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film 24 june 2010 new york


Contents

Pablo Picasso, Tournage: Plan Americain, 1968, Lot 143

Simon de pury

From the Chairman – lights, camera, action! ...page 3

dennis hopper

On the eve of his show at LA’s MOCA, Geoff Nicholson profiles the ‘supervillan, art-world mover and old biker’ ...page 4

reel time

Artists who work with film ...page 14

francesco vezzoli From fan-boy to superstar ...page 20

isabella rossellini Anchovies and orgies – who knew?! ...page 26

kenneth anger

An appreciation of the gay icon and auteur of Scorpio Rising ...page 32

kutlug atAman

Soul-searching and belly-dancing: an interview with the leading Turkish video artist ...page 36

Object lesson

Rossy de Palma, the irreverant muse of Lot 000 ...page 42

News

What’s happening in the international art world ...page 44

2pm: film Lots 1 – 191 ...page 46

Buyers guide

How to buy and whom to contact at Phillips de Pury ...page 98 00


FILM is the ultimate art form, where all artistic disciplines come together and merge seamlessly. When I look at a great work of art, read an incredible novel or listen to fabulous music, I get totally enthralled but never fully detached from my own personal existence. When I am in a movie house and see an outstanding film, I not only completely forget my own being but need at least ten to fifteen minutes to readapt when I walk out of the cinema. Movie-makers such as Antonioni, Fellini, Visconti, Truffaut, Polanski, Spielberg, Cameron or Almodóvar are some of the greatest artists ever. FILM is, of course, a medium that has also inspired artists active in different fields. From Fernand Léger’s works inspired by Charlie Chaplin up to Douglas Gordon’s burnt portraits of movie stars such as Audrey Hepburn or Ingrid Bergman, there are many examples. Video art, while actively collected by institutions and some enlightened collectors for years, still has not been fully recognized by the art market, even if video art by towering figures such as Bruce Nauman, Bill Viola or, more recently, Doug Aitken are exceptions. Technological progress with HD equipment will eventually bring about a development of the video market, not unlike what happened to the market for photography which took years to mature. Francesco Vezzoli is the one artist who blends influences from the world of contemporary art, cinema, fashion and music. Karen Wright met him for the, as ever, extensive editorial contents that have become an essential feature of our theme sale catalogs. And now let’s start the FILM!

SIMON de PURY Chairman, Phillips de Pury & Company

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dennis hopper inside out words geoff nicholson | PhotographS peter rigaud


Double Standard, 1961

ÂŤDouble standard is a powerful enough image that many a photographer might have based an entire career on itÂť 6


All artworks © Dennis Hopper. All images Courtesy the artist and Tony Shafrazi Gallery, New York.

ourselves, but this photograph seems both archetypal and unimprovable. Right there at the center of the picture is a gas station, with two signs for Standard Oil, giving the picture its title and also invoking Ed Ruscha’s gas station paintings. (The photograph was indeed used on an invitation to an early Ruscha exhibition.) And above the gas station is a billboard featuring an extraordinarily elegant woman telling us that ‘Smart Women Cook with Gas’. A closer look also reveals that the light holding the traffic has already turned green. We’re seeing a moment of stasis before the cars start to move again and the scene comes to life. It’s a distinctively LA picture, but there are elements in there that don’t quite gel. For a start, everything looks so grey. It’s a black and white photograph, yet we can tell that it definitely isn’t a fine Californian blue sky. And LA may well be a city of glamor and elegance, of gorgeous mountains and sparkling swimming pools, but as we see here, it’s also a decentered city, made for cars rather than people, a place of low-rise buildings and often surprisingly bleak cityscapes. It’s a powerful enough image that many a photographer might have based an entire career on it. With this, and maybe a dozen of his other most famous photographs (the portraits of artists such as Ruscha, Warhol, Rauschenberg, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Hockney et al, making them look as glamorous as movie stars, plus some historically resonant photographs of Selma marchers, hippies, bikers, Allen Ginsberg, Phil Spector and Martin Luther King), Hopper would surely have done enough to be recognized, at the very least, as a significant 1960s photographer, and if nothing else, as a guy who was in absolutely the right place at the right time. And I like to imagine our naive enthusiast doing a little research on Hopper, and discovering that he took all these great pictures between and 1961 and 1967 and then stopped. ‘How come?’ our friend would wonder. ‘Who is this Dennis Hopper guy anyway?’ To which the answer is, he’s a lot of different things to a lot of different people; a photographer yes, though primarily an actor, and also a director and writer, responsible for arguably the most important movie of the 1960s, a painter and collagist, a serious art collector, a performance artist who blew himself up with dynamite, and (at least once) a vocalist with the rock band, Gorillaz. And perhaps these days he’s also defined by what he’s ceased to be: no longer an addict, no longer a gun nut, no longer crazy, no longer the guy of whom Henry Fonda once said, ‘The man is an idiot! I will not work for Dennis, because I won’t put up with his shit. He’s a total freak-out, stoned out of his mind all the time. Any man who insists on wearing his cowboy hat to the Academy Award ceremonies and keeps it on at the dinner table afterward ought to be spanked.’ Dennis Hopper was born in Dodge City in 1936, and he was one of those all round arty kids; playing piano, painting, acting. When he was 13, his parents moved to San Diego and he appeared on various local stages. One of the crucial experiences he had at this time was meeting Vincent

Sometimes I like to imagine there’s a naive young man or woman, out there in America or maybe beyond, dreaming of Los Angeles, and thumbing through a book of iconic photographs of the city. There, alongside Max Yavno’s night shot of the giant stucco leg atop a stocking store, or Garry Winogrand’s 1960s image of two ultra-stylish women heading toward the LAX theme building, might very well be a photograph by Dennis Hopper titled Double Standard, dated 1961. The shot is taken from inside a car waiting at a traffic light at what we know is the convergence of Santa Monica Boulevard, Doheny Drive and Melrose Avenue, though in fact there’s something oddly anonymous about the place. The photographer evidently used a wide-angle lens, wide enough to show most of the windshield, and to reveal that the car’s a convertible. A couple of lines of waiting traffic are visible in the rear view mirror, and the scene looks appealingly cinematic and wide screen. The buildings seem irrelevant compared to the broad expanse of tarmac: a solitary pedestrian is waiting to cross the street. The subject matter is familiar, perhaps we’ve taken similar pictures 7


«Hopper established a curious status for himself, as both insider and outsider, a mainstream Hollywood actor who was hip enough to ‘get’ pop art, even hip enough to hang out at the Factory»


Above: Andy Warhol and members of the Factory

Price, who advised him to collect art. Far more significantly, as it must have seemed at the time, San Diego wasn’t so far from Hollywood, and before long he had an agent who recognized that he had a certain something: the tough vulnerability, the edgy, compact energy and, by no means least, those haunted and haunting blue eyes. By the age of 18 he was a contract player at Warner Brothers. A year later he was in Rebel Without a Cause (1955) alongside James Dean, who befriended him, encouraged him to start taking photographs and to see life, as Hopper has described it, ‘through a frame’. Hopper acted in two of Dean’s three completed movies, and was devastated by his death: a kindred spirit had departed. As an actor, Hopper modeled himself on Dean and became ‘difficult’ in some of the same ways, though since his box-office power was infinitely less than Dean’s, this became a real problem. Much is made of Hopper being ‘blacklisted’ by Hollywood as impossible to work with, and it’s true that his movie roles were few and far between in the late 1950s and early 1960s, but he never stopped acting and he worked steadily in television, in Wagon Train, Cheyenne and The Twilight Zone, among dozens of other shows. If the work was less than prestigious, at least he was able to satisfy some of his higher artistic yearnings by becoming, in his words, a gallery bum. He bought art, became pals with the resident LA artists, and joined in the fun when the New Yorkers came to town. And most of the time he had his camera with him. He was there at the Ferus Gallery for Warhol’s soup-can exhibition and bought a painting for $75, though Irving Blum bought it back because he wanted to preserve the paintings as a set. Other investments were far more long term and profitable. He bought Roy Lichtenstein’s Sinking Sun (1964) for a thousand bucks and sold it some 40 years later for $16 million. Hopper established a curious status for himself in those days, as both insider and outsider, a mainstream Hollywood actor who was hip enough to ‘get’ pop art, even hip enough to hang out at the Factory, where he took a wonderful picture of Warhol, Gerard Malanga, Taylor Mead et al on the famous couch. He was an actor who could appear in the TV show Bonanza the very same year he appeared in Warhol’s Tarzan and Jane Regained… Sort of and 13 Most Beautiful Boys (1964). And evidently his name came off the real or imagined blacklist. In 1965 he was cast opposite John Wayne in The Sons of Katy Elder. Like any jobbing actor, Hopper’s work was diverse. As well as playing any number of cowboy roles, he also appeared in the psychedelic drug movie The Trip (1967), and the biker movie The Glory Stompers (1968). How big a stretch was it to put all these elements together and make the movie Easy Rider (1969), which is after all a kind of psychedelic, biker, cowboy movie? Easy Rider is, above all, why we’re talking about Hopper as a major cultural icon rather than as a minor 1960s photographer. It’s also why he gave up photography. He stopped taking photographs in 1967 because he wanted 9

(Gregory Markopoulos, Taylor Mead, Gerard Malanga & Jack Smith), 1963; Below: Andy Warhol (with flower), 1963, from the Billboard painting series, 2009


to be a movie director; not just in control of stills, but in control of the whole show: the words, the design, the music, the editing: everything. He wanted to be, decided he was, an auteur. He wrote, directed, and starred in Easy Rider. And sure, Peter Fonda produced and co-wrote it, Fonda and Jack Nicholson also starred in it, and the look of the film owes a great deal to the cinematographer László Kovács, but you sometimes get the feeling that if Hopper could have dispensed with all these other people and done absolutely everything himself, he surely would have. It’s hard at this historical distance to reconstruct just how strange, exciting and important Easy Rider seemed at the time. It’s also hard to remember just how much of an ‘us and them’ mentality prevailed for much of the 1960s, but Easy Rider was definitely for ‘us’. I watch Easy Rider again from time to time, and it’s one of those movies that seems different at every viewing, sometimes wildly clever and prescient, other times a little obvious and silly. One of the best things you can say about the central performances of Hopper as Billy and Peter Fonda as Wyatt, is that they don’t beg for approval or sympathy. You’re allowed to make up your own mind about them. Are they really personifications of some new spirit of freedom that’s abroad in America? Or are they just a couple of vacuous potheads who bought their freedom by doing a big cocaine deal? Is Easy Rider a celebration of 1960s idealism or a critique? Perhaps it’s all the above. To the money men of Hollywood, however, none of this mattered a whole lot. The movie was a gigantic financial jackpot. The counterculture was profitable and exploitable. Hollywood numbers are always unreliable, but it’s generally accepted that the movie was made for a little under half a million dollars, and has to date taken at least $50 million: a nice rate of return. Success like that buys a director a lot of creative rope, and Hopper duly hanged himself. With a budget about double that of Easy Rider, he took a cast and crew down to Peru to make (in fact largely to improvise) The Last Movie (1971)­, a title that you’d have to say was asking for trouble. The basic idea seems promising enough. A film crew is making a movie in an Indian village in Peru. The local Indians embrace the crew and feel a loss when they depart. Therefore they invent a series of rituals that reenact the movie-making process, but not realizing that movie death and violence is pretence, they do it for real. Hopper apparently edited a somewhat conventional narrative cut of the film, but then, egged on by Alejandro Jodorowsky, the director of El Topo (1970), he came up with a much more radical version, with wild jump cuts, much toying with reality and illusion, and various kinds of deconstruction. The producers enjoyed this about as much as you’d expect. The movie is often dismissed as unwatchable, and these days it’s certainly hard to find a way to see it, but I remember it as not so much incoherent as slow and a little pretentious, and not nearly as way out subversive as it thinks it is. But again the content of the film may be less relevant than the legend.The movie gave Hopper a reputation (pretty thoroughly deserved) as

a dangerous and intractable lunatic, wallowing in drink, drugs, guns, sex and his own ego. None of this was secret. Life magazine of June 19, 1970 has Hopper on its cover, with the shoutline, ‘The Easy Rider makes a wild new movie’. Inside there’s a sensational report from the set of The Last Movie: lots of dope, cocaine and acid, lots of extreme sex, including ‘whipping parties’. But it’s also clear from the article that some very serious and committed filmmaking is going on. Hopper is quoted as saying, ‘Man, the movies are coming out of the dark ages, I mean for 40 years the uncreative people told the creative people what to do. Now we’re telling them…’ The fact is, Hopper didn’t go down to Peru just to take drugs, have sex, and waste somebody else’s money. He went down there to take drugs, have sex, and make a great work that broke then reinvented the rules of moviemaking. You might wonder if that was a realistic ambition, and if Hopper was really the man for the job, but he wasn’t screwing around, he was deadly serious about it all, perhaps too serious for his own good. The movie was despised at the time though very little seen, then it was shelved. In many ways, that’s business as usual in the movie world, but Hopper took it very 10


Far left: Jasper Johns, contact sheet, 1964, from the Billboard painting series, 2009; above, Ed Ruscha, 1964; left, James Rosenquist, 1964, from the Billboard painting series, 2009.

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Installation view, Dennis Hopper: Signs of the Times, September 12 – October 24, 2008, Tony Shafrazi Gallery, New York

«Supervillain, art-world mover, old biker... what HE brings to the table is a great weight and range of cultural reference and resonance» Part of Hopper’s rehabilitation involved him moving back to LA in the mid-1980s, where, in one of those great, instinctively right decisions, he bought a studio in Venice designed by the then not especially well-known architect, Frank Gehry. It’s not every Hollywood actor who has the smarts or the inclination to live in a piece of cutting-edge architecture: a great many want to live in faux-castles in Beverly Hills. Hopper got it dead right. Over the years he expanded the studio, bought adjoining properties, and turned the place into a kind of art fortress, containing not only works by his 1960s fellow travelers, but also by subsequent generations of artists, Basquiat, Schnabel, Haring, Cindy Sherman, Damien Hirst, right through to Banksy. Depending on how you count, this was probably Hopper’s third art collection, the two previous ones having been dispersed as a result of his divorces. From the mid-1980s onward, Hopper’s own art also began to get more serious attention. Those photographs from 1961-67 were widely exhibited, and eventually he started taking more. He also experimented with other art forms, as he put it, ‘painting, sculpture, light machines, billboards, sets, video, digital work – just about everything’. His work has been seen around America and Europe, in Tokyo, at the State Hermitage in St Petersburg, and in a touring exhibition, called Hopper and the New Hollywood, which has visited France and Australia. Would he have had so many shows if he hadn’t been a movie star? Probably not. On the other hand, Hollywood is full of actors ‘expressing themselves’ on canvas or in photographs, and you don’t see the Hermitage inviting them to exhibit. Hopper’s career as an art world star will reach a zenith in July of this year when a Julian Schnabel-curated exhibition of Hopper’s work, Double Standard, opens at LA’s MOCA. It will be Jeffrey Deitch’s first show as incoming director, and we all hope that Dennis Hopper will be around to see it. Earlier this year he was diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer, while also fighting a bitter divorce, his fifth. When, in the middle of this, he made a rare public appearance to receive his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, he looked very frail indeed, although his spark was definitely still visible. The crowd that watched the ceremony, and I was among them, displayed an overwhelming warmth toward the old devil. News of the Double Standard exhibition was received with enthusiasm and skepticism, both inside and outside LA. The naysayers thought it sounded a bit too ‘Hollywood’, its supporters thought it sounded like a lot of fun. If you’re in LA, why not use and enjoy the connection to some of its glitz and star power? Optimists, and I include myself, hope the exhibition will be able to square the circle between the serious and the entertaining, between high art and Hollywood commerce, between a good exhibition and good box office, between the insiders and the outsiders. It ought to be possible.That’s pretty much what Dennis Hopper has been doing his whole life. n

badly indeed. He holed up in the Mabel Dodge Luhan House in Taos, New Mexico, where his addictions got worse. By his own account his daily intake consisted of ‘a half-gallon of rum with a fifth on the side, 28 beers and three grams of cocaine’. Then if he wanted to get really drunk, he’d do shooters and tequila. Other people reported that he’d put together a significant collection of guns, and sometimes fired a machine gun into his bedroom wall. ‘Some of the folks alongside me went Establishment or dropped dead,’ said Hopper. ‘I was more fortunate. I went insane.’ This was a long dark period, more than a decade, with Hopper surfacing only occasional, though when he did, some amazing work resulted: Hopper as the demented photographer in Apocalypse Now (1979) and as the supercool, existential Ripley in The American Friend­(1977). However, at some point he seems to have realized that maybe he wasn’t quite the unbounded cosmic genius he once thought he was. He was a great actor, a pretty good director (though Easy Rider was always likely to be a once in a lifetime thing), a great photographer, a great presence and personality, and always the hippest man in the room. Maybe he realized he didn’t need to be a combination of Orson Welles and Jean-Luc Godard as well. Maybe he decided it was time to get back to work. There’s some doubt about exactly when Hopper got clean. David Lynch says it happened at least a year and a half before he cast Hopper as Frank Booth in Blue Velvet, which was released in 1986. Even so, it can’t have been very reassuring when Hopper called Lynch and said he had to play the part, because he was Frank Booth, the Oedipal, gas-sniffing drug lord, sadist and all-round maniac. But whether he was Frank Booth or not, he certainly brought conviction and credibility to a part that might have been simply ludicrous in other hands. The movie signaled Hopper’s return to the main stage. The irony is hardly subtle, that as soon as he stopped being a deranged lunatic in life, the world loved him for playing one on screen, and he went on to play quite a few more, in Super Mario Brothers (1993), Speed (1994) and Waterworld (1995) among others. At the same time, he had a parallel career in quirky independent movies such as Basquiat (1996), playing art dealer Bruno Bischofberger, and in Larry Bishop’s Hell Ride (2008) in which he was Eddie Zero, an old biker who now favors a sidecar. Supervillain, art-world mover, old biker: it’s hard to think of another actor who could convincingly play all those roles, and although nobody ever exactly thinks of Hopper as a versatile actor, what he does bring to the table is a great weight and range of cultural reference and resonance. It certainly has a lot to do with his 1960s, countercultural past, though he seldom has a trace of the old hippy about him; peace and love not really being his thing. His involvement with the art world is clearly the real deal. Plus he brings a sense of danger and unpredictability to everything he does. We know we aren’t watching some actor who’s trying to imagine what it’s like to be scarily out of control; Hopper has lived the part.

Geoff Nicholson is a British writer living in Los Angeles. His latest book is Gravity's Volkswagen. Double Standard opens at MOCA, LA, on July 11, 2010 12


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Aaron Johnson in Sam Taylor-Wood's Nowhere Boy, 2010

reel time artists using film

Courtesy Icon Films Distribution

words sarah kent

The elusive graffiti artist Banksy has recently made a foray into film. His first feature Exit Through the Gift Shop (2009) premiered at the Sundance Film Festival; tickets for its London debut in March sold out in one minute. A disarming mixture of fact and fiction, the film follows the antics of Thierry Guetta, a video fanatic who obsessively records the nocturnal shenanigans of LA street artists such as Shepard Fairey, Buff Monster and Swoon. Guetta then befriends Banksy and films his more notorious antics – such as smuggling his pictures into London’s Tate Britain and New York’s Metropolitan Museum, stenciling images onto the wall separating Israel from the West Bank, and installing an inflatable Guantanamo detainee in Disneyland. Inspired by Banksy’s example, Guetta decides to become an artist himself and stages a

huge show in a Los Angeles warehouse of derivative tat made by a large team of helpers. Clever publicity achieves instant success and the show nets him a million dollars in sales; this prompts a bemused Banksy (his face hidden by a hood and his voice modified electronically) to wax philosophical about the art world. ‘Maybe it means art is a bit of a joke,’ he concludes. Since Guetta’s rise to fame mimics his own story, one can’t help seeing this ironic comedy as autobi­ographical and to assume that Banksy senses it’s time to move on – to film making. He wouldn’t be the first; artists have been attracted to the medium ever since its inception. The Italian futurists, Bruno Corra and Arnaldo Ginna began experimenting with ab­stract films a century ago and, only 20 years later, Salvador Dalí and Luis Buñuel made one of the


From left: Dziga Vertov’s Man with a Movie Camera, 1929; Michael Fassbender in Steve McQueen’s Hunger, 2008; Bansky, Exit Through the Giftshop, 2009; Candice Breitz, Queen

most shocking opening sequences ever to appear on screen. Un Chien Andalou (An Andalusian Dog, 1929) begins with Buñuel sharpening a cutthroat razor and, without warning, slicing through a woman’s eyeball. If Banksy’s notoriety comes from ignoring convention, the sheer exhilaration of working with a new medium still free of rules is apparent in Dziga Vertov’s Man With a Movie Camera (1929), a high-speed, split-screen romp round Russia’s cities. But my story begins 35 years later, when artists saw themselves in opposition to a wellestablished industry that was big business. Fluxus, a loose-knit group of poets, musicians, dancers and conceptual artists, spearheaded the assault. In 1964 during a Fluxus performance in New York, Nam June Paik ran a clear strip of film through a projector. It was a humorous declaration of intent; metaphorically, Zen for Film purged the medium of associations with mainstream cinema and laid claim to it for experimental film-makers. Andy Warhol’s Sleep (1963) was first shown at the Film-Makers’ Co-operative in New York to an audience of nine, two of whom left within the hour. You can’t blame them; Warhol had left the camera running while his former boyfriend, John Giorno, enjoyed a good night’s sleep. At another showing, a frustrated viewer supposedly yelled in Giorno’s ear, ‘Wake Up!’ Warhol was treating the moving image as though it were a painting which, rather than changing through time, remains stuck in the present tense; few people sit watching a painting for several hours, though. Empire (1964), an eight-hour shot of the Empire State Building, is similarly unwatchable. Blow Job (1964), on the other hand, is mesmerizing. The camera focuses on the face of DeVerne Bookwalter who is supposedly enjoying a blowjob; you have to take it on trust that the signs of sexual ecstasy crossing his face are genuine. Shot at 24 frames per second (sound speed), but projected at 16fps (silent speed), the film is in slow motion, which produces an atmosphere of

surreal intensity. On UbuWeb, you can watch a real-time version which destroys the excruciating tension, but reveals just how crucial discomfort is to the real Warhol experience. Between 1963 and 1968 Warhol made 650 films including 500 Screen Tests – portraits of visitors to the Factory, such as Bob Dylan, Salvador Dalí, Marcel Duchamp, Allen Ginsberg and Edie Sedgwick, who endured the camera’s dispassionate gaze for four, long minutes. Watching them squirm is as excruciating for the viewer as it must have been for the sitter. After Valerie Solanas shot Warhol in June 1968, Paul Morrissey took over the Factory’s film output and made it more mainstream. Two years later, Warhol withdrew his films from distribution and switched to video, making some 4,000 tapes including a series of programs for MTV. His obsession with celebrity meanwhile had taken him in a different direction from other artists so, although he was one of the most radical film-makers ever, he has not been as influential as might be expected. In 1984 he entrusted his films to the Museum of Modern Art, which is now releasing them again for exhibition. It’s easy to see why someone would switch from film to video – electronic media avoid nightmare scenarios like the one I endured in London, in the early 1970s. I had arranged a show of Carolee Schneemann’s films; the 16mm reels all came end out, but the technician didn’t have a clue how to rewind them, so I laced up the projector and switched on. A river of film began spooling over the floor, leaving us knee-deep in celluloid. Eventually, we got things under control and showed Fuses (1967) to a stunned audience of old-age pensioners; I had forgotten how explicit the content was. Shots of nature and abstract patterns made by staining, burning or scratching the celluloid thinly veil the main subject – the artist having sex with her boyfriend. Having trained as a painter, Schneemann approached film as a fine art material, but she

also used it to document performances such as Meat Joy (1964), in which eight, scantily-clad performers enjoy an orgiastic romp with mounds of sausages, chickens, raw fish and pools of paint; the artist described it as ‘an erotic rite – excessive, indulgent, a celebration of flesh as material’. At the time, such overt sensuality was deeply shocking, but attitudes have changed since then and, when it was re-enacted at the Whitechapel Gallery, London, in 2002, the event seemed decidedly tame. Marina Abramovic´ had a retrospective that recently closed at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, where Imponderabilia (1977/2010), a piece she had made with Ulay, was re-enacted by various combinations of performers – two males, two females and a male/female duo. The reenactment caused problems, though; some members of the public complained that squeezing between the participants is too embarrassing, while others took the opportunity to grope the naked performers. Such was the charisma of Ulay and Abramovic´, that no such issues arose when they performed together and, for them, the chemistry engendered by the live encounter with an audience was crucial. ‘Performance is about an exchange of energy between performer and the audience,’ Abramovic´ has said. ‘Without this audience the performer has no function.’ Not surprisingly, then, she regards their film recordings as merely ‘second-best documents’. As more and more artists began using film, though, heated debates erupted as to the status of these recordings – were they merely documents or were they artworks in their own right? And how should they be marketed? The argument was complicated by artists such as Vito Acconci who rarely filmed performances because, he said, ‘I don’t want the videotape/film to become the piece… Once a performance is over it should be transmitted only by reportage and rumor.’ But he performed a number of fetishistic body rituals especially for the camera. In

Vertov: courtesy Kino International. McQueen: courtesy Pathe Ltd. Banksy: courtesy Pest Control. Breitz: © the artist, photo Stephen White

