any refunds where the

2 PROPERTY wITh a † SYmBOl

export documents do not exactly comply with governmental regulations. Property

These lots will be sold under the normal UK VAT rules, and VAT will be charged at 17.5%

subject to temporary admission must be transferred to another customs procedure

on both the hammer price and buyer’s premium.

immediately if any restoration or repair work is to be carried out.

Where the buyer is a relevant business person in the EU (non-UK) or is a relevant business

Buyers carrying their own property must obtain hand-carry papers from the Shipping

person in a non-EU country then no VAT will be charged on the buyer’s premium. This is

Department, for which a charge of £20 will be made. The VAT refund will be processed

subject to Phillips de Pury & Company being provided with evidence of the buyer’s VAT

once the appropriate paperwork has been returned to Phillips de Pury & Company. Phillips

registration number in the relevant Member State (non-UK) or the buyer’s business status

de Pury & Company is not able to cancel or refund any VAT charged on sales made to UK

in a non-EU country such as the buyer’s Tax Registration Certificate. Should this evidence

or EU private residents unless the lot is subject to temporary admission and the property

not be provided then VAT will be charged on the buyer’s premium.

is exported from the EU within 30 days of payment date. Any refund of VAT is subject to a minimum of £50 per shipment and a processing charge of £20.

3 PROPERTY wITh a § SYmBOl Lots sold to buyers whose registered address is in the EU will be assumed to be remaining

Buyers intending to export, repair, restore or alter lots under temporary admission should

in the EU. The property will be invoiced as if it had no VAT symbol. However, if an EU buyer

notify the Shipping Department before collection. Failure to do so may result in the import

advises us that the property is to be exported from the EU, Phillips de Pury & Company will

VAT becoming payable immediately and Phillips de Pury & Company being unable to

re-invoice the property under the normal VAT rules.

refund the VAT charged on deposit.

Lots sold to buyers whose address is outside the EU will be assumed to be exported from

6 VaT REFUnDS FROm hm REVEnUE & CUSTOmS

the EU. The property will be invoiced under the normal VAT rules. Although the hammer

Where VAT charged cannot be cancelled or refunded by Phillips de Pury & Company, it may be

price will be subject to VAT, the VAT will be cancelled or refunded upon export. The

possible to seek repayment from HM Revenue & Customs (‘HMRC’). Repayments in this

buyer’s premium will always bear VAT unless the buyer is a relevant business person in

manner are limited to businesses located outside the UK and may be considered for example

the EU (non-UK) or is a relevant business person in a non-EU country, subject to Phillips

for Import VAT charged on the hammer price for lots sold under temporary admission.

de Pury & Company receiving evidence of the buyer’s VAT registration number in the relevant Member State (non-UK) or the buyer’s business status in a non-EU country such

All claims made by customers located in another member state to the UK will need to be

as the buyer’s Tax Registration Certificate. Should this evidence not be provided VAT will

made under a new mechanism from 1 January 2010. The process prior to 1 January 2010 is

be charged on the buyer’s premium.

no longer in operation.

4 PROPERTY SOlD wITh a ‡ OR Ω SYmBOl

If you are located in an EU member state other than the UK you will now need to apply for a

These lots have been imported from outside the EU to be sold at auction under temporary

refund of UK VAT directly to your local tax authority. This is done via submission of an

admission. Property subject to temporary admission will be offered under the

electronically based claim form which should be accessed through the website of your

Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme and will be subject to import VAT of either 5% or 17.5%,

local tax authority. As a result, your form may include VAT incurred in a number of

marked by ‡ and Ω respectively, on the hammer price and an amount in lieu of VAT at 17.5%

member states. Furthermore, from 1 January 2010 you should only submit one form per

on the buyer’s premium. Anyone who wishes to buy outside the Auctioneer’s Margin

year, rather than submitting forms throughout the year.

Scheme should notify the Client Accounting Department before the sale. Please note that the time limits by which you must make a claim have been extended. When making a claim for VAT incurred in another EU member state any claim will still be

Where lots are sold outside the Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme and the buyer is a relevant business person in the EU (non-UK) or is a relevant business person in a non-EU country

made on a calendar year basis but must now be made no later than 30 September

then no VAT will be charged on the buyer’s premium. This is subject to Phillips de Pury &

following that calendar year. This effectively extends the time by which claims should be

Company receiving evidence of the buyer’s VAT registration number in the relevant

made by three months (e.g. for VAT incurred in the year 1 January to 31 December 2010 you

Member State (non-UK) or the buyer’s business status in a non-EU country such as the

should make a claim to your local tax authority no later than 30 September 2011). Once you

buyer’s Tax Registration Certificate. Should this evidence not be provided VAT will be

have submitted the electronic form to your local tax authority it is their responsibility to

charged on the buyer’s premium.

ensure that payment is obtained from the relevant member states. This should be completed within four months. If this time limit is not adhered to you may receive interest on the unpaid amounts.

5 ExPORTS FROm ThE EUROPEan UnIOn The following types of VAT may be cancelled or refunded by Phillips de Pury & Company

If you are located outside the EU you should apply for a refund of UK VAT directly to

on exports made within three months of the sale date if strict conditions are met:

HMRC (The rules for those located outside of the EU have not changed). Claim forms are • The amount in lieu of VAT charged on the buyer’s premium for property sold

only available from the HMRC website. Go to http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/index.htm, and

under the Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme (i.e., without a VAT symbol).

follow Quick Links then Find a Form. The relevant form is VAT65A. Completed forms should be returned to: HM Revenue & Customs, VAT Overseas Repayment Directive, Foyle

• The VAT on the hammer price for property sold under the normal VAT rules

House, Duncreggan Road, Londonderry, Northern Ireland, BT48 7AE, (tel) +44 2871 305100

(i.e., with a † or a § symbol).

