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BRIAN CL ARKE

W O R K S O N PA P E R

2 8 FEB RUARY – 2 7 MARCH 2 0 11    LOND ON

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BRIAN CL ARKE

WORKS ON PAPER

PHILLIPS DE PU RY & CO MPANY SPACE AT TH E SA ATCHI GALLERY LO NDO N 2 8 FEB RUARY – 2 7 MARCH 2 0 11

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The artist dedicates this exhibition to Liz and Dan because he likes them

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The artist would like to thank those responsible for making this exhibition a reality, particularly all the staff at his studio in London, the curator, and the team at Phillips de Pury & Company, for their dedication and enthusiasm. Brian Clarke Studio: Martin Booth Francesco Brusatin Jigisha Awuah Alan Miller Zara Schofield Belen Pavani Curator: Bettina von Hase, Nine AM Limited Phillips de Pury & Company: Simon and Michaela de Pury Finn Dombernowsky Helen Rohwedder For the making of the catalogue: Tom Radcliffe Andrew Lindesay Mark Hudson Thanks also to Winsor & Newton

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PREFACE

by Simon de Pury, Chairman, Phillips de Pury & Company

We are very proud to be presenting at the Saatchi Gallery the first exhibition ever entirely devoted to works on paper by Brian Clarke. This exhibition, spanning the years of his entire career so far, gives us a fascinating insight into his thought process when he conceives some of his paintings, sculptures, stained glass windows or architectural projects. It is a medium with which he feels particularly at ease. There is not a day that passes when he does not work on his drawings. The first time I came into contact with Brian Clarke’s work was a number of years ago when I saw the spectacular stained glass that Francesca von Habsburg had commissioned for Casa Austria in Salzburg. Since then I have been a great admirer of his many artistic achievements. It has been a true pleasure to work with Brian on the preparation of this exhibition. My warmest thanks go to him, to my dear friend Bettina von Hase who has curated this exhibition from its inception, to Martin Booth, his very able studio manager and to the wonderfully efficient Helen Rohwedder at Phillips de Pury.

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INTRODUCTION by Bettina von Hase, curator

ÒI see the world through drawingÓ Brian Clarke

I first became aware of Brian ClarkeÕs drawings when the German publisher Steidl launched the artistÕs seven-volume set of sketchbooks called Work in 2009. Their contents, and subsequent visits to his studio to see other works, neatly tucked away in drawers, revealed that his drawings are the foundation on which everything else is built. Clarke is an artist who draws as he breathes: ÒIÕve been waiting all my life for my line to express who I really am inside, deep down, honestlyÓ, he says. This exhibition demonstrates the achievement of his goal. It is therefore timely and a great pleasure to put this journey of discovery on show. I would like to thank Brian Clarke for giving me so much of his valuable time, and his brilliant team, studio manager Martin Booth and Francesco Brusatin, for many insights and enjoyable hours spent in the studio. The previously unseen 100 works span 40-plus years of the artistÕs career, from 1969 to the present day. It is the artistÕs first show of works on paper, except for a small exhibition of 15 works at St. EdmundÕs Art Centre,

Salisbury in 1979. ClarkeÕs line and use of colour are twin obsessions, and have become his own to the extent that they flow confidently and without artifice from one medium to another. They are evident in his well-known stained glass projects, collaborations with international architects, where the line is made of lead and both separates and enhances colour; they take centre stage in his painting, sculpture, mosaics, textiles and lately, jewellery (see Gridline 1 and City Boy, reproduced on these pages). ÒIÕve arrived at that stage where quite naturally my paintings have now become lines, just lines. And my three-dimensional works have become lines; and my stained glass is also becoming more and more like thatÓ, he says. In ClarkeÕs work, drawing is as relevant as other media. It is typical of the artist to have kept these works on paper from the public eye for so long; he works quietly, away from the hustle and bustle of the art world. Born in Oldham, Lancashire, in 1953, son of a miner and a housewife, he has always considered himself an outsider, but one Òwho everybody

Gridline 1 Stained glass 303 × 353 cm 1990 Collection: Museum der Stadt Langen, Germany