(A Portrait of Madonna), 2005

«On Youtube you can watch a real-time version [of blow job] which 16


Openings (1970), we watch him pulling out the hairs round his navel and, in Conversions (1971), attempting a temporary (and self-evidently doomed) sex change. Bruce Nauman spent many lonely hours in his studio performing for the camera. In Walking in an Exaggerated Manner Around the Perimeter of a Square (1967–68), he teeters along chalk lines swaying his hips in ludicrous simulation of the contrapposto pose of classical sculpture. In other films we see him playing the violin, dancing and bouncing balls. Watching these daft exercises, you feel like a voyeur snooping on private moments as the artist whiles away the time waiting for inspiration to strike. Nauman usually ignores the fact that he is being watched except on one occasion, when in a fit of paranoia, he hisses, ‘Get out of my mind. Get out of this room.’ In place of live performance, this studio footage offers us the false sense of intimacy of a recording; Acconci goes on to explore this in numerous videos. Nauman also switched to video, producing many of the most memorable and troubling pieces ever made; the dark humor of his self-deprecating absurdities has had enormous influence on subsequent generations. Bas Jan Ader recorded numerous incidental acts, whose anti-heroism has become legendary. Fall II (1971) is pure slapstick. Riding a bicycle beside an Amsterdam canal, he swerves and falls headlong into the water. No matter how many times you watch it, this act of deliberate incompetence remains extremely funny. I’m Too Sad To Tell You (1971), on the other hand, shows him crying for over three minutes. The tears don’t come easily, but whether this is an emotive device or a sign of real feeling remains ambiguous. Either way, the understated theatricality is unusually affecting. None of these artists saw film as their primary medium, but it was inevitable that, sooner or later, someone would choose to explore the potential of cinema. Rebecca Horn began filming performers wearing her fetishistic body

extensions. In Berlin Exercises (1974–75), we see her clawing the walls and floor with three-foot finger gloves and stroking her lover’s cheeks with the cockatoo mask strapped over her face. Mechanical wings close round a naked woman in Paradise Widow (1975), encasing her in a phallic cocoon of shimmering black feathers. ‘The sculpture,’ Horn told me, ‘was part of a dialogue between me living in Berlin and someone I longed to be with, living in New York. It’s a shell or second skin that is both protective and constraining, an isolated cage.’ Soon her films began taking on a perversely surreal character of their own. Horn often rented out her New York loft while she was away. This inspired Der Eintänzer (The Dancing Cavalier, 1978), a bizarre tale set in a temporary dance studio. A blind man comes for lessons, hoping that physical contact and the rhythms of the tango will restore his confidence. We watch nubile dancers doing their exercises, while a nymphette is caressed by the feathery fronds of a huge double fan, which swirls round her in motorpowered ecstasy. The blind man can’t share these titillating scenes, but nor can we experience his heightened sense of touch and smell. In an enraptured monologue, he describes the aroma of peaches filling the room, while caressing the palm of his hand with a bird’s wing. A sense of menace darkens the mood; hat pins becomes instruments for blinding and carving knives for murder; pushed under the door, some broken feathers hint at the imminent death of the fledglings within. Sure enough, a swing propels its occupant through the open window, leaving the room empty save for a table that dances a forlorn tango, all alone. Horn has long been a fan of Buster Keaton and Buster’s Bedroom (1990) starts with a metaphoric journey; a blindfolded girl drives 30 miles along a desert road towards Hollywood, in search of Buster Keaton. It’s a sad tale of unrequited love. The heroine, Diana Daniels (Geraldine Chaplin) spends her time in a whisky-driven

wheelchair. ‘Out of love for her sadistic idol, a snake-obsessed doctor played by Donald Sutherland,’ Horn explains, ‘she has made herself paralyzed and just sits in a wheelchair drinking constantly. You can love someone so much that you paralyze yourself.’ The film ends with the girl committing suicide by wading into the sea, watched through binoculars by the rest of cast. In 1970 Robert Smithson began constructing Spiral Jetty, a 15-foot wide causeway that spirals into the water from the north bank of the Great Salt Lake, Utah. Realizing that few people would travel to this remote spot, he decided to film the fleet of lorries tipping tons of rock and soil into the shallow water. He had little experience of filming and found the process fascinating. ‘Film strips hung from the cutter’s rack,’ he wrote, ‘bits and pieces of Utah, out-takes overexposed and underexposed, masses of impenetrable material. The sun, the spiral, the salt buried in lengths of footage. Everything about movies and moviemaking is archaic and crude.’ We see light glinting off the rose-colored water of the lake as, hovering over the iconic earth work in a helicopter, Smithson intones: ‘From the centre of the Spiral Jetty north by east: mud, salt, crystals, rocks, water, spiral. North east by east: mud, salt, crystals, rocks, water, spiral…’ and so on, round the points of the compass. The artist walks to the end of the 1,500-foot causeway and, in a solitary moment of epiphany, stands gazing over the water into shimmering emptiness. It wouldn’t be long before the scenes Smithson described in the editing suite were history. In 1965 Kodak launched Super 8, a film which came in cartridges that slotted into light, portable cameras, and artists quickly switched from 16mm to the more convenient gauge. Not long after, Sony brought out the Portapak; it was expensive and poor quality, but as prices came down and the quality improved, artists began abandoning film for video, which didn’t have to be sent away for processing and could be edited

reveals how crucial discomfort is to the real Warhol experience» 17


From left: Bas Jan Ader, I’m too sad to tell you, 1970. Rebecca Horn, Buster’s Bedroom, 1990. Tacita Dean, Kodak, 2006. Robert

on the hoof. Artists had used film mainly for documenting performance and land art; soon, though, hundreds would choose video as their primary medium. But that is another story. Among those still committed to film was Derek Jarman. At the Slade School of Art in London, he studied theatre design and was commissioned to design the sets for Ken Russell’s film The Devils (1970). He began experimenting with a film camera, and his love of cinema was born. His preferred stock was Super 8 because, he said, ‘the Super 8 camera is free; 35mm is chained by money to institutions… economics have gutted mind from the format.’ He was also expert in transferring footage from Super 8 to 35mm and from video to film, to get the effects he wanted. Shot in Sardinia, Jarman’s Sebastiane (1976) portrays the martyrdom of St Sebastian in terms of frustrated homosexual desire.The camera dwells lovingly on the slender bodies of Roman soldiers as they while away the time swimming and sunbathing in some isolated outpost of empire. When Sebastiane refuses the advances of his commanding officer, he is cruelly punished and finally put to death by his comrades. The soldiers speak in Latin, which enhances the sense of alienation and the claustrophobia of this eulogy to the beauty of the male body. ‘When I made Sebastiane,’ Jarman explained, ‘there was no way of imagining yourself as a gay, you wouldn’t even see gays on television, so how could you come to terms with yourself?’ Shot on 35mm, his final film Blue (1993) was made while he was dying of Aids. This sublimely beautiful work takes cinema to new heights of intelligence and urgency. There are no images; in homage to Yves Klein, who created an intense blue pigment, and in acknowledgment of his own encroaching blindness, the screen is bathed in clear blue light. A male voice reads a moving account of the artist’s thoughts, feelings, recollections and desires as his health continues to deteriorate. ‘The virus rages fierce,’ he reads. ‘I have no friends now who are not dead or dying. Like a blue frost it caught them.’ Cadaverous but

undaunted, Jarman attended the premier at the Venice Biennale and, with characteristically robust humor, described Blue as ‘a jolly good signing-off film.’ Tacita Dean began using that ‘beautiful, incandescent material’ as a student at the Slade School of Art. In Berlin where she now lives, she showed me the Steinbeck machine on which she does her editing. ‘It’s what I learned on,’ she told me. ‘The real process is in the editing.’ Soon after she graduated in 1992, I included her in Peripheral States at the Benjamin Rhodes Gallery, London. A loop of film traversed the walls before clicking through the gate of a projector to produce a flickering, black and white image of Manet’s Le Déjeuner sur l’Herbe, as recreated by actors – bearded women and clean-shaven men. The Story of Beard (1992) is an installation as much as a film, a celebration of the physical qualities of celluloid and the whirring theatricality of old-fashioned projectors. ‘The plasticity of film – the transcription of time through length – is important to me,’ says Dean, ‘and the tangibility, the fact that it consists of serial imagery using light and lenses.’ The Uncles (2004) helps explain her obsession; film-making is in her blood. Her two uncles are sons of key figures in the post-war British film industry – Basil Dean, producer, writer, director and founder of Ealing Studios which was central to British film-making, and Michael Balcon, the producer of over 200 films including the

famous Alec Guinness comedies made at Ealing. As the old men reminisce, you realize that this family portrait pays tribute to a glorious period in British cinema as well as the role played by Dean’s ancestors. Foley Artist (1996) follows the post-production phase of a film in Shepperton Studios as sound is added to script. The dubbing chart reads: ‘Footsteps on board; open door; footsteps on carpet; open door; footsteps on stairs; footsteps on tile; close door…’ Whether waving clothes to simulate wind or stomping on soggy papier-mâché to mimic footsteps on wet pavements, foley artists produce the sound effects that bring film images to life. The real subject of this fascinating film is the alchemy of creating magical realism from base materials – of making thunder with sheets of metal and kissing your wrists to simulate passionate embraces. Shortly before they stopped making film stock, Dean persuaded the Kodak factory in Chalon-sur-Saône, France to let her film the production line. Following the celluloid as it travels through miles of machinery, Kodak (2006) is an elegiac farewell to an obsolete material. Made at the same time, Noir et Blanc was filmed on the last rolls of 16mm, black and white stock that Dean could lay her hands on. ‘I’d be sorry to see the passing of film,’ she says, ‘but it is being replaced by digital technology and the labs are closing down. People portray me as a fetishist, but I simply prefer the quality of film and I like the fact that it’s anachronistic, a hounded medium.’ Steve McQueen began making shorts while studying at Goldsmiths College, London. After graduating in 1993, he went to New York University Film School but stayed only a year. ‘NYU is high profile, but in terms of making films, it’s very formulaic and unimaginative,’ he told me. ‘They don’t like you throwing the camera up in the air.’ A commission from New York’s Museum of Modern Art led to Deadpan (1997), a reworking of Buster Keaton’s famous stunt from Steamboat Bill Jr (1928). When I saw it at the ICA in London, the

Bas Jan Ader: © the artist, Collection Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen. Horn: © Rebecca Horn, courtesy Sean Kelly Gallery, New York. Dean: courtesy the artist, Marianne Goodman Gallery, New York and Frith Street Gallery, London. Smithson: photo Gianfranco Gorgoni, Collection Dia Art Foundation. Jarman: courtesy Kino International

Smithson, Spiral Jetty, 1970. Derek Jarman, Sebastiane, 1976

«Being in the film gives it a certain authenticity– though yo 18


silent, black and white image filled the entire wall of a darkened room, dominating one’s field of vision to claustrophobic effect. McQueen stands before a timber barn; the wall behind him suddenly topples forwards, but a window just big enough to slip over his large frame, miraculously saves him from harm. Re-enacted again and again and filmed from every conceivable angle, the crash begins to appear sinister, as harmless slapstick morphs into what could be a premeditated act of aggression. And as the wall thunders past his cheek for the umpteenth time, McQueen’s calm begins to seem like a demonstration of supreme courage, a metaphor for survival against the odds. The final shot brings home the wall’s deadly potential; it thuds to the ground kicking up dust and leaves and the screen goes black, as if the camera had finally been crushed. ‘Being in the film gives it a certain authenticity’, McQueen explains. ‘You’re putting yourself on the line – though you are just as vulnerable behind the camera as in front of it.’ I asked him, in 1999, if he would like to make mainstream movies. ‘If I had an idea I’d go for it,’ he replied. ‘I don’t see any difference between art films and mainstream cinema. It’s a question of language, different ways of speaking about the same thing. Everything is related to everything else – drama, reportage, advertising, documentary, art films – but the doors to museums and galleries are stiff, access is harder than to television or the cinema.’ It was an apocryphal statement. Later that year he won the Turner Prize; in 2002 he was awarded an OBE and in 2008 released his first feature film, Hunger, which won the Caméra d’Or and the International Critics Federation Prize at Cannes and garnered further awards at the Sydney and Venice Film Festivals. Hunger follows the final weeks in the life of Bobby Sands (played by Michael Fassbender), the IRA hunger striker who died in 1981 in the Maze Prison, Belfast, after a 66-day campaign to be recognized as a political prisoner.The first 45 minutes takes the form of a fly-on-the-wall documentary of life in the H-block acutely observed in horrific

detail. Ugly circumstances are portrayed with great beauty; when, for instance, naked prisoners smear the walls of their cells with faeces and urine, they create swirling patterns resembling abstract paintings. Then, shot in a single take, comes a 22-minute discussion between Bobby Sands and Father Dominic Moran (played by Liam Cunningham) concerning the morality of the hunger strike that Sands is planning. This intense debate acts as the fulcrum between the noise and violence of the first section and the elegiac finale in which we watch Sands slowly die of starvation. With its rigor, clarity and visceral immediacy, the film is a masterpiece, unlike anything seen before. Like Candice Breitz, the Berlin-based South African artist whose video works like Queen (A Portrait of Madonna) (2005) are popular with both critics and the public, McQueen is a regular fixture at biennials. In 2009 McQueen represented Britain at the Venice Biennale with a two-screen film of the gardens in which the event takes place. Giardini was filmed in February when the place is abandoned to feral cats, scavenging dogs, cruising men, birds, bugs and piles of rubbish. Life continues off-screen – church bells ring, crowds chant and ships glide past on the canal – while in long, lingering shots the gardens are portrayed as a peripheral zone that follows its own rhythms and cadencies. Sam Taylor-Wood works with photography, film and video. Still Life (2001) uses the gorgeous color and exquisite detail of 35mm film to witness the high-speed transformation of a dish of succulent fruit into a mildewed heap of rotten matter. In under four minutes, decay has worked its hideously beautiful magic, leaving you breathless with desire to hang onto life for as long as possible. She moves in pop star and celebrity circles, so it’s not surprising that she jumped at the chance to make a film about the teenage years of John Lennon, played in Nowhere Boy (2009) by Aaron Johnson. Focusing on the influences of his mother Julia and aunt Mimi with whom he lived, Nowhere Boy follows Lennon from his first

attempts to learn the guitar, to his friendship with Paul McCartney to setting up the Quarrymen, the band which later became the Beatles. The performances are first-rate, but it’s a conventional film containing nothing to indicate a director with the visual flair of a fine-art background. In Vexation Island (1997), Rodney Graham exploits the high production values of 35mm film to produce an eight-minute loop that mimics the seductive beauty of adverts and travelogues. Dressed as an 18th-century buccaneer, he lies prone beneath a palm tree on a desert island. Awakened by his squawking parrot, he looks round for something to drink, spies a coconut in the tree overhead and shakes it free. Plummeting down, the coconut knocks him unconscious, he falls down and the loop begins again. Aerial shots of the tiny island contrast the beauty of this tranquil idyll with the imminent threat of death from heat exhaustion, thirst and starvation. With delicious irony, Graham points out that Paradise is not trouble-free. Rheinmetall/Victoria 8 (2003) pays tribute to two obsolete machines, considered classics in their day. The Victoria A, a 35mm projector from the 1950s, projects a black and white film of a Rheinmetall typewriter, a must-have piece of office equipment from the 1930s. Loving closeups eulogize the perfectly engineered parts of this museum treasure as simulated snow begins to bury the relic; but the antiquated projector soldiers on, and the film repeats –­endlessly. Graham’s homage to cinema, then and now, brings this story to a close. In the 1960s, experimental film-makers saw themselves working in opposition to the mainstream and showed their films mainly in art galleries and alternative venues; the current trend is to make feature films for exhibition in festivals followed, hopefully, by distribution in mainstream cinemas. And the success that Steve McQueen, Sam Taylor-Wood and Banksy have met with from film critics and the public alike suggests that the doors may remain open for challenging and innovative work. n

you are just as vulnerable behind the camera as in front of it» 19


Arriving at 10 Corso Como in Milan, I am slightly annoyed to find that the best table in the restaurant is already occupied, so I take the next best. I am therefore amused to learn that the occupant of the best table is none other then my dinner date Francesco Vezzoli. I shift to his table and we laugh about the mistake. He apologizes that the kitchen will not open for half an hour and asks if he can order anyway, as he is starving, courteously asking if I mind whether he eats loads. In the end he orders something that sounds like Satan, but turns out to be seitan, explaining, ‘It’s a protein; it’s a soya thing… It’s cooked as if it was meat, but I wouldn’t suggest it. It’s a very strange thing’. He refuses a drink, remarking, ‘We are talking and I might say something stupid if I drink.’ We launch into our conversation and I try valiantly to keep up with him, both in speed of conversation and in eating the many dishes that appear. I point out that it appears to me that we are bit players in a Fellini movie, as I sit with tottering piles of untouched plates in front of me while his plates are quickly emptied. He laughs again when I comment on the speed of attack, saying he was hungry – but then he is always hungry! Karen WRIGHT Did you grow up in Italy? FRANCESCO VEZZOLI Yes, I grew up in Brescia, a provincial city, in a normal bourgeois family. KW Your family wasn’t particularly interested in the arts? FV They were not rich: a doctor and a lawyer.

Francesco Vezzoli, Ballet Russes Italian Style (The Musical You Will Never See Again), 2009 Live Performance with the Bolshoi ballet and Lady Gaga.

Image Courtesy MOCA, Los Angeles; The Garage Center for Contemporary Culture, Moscow; Gagosian Gallery.

KW Both professionals. A nice combination. FV Yes, a pediatrician and a lawyer; very politically aware. They took me to museums. They had friends that were involved with art. We had no expensive art, but we had one lithograph by Joseph Beuys that said ‘Art equals Capital’ and a Bauhaus poster, so I grew up thinking that was the art of my parents, which is how I kind of explain to myself why I do what I do. Why I became so attached – at the beginning especially – to being read as a camp side of pop culture.


francesco vezzoli greedy for life interview karen wright


KW I am very interested in how artists explain and talk about their work. I doubt if you can remove biography from work. FV No. KW It’s very important to look as well, but I do think biography is important. FV Biographies are very important and can explain a lot – maybe sometimes too much because they kill the romanticism in some work. In my case, especially in Italian culture, there was this background. In general, most of the artists in Arte Povera were not so flamboyant when it came to speaking, so clearly my effervescence and my campy statements were never really seen in a positive light, but that’s OK. I think that anything that provides a young artist some challenge is a good thing; I’m not complaining. KW What would you tell a young artist then? FV I don’t have a recipe for everybody. All I can say is that there are some objective facts. To be an artist working today you have to push your luck in many directions. You have to be really committed and you cannot expect to be a fake savant or something like that; it just doesn’t work. You have to be a hard worker and it’s a bit embarrassing, but I think that’s the truth. You have to be slightly more American – not too much. KW We are getting ahead of ourselves. You grew up in Italy and your first heroes were the heroes of your grandmothers. FV Yes. KW But now you seem to have jumped ship a bit and you are looking toward other… FV I’m being realistic. I moved to London, I studied at St Martin’s and I saw the Young British Artists growing because I arrived there in 1989 and my first show was at Anthony d’Offay, so I have learnt my lessons. I am not saying I have been as successful as some people would have hoped but maybe I have been more successful than some people would ever have expected. I am just traveling my way through. KW It’s not that you’ve turned your back on Italy: you can see with Democrazy and Caligula that they are both very Italian. FV Yes. KW But they have this overlay of another culture on top of it. FV Yes. My first video [OK, the Praz Is Right!] had John Maybury [directing] and Carlo Di Palma [as cinematographer] and the idea was that I was bringing John, who back then was not only what he still is now, the greatest director doing pop videos, together with Carlo Di Palma, and me doing the local work with Iva Zanicchi. Zanicchi was a Berlusconi supporter, the host of OK, The Price Is Right and a former camp pop diva worthy of the Eurovision Song Contest. I still love her today for having accepted a leap into the void. She had no idea what she was getting herself into. I am still doing the same now but with Lady Gaga and Jonas Åkerlund. I think the core is still there. I am just applying my system of fantasies to a larger media scheme. I am willing to analyze the global media a bit further because I feel – can I go on speaking freely? KW Absolutely. FV I feel that the media has such a relevant role in contemporary culture

Above, stills from An Embroidered Trilogy, from left: The End (teleteatro), 1999. OK! The Praz is Right, 1997. Il Sogno di Venere, 1998. Iva Zanicchi in Ok! The Praz is Right, 1997. Opposite, left: Helen Mirren and Milla Jovovich in Trailer for a Remake of Gore Vidal’s Caligula, 2005. 22

All artworks courtesy the artist.

KW Your parents were very serious? FV They were serious, but it was not as serious as it may sound. They took me to the Arte Povera exhibition. That was the art of my parents and that’s why I felt in need of distancing myself and almost to be more attached to what my grandmothers presented to me as art - television, pop culture and melodramas of the 1940s and 1950s. KW Were you close to your grandmothers? FV To both of them. Yes. It is normal in an Italian family: you grow up with them, especially when your parents are studying and starting off their careers, so I was with my grandmas a lot. KW What I found when I was studying contemporary Italian art was this love of family but also the need to distance oneself artistically. If you don’t, it’s very hard to make that leap forward and you are left looking backwards. FV Especially if your parents provide you with such an apparently safe haven, like Beuys and Merz. Even that was bound to become outdated, just as it happens in all art forms. Certainly traveling to London at the moment when the Young British Artists were exploding taught me that Beuys was no longer necessarily the name everybody quoted - although now it may come back. KW That leads to a discussion as to what is good and bad in art and how you determine that? FV I try never to distinguish between what is the real thing and what is not, even with artists that are extremely prolific. I don’t believe in artworks, I believe in art because even with those artists – I think Duchamp said this, but I don’t want to misquote him, let’s pretend it’s my quote – there are artists who are supposed to be great at producing art, but then they produce so many pieces it’s hard to consider all those works unless you consider them as a whole to make things intellectually more simple. So in a way, for me the artwork is the life! There are some artists who do artworks in order to get laid, or there are artworks that are done in order to be paid so one can move onto the next bigger project. It’s like the life of Vittorio De Sica, you know; some movies were made by De Sica to be near the casino to gamble or some were made just to pay for the next project. KW Could you see that in a filmmaker’s work? Can you determine why it was made, do you think? FV No, I personally can't because when I saw those movies I was too young, but studying the life of some people you then realize. I am not so intelligent to tell if one particular movie was done out of love or for money. De Sica was certainly as prolific an actor and a filmmaker as Warhol. They were both public, pop figures. I never judge artists too much by specific artworks, I judge them by their life. But that has a lot to do with the media being a great topic of study for me. Sometimes people criticize me because they feel I judge some artist through their public life, their media life, rather than their works. But I can’t help it. I think the public statement of an artist can inspire a human being. There isn’t much difference between issue three, four and five of a certain sculpture. I am more interested to hear an interview from a great artist who is inspiring, rather than seeing another one of his artworks, especially if he produces a hundred every year.


and so many artists use the media so successfully to sell and promote their work, and I respect them for that. But there are very few artists who actually analyze the media. It’s all in that John Maybury video. It merges my fascination with the tip of the iceberg of London culture (Leigh Bowery and John and avant-garde film making) with the roots of Italian cinema, because the whole video is a homage to Conversation Piece by Luchino Visconti, and the presence of our local camp hero, Iva Zanicchi. It’s the merging of these elements. KW So it’s a very seminal piece for you? FV It’s the first one and I like to think that it tells a long story. KW Like Caligula, where you used big stars like Helen Mirren, Gore Vidal and Courtney Love, for your project Greed, you again approached stars – Natalie Portman and Michelle WIlliams. Why was that? FV If you do a perfume, you need stars if you want to sell it. Speaking from a commercial point of view, a perfume with no stars means no revenue. Sometimes a perfume ad is conceived depending on which star is going to take part. For me it was hilarious to have Natalie Portman and Michelle Williams who are such anti-perfume kinds of icons. They have never done a campaign, they have never agreed to run the red carpet with that kind of agenda, so that was hilarious. KW And did they really enjoy being part of it? FV They did. And Roman Polanski enjoyed directing them. I remember being inside the Hotel Plaza [where the shoot happened]. It was the day of the big collapse of the stock market and there is this whole floor of the Plaza blocked by me, Polanski, Natalie Portman and Michelle Williams in a cat fight. If somebody from the Herald Tribune had come and looked at us it would have been the most surreal live performance ever seen: the greatest leading European director directing the two most beautiful girls on earth, dressed in negligees, struggling for a perfume that does not exist. I consider myself so lucky.

«There are some artists who do artworks in order to get laid, or there are artworks that are done in order to be paid so one can move onto the next bigger project. some movies were made by De Sica to be near the casino to gamble or some were made just to pay for the next project»

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«it was the most surreal live performance –roman polanski directing Michelle williams and natalie portman, dressed in negligees, struggling for a perfume that does not exist»

KW When you planned Greed, you were doing it at the top of the boom of the art market. FV Yes. KW So were you sticking two fingers up at the art market at the same time? FV No, I think [Greed] can apply to the art market but at that time it was applied to every market. I could say yes, I was challenging the art market, but that would seem such a cool, politically correct answer. Instead I give you a very unashamedly ambitious answer. I was trying to discuss something more philosophical. I was trying to discuss human greed which animates our passions and our dreams from the lowest to the highest ranks of society and markets. I decided to have it embodied by two faces that are renowned worldwide and by a director who is equally respected and notorious for having been very greedy for both life and emotions and who is also one of the great visionary geniuses. KW So back to stars – FV It’s a little bit the same with the Lady Gaga project. We were doing a homage to Diaghilev and the ballet he did with the Kirov. Miuccia Prada designed the costumes. I think it is always very important to draw major players – and Gaga is more major than anybody else in the world – but somehow you have to have the strength to reconstruct them into a narrative that is closer to your heart. KW You talk about collaboration and not directing. FV It is impossible to direct Gaga. In any case, for me, when it comes to this performance it is the concept. I put into action a sequence of amazingly unpredictable, unmergeable people: the Bolshoi Ballet and Lady Gaga, and the costumes of Miuccia Prada and Frank Gehry. Once all the elements are on stage, for me failure would only

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Opposite page, top: Michelle Williams and Natalie Portman in Greed, the New Fragrance by Francesco Vezzoli, 2009. Opposite page, below: Francesco by Francesco:

All artworks courtesy the artist. Greed: Courtesy Gagosian Gallery. Francesco by Francesco: Photo by Francesco Scavullo.

Before & After, 2002. Bernard-Henri Lévy and Sharon Stone in Democrazy, 2007.

job to direct the Academy Awards, which I could consider, then I would want sheer perfection, but then I would be up for another dynamic. I think I am being very precise with that performance. I was making an aesthetic conceptual discourse within the art world. For me, the point was thinking of Richard Hamilton with his Mick Jagger. I was trying to push the boundary by having as mainstream an artist as possible. I use mainstream here not as a critical judgment, but to highlight that she is a world-renowned figure who gets a hundred million hits on Google. For her to be part of an artistic performance I think was a first, and I claim that. I can’t think of somebody else on such a level of visibility who was part of an art piece voluntarily. I can only think of the Hamilton piece with Mick Jagger and Robert Fraser but that was not a performance. KW No, that was a documentary, something quite different. FV Yes. KW Are you in conversation about any projects at the moment? FV I challenged Klaus [Biesenbach] recently I said if it was up to me I would like to do a project where I re-create performances. I would ask the Pet Shop Boys to redo the singing sculptures of Gilbert & George or Martha Stewart to redo Martha Rosler’s Semiotics of the Kitchen. KW So you plan to continue using famous people? FV At this very moment I don’t know because I feel that I’d like to keep analyzing the media but I must say, beyond my expectation, the Lady Gaga thing kind of exploded in my own little hand in the sense that I was so pleased and flattered that she accepted the invitation to work with me. But now that work has reached a certain level of iconicity because the identity of this woman has flooded into the most stellar reaches, and certainly not because of me, but it’s fascinating that I decided to work with her and she accepted, so I have to think well about who to choose next. It’s more about how great she is and how inspiring she is and how challenging she is. I saw her a week ago and she just inspired me but at the same time she makes so many other people you are supposed to work with so pale. n

be the absence of the Bolshoi or Lady Gaga, or Frank Gehry forbidding us to use his hat at the last minute. Once those elements are in the big saucepan, I would say you should enjoy the soup however it comes out. Sometimes it comes out perfect, sometimes less than perfect. KW Did you set up the stage structure for the dancers, the runway idea? FV Yes, that was the stage designed, constructed and masterminded by me. But then we had literally no time for rehearsals because nobody gets paid in this game. If you were considering bills you would be bankrupt just thinking about it. Imagine getting the Bolshoi and Lady Gaga, and Frank Gehry to do a hat. He should command one million dollars! And then Gaga and the Bolshoi millions each! KW Did you put them in their poses, the Bolshoi? What did you say to them? FV We had some creative dialogue regarding the choreography. I wanted them to do something classic because I wanted them to be very Bolshoi. I was doing the needlework, they were doing the dance and Gaga was Gaga doing the singing and Frank Gehry was being himself designing a hat that could eventually look like one of his buildings. KW What was the eye on the hat from? Was that Gehry? FV Yes, he designed it like an eye with a trembling eyeball. KW I know you have done it before but what were you trying to say with the embroidery? FV Embroidery is my language. I did embroidery in my first videos, including the one directed by John. It is a visual language I chose when I did my first project. KW Are you sewing ideas or is that too banal a way of looking at it? FV I am embroidering connections to create my projects first of all, but more than that I think it was the idea of choosing a language that embodied domesticity, femininity, almost cheesiness, to a certain degree. KW So in the Lady Gaga piece you want everything to work together but nothing is working together – a disconnect. FV If you want that connective element, playing to perfection, then it would be the Academy Awards but I am not up for that. If they give me a 25


Isabella rossellini the art of seduction words C. carr


This page and opposite: In Green Porno Series 1 to 3 and in the most recent Seduce Me, Isabella Rossellini educates us on the mating rituals of insects, sea creatures and other animals.