(fax) +44 2871 305101. You should submit claims for VAT to HMRC no later than six months from the end of the

The following type of VaT may be cancelled or refunded by Phillips de Pury &

12 month period ending 30 June (e.g. claims for the period 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2010

Company on exports made within 30 days of payment date if strict conditions are met:

should be made no later than 31 December 2010). • The import VAT charged on the hammer price and an amount in lieu of VAT on the buyer’s premium for property sold under temporary admission (i.e., with a ‡ or a

Please note that refunds of VAT will only be made where VAT has been incurred for a business

Ω symbol) under the Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme.

purpose. Any VAT incurred on articles bought for personal use will not be refunded.

In each of the above examples, where the appropriate conditions are satisfied, no VAT

7 SalES anD USE TaxES

will be charged if, at or before the time of invoicing, the buyer instructs Phillips de Pury &

Buyers from outside the UK should note that local sales taxes or use taxes may

Company to export the property from the EU. If such instruction is received after payment,

become payable upon import of lots following purchase. Buyers should consult their

a refund of the VAT amount will be made.

own tax advisors.

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COnDITIOnS OF SalE The Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty set forth below govern the relationship

(c) Telephone bidders are required to submit bids on the ‘Telephone Bid Form’, a copy of

between bidders and buyers, on the one hand, and Phillips de Pury & Company and

which is printed in this catalogue or otherwise available from Phillips de Pury & Company.

sellers, on the other hand. All prospective buyers should read these Conditions of Sale

Telephone bidding is available for lots whose low pre-sale estimate is at least £500.

and Authorship Warranty carefully before bidding.

Phillips de Pury & Company reserves the right to require written confirmation of a successful bid from a telephone bidder by fax or otherwise immediately after such bid is

1 InTRODUCTIOn

accepted by the auctioneer. Telephone bids may be recorded and, by bidding on the

Each lot in this catalogue is offered for sale and sold subject to: (a) the Conditions of Sale

telephone, a bidder consents to the recording of the conversation.

and Authorship Warranty; (b) additional notices and terms printed in other places in this catalogue, including the Guide for Prospective Buyers, and (c) supplements to this

(d) When making a bid, whether in person, by absentee bid or on the telephone, a bidder

catalogue or other written material posted by Phillips de Pury & Company in the saleroom,

accepts personal liability to pay the purchase price, as described more fully in Paragraph

in each case as amended by any addendum or announcement by the auctioneer prior to

6 (a) below, plus all other applicable charges unless it has been explicitly agreed in writing

the auction.

with Phillips de Pury & Company before the commencement of the auction that the bidder is acting as agent on behalf of an identified third party acceptable to Phillips de Pury & Company and that we will only look to the principal for such payment.

By bidding at the auction, whether in person, through an agent, by written bid, by telephone bid or other means, bidders and buyers agree to be bound by these Conditions

(e) Arranging absentee and telephone bids is a free service provided by Phillips de Pury &

of Sale, as so changed or supplemented, and Authorship Warranty.

Company to prospective buyers. While we undertake to exercise reasonable care in These Conditions of Sale, as so changed or supplemented, and Authorship Warranty contain

undertaking such activity, we cannot accept liability for failure to execute such bids except

all the terms on which Phillips de Pury & Company and the seller contract with the buyer.

where such failure is caused by our wilful misconduct.

2 PhIllIPS de PURY & COmPanY aS aGEnT

(f) Employees of Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies, including the

Phillips de Pury & Company acts as an agent for the seller, unless otherwise indicated in

auctioneer, may bid at the auction by placing absentee bids so long as they do not know

this catalogue or at the time of auction. On occasion, Phillips de Pury & Company may own

the reserve when submitting their absentee bids and otherwise comply with our employee

a lot, in which case we will act in a principal capacity as a consignor, or may have a legal,

bidding procedures.

beneficial or financial interest in a lot as a secured creditor or otherwise. 5 COnDUCT OF ThE aUCTIOn

3 CaTalOGUE DESCRIPTIOnS anD COnDITIOn OF PROPERTY

(a) Unless otherwise indicated by the symbol

Lots are sold subject to the Authorship Warranty, as described in the catalogue (unless

which is the confidential minimum selling price agreed by Phillips de Pury & Company with

such description is changed or supplemented, as provided in Paragraph 1 above) and in

the seller. The reserve will not exceed the low pre-sale estimate at the time of the auction.