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on the inside has always known aboutÓ. He has drawn every day since he was 13 years old. He produces hundreds of drawings a year, destroying some, or using torn-out parts he likes Ð Ôbits of linesÕ as he calls them Ð for inclusions in his collages. Clarke draws mostly at his home in Peel Street rather than the studio in northwest London, underlining the private nature of a continuous, unbroken process. The works on show here Ð drawings, grids and other collages Ð exude a distilled, authentic atmosphere, at once completely fresh but with the patina of their own time. They divide into two broadly chronological parts. The first is retrospective, the second recent, where some works Ð the rose windows on black paper, the gothic literature windows, the spitfires, and Porsche cars drawings Ð were made especially for this show. There are gaps in the chronology, as a fire destroyed a large number of works in the late 80s; and in the 90s, Clarke focused more on tearing sections from new drawings, using fragments of lines that excited him, in a deliberate move away from figuration. A dominant aspect of the works is their coherence, visible in the continuing passionate investigation of shapes and personal symbols that the artist is drawn to. They are sometimes held by his grids, which have a disciplined formality, only to be subverted by spontaneous inclusions he refers to as Òthe quiet little whistle of a lineÓ. Then there is the cross, with its vertical and horizontal line echoing an architectural structure rather than a religious symbol. The gothic windows and spitfires are infused with a poetic and keen awareness of the passage of time. Clarke was surprised when he reviewed the works while preparing for this exhibition. It made him feel that he had been justified in Òchasing the same rainbow since I was 16 years oldÓ. The two openers are early life drawings of the female form with black, collaged paper fragments, the final ones closing the show unmistakably complete the circle, large four-part rose windows on black paper drawn with white Caran DÕAche crayons and metallic ink pens. In the retrospective room there are portraits of friends and early life drawings of the male nude, followed by layered newspaper collages and drawings made in the 80s in London and New York. There is an increasing preoccupation with what art historian Martin Harrison calls ClarkeÕs Ônorthern nervous lineÕ, in a series of abstract works with a distinct rhythmic touch. The room of recent works includes 14 vibrantly coloured collages, closely reminiscent of ClarkeÕs stained glass works, where luminous hues of colour are visible through the grids, which hold the Ôwhistles of lineÕ. Shimmering gold and silver caramel wrappings and multi-coloured paint tubes on the penultimate wall cascade over white Velin Arches paper, placed opposite two sets of ten gothic windows collaged with books that have a special meaning to the artist. The rose windows finale, next to the sweet wrappers and the paint tubes, also pictured on the front and back cover of the catalogue, sums up ClarkeÕs inherent belief that there is nothing so unimportant that it might not be of potential significance to an artist. Whether rose window, caramel or paint tube, he invests all with grace. City Boy Acrylic and collage on panel 183 × 72 cm 1977 Private collection, London

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INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN CLARKE by Bettina von Hase

BvH Would you describe the significance of drawing in your life? BC For me, drawing is the nearest thing I get to playing an instrument. I can’t play the violin, but I can draw. I doodle at lot, my doodles have a curious and consistent thematic stream running through them. When you are drawing, and you really let go, you’re not conscious of your thoughts. You enter a kind of altered state, in which the work is so consuming that you’re just like a dreamer. BvH Do you look at your drawings with a critical eye? BC Whether the drawings are good, bad, crude, clumsy, sophisticated or academic is neither here nor there for me, because if you draw naturally the work in some mysterious way will carry your authentic personality within it. Who I really am is in the drawings. It is me at my most open and liberal and real. I see the world through drawing. Even the sculpture I am working on now, I see as drawings, “drawings in the air”. BvH Will you explain that? BC Ever since my youth I’ve always proclaimed myself to be, in some mysterious way that I have difficulty explaining, connected to architecture. I respond to architectural culture, and to the way architects think. Over the years I have had many close relationships with architects, fewer with painters. I understand architectural culture. One of the things about architecture that really excites me is its inclusivity…. BvH You mean artists were working in isolation? BC I was brought up in a world where artists thought they had a direct line to God, and were enigmatic and sublime … well, most of the time that was rubbish, and it needs to be said. I would never have dreamt of asking someone what they thought about my painting then. That was not the culture, and yet I enjoyed the collaborative work. That’s why I like working with craftsmen. I’m very good at working with them. John Piper used to say that for stained glass to be anything other than a minor art, it had to be nourished by painting. I think history proves that. I also think history proves that when stained glass is major, it is as major as any oil painting, any sculpture, any work in architecture, any great work in music; it forms part of the very best of our occidental culture. My painting and stained glass, my mosaic, anything I do, is borne out of a mutual nourishment of them all. And drawing is its foundation. There are times when I cannot say what I want to say with stained glass, and it has to be said with painting. And there are times when I couldn’t possibly create the atmosphere and the mood I want to with a painting, when I think of volumetrics and space, and the adjacency of experience in a building. And bringing light into a building with trans-illuminations of colour… I feel doubly blessed, because I have these two mutually nourishing experiences. That is why my paintings do not look like other people’s, and my stained glass certainly does not look like anybody else’s stained glass. BvH Who has influenced you? BC I have obviously looked at Holbein, Egon Schiele, Johannes Schreiter, Cy Twombly, David Hockney. But my line is my own now. It doesn’t belong to anybody else. I’ve stolen from other people, but that’s now been fully absorbed into my own personality.