The world knows her face. For fourteen years, she appeared in those alluring Lancôme ads seen in every perfume-scented glossy. She delivered the courageous and indelible performance at the heart of one of the most important films of the 1980s (Blue Velvet), appearing subsequently in over 60 films and television show from Wild at Heart to 30 Rock. She had famous parents (Ingrid Bergman, Roberto Rossellini) and relationships that figured in gossip columns (Martin Scorsese, David Lynch, Gary Oldman). Certainly no one expected to see her playing a fly, a snail, a limpet – in short, award-winning films she writes, directs and produces. No one expected her to collaborate with a director whose films look like they fell off the back of a truck around 1930 and were discovered just last week in a snow bank, slightly faded and a little jumpy in the projector. The things that made Isabella Rossellini famous created a certain image, but she’s never been enamored of her own glamour. She has many interests and a restless mind. On the day we met near New York’s Museum of Modern Art for a conversation, she had just visited both the Henri Cartier-Bresson and Marina Abramovic´ exhibits. In 2006, invited to participate in the Sundance Channel’s Iconoclast series – in which a celebrity spotlights someone they admire – Rossellini chose inventor Dean Kamen, who created mobile dialysis systems and all-terrain wheelchairs, though he’s now best-known for the Segway PT, a two-wheeled human transporter controlled by small shifts of body weight. Rossellini is currently working on her bachelor’s degree at New York University, in a division where students design their own curricula. Hers is divided between science and art. And for the past eight years, she has trained seeing-eye dogs for the Guide Dog Foundation. In 2002, Rossellini began working with the Canadian director Guy Maddin – the auteur of those above-mentioned ‘lost’ films. She agreed to play a leading role in The Saddest Music in the World – as a bitchy, legless beer baroness. Maddin turned out to be an unlikely kindred spirit. And in retrospect, her decision to take this role looks like a turning point that facilitated a new direction for her own work. ‘It’s all freeing. Anything is possible in experimental film,’ she says. ‘I enjoy the company of the

people. I enjoy the mental process. You know, when you’re old they don’t ask you so much to work.’ She turns 58 in June. ‘So to me, this is a whole new very amusing and energetic life. Even if there is no money. I made a lot of money as a model, and I was prudent with my money. I saved it. So now I have fun.’ Every improbable collaboration can use a creation myth. Maddin came up with this one: He was strolling through Central Park one day when he spotted Rossellini talking to the owner of a labrador. She had one hand in the dog’s mouth. Maddin approached, pretending not to recognize her, and put his own hand in the Lab’s mouth. Dog and owner then departed, leaving Maddin’s and Rossellini’s fingers entwined and covered with drool. ‘He likes to lie,’ Rossellini laughs. In reality, she’d never heard of Maddin until her agent sent her the script for Saddest Music along with a stack of Maddin’s videos. She looked at the pile and saw that one was six minutes long. She could give him six minutes. So she watched The Heart of the World (2000), a short masterpiece of unremitting intensity, with the look of 1920s Soviet science fiction and a nutty plot. Anna, a state scientist who studies the earth’s core, warns that the world will soon die of heart failure. To save the planet, she must chose between the two brothers vying for her love – mortician Nikolai and actor Osip (who plays Jesus in a passion play). When she’s distracted by a top-hatted capitalist and his money bags, the world has a heart attack and Anna must plunge to the earth’s core to save it. Filmed in grainy black and white with constructivist sets and title cards instead of dialogue, Heart is acted, costumed, and lit like a silent film but runs at the very 21st-century pace of about two shots a second. ‘I’d decided to do his film after seeing the six minutes of The Heart of the World. It’s such an original hand,’ says Rossellini. She hadn’t even read the script. Well, she read two pages. ‘The writing was so baroque, with sentences half a page long. I didn’t understand anything.’ But when working with someone who’s so visual, she points out, ‘a script is never going to be revealing. I mean, Heart of the World – what kind of a script could that have?’ Sometimes you have to trust the artist. Recently, Shirin Neshat put Rossellini in touch with Marjane Satrapi, author of Persepolis. The book became an animated film and will now be redone as a drama. Satrapi asked Rossellini if she could play a role. Could she read the script? ‘I was really busy,’ said Rossellini, ‘and I said, “I can’t read the script right now, but obviously it’s yes.”’

Isabella Rossellini's storyboard for Seduce Me 28

She felt the same way about Maddin, but had one concern as she does with everyone who’s very original. ‘How mad are they in person?’ She called him to ask if they could meet. ‘Where is Winnipeg?’ Not very far from New York, he told her. Thirteen hundred miles later, Rossellini met Maddin at Winnipeg’s airport. In a story she related during an appearance at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, they waited for her luggage, and Maddin told her that his grandfather had died in November but it was so cold they had to wait till March to bury him. Then the spring floods came and his body ended up three or four miles downriver. So they had to bury him again, nine months dead. And Rossellini was thinking, ‘This is his chit-chat?’ She decided then and there to work with him. Winnipeg has the coldest winter weather of any major Canadian city. Saddest Music went into production in February 2003, with temperatures averaging zero (minus 17.7 degrees Celsius), in an old warehouse Maddin dubbed ‘probably the coldest soundstage in movie history’. He’d filled part of it with snow to create a ramshackle Depression-era Winnipeg, ‘World Capitol of Sorrow’. A few jet-engine-size heaters were scattered about, throwing heat in a five-foot circumference. No one had the luxurious trailers ubiquitous on a Hollywood set, so actors began going outside to stand on the frozen tundra. It was warmer out there. Maddin’s films seem suffused with nostalgia for a time before he was alive, but of course, it’s just nostalgia for the cinema made then – when lighting was soft, acting was broad, and melodrama reigned. He had never worked with an actor of Rossellini’s stature before. In a production diary he wrote for The Village Voice, he claimed he was so intimidated that on the first day, he couldn’t film her. So he gave her a Super 8 camera and told her to point it at herself while she was acting. ‘I don’t remember that,’


she laughs. ‘But he has a lot of Super 8 cameras that he hands out to friends who come to visit the set.’ And he might well use what they happen to shoot. Maddin banished tripods and had all the lenses coated with Vaseline. Then they were cleaned at the center and wiped outwards in concentric circles to get distortion at the periphery of the frame for that frail get-me-to-the-film-preservation-lab look he so reveres. Maddin is less adept – or maybe just less interested – in story than in mood. But Saddest Music began with a screenplay by Kazuo Ishiguro which apparently had to do with the fall of Communism. Maybe that explains the Russian constructivist set design, but it’s hard to know what else remained after Maddin and his screenwriter George Toles re-processed the story through their time machine. Certain critics commented, however, that with this film Maddin had finally presented a semi-coherent narrative. Rossellini’s beer baroness character, Lady Port-Huntly, is tough and bitter, with platinum blonde hair that seems more helmet than wig. Looking to promote her brand of suds as Prohibition comes to an end, she sets up a contest to determine which country has the saddest music. The winner will walk away with a mammoth $25,000. From around the globe, heavy-hearted drummers, cellists, bagpipers, and flautists come streaming into Winnipeg in their native costumes. In montages. In soft focus. Among them are members of the Kent family. Lady Port-Huntly has what is sometimes called ‘a past’ with both Broadway impresario Chester Kent (a Canadian ex-pat now calling himself ‘the American ambassador of sadness’) and Chester’s alcoholic father Fyodor, who accidentally amputated both of the Lady’s legs after a car accident. As the competition gets under way, Lady Port-Huntly decides the fate of each nation with a thumbs up or thumbs down like a Roman emperor, or perhaps a movie critic. And Fyodor tries to make amends with her by manufacturing glass legs, filling them with beer. The Lady loves those legs. She sloshes as she walks. Rossellini felt this character had to be composed ‘according to films’ rather than

human psychology. She points out that it isn’t just the look of a Maddin film that’s anachronistic. ‘Even the characters he creates. They seem to come out of films. You know – the femme fatale, the mystery. His films exist because earlier films exist. ‘When I went to Winnipeg to be with Guy for three days – to make sure he wasn’t crazy – he had a beautiful collection of photography books, and he also was very interested in fashion, which I liked. A lot of directors – sometimes they despise fashion or they think it’s a lesser art, and that always makes me slightly uncomfortable because that comes with a certain amount of, “I’ll teach you Isabella. You are not going to use those tricks you used as a model with me.” There’s always that unspoken anger. But instead, Guy was enthusiastic about fashion photography and knew a lot about it. And he had a beautiful collection of strange photographers that I didn’t know. So when I came back home, I sent him photos – references to who I thought the character was. I always say that she was the daughter of Cruella de Vil and Lon Chaney. We had looked at a lot of silent films with Lon Chaney, who was known for his close-ups. Which to us don’t look realistic at all. But at that time, he was a master of going from happiness to great despair in a long close-up. That gave me the tone of the film, and how the film had to be acted.’

Rossellini pulled a copy of that day’s New York Times out of her bag, saying, ‘They have a new print of Metropolis.’ A film archivist had just found 25 minutes of footage, missing from the Fritz Lang classic since 1927, and she was eager to see it. She has loved silent films since her childhood in Italy when there was little local programming on television, but lots of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. ‘Doesn’t this look like a Guy Madden film?’ she asked, pointing to a new still of Metropolis’s Thin Man character. ‘Method acting is definitely to be respected, but it doesn’t always work. You couldn’t do Metropolis the way Marlon Brando did Streetcar Named Desire.’ That’s why she sometimes uses a photo, a painting, or a sculpture as a reference. And not just in Maddin’s films. For the unforgettable Blue Velvet scene where her character, the sexually-abused Dorothy Vallens, runs naked and dazed across a front lawn, Rossellini borrowed the body language from Nick Ut’s famous photo of a burned and naked Vietnamese girl running from a napalm attack. David Lynch had told her that one day when he was a boy coming home from school, he saw a woman walking naked in the street, and he didn’t laugh or feel titillated. He started to cry. ‘He wanted that feeling in the film,’ Rossellini said. He wanted the audience to see a naked woman and feel terrified. When the Museum of Modern Art decided to mount a retrospective of her father’s work in 2006, Rossellini thought about what she could do to help promote it. Though Roberto Rossellini is widely acknowledged to be a visionary, a founder of Neorealism, the director of such classics as Rome Open City (1945) and Germany Year Zero (1947), some of his work had been stuck in legal limbo – unseen – for years. His daughter worried about his legacy. She knew she could set up interviews and talk to the press about him, but that would be the usual thing. That would be an encounter with the same old questions. She had something more poetic in mind, something almost ineffable: ‘my impression of my dad as an artist.’ She would have to make a film. ‘I thought I would like to borrow Guy’s aesthetic, these films that are like an ectoplasm, like a ghost about to disappear and go to the beyond. Because if I had to capture an anxiety that I had, it’s that my father was going to be forgotten. [Maddin’s films] have an ethereal quality, like my father’s films. Because my


«Conventional wisdom had it that Roberto Rossellini had destroyed Bergman’s career. But, says their daughter, ‘Mom felt in many ways that she had damaged father’s work’»

From the top: Isabella Rossellini as her mother Ingrid Bergman in My Dad is 100 Years Old; Director Guy Maddin and screenwriter and actress Isabella Rossellini; Isabella Rossellini as Charlie Chaplin. 000


Stills from the Green Porno Series and Seduce Me: courtesy Sundance Channel. Storyboard courtesy Isabella Rossellini. Stills from My Dad is 100 Years Old: courtesy Zeigest Films. Maddin and Rossellini photo by Robin Holland, film stills by Judy Shapiro

father’s films are 60 years old and there is not much money behind them so the copies have not been kept up. They are not very well restored.’ She talked to Maddin about it. As she worked on her script, he was reading it, asking her questions. But who would play her dad? ‘Maybe my dad will be this big belly,’ Rossellini suggested. She and her siblings had liked to cuddle against his belly. He was so maternal. ‘Guy was immediately encouraging,’ and with the image of the belly, she says, he became willing to direct her script, ‘because – ah, yes that’s something interesting. And then he was the one who said, you play everybody else.’ My Dad Is 100 Years Old allows Roberto Rossellini to argue the essence of cinema with David O Selznick, Alfred Hitchcock, and Federico Fellini, who have all shown up in an abandoned movie theater in Winnipeg. They are all played by Isabella, who wants both to defend her father and to understand him. Are we just going to movies to distract ourselves from reality? Can the ‘life’ depicted in a work of art ever be like real life? Should it be? Must it be? Was Dad a genius? Suddenly her mother appears on the ragged screen up front. That is, Isabella appears as Ingrid Bergman – a goosebump moment (though she’s already shown us in profile how much she resembles her father). Bergman is just an image now, a projection. Which allows the real Isabella to stand there questioning her. Was Anna Magnani hurt when father left her for you? Why did you fall in love with Dad? Why did you divorce him? Some say father destroyed your career. ‘No,’ replies Ingrid. ‘I destroyed his.’ These were things she’d discussed with her mother. ‘I’ve been protective of my father’s and mother’s work,’ says Rossellini, referring to the restoration and conservation of their films. But the scandal that hurt both their careers – ‘this scandal that they’d done together by falling in love,’ as Rossellini put it – still has the power to shock because of its monumental unfairness. Now that it’s too late, many probably feel an urge to protect. Ingrid Bergman and Roberto Rossellini were both married to other people when they met, and Bergman broke what was then the Hollywood code by refusing to lie about the relationship. US Senator Edwin Johnson denounced Bergman as ‘an apostle of degradation’ and Roberto Rossellini as ‘vile and unspeakable’. For example. Most of his insults were actually more demented. The star of Casablanca and other classics was then declared persona non grata by the Senate and not allowed to work in Hollywood for seven years – or to enter the United States, where she still had a daughter. Conventional wisdom had it, therefore, that Roberto Rossellini had destroyed Bergman’s career. But, says their daughter, ‘She felt that father had to adjust to her. He was making films about Italians, and all of a sudden, he had a foreigner that he was obliged to write for. Then father wasn’t making Neorealism. His great accomplice was Anna Magnani. My mom didn’t have the capacity of Anna Magnani to improvise

with people.’ And this was important in Neorealism since non-actors played most of the parts. ‘Mom was very shy. So she felt in many ways that she had damaged father’s work.’ Rossellini may do a film to honor her mother’s hundredth birthday in 2015 and would love to see a retrospective for her too. Maybe even an exhibit. ‘We have a beautiful archive. Mama kept everything.’ Certainly, she felt better about her father’s legacy after the MoMA retrospective, which ran from November 15 to December 22, 2006. Rossellini went every day. She’d go to the afternoon film, nip into the museum restaurant for dinner, and go back for the evening film. ‘It was an incredible pleasure to see the body of work of my dad all at once,’ she smiles. ‘I admired him even more.’ In 2006, Sundance Channel executive Laura Michalchyshyn saw My Dad Is 100 Years Old. (She’s from Winnipeg and a friend of Maddin.) Sundance bought the film, and Michalchyshyn asked Rossellini if she’d be interested in creating short films for third and fourth screens (laptops, cell phones). They should be two minutes long, ‘flashy and fun,’ and should deal with the environment – the favorite cause of Sundance creative director, Robert Redford. Rossellini has often told interviewers that when she was a girl she wanted to be like Jane Goodall and go live with chimpanzees. While life took her down a different path, she retained a great curiosity about all kinds of animals. She also knows that just saying the word ‘environment’ can cause the brain to glaze over, while everyone perks up at the word ‘sex’. This led her to Green Porno, her witty short films about the sex lives of the barnacles and the bees. With their clever handmade costumes and bright colors, these films often have as much startling beauty as startling news. Anchovies have orgies? Who knew? Rossellini draws her information from scientific tomes, consults experts to make sure her scripts are accurate, and imagines how she can transform herself into that anchovy – or firefly or snail. She’s drawn to critters whose mating habits we humans don’t usually ponder. And her scripts have a dry humor. After 18 episodes of Green Porno, she’s moved on. A bit. Now the series is called Seduce Me, and focuses on courtship – if that’s a word one can apply to, say, a bedbug. While Green Porno attracted voluminous hits and won Webby Awards (two for Rossellini’s performances and two in the experimental category), the series never found a sponsor. No one would come near it as long as the word ‘porno' was attached. But Seduce Me still has its bawdy moments. The duck episode is particularly risqué. Pink fabric tunnels illustrate the female bird’s labyrinthine vaginal structure. Rossellini, as Duck, is set upon by too many males but gloats, ‘I can trick the phallus,’ and then chooses the one male who gets to find her eggs. She pulls out the script she’s working on for an upcoming seahorse/pipefish episode. Her page is divided. Monologue on the right.

Sketches on the left. ‘Not completely storyboarded but almost,’ she says. Each Seduce Me episode begins with a muscular male arm (or two or three) reaching for Rossellini. This time, the arm points down to a pair of large pants. ‘The camera will lower, and the pants will open up as if a man is showing me his penis. So I look inside the pants and say, “Nothing in there. Are you seducing me? What am I? A seahorse?” Because seahorses don’t have penises. They have pouches and it’s the female that puts eggs in the pouch.’ Next she’s drawn the episode’s mise-enscène – an aquarium. She’ll play the seahorse, and her sketch shows how the costume will be adapted to fit her. We zoom in to one of the algae. It has eyes. It’s really a sea dragon, cousin to the seahorse. Enter another cousin, the pipefish, played by a puppet. Drama ensues. Briefly. With production designers Rick Gilbert and Andy Byers, she chooses three or four colors per episode. More than that is too much for a small screen. She gives them photos of the animal with her script and drawings ‘and they take it to the stratosphere’, as she puts it. This particular episode she had to rewrite.

‘I read about something called “post-copulatory selection”. I love the name. It means that the male – if he sees another female he likes better – he can abort the babies. How do you like that? So I chose the seahorse because it’s just more beautiful.’ But when she consulted a biologist to fact-check, he told her that seahorses don’t abort. The pipefish does. She reworked the script to include a pipefish ‘so I can tell the story about aborting’. She feels that she and her team are ‘on a roll’. She’ll work with Gilbert and Byers ‘until they become very famous and don’t want to work with me anymore’. Maybe then she’ll switch to animation. ‘I’d use somebody who could draw better than I can. But maybe it should be my own drawing. ‘Maybe I should take a drawing class.’ n C.Carr wrote for The Village Voice from 1984 until

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kenneth anger attacking the sensorium words Ian macmillan

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«Scorpio Rising certainly wallows in artifice and stylization, but it is also a hymn to Anger’s own unique concept of beauty – a closetsmashing, gay fetish of exaggerated masculinity which was a milestone in its day» All stills courtesy the BFI

History is loaded with warnings about worshipping false idols, but they all seemed to have been ignored when the cult American film-maker Kenneth Anger took to the stage of London’s National Film Theatre in October 2006.The standing ovation that greeted him might in part have been a relieved acknowledgment that the notoriously reclusive director had actually turned up at all, but it was surely more a resounding confirmation that, to his legions of devoted followers, this man, who has spent most of his lifetime shaking off the tag of ‘Satanist’, is something of a God. There were no signs that his radical bent was tailing off in his twilight years. Dressed in baggy leather trousers and a New York Rangers’ hockey shirt with the letters R and S pointedly removed, the softly-voiced semihermit, who that evening accused Walt Disney of ‘castrating’ Mickey Mouse, and turning him into a ‘namby-pamby sweetie-pie little boy’, was as rebellious as his shirt spelled out. Anger was angry in the 1940s and he’s still resoundingly angry today, even at the age of 83. From the iconography of queer culture, through MTV to contemporary art’s embrace of film as a medium, Anger’s influence has been enormous. What’s all the more remarkable is that his status on the highest altar of underground film-making is predicated on a very slim output. The major works that make up what is generally known as the Magick Lantern Cycle collectively amount to less than three-hours’ running time, and were created over the extraordinary span of 34 years. Nevertheless, they are nothing short of visionary in all senses of the word. Rich, allusive, sometimes magisterial and sometimes unsettlingly sinister, they remain marvels of what I would call Pure Cinema – a fusion of sound and image that is beyond narrative but engages the senses in a way only film can. Anger’s most famous work is undoubtedly 1964’s Scorpio Rising. It’s serendipitous that it was released in the same year in which Susan Sontag defined the sensibility of ‘camp’ as an actual aesthetic. For Sontag, those who saw culture through the prism of camp saw it ‘not in terms of beauty, but in terms of the degree of artifice, of stylization.’ Scorpio Rising certainly wallows in artifice and stylization, but I’d argue that it is also a hymn to Anger’s own unique concept of beauty – a closet-smashing, gay fetish of exaggerated masculinity that may indeed seem camp, if not kitsch, to some 21st-century audiences but which was a milestone in its day. Beginning with an iconic title sequence in which a leather boy’s studded jacket spells out the film’s title and the director’s credit, over the course of its 30 minutes, it is quintessential Anger, flirting unashamedly with the occult, Christianity, Nazism and, most significantly, homosexual desire. Its central figure, Scorpio, a biker played by an ex-marine named Bruce Byron


Stills from Scorpio Rising, 1964 33


whom Anger found loitering around Times Square, is elevated to the status of a latter-day, leather-clad messiah. His camera also repeatedly lingers on the resolutely heterosexual milieu of bikers that gather under the Coney Island boardwalks, described by Anger as ‘strange as darkest Africa.’ Scorpio Rising is a dizzyingly edited montage of these macho riders, windup kids’ biker toys, and flashes of 1950s and 1960s Americana – James Dean, Marlon Brando, Peanuts comic strips. Interspersed throughout are clips from a stiff, low-budget Lutheran Sunday school film called The Last Journey to Jerusalem. Images of the gospels mirror Scorpio himself, first stalking the streets of New York, then raging and posturing in an empty church. The work as a whole is, literally, a queering of idolatry worship – a fantasia on the sexual allure of the ‘mean streets’ of the US, partly informed by the relatively chaste gay pornography of the time in magazines such as Physique Pictorial, where defined young men in posing pouches were captured in a style that was both erotic and faintly ridiculous. Yet there’s nothing ridiculous about Scorpio Rising. While it certainly borrowed from earlier experimental film-makers such as the surrealists and even Eisenstein, it blazed a trail with a bold filmic language all of its own, due in no small part to its radical soundtrack. Anger’s films have no dialogue. Arguably the most striking breakthrough of Scorpio was its spot-on appropriation of popular music from the 1950s and 1960s: crooners like Bobby Vinton and Ray Charles and girl groups such as the Crystals and Martha Reeves and the Vandellas. So brilliantly does Anger enmesh the surface innocence of American pop with his menacing, brooding visuals that, to anyone remotely familiar with the film, it’s nigh on impossible to hear these songs without conjuring up marching leather boots, Scorpio’s claustrophobic bedroom or the orgiastic Halloween party scene. And of all his work, this more than any other would lead to his dazzling juxtaposition of throwaway song and visual iconography being incorporated in the world of mainstream film. Much has been made of how Martin Scorsese borrowed this technique in his earliest feature films, but it has perhaps been an even bigger influence on David Lynch. Over 20 years before Lynch made Blue Velvet, with its use of Bobby Vinton’s saccharine tune that also gives the film its name, Anger had already co-opted the song to underpin the dark undercurrents of the glossy American Dream.