, each lot is offered subject to a reserve,

the condition that they are in at the time of the sale on the following basis. (b) The auctioneer has discretion at any time to refuse any bid, withdraw any lot, re-offer a (a) The knowledge of Phillips de Pury & Company in relation to each lot is partially

lot for sale (including after the fall of the hammer) if he or she believes there may be error

dependent on information provided to us by the seller, and Phillips de Pury & Company is

or dispute and take such other action as he or she deems reasonably appropriate.

not able to and does not carry out exhaustive due diligence on each lot. Prospective buyers acknowledge this fact and accept responsibility for carrying out inspections and

(c) The auctioneer will commence and advance the bidding at levels and in increments he

investigations to satisfy themselves as to the lots in which they may be interested.

or she considers appropriate. In order to protect the reserve on any lot, the auctioneer

Notwithstanding the foregoing, we shall exercise such reasonable care when making

may place one or more bids on behalf of the seller up to the reserve without indicating he

express statements in catalogue descriptions or condition reports as is consistent with

or she is doing so, either by placing consecutive bids or bids in response to other bidders.

our role as auctioneer of lots in this sale and in light of (i) the information provided to us by the seller, (ii) scholarship and technical knowledge and (iii) the generally accepted

(d) The sale will be conducted in pounds sterling and payment is due in pounds sterling.

opinions of relevant experts, in each case at the time any such express statement is made.

For the benefit of international clients, pre-sale estimates in the auction catalogue may be shown in US dollars and/or euros and, if so, will reflect approximate exchange rates.

(b) Each lot offered for sale at Phillips de Pury & Company is available for inspection by

Accordingly, estimates in US dollars or euros should be treated only as a guide.

prospective buyers prior to the auction. Phillips de Pury & Company accepts bids on lots on the basis that bidders (and independent experts on their behalf, to the extent

(e) Subject to the auctioneer’s reasonable discretion, the highest bidder accepted by the

appropriate given the nature and value of the lot and the bidder’s own expertise) have fully

auctioneer will be the buyer and the striking of the hammer marks the acceptance of the

inspected the lot prior to bidding and have satisfied themselves as to both the condition of

highest bid and the conclusion of a contract for sale between the seller and the buyer. Risk

the lot and the accuracy of its description.

and responsibility for the lot passes to the buyer as set forth in Paragraph 7 below.

(c) Prospective buyers acknowledge that many lots are of an age and type which means

(f) If a lot is not sold, the auctioneer will announce that it has been ‘passed’, ‘withdrawn’,

that they are not in perfect condition. As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company

‘returned to owner’ or ‘bought-in’.

may prepare and provide condition reports to assist prospective buyers when they are inspecting lots. Catalogue descriptions and condition reports may make reference to

(g) Any post-auction sale of lots offered at auction shall incorporate these Conditions of

particular imperfections of a lot, but bidders should note that lots may have other faults

Sale and Authorship Warranty as if sold in the auction.

not expressly referred to in the catalogue or condition report. All dimensions are approximate. Illustrations are for identification purposes only and cannot be used as

6 PURChaSE PRICE anD PaYmEnT

precise indications of size or to convey full information as to the actual condition of lots.

(a) The buyer agrees to pay us, in addition to the hammer price of the lot, the buyer’s premium, plus any applicable value added tax (VAT) and any applicable resale royalty (the

(d) Information provided to prospective buyers in respect of any lot, including any pre-sale

‘Purchase Price’). The buyer’s premium is 25% of the hammer price up to and including

estimate, whether written or oral, and information in any catalogue, condition or other

£25,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above £25,000 up to and including

report, commentary or valuation, is not a representation of fact but rather a statement of

£500,000 and 12% of the portion of the hammer price above £500,000.

opinion held by Phillips de Pury & Company. Any pre-sale estimate may not be relied on as a prediction of the selling price or value of the lot and may be revised from time to time by

(b) VAT is payable in accordance with applicable law. All prices, fees, charges and

Phillips de Pury & Company at our absolute discretion. Neither Phillips de Pury &

expenses set out in these Conditions of Sale are quoted exclusive of VAT.

Company nor any of our affiliated companies shall be liable for any difference between the pre-sale estimates for any lot and the actual price achieved at auction or upon resale.

(c) If the Artist’s Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to the lot, the buyer agrees to pay to us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those regulations and we

4 BIDDInG aT aUCTIOn

undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist’s collection agent. Lots subject to

(a) Phillips de Pury & Company has absolute discretion to refuse admission to the auction

the Artist’s Resale Right are identified with the symbol ♠ next to the lot number.

or participation in the sale. All bidders must register for a paddle prior to bidding, supplying such information and references as required by Phillips de Pury & Company.

(d) Unless otherwise agreed, a buyer is required to pay for a purchased lot immediately following the auction regardless of any intention to obtain an export or import licence or

(b) As a convenience to bidders who cannot attend the auction in person, Phillips de Pury

other permit for such lot. Payments must be made by the invoiced party in pounds

& Company may, if so instructed by the bidder, execute written absentee bids on a bidder’s

sterling either by cash, cheque drawn on a UK bank or wire transfer, as follows:

behalf. Absentee bidders are required to submit bids on the ‘Absentee Bid Form’, a copy of which is printed in this catalogue or otherwise available from Phillips de Pury &

(i) Phillips de Pury & Company will accept payment in cash provided that the total

Company. Bids must be placed in the currency of the sale. The bidder must clearly

amount paid in cash or cash equivalents does not exceed the local currency

indicate the maximum amount he or she intends to bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and

equivalent of US$10,000.

value added tax (VAT). The auctioneer will not accept an instruction to execute an absentee bid which does not indicate such maximum bid. Our staff will attempt to execute

(ii) Personal cheques and banker’s drafts are accepted if drawn on a UK bank and

an absentee bid at the lowest possible price taking into account the reserve and other

the buyer provides to us acceptable government-issued identification. Cheques

bidders. Any absentee bid must be received at least 24 hours in advance of the sale. In the

and banker’s drafts should be made payable to ‘PDEPL LTD’. If payment is sent by

event of identical bids, the earliest bid received will take precedence.