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BvH How would you describe yours? What is it about your line that sets you apart? BC With very few exceptions, an artist’s work is a direct simulacrum of his or her human experience or ability, as with the Brontë sisters, to project into human experience. Being an artist is like training yourself to become more and more sensitive. As you grow older, you also have to fight not to become cynical. Because otherwise you are in danger of cutting off the view onto the world you want to see. And nothing more than drawing is my access to that world. A drawing can be silly or crude, but locked inside it might be a little idea that given enough care and attention can rise above the rest of the orchestra and be heard individually. BvH Like a pleasing line of a torso? BC Let’s say you’re drawing from life, from the jaw bone down to the neck, sometimes it’s possible to change direction in a very subtle way. When the line frees itself from the need to render figuration, you can convey something else that is more sublime than illustration. A great deal can be conveyed in a line and a mark, in the way cave paintings do. BvH One is not less than the other? BC Exactly. Twombly’s line is majestically human. But my line has nothing to do with Cy’s. My line is my line. Actually keeping diligently working at something will ultimately let the light in. Suddenly you find where that line is leading you. And I have finally found the courage to let my paintings become just line. It’s like being let out of Alcatraz. BvH Please elaborate on that? BC It’s like I always wanted to do it, but never felt brave enough. There’s always a danger that you get sophisticated, which I want to avoid because line, emotionally expressive line, is against all that. I spent a lifetime waiting for my line, just to be in a position to know that what I am putting down on paper is as close to the best of me that I can get at that moment. BvH How about colour? BC I am a two-mistress man. And that other mistress is colour. When the two combine, sometimes it’s a collision and doesn’t work, and sometimes it is the most ecstatic copulation or, if you like, marriage. BvH Drawing is often seen as a lesser art form. What’s your view? BC It is an intellectual absurdity that because a work of art is created on a piece of rag with oil paint on it, that it is in some way intrinsically more valuable than something on paper or something on aluminium. With Duchamp’s ready-mades and Dada behind us, you would have thought that the artistic community would be intelligent and informed enough to recognize that the medium is not the message. And that the value of a work of art lies in its intrinsic poetic gravitas, not in what matter it is constructed with. But it’s an issue of “art market-place rules.” I’ve spent a lifetime overcoming the prejudice against stained glass. It’s the same problem. One of the arguments is that there are craftsmen involved, so it is an applied art, not “fine” art. Wait a minute, how about Damien Hirst’s shark? Do you think he killed it? Do you think he prepared it for taxidermy,

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do you think he built the glass case on his own? I am missing something in this intellectual logic.

true, and then I started having some inklings of it. Well, now I know. BvH Did you always draw? Were you always an artist?

BvH LetÕs talk about your grids, which have a very structural qualityÉ BC Once you are faced with an architectural structure, or seemingly infinite grid or matrix, it can be quite an overwhelming and frightening Blade RunnerÐish experience; a grid is almost like trying to think of the infinite. But then you introduce into it a Ôquiet little whistle of a lineÕ, which renders the grid benign and almost decorative. The grid then becomes the structure or the armature upon which the whistle plays itself out. ItÕs playing the one against the other. IÕve always been interested in things that explore that conflict or collision.

BC I put it down to my Dad. He was a coalminer, and then worked in a mill. He used to make wedding cakes for family and friends. He had been a cook at some point, in the army, I think, and he used to decorate the wedding cakes with little curlicues and baroque baubles and silver balls. I used to watch him make these wedding cakes. From an early moment on I desired to make things. ThatÕs a very early memory, it went on through my toddlership. I have sketchbooks from when I was 14. By the time I started the second one, it was all collage. BvH In your recent work there is more drawing, less collage É why?

BvH A kind of optimistic tension? BC It can carry the whole range of emotions that we as human beings can experience. BvH When you look at the work in this exhibition, from the beginning to now, what transformations are there? It strikes me as very coherent É BC It is a lifetime of looking. You can see it in most artists, the seed of it. When I look back on those older works, I just feel grateful that I did not abandon the search, didnÕt get crushed by the lack of understanding, by the lack of interest. BvH In your collages you use torn-up drawings Ð why do you tear up work? BC I enjoyed making the drawings, but didnÕt necessarily always think they meant very much. I often saw something in them that was good, a line suggesting the underside of an arm, or a hand. I took to tearing those moments out of drawings, on the basis that lines taken from existing drawings had a less self-conscious feel to them. Throughout the 90s, I tore up most drawings, apart from those in my sketch books, which I tend not to alter. IÕve got a drawer full of very nice bits. ThatÕs creative tearing up, not editing down of. It wasnÕt destructive.