But this drive to upset the system, to follow an artistic path of most resistance, remains the core of what has forever driven Anger. A prime example of his unshakably contrarian nature came from his first brush with actual artistic patronage. Spurred by the critical success of Scorpio Rising, the Ford Foundation awarded him a lavish grant of $10,000 to realize a feature-length proposal. The reward for their investment was, however, Anger’s shortest-ever film: 1965’s glorious Kustom Kar Kommandos. From first frame to last it runs little over three minutes. The Foundation’s scheme of providing grants to film-makers was axed the following year. Kustom Kar Kommandos is, nevertheless, kompelling – a crystalline distillation of the latent homoeroticism and male narcissism that suffused Scorpio Rising. A handsome, all-American boy is seen polishing and adoring his customized, mirror-interiored dream machine. For the most part, the boy himself is merely a cipher – the camera lingers on his body, his tight jeans, his hands, and it’s some time before we actually see his face. Just as the kid is fetishizing the steelwork of the car, so Anger is fetishizing its handsome, self-absorbed owner. The vivid, saturated colors of the footage add an extra element, representing as they do the occultist guru Aleister Crowley’s belief that colors have magickal (Crowley’s spelling), symbolic properties. Crowley’s espousal of ceremonial magick and latter-day witchcraft in early 20th-century Britain saw him reviled with the epithet ‘the most evil man in the world’. His symbolism and transgression are an integral part of Anger’s cinematic world. But in the way that Crowley’s writings were once heresy yet are now a staple of the New Age sections of bookshops across

Above: Lucifer Rising, 1972. Opposite: Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome, 1954. 34

All stills courtesy the BFI

It’s fittingly ironic that Anger’s work became a gift to conventional narrative film-making, for his entire career was based on being a wicked subversion of everything Hollywood represented – all the more pointed because he was something of an insider in that world. He was born Kenneth Anglemeyer in 1927 in Santa Monica, California. Though his father worked for an aircraft company, the young Kenneth was introduced to the cultures of art and film by his bohemian grandmother. When the family moved into her house, he was enrolled at Beverly Hills High School. He danced with Shirley Temple and appeared as the changeling prince in a 1935 version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Like that other movie-fixated kid, Andy Warhol, he was obsessed with the stars and the glamour of American film. But unlike Warhol, he swiftly saw through the values of the Hollywood system. When he abbreviated his surname to the curt brutality of ‘Anger’, it was a provocation. Post-war America would adopt consumerism and bland surface values, the Technicolor dream of Rock Hudson hand in hand with Doris Day. Anger knew that much of this was a sham. (He also knew that Hudson was what the gay subculture of the time called ‘a screaming queen’.) His most vocal attack on the dream was not his cinema, which would always remain of minority appeal, but his scurrilous Hollywood Babylon books filled with gossip he had gleaned from years of hanging around the studios as a youngster. Among his revelations were lurid accounts of Valentino’s taste for submissive sex, and Charlie Chaplin’s unhealthy interest in underage girls. Suppressed for years before they were first published in Paris in the early 1960s, they cemented his public notoriety despite the fact that they are, to a great extent, his most throwaway work.


the globe, so Anger’s films could be interpreted as somewhat louche and even naive to our modern eyes. Flash-frames of Hitler or the swastika, and autosuggestions of violence and dark sexuality might now be dismissed as blasé, having been co-opted by everything from punk rock to Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange or the writing of JG Ballard. The question remains: can Anger’s prime work shock us still? To answer this, one need only look at the director’s first surviving foray into film-making, 1947’s Fireworks. From its arresting, haunting opening of a sailor boy carrying a limp figure, Anger himself, in the classical pose of the Pietà, to its literally explosive firework climax, it is still a veritable jolt to the system, and to taste and decency. Fireworks is a raw exploration of homoerotic sexual violence, culminating in Anger’s beating and eventual gang-rape by a group of sailors after he has tried to pull one of them in a bar. Although it had its supporters, most notably Alfred Kinsey who actually bought a print of the film for the collection of the Kinsey Institute, it was a scandal to post-war McCarthyite America. Anger was tried for obscenity and only escaped jail when the Supreme Court ruled that it was, in fact, a work of art.

millions. Mick Jagger’s brittle electronic soundtrack, improvised on a Moog synthesizer, presaged the brutal nightmare of the Rolling Stones’ concert at Altamont the same year, when a fan was killed by Hell’s Angels employed as security guards. Even Anger’s cast embodies the lawless underbelly; one of the film’s principal participants was a sometime musician, Bobby Beausoleil, later to be convicted in 1970 a participant in the Charles Manson killings. Invocation was described by Anger himself as an ‘an attack on the sensorium’, and like all his best work it seeps into the viewer’s senses with the quality of a dream. Much of his work, he claims, comes to him in the unconscious. And his allusive, poetic, visually sumptuous films hit their audience on both a conscious and, I’d argue, a subconscious level. There’s an immediacy in their relative brevity, bold iconography and adoption of popular music, but there’s an after-image that haunts long after the caption card reads ‘The End’. Once seen, they are impossible to forget. Pure Cinema indeed. n

Over 60 years on, Anger’s work has not merely been canonized as art, it has informed generations of artists working across film, photography and music. It is hard to imagine the visual aesthetic of Robert Mapplethorpe or Derek Jarman without his influence. The English electronic band Coil and the installation artist Cerith Wyn Evans have freely acknowledged a debt to his work. The world of contemporary art now rewards him with beautifullypresented exhibitions, the most recent held at the London outpost of the European gallery Sprüth Magers. In the window, an installation of neon lips in orange and blue spelled out Hollywood Babylon. A series of exquisitely composed stills from across his film work was mounted, salon-like, in a small room. In the main gallery space, Anger’s 1969 film Invocation of my Demon Brother played on a loop. An intensely sinister collage of live ritual performance, trippy prismatic photography, and icons of the counterculture – Hell’s Angels and Anger acolytes the Rolling Stones and Marianne Faithfull – Invocation marks the moment where society itself caught up with Anger’s nihilistic imagination. Its writhing naked bodies are less the idealism of hippy musical Hair, more a last gasp of hedonism before liberty implodes.The darkness at the heart of America was no longer merely implicit. As borrowed news footage of soldiers disembarking from a helicopter into the hell of a war zone attests, the Vietnam War was an all too real horror for

The Magick Lantern Cycle is available on DVD and and Blu-Ray at filmstore.bfi.org.uk

«An intensely sinister collage of live ritual performance, trippy prismatic photography, and icons of the counterculture... Invocation of my demon brother marks the moment where society itself caught up with Anger’s nihilistic imagination» 35


kutluG ataman turkish delights interview karen wright | PhotographS shane deegan

Kutlug Ataman, the video and film-maker artist, was born in Istanbul in 1961. In 2004 he won the top award at the Carnegie Open and was shortlisted for the Turner Prize. By then, Ataman’s work was well established on the international contemporary circuit, having been shown in the 1999 Venice Biennale and the 2002 Documenta. His work can currently be seen in Rome in MAXXI, the new museum designed by Zaha Hadid, as part of its opening installation. Kutlug now lives between London and Istanbul. Karen Wright Let’s start with your recent filmwork series called Mesopotamian Dramaturgies (2009). Can you just tell me about the title? Kutlug Ataman [Laughs] ‘Mesopotamia’ means ‘in between the two rivers’, I think! It is originally the place between the rivers Tigris and Euphrates. I wanted to give the indication that I am moving away from working on how we construct our individual identities, as I did with Küba (2004) and Paradise (2006), into how we construct our communal identities. Now I am moving to how we construct our notions of geography and history. As an artist I think I have talked enough about how we make ourselves and how we make our communities; now I’m also curious about geography and history, about how we make those. In order to give that indication in the title, I decided to use this geographical reference. Of course, what you call the cradle of civilization was not strictly in between these two rivers: it was around that river all the way to the Nile Delta and also the Ganges in India. Mesopotamia was in the center, if you like, with the Assyrians – KW Ancient cultures? KA Yes, the ones we know. I’m sure there were other ones, but we base our identity on these ones. This is where dramaturgy – the art of writing narratives and staging theatre – comes in. These [old] dramaturgies continue today. How? For example, I’m very sensitive to it living in Turkey, being a product of that society. You have one society that comes from a completely different sediment, and yet you have a political power which is an ideology that wants to be something else. Take the Turkish revolution in the 1920s, when, overnight, [Kemal Atatürk’s] government declared, ‘You are not going to wear a fez, you are going to wear a western-style hat. You are not going to use Arabic letters, you are going to use Roman letters. The way you greet each other, the time, the dates, the calendar – everything will change overnight, with a revolution.’ There is a history of change here: it took 250 years to start the [modernization] process, but then the brutal moment, the implementation of the new law, came. People who opposed it were imprisoned. My practice at the moment is about pointing to these limitations, to these prescriptions that we all live in, because I am interested in narrative; how we create these narratives, for each other,

Kutlug Ataman photographed in London, 13 May 2010


how we play out these narratives and how we prescribe these for each other, in society, which is ideology. KW Paradise was your first step in the US, wasn’t it? KA Yes. After Küba, everyone was saying, ‘Oh, you gave a voice to a community that would not have a voice otherwise, the poor Kurds, the poor Kurds.’ Politically, I agree with them, but my work is not this one-liner. Just because I talk about how we construct identity, doesn’t mean that I am an artist that defined by identity politics. All this politically correct stuff is just so blunt, so limiting. So I went and did Paradise in a very wealthy community in southern California to provoke [chuckles], to show them that Paradise functions exactly the same way as Küba. It is not about giving a voice to the poor – these are very rich people and I give them a voice – but about how we all construct our identities. It’s all about construction. We need narrative as human beings, otherwise what you call reality becomes very raw and it becomes scary; it becomes incomprehensible, pornographic. History and geography are subjective notions. We are sure of our boundaries. But other people, other countries, might not be: for them, these borders don’t really exist or make sense because their narratives are completely different. KW So you’re basically saying what you said in Küba, which is ‘We are some of many stories’? KA Yes. I think that a common thing that connects all my works together is the fact that I’m always dealing with narrative, I’m always dealing with constructing narrative – that is what my work is about. KW You do come from a place of great verbal history. KA It is true, but also I’m trained as a film-maker and I’m constantly manipulating stories. I think for me it all started as a game. It was not very intellectual in the beginning. I was exposed to film crews as a very little boy, my parent’s home was used as a film set – it really started from that moment. What I remember is always being behind the scenes to see how everything was made; I think this relates today to my position as an artist. I never believed in the illusion that was being created because I knew how it was made. It’s like growing up in a kitchen: you know where taste comes and how it is created, so you are interested in making it or analyzing it. I lost my excitement about making movies because I didn’t believe in them. I had a more critical and analytical position, which is why I think I turned out to be an artist.

KW That’s a really interesting distinction, about being carried away by film-making. KA No, I am not like that. I know that there are a lot of artists who are trained as artists and they are fascinated by films and they use film as an ingredient. Steve McQueen, in my view, is a good film-maker, as he demonstrated with Hunger. Also, even though I’m not so great a fan of his art, that film-maker… what’s his name? KW Douglas Gordon? KA No, not Douglas Gordon. I like his work. Julian Schnabel. I think he’s a wonderful film-maker. But they come from a different angle. They all start from their love of the film. I am not like that. I should have been trained as an artist, I guess, but I was trained as a film-maker and I grew out of it. I said, ‘This is just formulaic, I do the same thing over and over. It’s a métier.’ It was not intellectual enough for me. I had to be able to analyze why the image is moving, I had to be talking about time, creating time, creating space with moving image – and it’s not self-reflexive. There are very few Hollywood films that are self-reflexive, that analyze themselves. A good example would be Martin Scorsese’s The King of Comedy [1982]. I think art, theoretically and in terms of experimentation, was attractive, and that is why I have ended up there. There is still a side of me that misses film: I still write screenplays and I make films once in a while, but they turn out to be festival films, not commercial films. I’m completely happy with that. It’s like being a cook – you don’t necessarily have to work professionally in a restaurant to be a cook. KW You start off in your earlier films with very much coming from your own experiences growing up. For instance, you were a collector of orchids when you were young, so it seems natural that you did The 4 Seasons of Veronica Read [2002], about a collector of amaryllis, and Stefan’s Room [2004], about the man who keeps butterflies in his room. Did it reflect your isolation growing up in Istanbul? KA I ran out of exotic friends! I was talking about my own experience and my own life earlier on in my artworks. I found a way of talking about myself through these characters. Funnily enough, the more I did those pieces, the more I forgot about them. It was almost like therapeutic – I hate this very grumpy big therapy! Post-Küba, I have said goodbye to all that by doing this belly-dance piece – Turkish Delight [2007]. This is really the end of the first phase of my preoccupation, but it wasn’t seen that way. It was seen as a joke by people who are used to kind of one-liners. In the


Opposite, top: installation view of Küba, BAK, Utrecht, 2007; bottom: Turkish Delight, 2006 This page: installation view of Paradise, Lentos Museum, Linz, Austria, 12 February 2009

Noughties, art became so shallow – it was about art as a system, not just artists. Critics, curators and museums – they all became shallow during the first decade of this century. I made fun of this whole situation. I made Turkish Delight because I felt certain that everyone would see the joke. Strangely, the joke was seen in places like Turkey, places that were the victim of this kind of shallowness. But in places like London, it was taken as, ‘Oh, this artist does belly dancing! Ha, ha!’ They didn’t get it – which is fine, but it also proves my point, because I was making fun just of that. It was a comment on how the market forces were influencing and directing art practice, and how a lot of artists were falling into that trap. A lot of very good artists who started out doing extremely interesting work – when I first came to London, there were so many interesting artists about. Where are they now? Completely disappeared. There’s nothing that you can call young British art. A lot of people in the mid-1990s were doing a lot of video and film, they were doing great works. Their early works are still valid today, and but their produce since then is going to be thrown in the trash. It will never come back. It’s an embarrassment. And it’s not their fault alone. It is also the fault of the system, the gallery system. Right, I said: I’m going to make two different pieces that are about my state of mind and how I am suffering. In the end, it’s always about me! [Laughs] So the first work about my own alienation was called Circle of Friends (2007). It’s one piece, seven very small screens, and each one is the same man who practices auto-fellatio. It is very pornographic, if you like, but cut and edited in such a way that it’s like a ballet. The other piece was Turkish Delight, which is an act of defiance and protest. I didn’t shave and I put on weight on purpose. In six months I gained 18kg, which took me a very, very long time to lose. Do you remember I was eating all that pasta? [Laughs] With butter. KW Pasta! It was delicious? KA Yes, but it was so difficult to let go. Even now, I’m addicted. I realized these things – chocolate, pasta – are addictions. I never had these addictions before. I kind of made myself gain this image that doesn’t really belong to me, then I went and got this red and gold – you know, seduction colors! – belly-dancing outfit! Then I dressed up with long hair, eyelashes and makeup, and did Turkish belly-dancing, which is, of course, Turkish delight. The whole culture is kind of reduced to that. I cannot dance. I was a clown, but I was talking about the market forces that make fools of us. After this, I thought, now I have to go in a completely different direction. KW So where did you go next? KA I see my practice like mining; artists are like miners. We have these picks and we go in these tunnels in complete darkness to try to find diamond, coal or whatever. Sometimes there are accidents and sometimes you die; sometimes, like in real life, you have a bad show or you get arrested. The museum director hates you and wants to kill you and then you don’t practice for five years because you criticized them or their show. But at the end, you are still taking risks with the pick and you are digging and digging and digging and it is not necessarily for the public, is it? You are there alone. That operation has to be financed. Once in a while, when you find the gold mine. But if the search itself doesn’t happen, then you will never get the gold. The galleries and the people who are interested in this popular art have to realize that. KW Your work is so about observation. I was just thinking about Andy Warhol’s films. Are they important to you? KA I just watched Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests. I like them because I thought I am going to fast-forward, but [I didn’t. The films] become very meditative because they keep changing. Some of [the participants] are acting, even though they were told to stay still. It’s not professional acting, rather, it is the real acting that we all do in real life – this moment the camera is pointed at you and you can’t help yourself acting, even if you act in a blasé manner. You begin thinking about acting and it becomes such a simple idea. What I really like about these Warhol pieces is that they remind me that you don’t conceive of something as an artist. You only discover it – something else tells you to do them. It’s like having that miner’s pick and experimenting: there’s either some gem in there or not. Sometimes, a good artist has a nose maybe, like a good miner… I don’t know in advance what I am doing. For me, my films are almost like reports that I make from my research, from my mining, and I make turns. I don’t

«the boys shouting as they fly in their fake Dolce & Gabbana clothes, being very sexy» 39


Below: Stills from Paradise, 2006. Opposite, top: installation view of Mesopotamian Dramaturgies, Lentos Museum, Linz, Austria, 12 February 2009 Opposite, bottom: still from Mesopotamian Dramaturgies, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, 2008

have any kind of important work – all my works I can talk about at great length because they are, for me, equally important. I don’t think Circle of Friends is less important than Küba. Yes, the world perceives it differently for so many other reasons – political, commercial consideration. KW Do you think where the works are shown is important? KA Yes. You have people from all over the world rushing through MoMA just because they have so many other things to see. When I did my show there it was like a shopping mall. You can imagine with my work – which requires eight hours, four hours, it requires concentration, sitting and reading subtitles! No way! So I showed my animation pieces and 99 Names (2002) – easily consumable and perceivable pieces. Those places are scary. There has got to be another way of exhibiting. I completely agree with you, because I think we are going through this whole thing again, the division between popular and – I don’t want to call it ‘high art’, I want to call it ‘experimental art’. The popular versus experimental. It’s like Tate, Guggenheim, MoMA: they are like Hollywood for art. Then you have little museums, little venues, Kunsthalles and publicly funded little places where you can actually go and see something which really opens up new horizons. Which is what art, living art, has to do. It has to completely and constantly open up new doors to different ways of perceiving. This quality of experience is going to become more and more of a problem, I think. KW Is that the difference between art-house cinema and mainstream? KA We all had high hopes about cinema independent of the studio system. Unfortunately, it imitated this studio system and it became the studio system. There is no such thing as independent cinema. So the question is: is the same force going to take over in the art world? If so, then you have absolutely no place where you can be an artist. Maybe we are like the dying remnant of an old system. I don’t know. Unfortunately, this whole liberal system, which is fine and dandy in many ways, at least theoretically, is in practice fascistic. Look, for example, at public money. What is public money? Public money originally was created – the concept, the notion of public money – to make art; creation cannot exist in the commercial realm. This is the scary thing. Art is becoming more and more shallow; this high art or experimentation is becoming now limited to the bedrooms or the living rooms of great collectors. So intellectual production becomes an exclusive property that is hidden inside big fortresses. And you get so paranoid: all my political pieces are going to be in five people’s hands and they are never going to be seen! That is scary. I want my pieces to be in museums. Mesopotamian Dramaturgies is actually two cycles. The first cycle has eight components, and the second cycle I have not started yet. I haven’t created it yet. Frame is all composed of found footage. The whole show is under the gaze of the Turkish generals. They are like headmasters. Attitudes towards the generals is different in each different work. They are themselves framed by the photographer – it’s found footage so it’s really evidential, I didn’t do it that way. The most powerful man is centered in such a way that everybody else’s head is cut off. So it is the logic of the hierarchy and the power that is predominant in this photography, and not the logic of the photography as we would have seen in western –

«It is not about giving a voice to the poor – these are very rich people and I give them a voice – but about how we all construct our identities»

KW So there’s a silent video. KA Yes, it’s a silent video. It moves, obviously, it’s not still photos, but people don’t talk because they’re not allowed to talk and so, in a way, they do not exist. But it’s so powerful in their silence that it actually becomes a monument. I did this piece as part of Mesopotamian Dramaturgies called Column and then I did Dome [both 2009]. The dome was a ceiling and instead of putting up all these angels, I put these teenaged Turkish boys attached to construction machines, so you hear these machines, the boys shouting as they fly in their fake Dolce & Gabbana clothes, being very sexy. 40

All photos courtesy the artist

KW Bad photography! [Laughs] KA [Laughs] Yes, in bad photography. Or in western photography. If you are taking the picture of the president you would still frame it from the logic of the frame that comes from the Renaissance, right? Whereas this time it is in clear evidence that the Renaissance didn’t occur in Mesopotamia – even in today’s Turkey, where they themselves are trying to impose this discipline and system. So under their careful gaze, I have this tower that was inspired by Trajan’s Column in Rome. I made this anti-tower and I compiled all these old TV screens on top of each other, and I made a tower of all these silenced faces. So it’s a monument to non-talking faces from Anatolia, all the peoples who are not allowed to talk there.


They’re being really naughty and there’s a bed on the floor. It’s almost like a sexual thing. These construction machines are very prominent in Turkey, which is modernizing – this modernizing energy and ideology, obviously what the generals are imposing. And modernity cuts through these ancient cultures with no other considerations than its own. Nearby is the Pursuit of Happiness [2009], which is a very talkative piece completely the opposite of the silent Column, in which I hear this woman who is trying to find the perfect husband and love for herself. Again, it’s a very sexual piece; she’s talking about her different husbands, and why she left each one; she’s still searching. It is something so completely unexpected from a woman who lives in a village in eastern Turkey, because in the perception of the Europeans, she should be veiled, beaten up and abused. But she’s not. It’s funny. This is about modernity also, this freed woman. Freeing women was one of the ideals of the Turkish Republic. You know, we are very proud that –

and politicians and I told them what I am doing. I was completely honest, but I said, ‘Had this story been true, taken it as true, how would you have processed this, and talked about it from the perspective of your discipline? How would you read it? What would be your reading from your discipline?’ So they offered me their readings, the subtext you know, what the story really signifies in the history of Turkey. I intercut that with my photographic evidences. I called it Journey to the Moon [2009]. It’s a feature-length documentary; everyone who watches it, believes it.

KW She got rid of her veil? KA Got rid of her veil. We are very proud that she’s in public space and when you are in public space then she talks about these things that you are also against it, very much, because it is almost pornographic. Then in a separate room I’m showing this fake film, which ate up most of my fabrication budget. It’s a feature-length film, but I show it in the form of installation in museums. I made up this fake story of a Turkish village in the 1950s attempting to go to the moon in a minaret. A completely unbelievable story. By attaching helium balloons! So, I went there, I created this fake village, I got all these people, photographed them, Photoshopped the photos, made them old, made this fake evidence and I pretended I found these photos. I got this fake narrator, to tell the story. But I also got some very real, famous Turkish intellectuals, scientists, historians

KW Unbelievable. KA Yes. I sometimes wrote five or six hours a day, but when I was traveling, my assistant continued doing it. It deformed my finger! So, this, again, is also kind of a joke, but at the same time it also has a basis. Shakespeare is very important in western culture, because the Elizabethan values remain values in the modern world. And our notions of morality, justice, ethics – they were concentrated in Shakespeare. It is a big revolution, compared to the Middle Ages. It’s like the Renaissance. I wanted to put it in my work, all, and yet when you project it, it’s completely meaningless. It’s all wiggly, because it’s going at 24 frames per second, so it becomes like a painting. On the big screen, it lasts only four minutes, sadly.

KW So it’s not a documentary? KA No, and it’s really not mockumentary, either, because there is mockumentary. And then I have another room where I deal with language. I wrote the entire complete works of William Shakespeare on film. Handwritten. It took a little less than three years. The whole folio: all the histories, comedies, tragedies. In English. And one-to-one copying.

KW Three years for four minutes! 41


object lesson: Lot 108 The success of a celebrity photograph is often linked to the sitter’s idiosyncratic appeal – their aura and magnetism – leaving viewers to comment on the subject’s allure and inadvertently overlook the mind which had envisioned, constructed and executed the final image. With that in mind, an adjudicated perspective would insist on a neat and lucent balance in which the sitter’s spark would not blind viewers from immediately identifying – and appreciating – the photographer’s inadmissible and unmistakable contribution, so that the final image reveals the cosmic appeal (hence the moniker, ‘stars’) of two individuals, not just one. Of this, Youssef Nabil’s portrait of Rossy de Palma is a superb example. The choice of the sitter is not arbitrary. In fact, Nabil’s selection of his subjects is limited to individuals who have joined the pantheon of excellence within their field, or, put more simply, icons. Rossy de Palma, the distinctive Spanish beauty who has served as muse to legendary filmmaker Pedro Almódovar, has built a totality that far exceeds the sum of its parts, a quintessential feature of a movie star. It is through such a legacy that an image of Rossy, as with Nabil’s other actor sitters, does not evoke a litany of movies in which she has appeared so much as the blazing impression with which she left the viewers. It’s entirely apt that Nabil has chosen her. The Cairo-born self-taught photographer has developed a style that is unequivocally his own. As a long-standing aficionado of old Hollywood films, Nabil’s work pays homage to the era by maintaining a black-and-white base that he later colors by hand, creating images that are at once imbued with nostalgic glamour and contemporary panache. In Rossy de Palma, Nabil carefully employs his unique style while respecting and revering de Palma’s appearance. The dual presence of his signature style and de Palma’s tongue-incheek self-presentation becomes a memento of an interaction between two performers, as the charisma of the movie star and the immortalizing effect of photographer are captured. n Youssef Nabil, b. 1972, Rossy de Palma, Madrid, 2002 (detail)

Due to her striking yet unconventional beauty, Rosse de Palma has often been compared to a living embodiment of a Pablo Picasso painting, such as the Portrait of Dora Maar Seated, from 1939, pictured here.

Rossy de Palma has excelled in off-beat roles in Pedro Almódovar’s films, most memorably as Antonio Banderas’ gazpacho-drinking fiancée in Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown (1988).

A muse for directors, musicians, fashion designers and photographers, Rossy has been the subject of numerous artworks. Dietmar Busse’s powerful portrait of the actress (2008) accentuates her dramatic beauty. 42

Louis Vuitton have enlisted Rossy’s comedic chops in a series of humorous viral videos to promote their online store in Spain, as the actress is closely associated with both screwball comedy and high fashion.

Picasso: courtesy Tate Modern, DACS 2010. Women on the Verge of A Nervous Breakdown: courtesy Sony Pictures Classics, All Rights Reserved. Busse: courtesy the artist. Louis Vuitton: LMVH

words Shlomi Rabi


BERLIN

Following Bruce Nauman’s victorious showing at the 2009 Venice Biennale, where he won the Golden Lion for his show at the American Pavilion, the superstar American artist is now the long overdue subject of his first major one-man show Dream Passage in the Hamburger Bahnhof - Museum für Gegenwart (until October 10, 2010). Prepare to be perturbed if you enter the claustrophobic installation, Corridor Installation (1970), where a camera shows you from behind making your way into a narrow passage, forever transforming your awareness of your own body in space. 44

Nauman: © the artist, courtesy Hamburger Bahnhof

news


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LONDON

When Thai director and artist Apichatpong Weerasethakul was nominated for the Hugo Boss Prize earlier this year, his name may not have been as recognizable in the contemporary art scene as fellow nominees Walid Raad and Cao Fei. However, Weerasethakul’s reputation in international film festivals is legendary thanks to films like Tropical Malady and Blissfully Yours, which won the Un Certain Regard award at the Cannes Film Festival. His exhibition at the BFI, Phantoms of Nabua (until July 3, 2010) features a dramatic installation of the titular work, pictured, a haunting video of the destructive yet creative aftermath of lightening striking the artist’s hometown.

New York

Mack: courtesy Cinémathèque française, © the artist. Weerasethakul: courtesy BFI Southbank Gallery. Marclay: © Christian Marclay. Dudognon: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Members of Foto Forum, 2005, © Estate of Georges Dudognon

Exploring the intersections and tensions between the aural and the visual, Christian Marclay breaks the boundaries between mediums in order to realign their potential, such as in Screen Play, 2005, above. In this ground-breaking exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art (July 1 – August 25, 2010), audience members will be invited to add notes to a musical sheet scrawled on chalkboardlined walls, creating a collective – and no doubt chaotic – sound score that will be played throughout the duration of the show.

Paris

Tournages Paris-Berlin-Hollywood, 1910-1939 at La Cinémathèque Francaise (until August 1, 2010) gathers a collection of over two hundred behind-the-scenes photographs from film production sets in France, Germany and the United States. The exhibition covers almost twenty years of a crucial moment in film history in which silent film transitioned into the ‘talkies,’ giving way to extravagant musical numbers as Willard Mack captured in Broadway to Hollywood (1933), above.