post, please send the cheque or banker’s draft to the attention of the Client 328

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CONTEMPORARY ART aUCTIOnS

lOnDOn

EVEnInG SalE

29 JUNE 2010 7pm DaY SalE

30 JUNE 2010 10am & 2pm

Viewing 21 – 29 June Phillips de Pury & Company Howick Place London SW1P 1BB Enquiries +44 30 7318 4010 Catalogues +44 20 7318 4039 / +1 212 940 1240 PhIllIPSDEPURY.COm UGO ROnDInOnE Tree, 2006 Estimate £200,000–300,000

ITALIA_backmatter_325-335.indd 329

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Accounting Department at Howick Place, London SW1P 1BB and ensure that the

which is in their possession and, in each case, no earlier than 30 days from the date of

sale number is written on the cheque. Cheques or banker’s drafts drawn by third

such notice arrange the sale of such property and apply the proceeds to the amount owed

parties will not be accepted.

to Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies after the deduction from sale proceeds of our standard vendor’s commission, all sale-related expenses and any

(iii) Payment by wire transfer may be sent directly to Phillips de Pury & Company.

applicable taxes thereon; (vi) resell the lot by auction or private sale, with estimates and a

Bank transfer details are as follows:

reserve set at Phillips de Pury & Company’s reasonable discretion, it being understood that in the event such resale is for less than the original hammer price and buyer’s

Bank of Scotland

premium for that lot, the buyer will remain liable for the shortfall together with all costs

Gordon Street

incurred in such resale; (vii) commence legal proceedings to recover the hammer price

Glasgow

and buyer’s premium for that lot, together with interest and the costs of such proceedings;

G1 3RS

or (viii) release the name and address of the buyer to the seller to enable the seller to commence legal proceedings to recover the amounts due and legal costs.

For the account of PDEPL LTD Sort code: 80-54-01

(b) The buyer irrevocably authorizes Phillips de Pury & Company to exercise a lien over the

Account no.: 00440780

buyer’s property which is in our possession upon notification by any of our affiliated

SWIFT BIC: BOFSGB21138

companies that the buyer is in default of payment. Phillips de Pury & Company will notify

IBAN: GB36BOFS 8054 0100 4407 80

the buyer of any such lien. The buyer also irrevocably authorizes Phillips de Pury & Company, upon notification by any of our affiliated companies that the buyer is in default

(e) As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company will accept Visa, MasterCard and

of payment, to pledge the buyer’s property in our possession by actual or constructive

UK-issued debit cards to pay for invoices of £50,000 or less. A processing fee will apply.

delivery to our affiliated company as security for the payment of any outstanding amount due. Phillips de Pury & Company will notify the buyer if the buyer’s property has been delivered to an affiliated company by way of pledge.

(f) Title in a purchased lot will not pass until Phillips de Pury & Company has received the Purchase Price for that lot in cleared funds. Phillips de Pury & Company is not obliged to release a lot to the buyer until title in the lot has passed and appropriate identification has

(c) If the buyer is in default of payment, the buyer irrevocably authorizes Phillips de Pury &

been provided, and any earlier release does not affect the passing of title or the buyer’s

Company to instruct any of our affiliated companies in possession of the buyer’s property

unconditional obligation to pay the Purchase Price.

to deliver the property by way of pledge as the buyer’s agent to a third party instructed by Phillips de Pury & Company to hold the property on our behalf as security for the payment

7 COllECTIOn OF PROPERTY

of the Purchase Price and any other amount due and, no earlier than 30 days from the date

(a) Phillips de Pury & Company will not release a lot to the buyer until we have received

of written notice to the buyer, to sell the property in such manner and for such

payment of its Purchase Price in full in cleared funds, the buyer has paid all outstanding

consideration as can reasonably be obtained on a forced sale basis and to apply the

amounts due to Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies, including

proceeds to any amount owed to Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated

any charges payable pursuant to Paragraph 8 (a) below, and the buyer has satisfied such

companies after the deduction from sale proceeds of our standard vendor’s commission,

other terms as we in our sole discretion shall require, including completing any anti-

all sale-related expenses and any applicable taxes thereon.

money laundering or anti-terrorism financing checks. As soon as a buyer has satisfied all of the foregoing conditions, he or she should contact us at +44 (0) 207 318 4081 or

10 RESCISSIOn BY PhIllIPS de PURY & COmPanY

+44 (0) 207 318 4082 to arrange for collection of purchased property.

Phillips de Pury & Company shall have the right, but not the obligation, to rescind a sale without notice to the buyer if we reasonably believe that there is a material breach of the

(b) The buyer must arrange for collection of a purchased lot within five days of the date of

seller’s representations and warranties or the Authorship Warranty or an adverse claim is

the auction. After the auction, we will transfer all lots to our fine art storage facility

made by a third party. Upon notice of Phillips de Pury & Company’s election to rescind the

located near Wimbledon and will so advise all buyers. Purchased lots are at the buyer’s

sale, the buyer will promptly return the lot to Phillips de Pury & Company, and we will then

risk, including the responsibility for insurance, from (i) the date of collection or (ii) five

refund the Purchase Price paid to us. As described more fully in Paragraph 13 below, the

days after the auction, whichever is the earlier. Until risk passes, Phillips de Pury &

refund shall constitute the sole remedy and recourse of the buyer against Phillips de Pury

Company will compensate the buyer for any loss or damage to a purchased lot up to a

& Company and the seller with respect to such rescinded sale.

maximum of the Purchase Price paid, subject to our usual exclusions for loss or damage 11 ExPORT, ImPORT anD EnDanGERED SPECIES lICEnCES anD PERmITS

to property.