BC ItÕs really simple. ItÕs what happens sometimes, you just find yourself. The journey to finding yourself can be really interesting, but when you actually feel that you understand who you are, then an urgency enters into the equation. You have to make work, because youÕre breathing cleanly again. You have to do the work to get to where you want to go. It wonÕt just happen by being in a straw hat in a lovely orchard in Provence. You have to think about it all the time. IÕm talking about me. I canÕt afford to be distracted. IÕm now very jealous of my time. BvH Tell me about the black works on paper, the most recent ones? BC I could never find the right pencils or pens that could carry a line on black paper, but finally I did. They are Caran dÕAche crayons, and metallic ink pens, or old-fashioned nib pens. The black paper is sugar paper, and the white paper is Velin Arches. The first time I came across it, John Piper gave me some, a whole pile of it. BvH What do you like about it? BC It looks handmade. ItÕs expensive. In those days, I used to draw on both sides. BvH Tell me about your use of templates?

BvH Is the line of the actual tear on the outside also important? BC Very much so. There are various ways to tear different kinds of paper. IÕve become quite adept at tearing the shape I want. I am right-handed, so if you tear the paper forward, with your left hand, it will take off the surface of the paper underneath as well. So, itÕll leave a different edge than if you tear it towards you. If you do the latter, you get a much cleaner edge. You learn these techniques. I like doing that. BvH The inclusions you put on the paperÕs surface are not random? BC No. I have always liked the torn edge, and I like the contrast between an irregular organic shape juxtaposed with a very formal grid or cross. It has always fascinated me, that marriage of opposites. I donÕt know what IÕm doing when IÕm doing them; IÕve never done any ice-skating, but it must be like that. You are all over the place, and fall on your arse, but when you get going, you just go with the flow, you do a little twirly bit, and then you get lost in it. Through the loss of your reason and logic an instinct takes over that is actually much more reliable. When I was younger, I guessed this might be

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BC We had a large peg board wall at Oldham School of Arts and Crafts, when I was about 12 or 13, upon which we used to hang tools. Silhouettes were painted underneath them to make it easier to spot where to replace the tools and to identify which were missing. The line drawn around a template shape has a unique quality. It lacks individual character or the personality of the drawer, however, when the even template line is interrupted, paused or let free to roam or shoot away from the template, the contrast is unique. It is the contrast of conflicting line ÒtypesÓ that is so mysterious and produces challenging and unexpected results. BvH Do you ever see lines in your head? BC Yes, I draw all the time. Actually, ALL the time. To the point of it being a distraction. I draw people when IÕm looking at them. I look at them so carefully and analytically that it appears rude. I often get carried away with my imaginary drawing to the point that I loose concentration on the conversation at hand. ItÕs not intentional, itÕs just about prioritizing. I prefer to draw than to talk. Lines are more rewarding than chatter.

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Life Drawing Pencil and collage on paper 59.8 Ă— 39.3 cm Burnley, 1969

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Life Drawing Pencil and collage on paper 59.8 Ă— 39.3 cm Burnley, 1969

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Liz 19 Pencil on paper 50 Ă— 35 cm 1975

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(i)

(ii)

(iii)

(vi)

(iv)

(vii)

(v)

(viii)

(i) Seated Figure Pencil on paper, 52 × 38 cm, 1970

(v) Seated Figure Pencil on paper, 56 × 38.5 cm, 1980

(ii) Crawling Nude 3 Charcoal on paper, 29.5 × 41 cm, 1986

(vi) Seated Figure Watercolour and pencil on paper (signed and dated), 59.8 × 46 cm, 1980

(iii) Seated Figure Pencil, gouache and collage on paper, 40 × 38.5 cm, 1970

(vii) Reclining female figure Pencil on paper, 49.5 × 38 cm, 1970

(iv) Seated Figure Pencil on paper, 55.5 × 38 cm, 1970

(viii) Diary box I Mixed-media collage, 51.5 × 46.5 cm, drawing 1969, diary box made 1977

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Cimabue Watercolour and pencil on paper 60 Ă— 46 cm Florence, 1980

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Cimabue III Pencil and collage on paper 66 Ă— 49 cm Florence, 1980