London

Tapping into contemporary anxieties regarding the pervasive presence of surveillance in our lives, Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance and the Camera (until October 3, 2010) presents photographs and video works by CCTV cameras, paparazzi and press photographers who capture their subjects without their explicit consent. The show will also explore celebrity’s relationship with visibility and privacy through photographs like Georges Dudognon’s Greta Garbo in the Club St. Germain (c. 1950s), whose iconic subject famously wished to be left alone. 45


FILM

2 pm THURSday 24 JUNE 2010 NEW YORK

Lots 1 - 192 Agius, L. 100 Aldridge, A. 111 Allan, T. 166 Avery, S. 33, 53 Ballester, A. 177 Barney, M. 179 Beaton, C. 59, 156 Bidlo, M. 150 Billiken Co. 192 Billiken Co. and Osaka Tin Toy Co. 191 Bull, C.S. 50, 75 Campeggi, S. 60, 61, 62, 63 Chaykin, H.V. 181 Clark, L. 76 Clergue, L. 17 Cocteau, J. 148 Collins, P. 123 Connell, W. 67, 68 Crewdson, G. 124, 125, 127, 128 Curtis, T. 164 Demarchelier, P. 82 Diba, K. 151 Doolittle, J. 69 Douglas, S. 142 Eisenstaedt, A. 52 English, R. 93 Erwitt, E. 6, 7, 87 Fatmi, M. 122 Fiks, Y. 74 Fossil Co. 189 Gassian, C. 45, 46, 77 Glinn, B. 105 Glinn, B. 13, 23, 24 Gottlieb, W. 39 Grant, A. 1, 4, 20 Gundlach, F.C. 8, 32

Haas. E. 14, 15, 21, 35, 36, 37, 42, 43 Haberny, G. 137 Hamilton, R. 141 Hildebrandt, G. 88 Homolka, F. 161, 165 Hopper, D. 131 - 136 Horowitz, J. 121 Horst, H. 48, 49, 51, 54 joyce, p. 184 Kander, N. 110, 126 Karsh, Y. 56, 57, 58 Kasten, B. 129, 130 Kaufman, S. 187 Keisuke Sawada/Medicom Co. 183 Kelley, M. 115 Larson, W. 117, 118 Lichtenstein, R. 119 Longo, R. 144, 149 Lyon, D. 38 Makkink, H. 92 Marclay, C. 139 Matter, H. 72 Megahouse Artworks Co. 188 Mekas, J. 146 Memorablia 169 - 176, 178, 182 Mitchell, B. 26, 28, 29 Morath, I. 5 Mr. Brainwash 180

Rauschenberg, R. 140 Ray, B. 25 Robot House Co. 190 Rosenquist, J. 114 Roth, S. 40 Rusconi, P. 99 Santlofer, J. 145 Schiller, L. 2, 34, 84, 85, 86, 153 Shere, J. 10 Smith, A. 154 Smith, J. 147 Stern, B. 89, 90, 91 Stern, B. 19 Stettner, L. 27, 41 Stock, D. 9 Stone, E. 155 Strauss-Peyton 158 Struss, K. 159 Sugimoto, H. 120 Telepnev, V.C. 71, 73 Teller, J. 97 Torres Llorca, R. 152 Troubridge, A. 106, 107 Unknown Artist 30, 31 Unknown Designer 185 Various Artists 167, 168 Verglas, A. 101 Warhol, A. 112, 113 Waters, R. 116 Weber, B. 109 Welles, O. 162 Wertheimer, A. 78, 80 Willoughby, B. 44 Worth, F. 64

Nabil, Y. 108 Nauman, B. 138 Newman, A. 3 Newton, H. 83, 104 Newton, H. 104 O’Neill, M. 163 Orkin, R. 16, 18, 22, 47, 160 Pallas, M. 70 Parkinson, N. 55 Penati, G. 12 Peyton, H. 157 Picasso, P. 143

Young, R. 79, 81, 94, 95, 96, 186 Zahedi, F. 65, 66, 98, 102 Zimbel, G. 11

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1 ALLAN GRANT 1919-2008 Grace Kelly, April 18, 1956. Gelatin silver print. 13 3/8 x 10 1/4 in. (34 x 26 cm). Signed, titled, annotated ‘This is a vintage print’ in pencil, credit and date stamps on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 47


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2 LAWRENCE SCHILLER b. 1936 Marilyn Monroe, 1962. Color coupler print, printed later. 26 3/8 x 38 in. (67 x 96.5 cm). Signed and numbered 41/75 in ink in the margin. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

5 INGE MORATH 1923-2002 Marilyn Monroe with Clark Gable on the set of “The Misfits,” 1960. Gelatin silver print. 11 5/8 x 8 in. (29.5 x 20.3 cm). Magnum copyright credit and ‘Cinema Misfits’ stamps on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

3 ARNOLD NEWMAN 1918-2006 Marilyn Monroe, Beverly Hills, California, 1962. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 14 1/4 x 19 1/8 in. (36.2 x 48.6 cm). Signed, titled and dated in pencil in the margin; copyright credit stamp on the reverse of the mount.

6 ELLIOTT ERWITT b. 1928 On the set of “The Misfits,” Reno, Nevada, 1960. Gelatin silver print. 10 1/8 x 11 7/8 in. (25.7 x 30.2 cm). Signed in ink in the margin; signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. LITERATURE Phaidon, Elliott Erwitt: Snaps, p. 511 Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 4 ALLAN GRANT 1919-2008 Marx Brothers, circa 1952. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 13 1/4 x 10 1/8 in. (33.7 x 25.7 cm). Signed in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired

7 ELLIOTT ERWITT b. 1928 New York City, 1966. Gelatin silver print, printed later. Y7/8 in. (20.3 x 30.2 cm). Signed in ink in the margin; signed, titled and dated in pencil POthe verso. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

directly from the artist

Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 48


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8 F.C. GUNDLACH b. 1926 Romy Schneider mit Kreuz, Hamburg, 1962. Gelatin silver print, printed 2009. 15 5/8 x 12 in. (39.7 x 30.5 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 2/10 in pencil on the recto. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

12 gianni penati b. 1930 Sophia Loren a Villa Ada, 1953. Carbon print, printed 2007. 10 3/4 x 7 7/8 in. (27.3 x 20 cm). Blindstamp credit on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 4 , 5 0 0 - 5 , 5 0 0

9 DENNIS STOCK b. 1928 Audrey Hepburn while filming “Sabrina”, 1953. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 19 1/2 x 14 in. (49.5 x 35.6 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 20/200 in pencil in the margin. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

13 BURT GLINN 1925-2008 Elizabeth Taylor from “Suddenly Last Summer,” 1959. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 12 3/8 x 18 1/2 in. (31.4 x 47 cm). Signed and artist’s fingerprint in ink on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

10 JOE SHERE 1917-2008 Jayne Mansfield and Sophia Loren at Romanoff’s in Beverly Hills, 1958. Gelatin silver print, printed 1978. 14 x 13 1/2 in. (35.6 x 34.3 cm). Signed, titled, dated in pencil and copyright credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE COLLECTION OF VICTORIA HAAS

14 ERNST HAAS 1921-1986 Barbra Streisand, Hello Dolly, 1969. Gelatin silver print. 9 7/8 x 6 5/8 in. (25.1 x 16.8 cm). Credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

11 GEORGE ZIMBEL b. 1929 Marilyn Monroe N.Y.C., 1954. Gelatin silver print, printed 1986. 11 1/4 x 8 in. (28.6 x 20.3 cm). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE COLLECTION OF VICTORIA HAAS

15 ERNST HAAS 1921-1986 Barbra Streisand, Hello Dolly, 1969. Gelatin silver print. 6 3/4 x 7 7/8 in. (17.1 x 20 cm). Credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 49


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16 RUTH ORKIN 1921-1985 Hollywood Shooting in Manhattan, ca. 1950. Gelatin silver print. 9 3/8 x 4 in. (23.8 x 10.2 cm). Titled in ink and credit stamp on the verso. PROVENANCE Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

19 BERT STERN b. 1930 Marilyn Monroe from The Last Sitting, 1962. Platinum-palladium print, printed 1991. 23 1/2 x 19 5/8 in. (59.7 x 49.8 cm). Signed, dated ‘1991’ and annotated ‘PP’ in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

17 LUCIEN CLERGUE b. 1934 Jean Cocteau filming “Testament of Orpheus,” Nice, 1959. Gelatin silver print, printed 2002. 13 1/8 x 14 1/8 in. (33.3 x 35.9 cm). Signed in ink in the margin; signed, titled and copyright credit in ink on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired

20 ALLAN GRANT 1919-2008 Grace Kelly at MGM Screening Ro om, March 22, 1956. Gelatin silver print. 9 3/8 x 7 1/4 in. (23.8 x 18.4 cm). Signed, annotated ‘This is a vintage print’ in pencil, credit and date stamps on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly

directly from the artist

from the artist

Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

18 RUTH ORKIN 1921-1985 Vee takes time off on a messenger route, 1948. Gelatin silver print. 7 x 9 1/2 in. (17.8 x 24.1 cm). Annotated ‘Vee takes time off on a messenger route, when she sees one of the cameras on its way to a sound stage. She’s getting a kick out of how smoothly the gears work – under Hal Rosson’s direction’ in ink on the reverse of the flush-mount. PROVENANCE Ruth Orkin Photo Archive, New York Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE COLLECTION OF VICTORIA HAAS

Ruth Orkin Photo Archive, New York

21 ERNST HAAS 1921-1986 John Huston, Portrait of him at his hotel, 1962. Gelatin silver print. 7 1/2 x 11 3/8 in. (19.1 x 28.9 cm). Magnum Photo Library stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 22 RUTH ORKIN 1921-1985 Marlon Brando in dressing room on set of “Julius Caesar,” MGM, 1952. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 13 3/4 x 11 3/4 in. (34.9 x 29.8 cm). Signed, titled, dated and copyright in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Ruth Orkin Photo Archive, New York

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 50


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23 BURT GLINN 1925-2008 Elizabeth Taylor from “Suddenly Last Summer,” 1959. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 14 3/4 x 21 7/8 in. (37.5 x 55.6 cm). Signed in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

27 LOUIS STETTNER b. 1922 Movie Usher, circa 1953. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 12 1/8 x 8 1/8 in. (30.8 x 20.6 cm). Blindstamp credit in the margin; signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

24 BURT GLINN 1925-2008 Gloria Swanson, José Ferrer and Judy Holliday at the Academy Awards, 1950. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 12 1/2 x 18 in. (31.8 x 45.7 cm). Initialed in pencil and credit stamp on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

28 BENN MITCHELL b. 1926 The Birds, 1963. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 13 5/8 x 10 3/4 in. (34.6 x 27.3 cm). Signed, titled ‘New York City,’ dated and copyright in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

25 BILL RAY b. 1961 Natalie Wood, 1963. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 12 1/2 x 10 in. (31.8 x 25.4 cm). Signed and dated in ink in the margin; initialed in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

29 BENN MITCHELL b. 1926 Paramount Theatre, 1947. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 10 5/8 x 13 5/8 in. (27 x 34.6 cm). Signed, dated and copyright in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

26 BENN MITCHELL b. 1926 Two Big Features, 1963. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 13 5/8 x 10 3/4 in. (34.6 x 27.3 cm). Signed, dated and copyright in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 51


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30 Unknown artist Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bogart, Film still from the movie “To Have and Have Not,” 1944. Gelatin silver print. 10 x 8 in. (25.4 x 20.3 cm). PROVENANCE for the Visual Arts, April 23 - May 3, 1988, lot 2896; Gotham Book Mart, New York

35 ERNST HAAS 1921-1986 “Leaping Horse” on the set of “The Misfits,” Nevada, 1960. Gelatin silver print, printed 1992. 16 7/8 x 11 1/4 in. (42.9 x 28.6 cm). Signed, titled, dated, numbered 32/50 in pencil by Alexander Haas, the photographer’s son, and Ernst Haas copyright credit stamp on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the Estate of

Estimate $ 5 0 0 -7 0 0

Ernst Haas

Sotheby’s, New York, The Andy Warhol Collection: Sold for the Benefit of the Andy Warhol Foundation

Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0 31 Unknown artist Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bogart, Film still from the movie “To Have and Have Not,” 1944. Gelatin silver print. 10 x 8 in. (25.4 x 20.3 cm). PROVENANCE for the Visual Arts, April 23 - May 3, 1988, lot 2896; Gotham Book Mart, New York

36 ERNST HAAS 1921-1986 Arthur Miller and Marilyn Monroe on the set of “The Misfits,” 1960. Gelatin silver print. 6 3/8 x 9 1/2 in. (16.2 x 24.1 cm). Titled ‘Misfits’ in an unidentified hand in ink and Magnum credit, Cinéma stamps on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired

Estimate $ 5 0 0 -7 0 0

directly from the artist

Sotheby’s, New York, The Andy Warhol Collection: Sold for the Benefit of the Andy Warhol Foundation

Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 32 F.C. GUNDLACH b. 1926 Cary Grant, A Star Goes to the Ball, Berlin, 1960. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 19 3/4 x 15 5/8 in. (50.2 x 39.7 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/7 in pencil on the recto. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE COLLECTION OF VICTORIA HAAS

37 ERNST HAAS 1921-1986 Cary Grant, Pride and Passion, Spain, 1956. Gelatin silver print, printed 1962. 6 7/8 x 10 in. (17.5 x 25.4 cm). Magnum credit and ABC press stamps on the verso. Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

33 SID AVERY 1918-2002 James Dean on the set of the “Giant,” Marfa, Texas, 1955. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 19 1/8 x 14 in. (48.6 x 35.6 cm). Signed in pencil and copyright credit reproduction limitation stamp on the verso. Number 11 from an edition of 70.

Only a handful of prints of this image were made and it is one of Ernst Haas’ most desirable movie set photographs.

PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 38 Danny Lyon Benny, Grand and Division, Chicago, 1966. Gelatin silver print, printed in 1999. 10 7/8 x 13 7/8 in. (27.6 x 35.2 cm). Signed and dated “Danny Lyon Chicago 1966” on the verso. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

34 LAWRENCE SCHILLER b. 1936 Clint Eastwood with Cigar, Durango, Mexico, 1969. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 12 1/2 x 19 in. (31.8 x 48.3 cm). Signed, titled and numbered 5/30 in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 52


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PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE COLLECTION OF VICTORIA HAAS

39 WILLIAM GOTTLIEB 1917-2006 Frank Sinatra and Axel Stordahl, circa 1947. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 13 1/8 x 10 1/2 in. (33.3 x 26.7 cm). Signed and titled in ink in the margin; signed, titled in ink and copyright credit reproduction limitation stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0

43 ERNST HAAS 1921-1986 On the set of the movie “Love and Death” by Woody Allen, 1975. Gelatin silver print. 6 x 9 in. (15.2 x 22.9 cm). Credit, title and Magnum Distribution copyright credit stamps on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 44 BOB WILLOUGHBY b. 1927 #61 Dustin Hoffman on the set of “The Graduate,” Paramount Studios, Hollywood, 1967. Gelatin silver print, printed 1984. 9 1/2 x 14 in. (24.1 x 35.6 cm). Signed, titled, dated, numbered 2/200 and copyright in pencil on the verso.

40 SANFORD H. ROTH 1906-1962 Marlon Brando, 1950s. Gelatin silver print. 13 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. (34.3 x 24.1 cm). Titled in an unidentified hand in pencil and credit stamp on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist

PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

41 LOUIS STETTNER b. 1922 The Great White Way, 1954. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 13 1/2 x 9 in. (34.3 x 22.9 cm). Blindstamp credit in the margin; signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

45 CLAUDE GASSIAN b. 1949 Vincent Cassel, Paris, 2006. Gelatin silver print. 23 x 15 1/4 in. (58.4 x 38.7 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 5/12 in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 46 CLAUDE GASSIAN b. 1949 Francis Ford Coppola, Paris, 2007. Gelatin silver print. 23 x 15 3/8 in. (58.4 x 39.1 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 3/12 in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE COLLECTION OF VICTORIA HAAS

42 ERNST HAAS 1921-1986 On the set of the movie “Love and Death” by Woody Allen, 1975. Gelatin silver print. 6 x 9 in. (15.2 x 22.9 cm). Credit, title, Magnum Distribution copyright credit and Tirage Archive Magnum Photos stamps on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

47 RUTH ORKIN 1921-1985 Woody Allen at the Met, 1963. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 18 1/8 x 12 1/4 in. (46 x 31.1 cm). Signed, titled and dated in ink on the mount; signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Ruth Orkin Photo Archive, New York Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 53


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48 HORST P. HORST 1906-1999 Katharine Hepburn, New York, 1981. Platinum-palladium print, printed later. 9 1/2 x 7 5/8 in. (24.1 x 19.4 cm). Signed in pencil and copyright credit stamp on the verso. Number 1 from an edition of 25. Literature National Portrait

51 HORST P. HORST 1906-1999 Marlene Dietrich, 1942. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 7 1/2 x 7 1/2 in. (19.1 x 19.1 cm). Signed in pencil on the recto. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

Gallery, Horst Portraits: 60 Years of Style, pl. 115

52 ALFRED EISENSTAEDT 1898-1995 Katharine Hepburn, New York City, 1938. Gelatin silver print, printed 1995. 14 x 13 5/8 in. (35.6 x 34.6 cm). Signed and numbered 113/250 in ink in the margin. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist LITERATURE Bulfinch

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 49 HORST P. HORST 1906-1999 Myrna Loy, 1941. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 9 1/2 x 7 3/8 in. (24.1 x 18.7 cm). Signed in pencil in the margin; signed in pencil and copyright credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

Press, Eisenstaedt: Remembrances, p. 56

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 53 SID AVERY 1918-2002 Elizabeth Taylor on the set of “Giant,” Marfa, Texas, 1955. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 10 1/8 x 10 in. (25.7 x 25.4 cm). Signed in pencil and copyright credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

50 CLARENCE SINCLAIR BULL 1895-1979 “Grand Hotel” Premiere at Chinese Theatre, circa 1932. Gelatin silver print. 13 x 10 in. (33 x 25.4 cm). Blindstamp credit on the recto; signed in ink and titled in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 Subjects in this composite image include the film’s stars Greta Garbo, Joan Crawford and John Barrymore.

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54 HORST P. HORST 1906-1999 Luchino Visconti, 1936. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 9 7/8 x 7 7/8 in. (25.1 x 20 cm). Signed in pencil and copyright credit stamp on the verso. Number 5 from an edition of 50. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

57 YOUSUF KARSH 1908-2002 Anna Magnani, 1958. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 19 3/4 x 16 in. (50.2 x 40.6 cm). Signed in ink on the mount; copyright credit stamp on the reverse of the mount. PROVENANCE Private Collection, California LITERATURE Bulfinch Press, Karsh: A Fifty-Year Retrospective, p. 187

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 Luchino Visconti was an Italian film, stage and opera director best known for his 1971 adaptation of Thomas Mann’s Death in Venice.

Anna Magnani was an Italian actress most celebrated for her Academy Award winning performance in The Rose Tattoo in 1955.

55 NORMAN PARKINSON 1913-1990 Mr. and Mrs. Ian Fleming, 1960s. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 9 1/2 x 11 3/8 in. (24.1 x 28.9 cm). Provenance Hamiltons Gallery, London; to

58 YOUSUF KARSH 1908-2002 Gregory Peck, 1946. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 19 3/4 x 15 3/4 in. (50.2 x 40 cm). Signed in ink on the mount; copyright credit stamp on the verso. PROVENANCE Private Collection, California LITERATURE Bulfinch Press, Karsh:

the present Private European Collection

Estimate $ 5 0 0 -7 0 0

A Fifty-Year Retrospective, p. 171

Ian Fleming was a British writer best known for creating the legendary character, James Bond. His twelve novels and four short-stories that chronicled Bond’s international adventures have been made into 22 feature films starring 6 different actors in the title role.

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 59 CECIL BEATON 1904-1980 Greta Garbo, 1946. Gelatin silver print. 3 5/8 x 3 5/8 in. (9.2 x 9.2 cm). Credit stamp on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

56 YOUSUF KARSH 1908-2002 Boris Korloff, 1946. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 19 1/2 x 15 7/8 in. (49.5 x 40.3 cm). Signed in ink on the mount; copyright credit stamp on the reverse of the mount. PROVENANCE Private Collection, California LITERATURE Bulfinch Press, Karsh: A Fifty-Year Retrospective, p. 176

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 The star of horror films throughout the 1930s, Boris Korloff is best known for his role as Frankenstein in the film trilogy, which included Frankenstein (1931), Bride of Frankenstein (1935) and Son of Frankenstein (1939). 55


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60 Silvano Campeggi b. 1923 Casablanca, 1945. Gouache and charcoal on paper. 13 3/4 x 19 3/4 in. (34.9 x 50.2 cm). Signed “Nano” on the reverse. PROVENANCE Collection of the Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0

61 Silvano Campeggi b. 1923 Gone with the Wind, 1945. Oil, charcoal and ink on paper. 19 5/8 x 13 5/8 in. (49.8 x 34.6 cm). Signed “Nano” along the central right edge and on the reverse. PROVENANCE Collection of the artist Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0

This film has always followed me, in my long career as a poster artist. It was so much in demand that three times, every twelve years, I was asked to draw a new poster for a new release of this beautiful film that has constantly delighted the public, generation after generation: my reward is to have been the artist holding the brush that collaborated, on the canvas, to create the PR of its incredible everlasting success! Silvano Campeggi

I was only in my early twenties when I was asked to create first the maquette, then the poster for this film. It was my first break into the Hollywood Movie Industry. I have been told that the sketch I made with Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh’s kiss, with Atlanta’s fire in the background, has won the imagination of entire generations and will do so for generations to come! Silvano Campeggi

artist

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Silvano “Nano” Campeggi is often referred to as Florence’s Greatest Living Artist. Born in Florence in 1923, he grew up under the tutelage of his father, a printer and typesetter, who exposed him to the world of graphics and design. More formally, he attended the Art School at Porta Romana, studying under accomplished painters of the time such as Ottone Rosai and Ardengo Soffici. His first career break-though came with a WWII commission from the American Red Cross to paint the portraits of American soldiers before they returned home. He earned many accolades for his sensitive and poignant renderings, and his involvement led him to become further inspired by American music, film and their cultural milieu. Thus it was, after the war and his move to Rome, that Nano was approached by Metro Goldwyn Mayer and his first masterpiece for cinema was born: the riveting image of Clark Gable holding Vivian Leigh in passionate embrace while Atlanta burns in the background; the icon for Gone with the Wind. In the following decades, Nano would produce over 3000 posters and graphic illustrations for such major filmmakers as MGM Studios, Warner Brothers, Paramount, Universal, Columbia Pictures, United Artists, RKO, and Fox. 64 of the films he illustrated won Oscars, including Casablanca, Ben Hur, Singing in the Rain, An American in Paris, West Side Story, Exodus, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and Gigi. In the 1950s and 1960s Nano became known as The Artist to the Stars. Today, his larger than life images of Hollywood’s greatest actresses are instantly recognizable cultural icons: the regal bearing of Grace Kelly; the smoky essence of Elizabeth Taylor; Lauren Bacall, green-eyed, sly and sultry in beret and cape; a perfectly coiffed Ava Gardner radiating power and control, Rita Hayworth towering from a low perspective as the unobtainable, unconquerable redhead; Sophia Loren displaying as much worldly, earth-mother warmth and wisdom as she does sheer beauty. Hollywood’s male stars also fell captive to Nano’s discerning eye: Marlon Brando cockily astride his Harley as The Wild One; James Dean, bare-chested, exuding rawness, arrogance and testosterone; a dusty, trail-weary John Wayne sporting his signature neck kerchief and broad-rimmed cowboy hat; Humphrey Bogart in his trademark white dinner jacket (a masterpiece of dramatic shadow and attitude), and so many others.

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62 Silvano Campeggi b. 1923 Exodus, 1969. Charcoal, gouache and acrylic on paper. 19 5/8 x 13 5/8 in. (49.8 x 34.6 cm). Signed “Nano” lower left. PROVENANCE Collection of

63 Silvano Campeggi b. 1923 Marlon Brando in The Wild One, 1945. Gouache and charcoal on paper. 19 3/4 x 13 3/4 in. (50.2 x 34.9 cm). Signed “Nano” lower left and on the reverse. PROVENANCE Collection of the artist Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0

the artist

Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0 To creat the Exodus poster I went into an incredible soul searching: it has been one of the most compelling tasks of my career. I decided to concentrate and to focus the pathos of the movie on Paul Newman’s intense, passionate and determined expression. It was a privilege for me to work with such a professional, talented and intense actor, so perfectly fit for the part. Silvano Campeggi

It was extremely interesting for me to portray and characterize such an incredible and phenomenal actor, in so many of his powerful movies like Sayonara, Julius Caesar, Mutiny on the Bounty and The Godfather. Silvano Campeggi

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64 FRANK WORTH b. 1923 Frank Worth Luxury Collectors Portfolio, 1939-1958. London: Cinemage Limited, 2002. Thirty-six gelatin silver prints, printed later. Each approximately 15 x 14 in. (38.1 x 35.6 cm) or the reverse. Each numbered 17/75 in ink and blindstamp credit in the margin. Accompanied by thirty-six Certificates of Authenticity from The Frank Worth Estate as well as a copy of Frank Worth: A Collection Discovered. PROVENANCE Cinemage Limited, London LITERATURE Cinemage Limited Editions, Frank Worth: A Collection Discovered, n.p.

Estimate $ 1 2 , 0 0 0 -1 8 , 0 0 0 Subjects include Jane Russell, Marilyn Monroe, Elizabeth Taylor, James Dean, William Holden, Cary Grant, Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis, Bob Hope, Frank Sinatra, Dennis Hopper and Jane Wyman, amongst others. 58


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65 FIROOZ ZAHEDI b. 1949 Elizabeth Taylor, Vienna, 1976. Pigment print, printed later. 19 x 13 1/8 in. (48.3 x 33.3 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 1/5 in ink in the margin.

68 WILL CONNELL 1898-1961 Star from In Pictures, 1936. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 13 1/2 x 10 1/2 in. (34.3 x 26.7 cm). Titled and annotated ‘p. 43’ in pencil and credit stamp on the verso. LITERATURE Connell, In Pictures: A Hollywood Satire, p. 43 Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

PROVENANCE Private Collection, Los Angeles

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 66 FIROOZ ZAHEDI b. 1949 Dennis Hopper in Heels, 1993. Pigment print, printed 2008. 19 x 15 in. (48.3 x 38.1 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 2/5 in ink in the margin.

69 JAMES DOOLITTLE ca. 1890-1950 Carole Lombard, 1936. Carbro print. 12 3/4 x 10 1/8 in. (32.4 x 25.7 cm). PROVENANCE Private Collection, San Francisco Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

PROVENANCE Private Collection, Los Angeles

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 This image of the american actress Carole Lombard is from series of color photographs that James Doolittle made of famous actresses of the 1930s. In 1942, just six years after this photograph was taken, Lombard died tragically in a plane crash leaving behind her husband, Clark Gable.

67 WILL CONNELL 1898-1961 Publicity from In Pictures, 1936. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 13 1/2 x 10 1/2 in. (34.3 x 26.7 cm). Titled, annotated ‘p. 97’ in pencil and credit stamp on the verso. LITERATURE Connell, In Pictures: A Hollywood Satire, p. 97 Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

70 MICKEY PALLAS 1916-1997 Dean Martin & Jerry Lewis, Chicago, 1951. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 10 3/8 x 10 3/8 in. (26.4 x 26.4 cm). Signed in ink in the margin.