Before bidding for any property, prospective buyers are advised to make their own (c) As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company will, without charge, wrap

enquiries as to whether a licence is required to export a lot from the United Kingdom or to

purchased lots for hand carry only. We do not provide packing, handling, insurance or

import it into another country. Prospective buyers are advised that some countries

shipping services. We will coordinate with shipping agents instructed by the buyer,

prohibit the import of property made of or incorporating plant or animal material, such as

whether or not recommended by Phillips de Pury & Company, in order to facilitate the

coral, crocodile, ivory, whalebone, rhinoceros horn or tortoiseshell, irrespective of age,

packing, handling, insurance and shipping of property bought at Phillips de Pury &

percentage or value. Accordingly, prior to bidding, prospective buyers considering export

Company. Any such instruction is entirely at the buyer’s risk and responsibility, and

of purchased lots should familiarize themselves with relevant export and import

we will not be liable for acts or omissions of third party packers or shippers.

regulations of the countries concerned. It is solely the buyer’s responsibility to comply with these laws and to obtain any necessary export, import and endangered species

(d) Phillips de Pury & Company will require presentation of government-issued

licences or permits. Failure to obtain a licence or permit or delay in so doing will not justify

identification prior to release of a lot to the buyer or the buyer’s authorized representative.

the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot.

8 FaIlURE TO COllECT PURChaSES

12 DaTa PROTECTIOn

(a) If the buyer pays the Purchase Price but fails to collect a purchased lot within 30 days

(a) In connection with the management and operation of our business and the marketing and

of the auction, the buyer will incur a late collection fee of £25, storage charges of £3 per

supply of auction related services, or as required by law, we may ask clients to provide

day and pro rated insurance charges of 0.1% of the Purchase Price per month on each

personal information about themselves or obtain information about clients from third parties

uncollected lot.

(e.g., credit information). If clients provide us with information that is defined by law as ‘sensitive’, they agree that Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies may use

(b) If a purchased lot is paid for but not collected within six months of the auction, the

it for the above purposes. Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies will not

buyer authorizes Phillips de Pury & Company, upon notice, to arrange a resale of the item

use or process sensitive information for any other purpose without the client’s express

by auction or private sale, with estimates and a reserve set at Phillips de Pury &

consent. If you would like further information on our policies on personal data or wish to make

Company’s reasonable discretion. The proceeds of such sale will be applied to pay for

corrections to your information, please contact us at +44 20 7318 4010. If you would prefer not to

storage charges and any other outstanding costs and expenses owed by the buyer to

receive details of future events please call the above number.

Phillips de Pury & Company or our affiliated companies and the remainder will be forfeited (b) In order to fulfil the services clients have requested, Phillips de Pury & Company may

unless collected by the buyer within two years of the original auction.

disclose information to third parties such as shippers. Some countries do not offer 9 REmEDIES FOR nOn-PaYmEnT

equivalent legal protection of personal information to that offered within the European

(a) Without prejudice to any rights the seller may have, if the buyer without prior

Union (EU). It is Phillips de Pury & Company’s policy to require that any such third parties

agreement fails to make payment of the Purchase Price for a lot in cleared funds within

respect the privacy and confidentiality of our clients’ information and provide the same

five days of the auction, Phillips de Pury & Company may in our sole discretion exercise

level of protection for client information as provided within the EU, whether or not they are

one or more of the following remedies: (i) store the lot at Phillips de Pury & Company’s

located in a country that offers equivalent legal protection of personal information. By

premises or elsewhere at the buyer’s sole risk and expense; (ii) cancel the sale of the lot,

agreeing to these Conditions of Sale, clients agree to such disclosure.

retaining any partial payment of the Purchase Price as liquidated damages; (iii) reject future bids from the buyer or render such bids subject to payment of a deposit; (iv) charge

13 lImITaTIOn OF lIaBIlITY

interest at 12% per annum from the date payment became due until the date the Purchase

(a) Subject to sub-paragraph (e) below, the total liability of Phillips de Pury & Company,

Price is received in cleared funds; (v) subject to notification of the buyer, exercise a lien

our affiliated companies and the seller to the buyer in connection with the sale of a lot

over any of the buyer’s property which is in the possession of Phillips de Pury & Company

shall be limited to the Purchase Price actually paid by the buyer for the lot.

and instruct our affiliated companies to exercise a lien over any of the buyer’s property 330

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aUThORShIP waRRanTY (b) Except as otherwise provided in this Paragraph 13, none of Phillips de Pury &

Phillips de Pury & Company warrants the authorship of property in this auction catalogue

Company, any of our affiliated companies or the seller (i) is liable for any errors or

for a period of five years from date of sale by Phillips de Pury & Company, subject to the

omissions, whether orally or in writing, in information provided to prospective buyers by

exclusions and limitations set forth below.

Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies or (ii) accepts responsibility to any bidder in respect of acts or omissions, whether negligent or

(a) Phillips de Pury & Company gives this Authorship Warranty only to the original buyer

otherwise, by Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies in connection

of record (i.e., the registered successful bidder) of any lot. This Authorship Warranty

with the conduct of the auction or for any other matter relating to the sale of any lot.

does not extend to (i) subsequent owners of the property, including purchasers or recipients by way of gift from the original buyer, heirs, successors, beneficiaries and

(c) All warranties other than the Authorship Warranty, express or implied, including any

assigns; (ii) property created prior to 1870, unless the property is determined to be

warranty of satisfactory quality and fitness for purpose, are specifically excluded by

counterfeit (defined as a forgery made less than 50 years ago with an intent to deceive)

Phillips de Pury & Company, our affiliated companies and the seller to the fullest extent

and has a value at the date of the claim under this warranty which is materially less than

permitted by law.

the Purchase Price paid; (iii) property where the description in the catalogue states that there is a conflict of opinion on the authorship of the property; (iv) property where our

(d) Subject to sub-paragraph (e) below, none of Phillips de Pury & Company, any of our

attribution of authorship was on the date of sale consistent with the generally accepted

affiliated companies or the seller shall be liable to the buyer for any loss or damage

opinions of specialists, scholars or other experts; or (v) property whose description or

beyond the refund of the Purchase Price referred to in sub-paragraph (a) above, whether

dating is proved inaccurate by means of scientific methods or tests not generally

such loss or damage is characterised as direct, indirect, special, incidental or

accepted for use at the time of the publication of the catalogue or which were at such time

consequential, or for the payment of interest on the Purchase Price to the fullest extent

deemed unreasonably expensive or impractical to use.

permitted by law. (b) In any claim for breach of the Authorship Warranty, Phillips de Pury & Company (e) No provision in these Conditions of Sale shall be deemed to exclude or limit the liability

reserves the right, as a condition to rescinding any sale under this warranty, to require the

of Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies to the buyer in respect of

buyer to provide to us at the buyer’s expense the written opinions of two recognized

any fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation made by any of us or in respect of death or

experts approved in advance by Phillips de Pury & Company. We shall not be bound by any

personal injury caused by our negligent acts or omissions.

expert report produced by the buyer and reserve the right to consult our own experts at our expense. If Phillips de Pury & Company agrees to rescind a sale under the Authorship

14 COPYRIGhT

Warranty, we shall refund to the buyer the reasonable costs charged by the experts

The copyright in all images, illustrations and written materials produced by or for Phillips

commissioned by the buyer and approved in advance by us.

de Pury & Company relating to a lot, including the contents of this catalogue, is and shall remain at all times the property of Phillips de Pury & Company and, subject to the

(c) Subject to the exclusions set forth in subparagraph (a) above, the buyer may bring a

provisions of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, such images and materials

claim for breach of the Authorship Warranty provided that (i) he or she has notified

may not be used by the buyer or any other party without our prior written consent. Phillips

Phillips de Pury & Company in writing within three months of receiving any information

de Pury & Company and the seller make no representations or warranties that the buyer of

which causes the buyer to question the authorship of the lot, specifying the auction in

a lot will acquire any copyright or other reproduction rights in it.

which the property was included, the lot number in the auction catalogue and the reasons why the authorship of the lot is being questioned and (ii) the buyer returns the lot to

15 GEnERal

Phillips de Pury & Company in the same condition as at the time of its auction and is able

(a) These Conditions of Sale, as changed or supplemented as provided in Paragraph 1

to transfer good and marketable title in the lot free from any third party claim arising after

above, and Authorship Warranty set out the entire agreement between the parties with

the date of the auction.

respect to the transactions contemplated herein and supersede all prior and contemporaneous written, oral or implied understandings, representations and

(d) The buyer understands and agrees that the exclusive remedy for any breach of the

agreements.

Authorship Warranty shall be rescission of the sale and refund of the original Purchase Price paid. This remedy shall constitute the sole remedy and recourse of the buyer against

(b) Notices to Phillips de Pury & Company shall be in writing and addressed to the

Phillips de Pury & Company, any of our affiliated companies and the seller and is in lieu of

department in charge of the sale, quoting the reference number specified at the beginning

any other remedy available as a matter of law. This means that none of Phillips de Pury &

of the sale catalogue. Notices to clients shall be addressed to the last address notified by

Company, any of our affiliated companies or the seller shall be liable for loss or damage

them in writing to Phillips de Pury & Company.

beyond the remedy expressly provided in this Authorship Warranty, whether such loss or damage is characterized as direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential, or for the payment of interest on the original Purchase Price.

(c) These Conditions of Sale are not assignable by any buyer without our prior written consent but are binding on the buyer’s successors, assigns and representatives. (d) Should any provision of these Conditions of Sale be held void, invalid or unenforceable for any reason, the remaining provisions shall remain in full force and effect. No failure by any party to exercise, nor any delay in exercising, any right or remedy under these Conditions of Sale shall act as a waiver or release thereof in whole or in part. (e) No term of these Conditions of Sale shall be enforceable under the Contracts (Rights of Third Parties) Act 1999 by anyone other than the buyer. 16 law anD JURISDICTIOn (a) The rights and obligations of the parties with respect to these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty, the conduct of the auction and any matters related to any of the foregoing shall be governed by and interpreted in accordance with English law. (b) For the benefit of Phillips de Pury & Company, all bidders and sellers agree that the Courts of England are to have exclusive jurisdiction to settle all disputes arising in connection with all aspects of all matters or transactions to which these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty relate or apply. All parties agree that Phillips de Pury & Company shall retain the right to bring proceedings in any court other than the Courts of England. (c) All bidders and sellers irrevocably consent to service of process or any other documents in connection with proceedings in any court by facsimile transmission, personal service, delivery by mail or in any other manner permitted by English law, the law of the place of service or the law of the jurisdiction where proceedings are instituted at the last address of the bidder or seller known to Phillips de Pury & Company.