In Pictures: A Hollywood Satire was the first satire that addressed the images and iconography of Hollywood filmmaking. From celebrity headshots to on-set snapshots, Connell’s photographs provide a humorous look at the Hollywood Studio system that redefined filmmaking in the 1930s.

PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

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71 Vladimir Clavijo Telepnev b. 1962 Untitled, 2003. Gelatin silver print. 31 5/8 x 25 7/8 in. (80.3 x 65.7 cm). Signed “Clavijo Telepnev” lower left; also signed and dated “Clavijo 2003” along the lower right edge. This work is unique. Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0

73 Vladimir Clavijo Telepnev b. 1962 Untitled, 2003. Gelatin silver print. 31 5/8 x 25 7/8 in. (80.3 x 65.7 cm). Signed and dated “Clavijo Telepnev 2003” along the lower left edge. This work is unique. Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

72 HERBERT MATTER 1907-1984 Solarized Head, 1930s. Gelatin silver print. 13 7/8 x 11 in. (35.2 x 27.9 cm). Credit stamp on the verso. PROVENANCE Staley Wise Gallery, New York Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

74 Yevgeniy Fiks b. 1972 Song of Russia #21, 2007. Oil on canvas. 48 x 35 3/4 in. (121.9 x 90.8 cm). Signed, titled and dated “Yevgeniy Fiks [in Cyrillic] #21 07” on the reverse. Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 60


75

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77

75 CLARENCE SINCLAIR BULL 1895-1979 Garbo Portfolio III, 1929-1937. Five gelatin silver prints, printed 1979. Each 11 x 14 in. (27.9 x 35.6 cm) or the reverse. Each with signature stamp and blindstamp credit in the margin; each numbered 34/50 in an unidentified hand in pencil and credit stamp on the verso. Colophon. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

76 LARRY CLARK b. 1943 Portrait of Linda Winchester, 1962. Gelatin silver print. 9 1/4 x 7 1/2 in. (23.5 x 19.1 cm). Signed in pencil on the mount. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 77 CLAUDE GASSIAN b. 1949 Isabelle Huppert, Paris, 2002. Gelatin silver print. 23 x 15 1/8 in. (58.4 x 38.4 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 3/12 in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

61


78

79

80

81

78 ALFRED WERTHEIMER b. 1930 Elvis on his Harley at his parents’ home, 1956. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 13 1/8 x 8 3/4 in. (33.3 x 22.2 cm). Signed, titled, dated, inscribed in pencil and copyright credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

80 ALFRED WERTHEIMER b. 1930 The Kiss, 1956. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 7 1/4 x 10 7/8 in. (18.4 x 27.6 cm). Signed, titled, dated and copyright in pencil on the verso. EXHIBITED Elvis at 21: Photographs by Alfred Wertheimer, The Grammy Museum, Los Angeles, 8 January - 28 March 2010 and nine other venues on the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, another example exhibited; Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History, 1955-

79 Russell Young b. 1960 Elvis, from Pig Portraits Series, 2006. Screenprint in colors, on Somerset paper. 37 1/2 x 29 in. (95.3 x 73.7 cm). Signed and numbered 12/50 in pencil, published by Bankrobber Gallery, London, framed. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

to the Present, Brooklyn Museum, New York, 30 October 2009- 31 January 2010, for all, another example exhibited LITERATURE Buckland, Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History, 1955Present, p. 43; Wertheimer, Elvis 1956, pp. 50-51

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 81 Russell Young b. 1960 Steve McQueen, from Pig Portraits Series, 2006. Screenprint in colors, on Somerset paper. 37 5/8 x 29 in. (95.6 x 73.7 cm). Signed and numbered 27/50 in pencil, published by Bankrobber Gallery, London, framed. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 62


82

83

82 PATRICK DEMARCHELIER b. 1943 Selected Images, 1986-1994. Four platinum-palladium prints, printed 1996. Three prints approximately 16 x 16 in. (40.6 x 40.6 cm); one print 20 x 14 3/4 in. (50.8 x 37.5 cm). Each signed, dated ‘1996’ and annotated ‘PP’ in pencil in the margin. Two from an edition of 5 plus artist’s proof. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from

83 HELMUT NEWTON 1920-2004 Jack Nicholson and Bob Evans, The 2 Jakes That Never Were, Beverly Hills, 1985. Gelatin silver print. 23 7/8 x 19 3/4 in. (60.6 x 50.2 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/10 in red pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0

the artist

Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 Titles include Robert Altman, New York, 1994; Johnny Depp, 1986; Dustin Hoffman and Warren Beatty, 1987; Madonna from Dick Tracy, Los Angeles, 1989 63


In May 1962, Lawrence Schiller photographed Marilyn Monroe frolicking poolside on the set of her feature film Something’s Got to Give. Just two months later, Monroe died from a drug overdose and the film was subsequently abandoned leaving these as some of the last cinematic images of the fallen star.

84

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84 LAWRENCE SCHILLER b. 1936 Marilyn Monroe (Color 3, Frame 18), 1962. Color coupler print, printed later. 37 3/8 x 55 1/2 in. (94.9 x 141 cm). Signed and numbered AP 3/10 in ink in the margin. One from an edition of 35 plus 10 artist’s proofs. Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0

86 LAWRENCE SCHILLER b. 1936 Marilyn Monroe, 1962. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 26 1/8 x 38 in. (66.4 x 96.5 cm). Signed and numbered 41/75 in ink in the margin. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 87 ELLIOTT ERWITT b. 1928 New York, 1955. Four gelatin silver prints, printed later. Each 12 x 8 in. (30.5 x 20.3 cm). Each signed, titled, dated and sequentially numbered 1-4 in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0

85 LAWRENCE SCHILLER b. 1936 Marilyn Monroe (Roll 14, Frame 17), 1962. Gelatin silver print, printed 2007. 37 3/8 x 55 1/2 in. (94.9 x 141 cm). Signed and numbered AP 3/10 in ink in the margin. One from an edition of 35 plus 10 artist’s proofs. Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 64


88

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91

88 Gregor Hildebrandt b. 1974 Die Braut, 2007. Inkjet print with cassette tape. 38 3/8 x 35 in. (97.5 x 88.9 cm). PROVENANCE Galerie Jan Wentrup, Berlin; Galerie Almine Rech, Paris Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0

90 BERT STERN b. 1930 Marilyn Monroe from The Last Sitting, 1962. Color coupler print, printed later. 19 x 19 in. (48.3 x 48.3 cm). Signed in ink in the margin; numbered 240/250 in ink and copyright credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0

89 BERT STERN b. 1930 Marilyn Monroe from the Last Sitting, 1962. Color coupler print, printed later. 19 x 19 in. (48.3 x 48.3 cm). Signed in ink in the margin; numbered 240/250 in ink and copyright credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0

91 BERT STERN b. 1930 Marilyn Monroe from The Last Sitting, 1962. Color coupler print, printed later. 19 x 19 in. (48.3 x 48.3 cm). Signed in ink in the margin; numbered 240/250 in ink and copyright credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 65


92

92 HERMAN MAKKINK b. 1937 “Rocking Machine” kinetic sculpture, 1969. Lacquered fiberglass. 16 1/4 x 29 1/2 x 17 1/2 in. (41.3 x 74.9 x 44.5 cm). Number two from the edition of six. Together with a certificate of authenticity. Estimate $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 - 2 5 , 0 0 0 The present lot is one from an edition of six produced in 1969, one of which was featured in the 1971 film A Clockwork Orange, directed by Stanley Kubrick. “The Rocking Machine and the Christ Unlimited figures were not designed especially for A Clockwork Orange. They formed part of my studio work at the time, and, after seeing them there, Kubrick wanted to use them for the film because they probably had the futuristic look he and his wife wanted. In the late sixties and early seventies, we, London based artists, felt terribly hip. We didn’t want to fight the establishment so much as shock them. Pop Art was in full swing and so was the sexual revolution, so I combined a penis with a beautifully shaped female rear in fibre glass. I thought this would be really shocking. I thought I could make the object move by constructing a heavy pendulum swing inside. To my surprise I found that it made an irregular movement, so I exaggerated that by adding extra weights in various places. That resulted in Rocking Machine’s specific, jerky motion.” Herman Makkink (© 2000 Drencrom V.O.F.) 66


93

93

Ron English b. 1959 Large Marilyn Red Peach. Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen on canvas. 52 x 30 in. (132.1 x 76.2 cm).

PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0

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96

97

98

94 RUSSELL YOUNG b. 1960 Easy Rider, from Fame, Shame series, 2006. Screenprint in colors. 22 x 37 5/8 in. (55.9 x 95.6 cm). Signed and annotated ‘PP 1/1’ in pencil (a printer’s proof), published by Bankrobber Gallery, London, unframed. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

97 Juergen Teller b. 1964 Gisele Bündchen, 2005. Chromogenic print. 19 7/8 x 16 in. (50.5 x 40.6 cm). This work is from an edition of five. PROVENANCE Lehmann Maupin,

95 RUSSELL YOUNG b. 1960 Bardot/Green, 2007. Screenprint in colors. 29 x 37 1/2 in. (73.7 x 95.3 cm). Signed and annotated ‘PP 2/3’ in pencil (a printer’s proof, the edition was 20), published by Bankrobber Gallery, London, unframed. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

98 FIROOZ ZAHEDI b. 1949 Uma Thurman/ Pulp Fiction, 1994. Color coupler print, printed 2008. 39 x 30 7/8 in. (99.1 x 78.4 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 3/30 in ink in the margin. PROVENANCE Private Collection, Los Angeles Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0

New York

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

96 Russell Young b. 1960 Brigitte Bardot, 2007. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas. 48 x 62 1/8 in. (121.9 x 157.8 cm). Signed and dated “Russell Young 2007” on the reverse. Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 68


99

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101

99 Paul Rusconi b. 1965 Untitled (Away from Myself), 2007. Diptych. Digital screen on Plexiglas with chromogenic photograph mounted to 6 mm Sintra. 37 x 28 in. (94 x 71.1 cm) each. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

101 ANTOINE VERGLAS b. 1962 Angelina Jolie, British GQ, 2000. Archival pigment print. 24 x 17 1/2 in. (61 x 44.5 cm). Signed in ink in the margin. Signed, numbered 1/5 in ink and blindstamp credit on a Certificate of Authenticity accompanying the work. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

100 LORENZO AGIUS b. 1962 Angelina Jolie, 2005. Lightjet print, Diasec mounted. 60 x 48 in. (152.4 x 121.9 cm). Signed and numbered 3/15 in ink on the recto. Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 69


102

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104

106

107

102 FIROOZ ZAHEDI b. 1949 House of the Spirits, 1994. Pigment print, printed later. 19 x 15 in. (48.3 x 38.1 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 1/5 in ink in the margin.

105 BURT GLINN 1925-2008 Twiggy, 1966. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 19 3/8 x 13 1/8 in. (49.2 x 33.3 cm). Signed in ink on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly

PROVENANCE Private Collection, Los Angeles

from the artist

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

103

No lot

106 AMELIA TROUBRIDGE b. 1974 Mickey Rourke 1, London, 2008. Digital archival print. 27 7/8 x 35 in. (70.8 x 88.9 cm). Signed and dated in ink in the margin; signed, titled, dated and numbered 2/10 in ink on an artist’s label affixed to the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired

104 HELMUT NEWTON 1920-2004 Isabelle Huppert at the Carlton, Cannes, 1976. Gelatin silver print. 23 7/8 x 19 7/8 in. (60.6 x 50.5 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/10 in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0

directly from the artist

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 107 AMELIA TROUBRIDGE b. 1974 Mickey Rourke 3, London, 2008. Hand printed archival bromide print. 37 1/8 x 27 7/8 in. (94.3 x 70.8 cm). Signed and dated in ink in the margin; signed, titled, dated and numbered 3/10 in ink on an artist’s label affixed to the verso.

Isabelle Huppert is a contemporary French actress celebrated for her award winning performances in Violette Nozière (1978) and The Piano Teacher (1991). She is one of only four women to twice receive the award for Best Actress at the Cannes Film Festival and is the most Cesar-nominated actress, the French equivalent of the Academy Award.

PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

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109

108 YOUSSEF NABIL b. 1972 Rossy De Palma, Madrid, 2002. Hand-colored gelatin silver print. 19 5/8 x 29 1/2 in. (50 x 75 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 2/3 in pencil on the verso. EXHIBITED I Live Within You, Savannah College of Art and Design – SCAD, Savannah,

109 BRUCE WEBER b. 1946 Rossy de Palma at the Circus, 1992. Gelatin silver print. 13 1/4 x 10 1/2 in. (33.7 x 26.7 cm). Signed, titled ‘Rosie [sic] de Palma at the circus’, dated and numbered 1/15 in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Robert Miller Gallery, New York Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

19 February - 12 March 2010; Youssef Nabil, GALERIST, Istanbul, 3 December 2009 - 10 January 2010; I Won’t Let you Die, Villa Medici, Rome, 1 April - 24 May 2009; Far From Home, North

110 NADAV KANDER b. 1961 Gael García Bernal with Sea, 2006. Archival pigment print. 60 x 48 in. (152.4 x 122 cm). Signed and dated in ink on the reverse of the flush-mount. Number 2 from an edition of 3. PROVENANCE Flowers, London Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, 17 February - 13 July 2008; Arabiske Blikke, GL Strand Museum, Copenhagen, 18 August - 15 October 2006; 19 miradas. Fotógrafos árabes contemporáneos, Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo, Sevilla, 20 April - 25 June 2006; Nazar: Photographs from the Arab World, The Aperture Foundation Gallery, New York, 8 September - 3 November 2005; Rites sacrés, Rites profanes: Zeitgenossische Afrikanische Fotografie, Kornhausforum, Bern, 17 June - 1 August 2004; Bamako 03: Contemporary African Photography, Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona MACBA, Barcelona, 30 January - 28 March 2004; Rites sacrés, Rites profanes, Rencontres Africaines de la Photographie, Bamako, 20 October - 20 November 2003; Pour un Moment d’Éternité, Rencontres Internationales de la Photographie, Arles, 5 July - 12 October 2003; for all, another example exhibited LITERATURE Aperture Foundation, Nazar: Photographs from the Arab World, p. 34; Hatje Cantz, Youssef Nabil: I Won’t Let You Die, p. 177

Estimate $ 1 8 , 0 0 0 - 2 2 , 0 0 0 71


111

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111 Alan Aldridge b. 1943 Andy Warhol’s Chelsea Girls, 1971. Poster. 29 3/8 x 19 3/4 in. (74.6 x 50.2 cm). Signed and dated “A R Aldridge 1971” lower right. Estimate $ 1 5 , 0 0 0 - 2 0 , 0 0 0

112 ANDY WARHOL 1928-1987 Eric Emerson (Chelsea Girls), 1982. Unique screenprint in colors. 16 x 11 1/2 in. (40.6 x 29.2 cm). A unique proof apart from the edition of 75 and 13 artist’s proofs, published by Anthology Film Archives, New York, with the Andy Warhol Art Authentication Board, Inc., inkstamp and issue number A168.056 in pencil on the reverse, framed. LITERATURE Frayda Feldman and Jörg Schellmann 287 Estimate $ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 0 , 0 0 0 72


113

113 andy warhol Van Heusen (Ronald Reagan), from Ads, 1985. Screenprint in colors, on Lenox Museum Board. 38 x 38 in. (96.5 x 96.5 cm). Signed and numbered 119/190 in pencil (there were also 30 artist’s proofs), published by Ronald Feldman Fine Art, Inc., New York, framed. Literature Frayda Feldman and JÜrg Schellmann 356 Estimate $ 1 8 , 0 0 0 - 2 2 , 0 0 0 73


114

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114 JAMES ROSENQUIST b. 1933 Short Ends, 1970. Lithograph in colors, on J.B. Green handmade paper. 28 x 20 in. (71.1 x 50.8 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 62/175 in white pencil (there were also 24 artist’s proofs), co-published by Castelli Graphics and Hollanders Workshop, New York, framed. LITERATURE Constance Glenn 34 Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 0 0 0

116 Raymond Waters b. 1965 Mickey Mouse (1932 & 1933), 2007; Trader Mickey, 1932; and Hurdles and Hazards, 1933. 16 mm films glued to canvas mounted to board with 140 LED lights, with Plexiglas case. 31 1/2 x 66 3/8 x 4 1/2 in. (80 x 168.6 x 11.4 cm). Signed, titled and dated “Raymond Mickey Mouse 1932 and 1933, 16 MM 67” lower left; also titled further “Trader Mickey 1932, and Hurdles and Hazards, 1933 16 mm (Mickey Mouse)” along the right turning edge. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist. EXHIBITED

115 MIKE KELLEY b. 1954 Street Sign, 2004. Screenprint in colors, on white enamel aluminum panel with puncture holes. 15 x 24 in. (38.1 x 61 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 50/100 in black ink on the reverse, published by Contemporary Editions, Los Angeles, unframed. Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

Toronto, Craig Scott Gallery, VALUES, January 19 - February 29, 2008 LITERATURE Values: Raymond Waters, Toronto, 2008, p.26

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

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120

THIS LOT IS SOLD WITH NO RESERVE

117 WILLIAM LARSON b. 1942 The Mechanical Gaze, 2008. Gelatin silver print. 28 x 22 in. (71.1 x 55.9 cm). Signed, numbered 3/5 in ink and copyright credit stamp on a label affixed to the verso. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

119 ROY LICHTENSTEIN 1923-1997 Merton at the Movies, 1968. Screenprint in colors, on silver foil. 30 x 20 in. (76.2 x 50.8 cm). One of an unknown number of uninscribed impressions, co-published by List Art Poster, New York and H.K.L. Ltd., Boston, framed. LITERATURE Mary Lee Corlett 61

Estimate $ 2 0 0 - 3 0 0 118 WILLIAM LARSON b. 1942 Terror as Pleasure in the Act of Free Fall, 2007. Gelatin silver print. 27 7/8 x 22 in. (70.8 x 55.9 cm). Signed, numbered 3/5 in ink and copyright credit stamp on the verso. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

•

120 HIROSHI SUGIMOTO b. 1948 U.A. Walker Theatre, New York, 1978, 2000. Photogravure, on Rives BFK paper. 17 3/4 x 21 1/2 in. (45.1 x 54.6 cm). Signed in pencil, stamp numbered 0424/One Thousand on a label affixed to the interior of the box, co-published by Eyestorm, London and Sonnabend Sundell Editions, New York, unframed, contained in original metal box. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 75


121

121 Jonathan Horowitz b. 1966 Best Actress (24 works), 2001. Printed text on colored paper each in the artist’s frame. 8 3/4 x 11 1/4 x 3/4 in. (22.2 x 28.6 x 1.9 cm) each. Estimate $ 1 5 , 0 0 0 - 2 0 , 0 0 0 76


122

122 Mounir Fatmi b. 1970 Ecran Noir N°1, 2005. 420 VHS video cassettes. 81 1/2 x 155 1/2 x 1 in. (207 x 395 x 2.5 cm). This work is unique. PROVENANCE Galerie la B.A.N.K, Paris; Private Collection, Paris EXHIBITED Paris, Centre d’art Contemporain d’Istres, Ecrans Noirs, October 27 - December 20, 2005; Paris, Galerie la B.A.N.K, Tête Dure, June 1 - September 2, 2006

Estimate $ 3 0 , 0 0 0 - 4 0 , 0 0 0 A vast mural composition, Ecran noir appears to be a large-scale painting yet is conceived from hundreds of VHS cassettes. These cassettes, in a departure from their characteristic usage, are transformed into decorative elements, creating a work that upon first inspection rings back to the geometric compositions of concrete or minimalist art. In accordance with these principals, the elements of motif repetition and the economy of means are prevalent throughout the present work. However what makes both the artist and the work so strong is the direct challenge Ecran noir brings to the basis of concrete art, namely that art should not symbolize or represent anything further than what we see.

threats. They comment on the violence and terror that are hidden within this wall of images that the viewer cannot see but can only imagine or fear. The elusive content of these cassettes are disquieting signs of an old world which stands in direct contrast to the minimalism of their appearance. Each individual cassette projects its own cinema, its own anxieties, its own secular fears and fantasies. The work comments on the power of images, from ones we have seen to ones we only think we have seen, from images we are shown to those that we interpret. The semiotic value of this wall of objects (and hidden images) is compounded by the fact that media images can often be visual decoys. This powerful work serves to reinforce the artist’s inquiry into the degree of reality and the level of truth found in each individual image.

Ecran noir benefits from an intentional ambiguity between a plastic vocabulary borrowed from minimalism and the artist’s choice to use VHS cassettes. Placed side by side, these ordinary and seemingly banal objects, project upon the viewer a wall of archaic relics of yesterday’s technology which have been rendered obsolete in today’s world. These cassettes once conveyed images, sounds and information and were tools of communication. Today they have become known as tools of propaganda or extremist

(Adapted from Marie Deparis’ 2007 essay on the artist’s website)

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125

126

123 Phil Collins b. 1970 Face Value, 2000-2002. C-print mounted to aluminum. 19 3/4 x 29 1/4 in. (50.2 x 74.3 cm). This work is from an edition of four. Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

125 GREGORY CREWDSON b. 1962 Production Still (Bleak Street), 2006. Color coupler print. 12 x 16 in. (30.5 x 40.6 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 3/30 in ink in the margin. Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0

124 GREGORY CREWDSON b. 1962 Production Still (Kim and Greg), 2003. Color coupler print. 16 x 12 in. (40.6 x 30.5 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 14/20 in ink in the margin. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

126 NADAV KANDER b. 1961 Benicio del Toro, Curb, Los Angeles, 2000. Color coupler print. 26 x 33 1/4 in. (66 x 84.5 cm). Signed and dated in ink on the reverse of the flush-mount. Number 2 from an edition of 5. PROVENANCE Flowers, London Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 78


127

128

129

130

127 GREGORY CREWDSON b. 1962 Untitled (Dead cow discovery) from Twilight, 1998. Color coupler print. 47 1/4 x 59 3/8 in. (120 x 150.8 cm). Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 3/10 on a label affixed to the reverse of the frame. PROVENANCE Ruth Bloom

129 BARBARA KASTEN b. 1936 The Cliffs, 1990. Dye destruction print. 63 1/2 x 47 1/4 in. (161.3 x 120 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/10 in pencil on the reverse of the backing board. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

Gallery, Los Angeles; Private Collection, Los Angeles; Phillips de Pury & Company, 26 October 2002, lot 195 LITERATURE Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Twilight: Photographs by Gregory Crewdson, pl. 29

130 BARBARA KASTEN b. 1936 Axis Mundi, 1990. Dye destruction print. 63 1/2 x 47 1/4 in. (161.3 x 120 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/10 in pencil on the reverse of the backing board. Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

Estimate $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0

128 GREGORY CREWDSON b. 1962 Production Still (Man in Woods #4), 2003. Color coupler print. 16 x 12 in. (40.6 x 30.5 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 17/20 in ink in the margin. Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0 79


131

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133

131 Dennis Hopper b. 1936 Willie Thomas, 1965. Gelatin silver print. 16 x 24 in. (40.6 x 61 cm). Signed and dated “Dennis Hopper 1965” and numbered of 15 on the reverse. This work is from an edition of 15. PROVENANCE ACE Gallery, Los Angeles Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0

132 Dennis Hopper b. 1936 Untitled (Barn Shadow), 1953. Gelatin silver print. 19 7/8 x 19 7/8 in. (50.5 x 50.5 cm). Signed and dated “D. Hopper 1953” and numbered of 15 on the reverse. This work is from an edition of 15. PROVENANCE ACE Gallery, Los Angeles Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0 133 Dennis Hopper b. 1936 Selma, Alabama (Full Employment), 1965. Gelatin silver print. 16 x 24 in. (40.6 x 61 cm). Signed and dated “D. Hopper 1965” and numbered of 15 on the reverse. This work is from an edition of 15. Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0 80


134

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136

134 Dennis Hopper b. 1936 News is Daily Again, 1963. Gelatin silver print. 16 x 24 in. (40.6 x 61 cm). Signed and dated “Dennis Hopper 1963” and numbered of 15 on the reverse. This work is from an edition of 15. PROVENANCE ACE Gallery, Los Angeles

135 Dennis Hopper b. 1936 Bad Heart (Downtown Los Angeles), 1961. Gelatin silver print. 16 x 24 in. (40.6 x 61 cm). Signed and dated “Dennis Hopper 1961” and numbered of 15 on the reverse. This work is from an edition of 15. PROVENANCE ACE Gallery, Los Angeles Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0

Literature T. Shafrazi, ed., Dennis Hopper Photographs 1901-1907, Cologne, 2009 (another example illustrated)

136 DENNIS HOPPER b. 1936 Torn Poster (Elect), 1965. Gelatin silver print. 24 x 16 in. (61 x 40.6 cm). Signed and dated “Dennis Hopper 1965” and numbered of 15 on the reverse. This work is from an edition of 15. PROVENANCE ACE Gallery, Los Angeles Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0

Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0

81


137

137 Greg Haberny Taxi Driver, 2009. House paint, black ink and dirt on nylon in the artist’s frame. 36 x 30 in. (91.4 x 76.2 cm). Signed twice, titled and dated “Greg Haberny Taxi Driver 2009”on the reverse. PROVENANCE Like the Spice Gallery, Brooklyn EXHIBITED New York, Like the Spice Gallery, Homeless Boys Social Club, 2010

Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0 82


138

139

138 Bruce Nauman b. 1941 Violent Incident-Man-Woman Segment, 1986. VHS tape with audio. Signed “B Nauman” and numbered of 200 on a label adhered to the VHS tape. The duration of the video is 30 mins. This work is from an edition of 200. LITERATURE R.