331

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phillips de pury & company

chairman

Directors

advisory Board

Simon de Pury

Aileen Agopian

Maria Bell

Sean Cleary

Janna Bullock

Finn Dombernowsky

Lisa Eisner

Patricia G. Hambrecht

Lapo Elkann

Alexander Payne

Ben Elliot

Olivier Vrankenne

Lady Elena Foster

chief Executive officer Bernd Runge

H.I.H. Francesca von Habsburg Marc Jacobs

senior Directors

Ernest Mourmans

Michael McGinnis

Aby Rosen

Dr. Michaela de Pury

Christiane zu Salm Juergen Teller Princess Gloria von Thurn und Taxis Jean Michel Wilmotte Anita Zabludowicz

intErnational spEcialists

Berlin

Shirin Kranz, Specialist, Contemporary Art +49 30 880 018 42

Brussels Olivier Vrankenne, International Senior Specialist +32 486 43 43 44 Katherine van Thillo, Consultant +32 475 687 011 Buenos aires Brooke de Ocampo, International Specialist, Contemporary Art +44 777 551 7060 Geneva

Katie Kennedy Perez, Specialist, Contemporary Art +41 22 906 8000

london

Dr. Michaela de Pury, International Senior Director, Contemporary Art +49 17 289 73611

los angeles milan moscow shanghai/Beijing

Maya McLaughlin, Contemporary Art +1 323 791 1771 Laura Garbarino, International Specialist, Contemporary Art +39 339 478 9671 Svetlana Marich, Specialist, Contemporary Art +7 495 225 88 22 Jeremy Wingfield, International Specialist, Contemporary Art +852 6895 1805

singapore Chin-Chin Yap, International Specialist, Contemporary Art +1 347 784 6916 Zurich/israel

Fiona Biberstein, International Specialist, Contemporary Art +41 43 344 86 32

GEnEral counsEl

manaGinG DirEctors

Patricia G. Hambrecht

Finn Dombernowsky, London/Europe Sean Cleary, New York (Interim)

WorlDWiDE oFFicEs NEW YORK

PARIS

BERLIN

450 West 15 Street, New York, NY 10011, USA

15 rue de la Paix, 75002 Paris, France

Auguststrasse 19, 10117 Berlin, Germany

tel +1 212 940 1200 fax +1 212 924 5403

tel +33 1 42 78 67 77 fax +33 1 42 78 23 07

tel +49 30 8800 1842 fax +49 30 8800 1843

LONDON

GENEVA

Howick Place, London SW1P 1BB, United Kingdom

23 quai des Bergues, 1201 Geneva, Switzerland

tel +44 20 7318 4010 fax +44 20 7318 4011

tel +41 22 906 80 00 fax +41 22 906 80 01

332

ITALIA_backmatter_332-333.indd 332

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FILM contEmporary art

auction

24 JUNE 2010

photoGraphs

EDitions

mEmoraBilia

nEW yorK

Viewing 19 – 24 June phillips de pury & company 450 West 15 Street New York 10011 Enquiries +1 212 940 1234 catalogues +1 212 940 1240 / +44 20 7318 4039 phillipsDEpury.com

stan DouGlas Subject to a film: Marnie, one from the complete portfolio of six, 1988–96 Estimate $6,000–9,000