139 CHRISTIAN MARCLAY b. 1955 Telephones, 1995. Two DVDs, one exhibition copy and one DVD submaster. Signed, titled and dated “Christian Marclay Telephones 1995” on the DVD cases. The duration of the video is 7 min. and 30 sec. This work is from an edition of 250. This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

Wolfs, “Nauman: Director of Violent Incidents,” Parkett, No. 10, September 1986, pp. 43 and 46, illustrated on the cover and inside cover; C. van Bruggen, Bruce Nauman, New York, 1988, p. 192, illustrated in color; J. Simon, ed., Bruce Nauman, Minneapolis, 1994, no. 361, p. 302, illustrated; London, Hayward Gallery, Bruce Nauman (exhibition catalogue), 1997, p. 105, illustrated; J. Kraynak, ed., Please Pay Attention: Bruce Nauman’s Words, Writings and Interviews, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2003, fig, 2.6, p. 97, illustrated; Tate Liverpool, Bruce Nauman: Make Me Think Me (exhibition catalogue), 2006, p. 66, illustrated in color

Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0 83


140

141

140 ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG 1925-2008 Still, from Reels (Bonnie + Clyde), 1968. Lithograph in colors, on Rives BFK paper. 30 x 22 in. (76.2 x 55.9 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 22/34 in pencil (there were also 7 artist’s proofs), published by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles (with their blindstamps), framed. LITERATURE Gemini G.E.L. 103, Edward Foster 57 Estimate $ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0

141 RICHARD HAMILTON b. 1922 Kent State, 1970. Screenprint in colors, on Schoeller Durex paper. 26 1/2 x 34 1/4 in. (67.3 x 87 cm). Signed and numbered 930/5000 in pencil (there were also 50 artist’s proofs), published by Dorothea Leonhart, Munich (with their blindstamp), unframed. LITERATURE Etienne Lullin 77 Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 84


142

142 STAN DOUGLAS b. 1960 Subject to a Film: Marnie, 1988-96. The complete set of six gelatin silver prints including text page. All: 13 7/8 x 17 7/8 in. (35.2 x 45.4 cm). All signed, dated and numbered 1/7 in pencil on the reverse, all framed. Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0 85


143 (actual size)

144

143 PABLO PICASSO 1881-1973 Tournage: Plan Américain, 1968. Etching. 2 3/8 x 3 1/4 in. (6 x 8.3 cm). With the artist’s stamped signature, annotated ‘épreuve avant aciérage’ (proof before steelfacing) in pencil (aside from the edition of 50), framed. PROVENANCE Marina

144 ROBERT LONGO b. 1953 Mnemonic Pictures, 1994. The complete set of twenty-four photo-lithographs in colors, on cream wove paper. 9 1/8 x 11 5/8 in. (23.2 x 29.5 cm). All signed with initals, annotated ‘A-X’ respectively and numbered ‘HC 26/26’ in pencil (hors commerce impression, the edition was 48), also signed and numbered in pencil on the title page, published by Editions Saga Pictures, Los Angeles, contained in original black linen box. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

Picasso (inkstamp on the reverse) LITERATURE Brigitte Baer 1625, Georges Bloch 1609

Estimate $ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0

86


145

146

148

147

149

145 JONATHAN SANTLOFER b. 1946 KISS portfolio, 2010. The complete set of eight lithographs with hand-coloring and collage and one flocked print in red, on Somerset paper. 21 1/2 x 16 in. (54.6 x 40.6 cm). All signed, dated and numbered 8/40 in pencil (the total edition was 54), co-published by Kunst Editions, Jim Kempner Fine Art and Ram Studio, New York, all unframed, all contained in original purple cloth-covered folder. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

147 Jack Smith 1932-1989 Untitled, ca. 1966. Felt tip on paper. 8 1/2 x 11 in. (21.6 x 27.9 cm). Signed “Jack Smith Photografer” center. Estimate $ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0 148 JEAN COCTEAU 1889-1963 Le testament d’Orphée, 1960. Lithograph in colors, on smooth paper mounted to canvas. 65 3/4 x 48 3/4 in. (167 x 123.8 cm). Published by Bedos & Cei. Imp., Paris, unframed. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

146 JONAS MEKAS b. 1922 Untitled, 1994. Screenprint in colors. 25 x 19 1/2 in. (63.5 x 49.5 cm). Signed, dated and annotated ‘3/10 PP’ in pencil on the reverse (a printer’s proof), framed. Estimate $ 7 0 0 - 9 0 0

149 ROBERT LONGO b. 1953 Untitled series, circa 1995. The complete set of four photolithographs in colors, comprised of twenty-six plates on four sheets of cream wove paper. All: 26 x 21 in. (66 x 53.3 cm). All signed with initals and annotated ‘PP’ in pencil (printer’s proofs), all unframed. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 87


150

151

152

150 Mike Bidlo b. 1953 L.H.O.O.Q., Marilyn Monroe. Ceramic plate. Diameter: 8 1/4 in. (21 cm). Signed, titled and dated “L.H.O.O.Q. Mike Bidlo 2008 EXIT ART” on the reverse. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

152 Ruben Torres Llorca b. 1957 Famous People Series. Oil and collage on canvas. 58 x 42 in. (147.3 x 106.7 cm). Signed “Ruben Torres Llorca” lower right. PROVENANCE La Acacia Gallery, Havana

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 151 Kamran Diba b. 1937 Hollywood Icons from Global News Series, 2009. Acrylic on canvas. 48 1/4 x 37 1/2 in. (122.6 x 95.3 cm). Signed and dated “K. Diba 09” lower left. PROVENANCE Private Collection

Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

88


153

154

155

153 LAWRENCE SCHILLER b. 1936 Tippi Hedren & Alfred Hitchcock, Los Angeles, 1962. Color coupler print, printed later. 12 3/4 x 19 in. (32.4 x 48.3 cm). Signed and numbered 16/35 in ink in the margin. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

155 ERIKA STONE b. 1924 Marilyn Monroe at circus opening, 1953. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 13 1/4 x 10 3/8 in. (33.7 x 26.4 cm). Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. Estimate $ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

154 ALEXIS SMITH b. 1949 Red Desert, 2003. Lithograph in colors, on Lana Royal Cream paper. 13 3/8 x 19 in. (34 x 48.3 cm). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 7/20 in pencil, published by Hamilton Press, Los Angeles (with their blindstamp), unframed. Estimate $ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0 89


156

157

158

159

160

156 CECIL BEATON 1904-1980 Greta Garbo, 1946. Gelatin silver print. 7 1/4 x 2 1/4 in. (18.4 x 5.7 cm). PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0

158 STRAUSS-PEYTON Portrait of Fanny Brice, ca. 1926. Gelatin silver print. 13 3/8 x 10 1/2 in. (34 x 26.7 cm). Signed in ink in the margin. PROVENANCE From the Collection of Strauss-Peyton LITERATURE Stephen White Editions, Strauss-Peyton: Celebrity and Glamour, p. 85

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 157 HOMER PEYTON Portrait of Charlie Chaplin, 1929. Gelatin silver print, mounted. 13 5/8 x 10 5/8 in. (34.6 x 27 cm). Signed in red crayon on the recto. LITERATURE Stephen White Estimate $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0

Fanny Brice was the stage name of comedian, singer and actress Fania Borach. She was made legendary when Barbra Streisand portrayed her in the play Funny Girl and its subsequent 1968 film for which Streisand received an Academy Award for Best Actress.

Based in their hometown of Kansas City, Missouri, Benjamin Strauss and Homer Peyton worked together as the photographic duo Strauss-Peyton. From 1908-1927, they photographed the celebrities, musicians and elite members of society that came to town for the acclaimed stage and cinematic performances at the Orpheum Theater.

159 KARL STRUSS 1886-1981 Film Still from “Ben Hur,� 1924-1925. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 7 1/2 x 9 3/8 in. (19.1 x 23.8 cm). Signed in pencil on the recto; titled, dated in an unidentified hand in ink and credit stamps on the verso. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

Editions, Strauss-Peyton: Celebrity and Glamour, p. 89

160 RUTH ORKIN 1921-1985 Orson Welles at Count Beistegui Costume Ball in Venice, September 3, 1951. Gelatin silver print. 9 5/8 x 12 3/8 in. (24.4 x 31.4 cm). Signed, titled and dated in ink in the margin; signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Ruth Orkin Photo Archive, New York

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 90


161

164

163

162

165

166

161 FLORENCE HOMOLKA 1911-1962 Charlie Chaplin, 1952. Gelatin silver print. 13 1/2 x 9 in. (34.3 x 22.9 cm). Credit stamp on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly

164 tony curtis b. 1925 1910 Marilyn, 1936-1937. Acrylic on cardboard. 13 1/2 x 17 in. (34.3 x 43.2 cm). Signed “Curtis” lower right. PROVENANCE Center Art Galleries, Honolulu; Robyn Buntin of Honolulu Gallery, Hawaii; Center Art Galleries, Honolulu; Private collection, Richmond, Virginia; Private collection, British Columbia Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

from the artist

Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 162 Orson Welles 1915-1983 Portrait of Monsieur Loyal, 1953. Watercolor and wax crayon on paper. 11 5/8 x 9 1/8 in. (29.5 x 23.2 cm). Signed, dated and dedicated “for Norman with the thanks - the very real thanks Orson Welles 1953” along the right edge; also dated “London 7-17-53” upper left. Provenance Estate of Nicolas Yantchevsky, Paris Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

165 FLORENCE HOMOLKA 1911-1962 Charlie & Oona Chaplin, 1952. Gelatin silver print. 8 7/8 x 13 1/2 in. (22.5 x 34.3 cm). Signed in ink on the recto; credit stamp on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0

163 MICHAEL O’NEILL b. 1951 Orson Welles, 1985. Platinum-palladium print, printed 2008. 26 3/4 x 20 5/8 in. (67.9 x 52.4 cm). Titled and copyright credit in the negative; signed, dated and numbered 1/29 in pencil on the verso. PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist.

166 TED ALLAN b. 1910 Groucho Marx “A Day at the Races,” 1936-1937. Gelatin silver print, printed circa 1972. 9 7/8 x 13 1/8 in. (25.1 x 33.3 cm). Signed in ink on the recto; signed by Sid Avery in pencil, Ted Allan copyright credit stamp on the reverse of the flush-mount; printed title and date on a label affixed to the reverse of the flush-mount. PROVENANCE

Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

Acquired directly from the artist

Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

91


167

168

167 Various Artists 29 Film Stills with autographs from Laurence Olivier, Jack Nicholson, Marlene Dietrich, Lauren Bacall, Paul Newman, John Gielgud, James Stewart, Fred Astaire, Claudette Colbert, Henry Fonda, Sylvester Stalone, Raquel Welch, Glenda Jackson, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Geraldine Page, Vanessa Redgrave, Alec Guinness, Barbara Stanwyck, Ellen Burstyn, George Scott, Jane Fonda, Ann Miller, Helen Hayes, Richard Chamberlain, Faye Dunaway and Maggie Smith. Gelatin silver prints and c-prints. 8 1/8 x 10 in. (20.6 x 25.4 cm) and 10 x 8 1/8 in. (25.4 x 20.6 cm). Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

168 Various Artists 29 Film Stills with autographs from Laurence Olivier, Joan Fontaine, Marlene Dietrich, James Stewart, Lauren Bacall, Paul Newman, John Gielgud, Dudley Moore, Christopher Reeve, Clint Eastwood, Henry Fonda, Claudette Colbert, Fred Astaire, Anne Bancroft, Jack Lemmon, Steve Reeves, Brigitte Bardot, Mickey Rooney, Rex Harrison, Liza Minelli, Ben Kingsley, Charlton Heston, Simone Signoret, Deborah Kerr, Greer Garson, Kathleen Turner and Walter Pidgeon. Silver gelatin prints and c-prints. 8 1/8 x 10 in. (20.6 x 25.4 cm) and 10 x 8 1/8 in. (25.4 x 20.6 cm). Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 92


170

169

171

169 Rita Hayworth as Gilda, 1946. Poster. 42 3/4 x 28 3/4 in. (108.6 x 73 cm). Autographed by Glenn Ford. This work is from an edition of 53. Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

171 Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s, 1961. Poster. 30 1/8 x 40 1/2 in. (76.5 x 102.9 cm). Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

170 Dial “M” for Murder, 1954. Poster. 40 x 27 in. (101.6 x 68.6 cm). Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 93


172

175

177

173

174

176

179

178

172 Ingmar Bergman’s Det Syvende Segl (The Seventh Seal), 1957. Poster. 33 1/4 x 23 1/2 in. (84.5 x 59.7 cm). Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

176 Two Works: Ballerina and Autant en Emporte le Vent (Gone with the Wind), 1950 and 1939. Posters. 63 7/8 x 46 3/4 in. (162.2 x 118.7 cm) each. Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

173 Ingmar Bergman’s Skammen (Shame), 1968. Poster. 39 1/2 x 27 3/8 in. (100.3 x 69.5 cm). Estimate $ 1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

177 Anselmo Ballester 1897-1974 Marlon Brando in Fronte del Porto (On The Waterfront), 1954. Poster laid down on linen. 54 1/2 x 78 in. (138.4 x 198.1 cm). Signed “Ballester” upper left. Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

174 Ingmar Bergman’s das Schweigen (The Silence), 1963. Poster. 33 x 23 3/8 in. (83.8 x 59.4 cm). Estimate $ 1, 2 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

178 Monty Python’s Life of Brian, 1979. Poster. 27 7/8 x 21 1/2 in. (70.8 x 54.6 cm). Provenance Collection of Graham Chapman.

175 Ingmar Bergman’s Det Sjunde Inseglet (The Seventh Seal), 1957. Poster. 27 5/8 x 19 5/8 in. (70.2 x 49.8 cm). Estimate $ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0

Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 179 MATTHEW BARNEY b. 1967 Cremaster 5, 1997. Sceenprint in colors with embossing, on black paper. 33 x 23 1/8 in. (83.8 x 58.7 cm). Signed, dated and numbered 158/250 in pencil, published by Film Forum, New York, framed. Estimate $ 6 0 0 - 9 0 0 94


180

183

182

181

184

185

180 MR. BRAINWASH b. 1966 Star Wars Reunion, 2008. Screenprint in colors, on Rives BFK paper. 20 x 28 in. (50.8 x 71.1 cm). Signed and numbered 215/300 in pencil, published in connection with the solo exhibition Life is Beautiful, Los Angeles, unframed. Estimate $ 9 0 0 -1, 2 0 0

183 Keisuke Sawada/Medicom Co., Japan Johnny Depp as Edward Scissorhands, 2002. Super-poseable latex and plastic, with custom-made cardboard box. Height: 12 in (30.5 cm). Estimate $ 3 5 0 - 4 5 0 184 PAUL JOYCE Barbarella, 1967. Pigment print, printed later. 28 1/2 x 42 in. (72.4 x 106.7 cm). Signed and numbered 6/50 in pencil in the margin. PROVENANCE Acquired directly

181 Howard Victor Chaykin b. 1950 Luke Skywalker, 1976. Poster. 28 7/8 x 20 in. (73.3 x 50.8 cm). Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

from the artist

Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0 185 Unknown Designer Desk, for the character Dr. Evil, from the film Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, ca. 1997. Painted MDF, aluminum-covered MDF, opaque Plexiglas, aluminum, plywood. Set property fabricated for the New Line Cinema production of Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery. 29 x 116 x 76 in. (73.7 x 294.6 x 193 cm). PROVENANCE 20th Century Props, Hollywood, California Estimate $ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0

182 Dr. No, first James Bond film 1962. Poster. 43 7/8 x 29 3/8 in. (111.4 x 74.6 cm). Estimate $ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0

95


186

187

188

189

186 RUSSELL YOUNG b. 1960 King Kong vs Godzilla, 2006. Screenprint in colors. 26 1/8 x 37 1/2 in. (66.4 x 95.3 cm). Signed and annotated ‘PP 1/1’ in pencil (a printer’s proof), published by Bankrobber Gallery, London, unframed. Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

188 Megahouse Artworks Length: 24 in. (60.9 cm). Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

Co., Japan Godzilla, 2008. Vinyl. Height: 18 in. (45.7 cm)

189 Fossil Co., USA Godzilla and Dracula movie character watches with pewter statuettes. Height: 2 1/2 in. (16.3 cm) each. Each numbered of 1,000 on the reverse. These works are from an edition of 1,000. Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

187 Steve Kaufman 1960-2010 Spiderman and the Lizard. Oil on canvas. 59 1/2 x 59 1/2 in. (151.1 x 151.1 cm). Signed “Kaufman” on the reverse. PROVENANCE Marvel Comics; Private Collection

Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0 96


190

191

192

190 Robot House Co., Japan Four Universal Studios Monsters: the Creature from the Black Lagoon, the Mummy, Wolfman, and Frankenstein. Tin and vinyl, each with custommade cardboard box. Height: 8 in. (20.3 cm). These works are from an edition of 2,400. Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

192 Billiken Co., Japan Three works: Godzilla and Mothra tin wind-up toys. Tin. Height: 8 in. (20.3 cm). Width: 10 in. (25 cm) each. These works are from editions of 800 (green Godzilla), 2000 (blue Godzilla) and 1500 (Mothra). Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0

191 Billiken Co., Japan and Osaka Tin Toy Co., Japan Three works: Michael Keaton/ Batman, Robocop and Star Wars—C-3PO. Tin and vinyl wind-up toys. Height: 8 in. (20.3 cm) (two works) and Height: 9 in. (22.8 cm) (one work). Estimate $ 1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0 97


GUIDE FOR PROSPECTIVE BUYERS BUYING AT AUCTION The following pages are designed to offer you information on how to buy at auction at Phillips de Pury & Company. Our staff will be happy to assist you.

Absentee Bids If you are unable to attend the auction and cannot participate by telephone, Phillips de Pury & Company will be happy to execute written bids on your behalf. A bidding form can be found at the back of this catalogue. This service is free and confidential. Bids must be placed in the currency of the sale. Our staff will attempt to execute an absentee bid at the lowest possible price taking into account the reserve and other bidders. Always indicate a maximum bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and any applicable taxes. Unlimited bids will not be accepted. Any absentee bid must be received at least 24 hours in advance of the sale. In the event of identical bids, the earliest bid received will take precedence.

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Bidding Increments Bidding generally opens below the low estimate and advances in increments of up to 10%, subject to the auctioneer’s discretion. Absentee bids that do not conform to the increments set below may be lowered to the next bidding increment.

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Pre-Sale Estimates Pre-Sale estimates are intended as a guide for prospective buyers. Any bid within the high and low estimate range should, in our opinion, offer a chance of success. However, many lots achieve prices below or above the pre-sale estimates. Where “Estimate on Request” appears, please contact the specialist department for further information. It is advisable to contact us closer to the time of the auction as estimates can be subject to revision. Pre-sale estimates do not include the buyer’s premium or any applicable taxes. Pre-Sale Estimates in Pounds Sterling and Euros Although the sale is conducted in US dollars, the pre-sale estimates in the auction catalogues may also be printed in pounds sterling and/or euros. Since the exchange rate is that at the time of catalogue production and not at the date of auction, you should treat estimates in pounds sterling or euros as a guide only.

by $50s by $100s by $200s by $200s, 500, 800 (i.e. $4,200, 4,500, 4,800) by $500s by $1,000s by $2,000s by $2,000s, 5,000, 8,000 by $5,000s by $10,000s auctioneer’s discretion

The auctioneer may vary the increments during the course of the auction at his or her own discretion. Catalogue Entries Phillips may print in the catalogue entry the history of ownership of a work of art, as well as the exhibition history of the property and references to the work in art publications. While we are careful in the cataloguing process, provenance, exhibition and literature references may not be exhaustive and in some cases we may intentionally refrain from disclosing the identity of previous owners. Please note that all dimensions of the property set forth in the catalogue entry are approximate.

3 THE AUCTION Conditions of Sale As noted above, the auction is governed by the Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty. All prospective bidders should read them carefully. They may be amended by saleroom addendum or auctioneer’s announcement.

Condition of Lots Our catalogues include references to condition only in the descriptions of multiple works (e.g., prints). Such references, though, do not amount to a full description of condition. The absence of reference to the condition of a lot in the catalogue entry does not imply that the lot is free from faults or imperfections. Solely as a convenience to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company may provide condition reports. In preparing such reports, our specialists assess the condition in a manner appropriate to the estimated value of the property and the nature of the auction in which it is included. While condition reports are prepared honestly and carefully, our staff are not professional restorers or trained conservators. We therefore encourage all prospective buyers to inspect the property at the pre-sale exhibitions and recommend, particularly in the case of any lot of significant value, that you retain your own restorer or professional advisor to report to you on the property’s condition prior to bidding. Any prospective buyer of photographs or prints should always request a condition report because all such property is sold unframed, unless otherwise indicated in the condition report. If a lot is sold framed, Phillips de Pury & Company accepts no liability for the condition of the frame. If we sell any lot unframed, we will be pleased to refer the purchaser to a professional framer.

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Transport and Shipping As a free service for buyers, Phillips de Pury & Company will wrap purchased lots for hand carry only. We will, at the buyer’s expense, either provide packing, handling and shipping services or coordinate with shipping agents instructed by the buyer in order to facilitate such services for property purchased at Phillips de Pury & Company. Please refer to Paragraph 7 of the Conditions of Sale for more information.

2 BIDDING IN THE SALE

Export and Import Licenses Before bidding for any property, prospective bidders are advised to make independent inquiries as to whether a license is required to export the property from the United States or to import it into another country. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to comply with all import and export laws and to obtain any necessary licenses or permits. The denial of any required license or permit or any delay in obtaining such documentation will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot.

Bidding at Auction Bids may be executed during the auction in person by paddle or by telephone or prior to the sale in writing by absentee bid. Bidding in Person To bid in person, you will need to register for and collect a paddle before the auction begins. Proof of identity in the form of government issued identification will be required, as will an original signature. We may also require that you furnish us with a bank reference. New clients are encouraged to register at least 48 hours in advance of a sale to allow sufficient time for us to process your information. All lots sold will be invoiced to the name and address to which the paddle has been registered and invoices cannot be transferred to other names and addresses. Please do not misplace your paddle. In the event you lose it, inform a Phillips de Pury & Company staff member immediately. At the end of the auction, please return your paddle to the registration desk.

Endangered Species Items made of or incorporating plant or animal material, such as coral, crocodile, ivory, whalebone, rhinoceros horn or tortoiseshell, irrespective of age, percentage or value, may require a license or certificate prior to exportation and additional licenses or certificates upon importation to any foreign country. Please note that the ability to obtain an export license or certificate does not ensure the ability to obtain an import license or certificate in another country, and vice versa. We suggest that prospective bidders check with their own government regarding wildlife import requirements prior to placing a bid. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to obtain any necessary export or import licenses or certificates as well as any other required documentation. The denial of any required license or certificate or any delay in obtaining such documentation will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot.

Bidding by Telephone If you cannot attend the auction, you may bid live on the telephone with one of our multi-lingual staff members. This service must be arranged at least 24 hours in advance of the sale and is available for lots whose low presale estimate is at least $1000. Telephone bids may be recorded. By bidding on the telephone, you consent to the recording of your conversation. We suggest that you leave a maximum bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and any applicable taxes, which we can execute on your behalf in the event we are unable to reach you by telephone.

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CONDITIONS OF SALE The Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty set forth below govern the relationship between bidders and buyers, on the one hand, and Phillips de Pury & Company and sellers, on the other hand. All prospective buyers should read these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty carefully before bidding.

the seller up to the reserve without indicating he or she is doing so, either by placing consecutive bids or bids in response to other bidders. (d) The sale will be conducted in US dollars and payment is due in US dollars. For the benefit of international clients, pre-sale estimates in the auction catalogue may be shown in pounds sterling and/or euros and, if so, will reflect approximate exchange rates. Accordingly, estimates in pounds sterling or euros should be treated only as a guide.

1 INTRODUCTION Each lot in this catalogue is offered for sale and sold subject to: (a) the Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty; (b) additional notices and terms printed in other places in this catalogue, including the Guide for Prospective Buyers, and (c) supplements to this catalogue or other written material posted by Phillips de Pury & Company in the saleroom, in each case as amended by any addendum or announcement by the auctioneer prior to the auction.

(e) Subject to the auctioneer’s reasonable discretion, the highest bidder accepted by the auctioneer will be the buyer and the striking of the hammer marks the acceptance of the highest bid and the conclusion of a contract for sale between the seller and the buyer. Risk and responsibility for the lot passes to the buyer as set forth in Paragraph 7 below.

By bidding at the auction, whether in person, through an agent, by written bid, by telephone bid or other means, bidders and buyers agree to be bound by these Conditions of Sale, as so changed or supplemented, and Authorship Warranty.

(f) If a lot is not sold, the auctioneer will announce that it has been “passed,” “withdrawn,” “returned to owner” or “bought-in.”

These Conditions of Sale, as so changed or supplemented, and Authorship Warranty contain all the terms on which Phillips de Pury & Company and the seller contract with the buyer.

(g) Any post-auction sale of lots offered at auction shall incorporate these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty as if sold in the auction.

2 PHILLIPS de PURY & COMPANY AS AGENT Phillips de Pury & Company acts as an agent for the seller, unless otherwise indicated in this catalogue or at the time of auction. On occasion, Phillips de Pury & Company may own a lot, in which case we will act in a principal capacity as a consignor, or may have a legal, beneficial or financial interest in a lot as a secured creditor or otherwise.

6 PURCHASE PRICE AND PAYMENT (a) The buyer agrees to pay us, in addition to the hammer price of the lot, the buyer’s premium and any applicable sales tax (the “Purchase Price”). The buyer’s premium is 25% of the hammer price up to and including $50,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above $50,000 up to and including $1,000,000 and 12% of the portion of the hammer price above $1,000,000.

3 CATALOGUE DESCRIPTIONS AND CONDITION OF PROPERTY Lots are sold subject to the Authorship Warranty, as described in the catalogue (unless such description is changed or supplemented, as provided in Paragraph 1 above) and in the condition that they are in at the time of the sale on the following basis.

(b) Sales tax, use tax and excise and other taxes are payable in accordance with applicable law. All prices, fees, charges and expenses set out in these Conditions of Sale are quoted exclusive of applicable taxes. Phillips de Pury & Company will only accept valid resale certificates from US dealers as proof of exemption from sales tax. All foreign buyers should contact the Client Accounting Department about tax matters.

(a) The knowledge of Phillips de Pury & Company in relation to each lot is partially dependent on information provided to us by the seller, and Phillips de Pury & Company is not able to and does not carry out exhaustive due diligence on each lot. Prospective buyers acknowledge this fact and accept responsibility for carrying out inspections and investigations to satisfy themselves as to the lots in which they may be interested. Notwithstanding the foregoing, we shall exercise such reasonable care when making express statements in catalogue descriptions or condition reports as is consistent with our role as auctioneer of lots in this sale and in light of (i) the information provided to us by the seller, (ii) scholarship and technical knowledge and (iii) the generally accepted opinions of relevant experts, in each case at the time any such express statement is made.

(c) Unless otherwise agreed, a buyer is required to pay for a purchased lot immediately following the auction regardless of any intention to obtain an export or import license or other permit for such lot. Payments must be made by the invoiced party in US dollars either by cash, check drawn on a US bank or wire transfer, as follows: (i) Phillips de Pury & Company will accept payment in cash provided that the total amount paid in cash or cash equivalents does not exceed US$10,000. Buyers paying in cash should do so in person at our Client Accounting Desk at 450 West 15th Street, Third Floor, during regular weekday business hours.

(b) Each lot offered for sale at Phillips de Pury & Company is available for inspection by prospective buyers prior to the auction. Phillips de Pury & Company accepts bids on lots on the basis that bidders (and independent experts on their behalf, to the extent appropriate given the nature and value of the lot and the bidder’s own expertise) have fully inspected the lot prior to bidding and have satisfied themselves as to both the condition of the lot and the accuracy of its description.

(ii) Personal checks and banker’s drafts are accepted if drawn on a US bank and the buyer provides to us acceptable government issued identification. Checks and banker’s drafts should be made payable to “Phillips de Pury & Company LLC.” If payment is sent by mail, please send the check or banker’s draft to the attention of the Client Accounting Department at 450 West 15th Street, New York, NY 10011 and make sure that the sale and lot number is written on the check. Checks or banker’s drafts drawn by third parties will not be accepted.

(c) Prospective buyers acknowledge that many lots are of an age and type which means that they are not in perfect condition. As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company may prepare and provide condition reports to assist prospective buyers when they are inspecting lots. Catalogue descriptions and condition reports may make reference to particular imperfections of a lot, but bidders should note that lots may have other faults not expressly referred to in the catalogue or condition report. All dimensions are approximate. Illustrations are for identification purposes only and cannot be used as precise indications of size or to convey full information as to the actual condition of lots.

(iii) Payment by wire transfer may be sent directly to Phillips de Pury & Company. Bank transfer details: Citibank 322 West 23rd Street, New York, NY 10011 SWIFT Code: CITIUS33 ABA Routing: 021 000 089 For the account of Phillips de Pury & Company LLC Account no.: 58347736

(d) Information provided to prospective buyers in respect of any lot, including any pre-sale estimate, whether written or oral, and information in any catalogue, condition or other report, commentary or valuation, is not a representation of fact but rather a statement of opinion held by Phillips de Pury & Company. Any pre-sale estimate may not be relied on as a prediction of the selling price or value of the lot and may be revised from time to time by Phillips de Pury & Company in our absolute discretion. Neither Phillips de Pury & Company nor any of our affiliated companies shall be liable for any difference between the pre-sale estimates for any lot and the actual price achieved at auction or upon resale.

Please reference the relevant sale and lot number. (d) Title in a purchased lot will not pass until Phillips de Pury & Company has received the Purchase Price for that lot in cleared funds. Phillips de Pury & Company is not obliged to release a lot to the buyer until title in the lot has passed and appropriate identification has been provided, and any earlier release does not affect the passing of title or the buyer’s unconditional obligation to pay the Purchase Price. 7 COLLECTION OF PROPERTY (a) Phillips de Pury & Company will not release a lot to the buyer until we have received payment of its Purchase Price in full in cleared funds, the buyer has paid all outstanding amounts due to Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies, including any charges payable pursuant to Paragraph 8 (a) below, and the buyer has satisfied such other terms as we in our sole discretion shall require, including completing any anti-money laundering or anti-terrorism financing checks. As soon as a buyer has satisfied all of the foregoing conditions, and no later than five days after the conclusion of the auction, he or she should contact our Shipping Department at +1 212 940 1372 or +1 212 940 1373 to arrange for collection of purchased property.

4 BIDDING AT AUCTION (a) Phillips de Pury & Company has absolute discretion to refuse admission to the auction or participation in the sale. All bidders must register for a paddle prior to bidding, supplying such information and references as required by Phillips de Pury & Company. (b) As a convenience to bidders who cannot attend the auction in person, Phillips de Pury & Company may, if so instructed by the bidder, execute written absentee bids on a bidder’s behalf. Absentee bidders are required to submit bids on the “Absentee Bid Form,” a copy of which is printed in this catalogue or otherwise available from Phillips de Pury & Company. Bids must be placed in the currency of the sale. The bidder must clearly indicate the maximum amount he or she intends to bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and any applicable sales or use taxes. The auctioneer will not accept an instruction to execute an absentee bid which does not indicate such maximum bid. Our staff will attempt to execute an absentee bid at the lowest possible price taking into account the reserve and other bidders. Any absentee bid must be received at least 24 hours in advance of the sale. In the event of identical bids, the earliest bid received will take precedence.

(b) Promptly after the auction, we will transfer all lots to our warehouse located at 29-09 37th Avenue in Long Island City, Queens, New York. All purchased lots should be collected at this location during our regular weekday business hours. As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company will upon request transfer on a bi-weekly basis purchased lots suitable for hand carry back to our premises at 450 West 15th Street, New York, New York for collection within 30 days following the date of the auction. Purchased lots are at the buyer’s risk, including the responsibility for insurance, from the earlier to occur of (i) the date of collection or (ii) five days after the auction. Until risk passes, Phillips de Pury & Company will compensate the buyer for any loss or damage to a purchased lot up to a maximum of the Purchase Price paid, subject to our usual exclusions for loss or damage to property.

(c) Telephone bidders are required to submit bids on the “Telephone Bid Form,” a copy of which is printed in this catalogue or otherwise available from Phillips de Pury & Company. Telephone bidding is available for lots whose low pre-sale estimate is at least $1,000. Phillips de Pury & Company reserves the right to require written confirmation of a successful bid from a telephone bidder by fax or otherwise immediately after such bid is accepted by the auctioneer. Telephone bids may be recorded and, by bidding on the telephone, a bidder consents to the recording of the conversation.

(c) As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company will, without charge, wrap purchased lots for hand carry only. We will, at the buyer’s expense, either provide packing, handling, insurance and shipping services or coordinate with shipping agents instructed by the buyer in order to facilitate such services for property bought at Phillips de Pury & Company. Any such instruction, whether or not made at our recommendation, is entirely at the buyer’s risk and responsibility, and we will not be liable for acts or omissions of third party packers or shippers. Third party shippers should contact us by telephone at +1 212 940 1376 or by fax at +1 212 924 6477 at least 24 hours in advance of collection in order to schedule pickup.

(d) When making a bid, whether in person, by absentee bid or on the telephone, a bidder accepts personal liability to pay the purchase price, as described more fully in Paragraph 6 (a) below, plus all other applicable charges unless it has been explicitly agreed in writing with Phillips de Pury & Company before the commencement of the auction that the bidder is acting as agent on behalf of an identified third party acceptable to Phillips de Pury & Company and that we will only look to the principal for such payment.

(d) Phillips de Pury & Company will require presentation of government issued identification prior to release of a lot to the buyer or the buyer’s authorized representative.

(e) Arranging absentee and telephone bids is a free service provided by Phillips de Pury & Company to prospective buyers. While we undertake to exercise reasonable care in undertaking such activity, we cannot accept liability for failure to execute such bids except where such failure is caused by our willful misconduct.

8 FAILURE TO COLLECT PURCHASES (a) If the buyer pays the Purchase Price but fails to collect a purchased lot within 30 days of the auction, the buyer will incur a late collection fee of $35, storage charges of $5 per day and pro rated insurance charges of .1% of the Purchase Price per month on each uncollected lot.

(f) Employees of Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies, including the auctioneer, may bid at the auction by placing absentee bids so long as they do not know the reserve when submitting their absentee bids and otherwise comply with our employee bidding procedures.

(b) If a purchased lot is paid for but not collected within six months of the auction, the buyer authorizes Phillips de Pury & Company, upon notice, to arrange a resale of the item by auction or private sale, with estimates and a reserve set at Phillips de Pury & Company’s reasonable discretion. The proceeds of such sale will be applied to pay for storage charges and any other outstanding costs and expenses owed by the buyer to Phillips de Pury & Company or our affiliated companies and the remainder will be forfeited unless collected by the buyer within two years of the original auction.

5 CONDUCT OF THE AUCTION each lot is offered subject to a reserve, which is the (a) Unless otherwise indicated by the symbol confidential minimum selling price agreed by Phillips de Pury & Company with the seller. The reserve will not exceed the low pre-sale estimate at the time of the auction.

(b)The auctioneer has discretion at any time to refuse any bid, withdraw any lot, re-offer a lot for sale (including after the fall of the hammer) if he or she believes there may be error or dispute and take such other action as he or she deems reasonably appropriate.

9 REMEDIES FOR NON-PAYMENT (a) Without prejudice to any rights the seller may have, if the buyer without prior agreement fails to make payment of the Purchase Price for a lot in cleared funds within five days of the auction, Phillips de Pury & Company may in our sole discretion exercise one or more of the following remedies: (i) store the lot at Phillips de Pury & Company’s premises or elsewhere at the buyer’s sole risk and expense at the same rates as set forth

(c) The auctioneer will commence and advance the bidding at levels and in increments he or she considers appropriate. In order to protect the reserve on any lot, the auctioneer may place one or more bids on behalf of

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in Paragraph 8 (a) above; (ii) cancel the sale of the lot, retaining any partial payment of the Purchase Price as liquidated damages; (iii) reject future bids from the buyer or render such bids subject to payment of a deposit; (iv) charge interest at 12% per annum from the date payment became due until the date the Purchase Price is received in cleared funds; (v) subject to notification of the buyer, exercise a lien over any of the buyer’s property which is in the possession of Phillips de Pury & Company and instruct our affiliated companies to exercise a lien over any of the buyer’s property which is in their possession and, in each case, no earlier than 30 days from the date of such notice, arrange the sale of such property and apply the proceeds to the amount owed to Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies after the deduction from sale proceeds of our standard vendor’s commission and all sale-related expenses; (vi) resell the lot by auction or private sale, with estimates and a reserve set at Phillips de Pury & Company’s reasonable discretion, it being understood that in the event such resale is for less than the original hammer price and buyer’s premium for that lot, the buyer will remain liable for the shortfall together with all costs incurred in such resale; (vii) commence legal proceedings to recover the hammer price and buyer’s premium for that lot, together with interest and the costs of such proceedings; or (viii) release the name and address of the buyer to the seller to enable the seller to commence legal proceedings to recover the amounts due and legal costs.

(c) These Conditions of Sale are not assignable by any buyer without our prior written consent but are binding on the buyer’s successors, assigns and representatives. (d) Should any provision of these Conditions of Sale be held void, invalid or unenforceable for any reason, the remaining provisions shall remain in full force and effect. No failure by any party to exercise, nor any delay in exercising, any right or remedy under these Conditions of Sale shall act as a waiver or release thereof in whole or in part. 16 Law and Jurisdiction (a) The rights and obligations of the parties with respect to these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty, the conduct of the auction and any matters related to any of the foregoing shall be governed by and interpreted in accordance with laws of the State of New York, excluding its conflicts of law rules. (b) Phillips de Pury & Company, all bidders and all sellers agree to the exclusive jurisdiction of the (i) state courts of the State of New York located in New York City and (ii) the federal courts for the Southern and Eastern Districts of New York to settle all disputes arising in connection with all aspects of all matters or transactions to which these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty relate or apply.

(b) As security to us for full payment by the buyer of all outstanding amounts due to Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies, Phillips de Pury & Company retains, and the buyer grants to us, a security interest in each lot purchased at auction by the buyer and in any other property or money of the buyer in, or coming into, our possession or the possession of one of our affiliated companies. We may apply such money or deal with such property as the Uniform Commercial Code or other applicable law permits a secured creditor to do. In the event that we exercise a lien over property in our possession because the buyer is in default to one of our affiliated companies, we will so notify the buyer. Our security interest in any individual lot will terminate upon actual delivery of the lot to the buyer or the buyer’s agent.

(c) All bidders and sellers irrevocably consent to service of process or any other documents in connection with proceedings in any court by facsimile transmission, personal service, delivery by mail or in any other manner permitted by New York law or the law of the place of service, at the last address of the bidder or seller known to Phillips de Pury & Company.

AUTHORSHIP WARRANTY

(c) In the event the buyer is in default of payment to any of our affiliated companies, the buyer also irrevocably authorizes Phillips de Pury & Company to pledge the buyer’s property in our possession by actual or constructive delivery to our affiliated company as security for the payment of any outstanding amount due. Phillips de Pury & Company will notify the buyer if the buyer’s property has been delivered to an affiliated company by way of pledge.

Phillips de Pury & Company warrants the authorship of property in this auction catalogue for a period of five years from date of sale by Phillips de Pury & Company, subject to the exclusions and limitations set forth below.

10 Rescission by Phillips de Pury & Company Phillips de Pury & Company shall have the right, but not the obligation, to rescind a sale without notice to the buyer if we reasonably believe that there is a material breach of the seller’s representations and warranties or the Authorship Warranty or an adverse claim is made by a third party. Upon notice of Phillips de Pury & Company’s election to rescind the sale, the buyer will promptly return the lot to Phillips de Pury & Company, and we will then refund the Purchase Price paid to us. As described more fully in Paragraph 13 below, the refund shall constitute the sole remedy and recourse of the buyer against Phillips de Pury & Company and the seller with respect to such rescinded sale..

(a) Phillips de Pury & Company gives this Authorship Warranty only to the original buyer of record (i.e., the registered successful bidder) of any lot. This Authorship Warranty does not extend to (i) subsequent owners of the property, including purchasers or recipients by way of gift from the original buyer, heirs, successors, beneficiaries and assigns; (ii) property created prior to 1870, unless the property is determined to be counterfeit (defined as a forgery made less than 50 years ago with an intent to deceive) and has a value at the date of the claim under this warranty which is materially less than the Purchase Price paid; (iii) property where the description in the catalogue states that there is a conflict of opinion on the authorship of the property; (iv) property where our attribution of authorship was on the date of sale consistent with the generally accepted opinions of specialists, scholars or other experts; or (v) property whose description or dating is proved inaccurate by means of scientific methods or tests not generally accepted for use at the time of the publication of the catalogue or which were at such time deemed unreasonably expensive or impractical to use.

11 Export, Import and Endangered Species Licenses and Permits Before bidding for any property, prospective buyers are advised to make their own inquiries as to whether a license is required to export a lot from the United States or to import it into another country. Prospective buyers are advised that some countries prohibit the import of property made of or incorporating plant or animal material, such as coral, crocodile, ivory, whalebone, rhinoceros horn or tortoiseshell, irrespective of age, percentage or value. Accordingly, prior to bidding, prospective buyers considering export of purchased lots should familiarize themselves with relevant export and import regulations of the countries concerned. It is solely the buyer’s responsibility to comply with these laws and to obtain any necessary export, import and endangered species licenses or permits. Failure to obtain a license or permit or delay in so doing will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot.

(b) In any claim for breach of the Authorship Warranty, Phillips de Pury & Company reserves the right, as a condition to rescinding any sale under this warranty, to require the buyer to provide to us at the buyer’s expense the written opinions of two recognized experts approved in advance by Phillips de Pury & Company. We shall not be bound by any expert report produced by the buyer and reserve the right to consult our own experts at our expense. If Phillips de Pury & Company agrees to rescind a sale under the Authorship Warranty, we shall refund to the buyer the reasonable costs charged by the experts commissioned by the buyer and approved in advance by us.

12 Client Information In connection with the management and operation of our business and the marketing and supply of auction related services, or as required by law, we may ask clients to provide personal information about themselves or obtain information about clients from third parties (e.g., credit information). If clients provide us with information that is defined by law as “sensitive,” they agree that Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies may use it for the above purposes. Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies will not use or process sensitive information for any other purpose without the client’s express consent. If you would like further information on our policies on personal data or wish to make corrections to your information, please contact us at +1 212 940 1228. If you would prefer not to receive details of future events please call the above number.

(c) Subject to the exclusions set forth in subparagraph (a) above, the buyer may bring a claim for breach of the Authorship Warranty provided that (i) he or she has notified Phillips de Pury & Company in writing within three months of receiving any information which causes the buyer to question the authorship of the lot, specifying the auction in which the property was included, the lot number in the auction catalogue and the reasons why the authorship of the lot is being questioned and (ii) the buyer returns the lot to Phillips de Pury & Company in the same condition as at the time of its auction and is able to transfer good and marketable title in the lot free from any third party claim arising after the date of the auction. (d) The buyer understands and agrees that the exclusive remedy for any breach of the Authorship Warranty shall be rescission of the sale and refund of the original Purchase Price paid. This remedy shall constitute the sole remedy and recourse of the buyer against Phillips de Pury & Company, any of our affiliated companies and the seller and is in lieu of any other remedy available as a matter of law. This means that none of Phillips de Pury & Company, any of our affiliated companies or the seller shall be liable for loss or damage beyond the remedy expressly provided in this Authorship Warranty, whether such loss or damage is characterized as direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential, or for the payment of interest on the original Purchase Price.

13 Limitation of Liability (a) Subject to subparagraph (e) below, the total liability of Phillips de Pury & Company, our affiliated companies and the seller to the buyer in connection with the sale of a lot shall be limited to the Purchase Price actually paid by the buyer for the lot. (b) Except as otherwise provided in this Paragraph 13, none of Phillips de Pury & Company, any of our affiliated companies or the seller (i) is liable for any errors or omissions, whether orally or in writing, in information provided to prospective buyers by Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies or (ii) accepts responsibility to any bidder in respect of acts or omissions, whether negligent or otherwise, by Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies in connection with the conduct of the auction or for any other matter relating to the sale of any lot. (c) All warranties other than the Authorship Warranty, express or implied, including any warranty of satisfactory quality and fitness for purpose, are specifically excluded by Phillips de Pury & Company, our affiliated companies and the seller to the fullest extent permitted by law. (d) Subject to subparagraph (e) below, none of Phillips de Pury & Company, any of our affiliated companies or the seller shall be liable to the buyer for any loss or damage beyond the refund of the Purchase Price referred to in subparagraph (a) above, whether such loss or damage is characterized as direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential, or for the payment of interest on the Purchase Price to the fullest extent permitted by law. (e) No provision in these Conditions of Sale shall be deemed to exclude or limit the liability of Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies to the buyer in respect of any fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation made by any of us or in respect of death or personal injury caused by our negligent acts or omissions. 14 Copyright The copyright in all images, illustrations and written materials produced by or for Phillips de Pury & Company relating to a lot, including the contents of this catalogue, is and shall remain at all times the property of Phillips de Pury & Company and such images and materials may not be used by the buyer or any other party without our prior written consent. Phillips de Pury & Company and the seller make no representations or warranties that the buyer of a lot will acquire any copyright or other reproduction rights in it. 15 General (a) These Conditions of Sale, as changed or supplemented as provided in Paragraph 1 above, and Authorship Warranty set out the entire agreement between the parties with respect to the transactions contemplated herein and supersede all prior and contemporaneous written, oral or implied understandings, representations and agreements. (b) Notices to Phillips de Pury & Company shall be in writing and addressed to the department in charge of the sale, quoting the reference number specified at the beginning of the sale catalogue. Notices to clients shall be addressed to the last address notified by them in writing to Phillips de Pury & Company.

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phillips de pury & company

Chairman

Directors

Advisory Board

Simon de Pury

Aileen Agopian

Maria Bell

Sean Cleary

Janna Bullock

Finn Dombernowsky

Lisa Eisner

Patty Hambrecht

Lapo Elkann

Alexander Payne

Ben Elliot

Olivier Vrankenne

Lady Elena Foster

Chief Executive Officer Bernd Runge

H.I.H. Francesca von Habsburg Marc Jacobs

Senior Directors

Ernest Mourmans

Michael McGinnis

Aby Rosen

Dr. Michaela de Pury

Christiane zu Salm Juergen Teller Princess Gloria von Thurn und Taxis Jean Michel Wilmotte Anita Zabludowicz

International Specialists

Berlin Shirin Kranz, Specialist, Contemporary Art +49 30 880 018 42

Brussels Olivier Vrankenne, International Senior Specialist +32 486 43 43 44

Katherine van Thillo, Consultant +32 475 687 011 Buenos Aires Brooke de Ocampo, International Specialist, Contemporary Art +44 777 551 7060

Geneva Katie Kennedy Perez, Specialist, Contemporary Art +41 22 906 8000

London Dr. Michaela de Pury, International Senior Director, Contemporary Art +49 17 289 73611 Los Angeles Maya McLaughlin, Specialist, Contemporary Art +1 323 791 1771

Milan Laura Garbarino, International Specialist, Contemporary Art +39 339 478 9671

Moscow Svetlana Marich, Specialist, Contemporary Art +7 495 225 88 22 Shanghai/Beijing Jeremy Wingfield, International Specialist, Contemporary Art +86 35 0118 2804

Singapore Chin-Chin Yap, Specialist, Contemporary Art +1 347 784 6916 Zurich/Israel Fiona Biberstein, International Specialist, Contemporary Art +41 43 344 86 32

General Counsel

Managing Directors

Patricia G. Hambrecht

Finn Dombernowsky, London/Europe Sean Cleary, New York (Interim)

WORLDWIDE OFFICES NEW YORK

PARIS

GENEVA

450 West 15 Street, New York, NY 10011, USA

15 rue de la Paix, 75002 Paris, France

23 quai des Bergues, 1201 Geneva, Switzerland

tel +1 212 940 1200 fax +1 212 924 5403

tel +33 1 42 78 67 77 fax +33 1 42 78 23 07

tel +41 22 906 80 00 fax +41 22 906 80 01

LONDON

BERLIN

Howick Place, London SW1P 1BB, United Kingdom

Auguststrasse 19, 10117 Berlin, Germany

tel +44 20 7318 4010 fax +44 20 7318 4011

tel +49 30 8800 1842 fax +49 30 8800 1843

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SPECIALISTs AND DEPARTMENTS

CONTEMPORARY ART

and Worldwide Head, Contemporary Art

New York

Aileen Agopian, New York Director +1 212 940 1255

Roxana Bruno +1 212 940 1229

Sarah Mudge, Head of Part II +1 212 940 1259

Jeremy Goldsmith +1 212 940 1253

Timothy Malyk +1 212 940 1258

Jean-Michel Placent +1 212 940 1263

Sara Davidson +1 212 940 1262

Peter Flores +1 212 940 1223

Cary Leibowitz, Worldwide Co-Director +1 212 940 1222

Kelly Troester, Worldwide Co-Director +1 212 940 1221

Jannah Greenblatt +1 212 940 1332

Joy Deibert +1 212 940 1333

PHOTOGRAPHS

New York

Vanessa Kramer, New York Director +1 212 940 1243 Shlomi Rabi +1 212 940 1246

Caroline Shea +1 212 940 1247

(Uli) Zhiheng Huang +1 212 940 1288

Carol Ehlers, Consultant +1 212 940 1245

Sarah Stein-Sapir +1 212 940 1303

Sarah Krueger +1 212 940 1245

Alexandra Leive +1 212 940 1252

New York

MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY EDITIONS

Michael McGinnis, Senior Director +1 212 940 1254

LONdON

LONDON

Peter Sumner, Head of Sales, London +44 20 7318 4063

Lou Proud +44 20 7318 4018

Henry Allsopp +44 20 7318 4060

Sebastien Montabonel +44 20 7318 4025

Laetitia Catoir +44 20 7318 4064

Alexandra Bibby +44 20 7318 4087

Judith Hess +44 20 7318 4075

Rita Almeida Freitas +44 20 7318 4087

Leonie Moschner +44 20 7318 4074

Helen Hayman +44 20 7318 4092

Ivgenia Naiman +44 20 7318 4071

Emma Lewis +44 20 7318 4092

Sarah Buchwald +44 20 7318 4085

Catherine Higgs +44 20 7318 4089

George O’Dell +44 20 7318 4093

Raphael Lepine +44 20 7318 4078

berlin

Edward Tang +44 20 7318 4024

Tanya Tikhnenko +44 20 7318 4065

Phillippa Willison +44 20 7318 4070

PARIS Edouard de Moussac + 33 1 42 78 67 77

DESIGN

New York

Alex Heminway, New York Director +1 212 940 1269

Marcus Tremonto +1 212 940 1268

Tara DeWitt +1 212 940 1265

Meaghan Roddy +1 212 940 1266

New York

Carmela Manoli +1 212 940 1302

Emily Bangert +1 212 940 1365

GENEVA

Carolin Bulgari +41 22 906 80 00

LONDON Lane McLean +44 20 7318 4032

THEME SALES

Alexandra Gilbert +1 212 940 1268

JEWELRY Nazgol Jahan, Worldwide Director +1 212 940 1283

Alexander Payne, Worldwide Director +44 20 7318 4052

Christina Schueblin +49 30 880 018 42

LONDON

New York

Corey Barr, New York Manager +1 212 940 1234

Steve Agin, Consultant +1 908 475 1796

Anne Huntington +1 212 940 1210

Domenico Raimondo +44 20 7318 4016

Stephanie Max +1 212 940 1301

Ellen Stelter +44 20 7318 4021

Ben Williams +44 20 7318 4027

Marcus McDonald +44 20 7318 4014

Marine Hartogs +44 20 7318 4021

PARIS

LONDON Tobias Sirtl, London Manager +44 20 7318 4095

Henry Highley +44 20 7318 4061

Arianna Jacobs +44 20 7318 4054

Siobhan O’Connor +44 20 7318 4040

Johanna Frydman +33 1 42 78 67 77

berlin

Christina Schueblin +49 30 880 018 42

Private sales New York Andrea Hill +1 212 940 1238

editorial

art and production

Karen Wright, Senior Editor

Fiona Hayes, Art Director

Marketing NEW YORK Trish Walsh, Marketing Manager

Iggy Cortez, Assistant to the Editor NEW YORK Andrea Koronkiewicz, Studio Manager Kelly Sohngen, Graphic Designer Orlann Capazorio, US Production Manager London Mark Hudson, Senior Designer Andrew Lindesay, Sub-Editor Tom Radcliffe, UK Production Manager 102


SALE INFORMATION

Auction Thursday 24 June 2010, 2pm Viewing Saturday 19 June, 10am – 6pm Sunday 20 June, 12pm – 6pm Monday 21 June – Wednesday 23 June, 10am – 6pm Thursday 24 June, 10am – 12pm Viewing & Auction Location 450 West 15 Street New York 10011 Sale Designation In sending in written bids or making enquiries please refer to this sale as NY000210 or Film. Theme sales New York Corey Barr, Manager +1 212 940 1234 Anne Huntington, Cataloguer +1 212 940 1210 Stephanie Max, Administrator +1 212 940 1301 London Tobias Sirtl, Manager +44 20 7318 4095 Arianna Jacobs, Cataloguer +44 20 7318 4054 Henry Highley, Administrator/Cataloguer +44 20 7318 4061 Siobhan O’Conner, Senior Administrator +44 20 7318 4040 Consultant Steve Agin, Toy Art +1 908 475 1796 Catalogues Leslie Pitts +1 212 940 1240 $25/£15 at the Gallery catalogues@phillipsdepury.com Absentee and Telephone Bids Rebecca Lynn, Manager +1 212 940 1228 +1 212 924 1749 fax Maureen Morrison, Bid Clerk +1 212 940 1228 bids@phillipsdepury.com client accounting Sylvia Leitao +1 212 940 1231 Buyers Accounts Nicole Rodriguez +1 212 940 1235 Seller Accounts Barbara Doupal +1 212 940 1232 Nadia Somwaru +1 212 940 1280 Client Services +1 212 940 1200 Shipping Beth Petriello +1 212 940 1373 Jennifer Brennan +1 212 940 1372 Property Manager Robert Weingart +1 212 940 1241 Photography Kent Pell, Matthew Kroening

Inside Front Cover Silvano Campeggi, Marlon Brando in The Wild One, 1945, Lot 63 Contents Pablo Picasso, Tournage: Plan Americain, 1968, Lot 143 Back Cover Andy Warhol, Eric Emerson (Chelsea Girls), 1982, Lot 112


w w w. p h i l l i p s d e p u ry.c o m

FILM Theme Sale NY  

NY Auction 24 June 2010

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