ITALIA_backmatter_332-333.indd 333

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SPECIALISTS AND DEPARTMENTS

CONTEMPORARY ART

Michael McGinnis, Senior Director +1 212 940 1254

and worldwide Head, Contemporary Art

MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY EDITIONS

LoNDoN

New York

Cary Leibowitz, worldwide Co-Director +1 212 940 1222

kelly Troester, worldwide Co-Director +1 212 940 1221

Jannah Greenblatt +1 212 940 1332

Joy Deibert +1 212 940 1333

Peter Sumner, Head of Sales, London +44 20 7318 4063

Henry Allsopp +44 20 7318 4060

Laetitia Catoir +44 20 7318 4064

Judith Hess +44 20 7318 4075

Leonie Moschner +44 20 7318 4074

Ivgenia Naiman +44 20 7318 4071

Lou Proud +44 20 7318 4018

Sarah Buchwald +44 20 7318 4085

Sebastien Montabonel +44 20 7318 4025

Catherine Higgs +44 20 7318 4089

Alexandra Bibby +44 20 7318 4087

George o’Dell +44 20 7318 4093

rita Almeida Freitas +44 20 7318 4087

raphael Lepine +44 20 7318 4078

Helen Hayman +44 20 7318 4092

edward Tang +44 20 7318 4024

emma Lewis +44 20 7318 4092

Tanya Tikhnenko +44 20 7318 4065

Phillippa willison +44 20 7318 4070

PHOTOGRAPHS LoNDoN

New York

New York

Shlomi rabi +1 212 940 1246

Caroline Shea +1 212 940 1247

Jeremy Goldsmith +1 212 940 1253

Carol ehlers, Consultant +1 212 940 1245

Timothy Malyk +1 212 940 1258

Sarah krueger +1 212 940 1245

Aileen Agopian, New York Director +1 212 940 1255

Sarah Mudge, Head of Day Sale +1 212 940 1259

Jean-Michel Placent +1 212 940 1263

roxana Bruno +1 212 940 1229

Maria Bueno +1 212 940 1261

Sara Davidson +1 212 940 1262

Peter Flores +1 212 940 1223

Alexandra Leive +1 212 940 1252

(Uli) Zhiheng Huang +1 212 940 1288

Sarah Stein-Sapir +1 212 940 1303

BerLIN

Christina Scheublein +49 30 886 250 57

JEWELRY

PArIS

Vanessa kramer, New York Director +1 212 940 1243

edouard de Moussac + 33 1 42 78 67 77

Nazgol Jahan, worldwide Director +1 212 940 1283

New York

Carmela Manoli +1 212 940 1302

emily Bangert +1 212 940 1365

DESIGN

GeNeVA

Carolin Bulgari +41 22 906 80 00

Alexander Payne, worldwide Director +44 20 7318 4052

LoNDoN

LoNDoN

Lane McLean +44 20 7318 4032

Domenico raimondo +44 20 7318 4016

ellen Stelter +44 20 7318 4021

Ben williams +44 20 7318 4027

Marine Hartogs +44 20 7318 4021

Marcus McDonald +44 20 7318 4014

LoNDoN

New York

THEME SALES

Alex Heminway, New York Director +1 212 940 1269

Tobias Sirtl, London Manager +44 20 7318 4095

Henry Highley +44 20 7318 4061

Arianna Jacobs +44 20 7318 4054

Siobhan o’Connor +44 20 7318 4040

Marcus Tremonto +1 212 940 1268

Tara Dewitt +1 212 940 1265

Corey Barr, New York Manager +1 212 940 1234

Meaghan roddy +1 212 940 1266

Steve Agin, Consultant +1 908 475 1796

Alexandra Gilbert +1 212 940 1268

Anne Huntington +1 212 940 1210

Stephanie Max +1 212 940 1301

PRIvATE SALES

New York

PArIS

Johanna Frydman +33 1 42 78 67 77

BerLIN

Christina Scheublein +49 30 886 250 57

EDITORIAL karen wright, Senior editor Iggy Cortez, Assistant to the editor

New York

Andrea Hill +1 212 940 1238

ART AND PRODuCTION Fiona Hayes, Art Director

MARkETING New York Trish walsh, Marketing Manager

LoNDoN Mark Hudson, Senior Designer Andrew Lindesay, Sub-editor Tom radcliffe, Uk Production Manager New York Andrea koronkiewicz, Studio Manager kelly Sohngen, Graphic Designer orlann Capazorio, US Production Manager 334

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21/05/10 10.48


SALE INFORMATION

AuCTION wednesday 30 June 2010, 10am vIEWING Saturday 19 June, 10am – 6pm Sunday 20 June, 12pm – 6pm Monday 21 – Saturday 26 June, 10am – 6pm Sunday 27 June, 12pm – 6pm Monday 28 June – Tuesday 29 June, 10am – 6pm vIEWING & AuCTION LOCATION Howick Place, London Sw1P 1BB SALE DESIGNATION when sending in written bids or making enquiries, please refer to this sale as Uk000310 or ITALIA THEME SALES London +44 20 7318 4040 New York +1 212 940 1234 themes@phillipsdepury.com CATALOGuES London +44 20 7318 4039 New York +1 212 940 1240 catalogues@phillipsdepury.com Catalogues £30/$60 at the Gallery ABSENTEE AND TELEPHONE BIDS Anna Ho tel +44 20 7318 4045 fax +44 20 7318 4035 bids@phillipsdepury.com BuYERS ACCOuNTS

P

CLIENT SERvICES

IC

C

D A

LY IL

Charlotte Salisbury +44 20 7318 4010 kNIG

katherine walters +44 20 7318 4010

HTS

BRID

kate Spalding + 44 20 7318 4081

S

V

EN

O

R

BUCKINGHAM PALACE GARDENS P

LA C

BIRD

E

BU

PHOTOGRAPHY

CK

6

M

A

LL

ING

K WAL CAGE

ST. JAMES’S PARK HA

M

GA TE

OS GR

Byron Slater

E

ST. JAMES’S PARK

CONSTITUTION HILL R O

LL

GREEN PARK

GE

G

WAREHOuSE & SHIPPING

MA

TH

HYDE PARK CORNER

Harmony Johnston +44 20 7318 4010

L

ST

elliot Depree +44 20 7318 4072

2

’S

SELLER ACCOuNTS

L PA

ES

8

AM .J ST

GREEN PARK

Carolyn whitehead +44 20 7318 4020

VE NO

R

GD

NS

VIC

TOR

TR IA S

EET

PL HOWICK

BU

CK

ING

HA

M

PA L

AC E

RO AD

VICTORIA

VA UX

H

A

LL

BR

ID

GE

Back cover Studio Simon, ‘Omaggio Ad Andy Warhol’ stool (detail), designed 1973, Lot 235 335

ITALIA_backmatter_p335.indd 335

21/05/10 10.48


lot 170. venini

ITALIA_BOB_visual_spreads_336.indd 336

25/05/10 11:17


ITALIA_BOB_visual_spreads_336.indd 337

25/05/10 11:17


ITALIA_338-001 x mms.indd 338

25/05/10 11:14

Italia  

Auction 30 June 2010 London

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