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Paolo alias Stefano Graphite on paper 100 Ă— 70 cm Rome, 1982

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(i)

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

(i) The Actor Pencil and gouache on card, 33 × 22 cm, London, 1987 (ii) The Actor II Pencil and gouache on card, 33 × 22 cm, London, 1987 (iii) The Skater Pencil and gouache on card, 33 × 22 cm, London, 1987 (iv) The Spaniard Pencil and gouache on card, 33 × 22 cm, London, 1987

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Untitled Pencil, gouache and collage on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm London, 1984

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Jhone Harp, London Pencil, gouache and collage on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm London, 1984

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Study for Six Paintings Felt pen, gouache and collage on paper 78 Ă— 112 cm London, 1979

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Study For Computergram Indian ink on graph paper 78.5 Ă— 122 cm Hamburg, 1981

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Sakhara Fragment Collage, wax rubbing and acrylic on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm Cairo, 1987

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Sakhara Fragment with Jhone Harp Wax rubbing, pencil and gouache with photographs and collage on Velin Arches 122 Ă— 80 cm Cairo, 1987

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Safety in Numbers Collage and acrylic on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm New York, 1984

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Sakhara I Wax rubbing, acrylic paint, graphite and collage on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm Cairo, 1987

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Roma Pencil and collage on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm Rome, 1982

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Pantheon Pencil and collage on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm Rome, 1982

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Port Stanley Bombed Chalk and pencil on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm London, 1982

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Wall Street Journal Pencil and collage on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm New York, 1982

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Egyptian Drawing Graphite and collage on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm Cairo, 1982

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Gulf Times Collage, oil paint and pencil on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm Doha, 1984

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Finsbury Square I Pencil and collage on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm London, 1982

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Finsbury Square II Pencil and collage on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm London, 1982

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Boys

Buildings

Beauties

Screen print on paper

Screen print on paper

Screen print on paper

108 × 74 cm

108 × 74 cm

108 × 74 cm

London, 1980

London, 1981

London, 1981

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Plot to Kill Collage and acrylic on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm Sydney, 1983

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Jhone Harp, New York Pencil and household paint on Velin Arches 122 Ă— 80 cm New York, 1984

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Finsbury Square III Graphite and pencil on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm London, 1982

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Finsbury Square IV Graphite and pencil on paper 122 Ă— 80 cm London, 1982

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I Forgive Her Collage and oil paint on paper 111 Ă— 77 cm New York, 1985

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Fallen Youth Collage and oil paint on paper 107 Ă— 76 cm New York, 1985

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Hit-Run Car Collage and oil paint on paper 107 Ă— 76 cm New York, 1985

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Die Alte Mutter Collage and oil paint on paper 107 Ă— 76 cm New York, 1985

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New York Opera 5

Red Icon 4

Collage, acrylic on paper

Collage, acrylic on paper

195 × 108 cm

195 × 108 cm

New York, 1984

London, 1984

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Black Icon 3 Collage, acrylic on paper 195 Ă— 108 cm London, 1984

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Meditations upon the Nature of Order IÐXIV 75 × 57 cm, London, 2010

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Meditations upon the Nature of Order I Collage, acrylic paint, watercolour, pencil and crayon on Velin Arches 75 Ă— 57 cm London, 2010

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Meditations upon the Nature of Order XII Collage, acrylic, crayon and Winsor and Newton labels on Velin Arches 75 Ă— 57 cm London, 2010

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Meditations upon the Nature of Order IV Collage, acrylic paint, watercolour and pencil on Velin Arches 75 Ă— 57 cm London, 2010

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Meditations upon the Nature of Order IX Collage, acrylic and crayon on Velin Arches 75 Ă— 57 cm London, 2010

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Meditations upon the Nature of Order X Collage, acrylic paint, watercolour and pencil on Velin Arches 75 Ă— 57 cm London, 2010

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Meditations upon the Nature of Order VI Collage, acrylic paint, watercolour and pencil on Velin Arches 75 Ă— 57 cm London, 2010

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Meditations upon the Nature of Order III Collage, acrylic and crayon on Velin Arches 75 Ă— 57 cm London, 2010

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Meditations upon the Nature of Order VIII Collage, acrylic paint, watercolour and pencil on Velin Arches 75 Ă— 57 cm London, 2010

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Meditations upon the Nature of Order XIII Collage, acrylic, crayon and gold leaf on Velin Arches 75 Ă— 57 cm London, 2010

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Meditations upon the Nature of Order VII Collage, acrylic paint, watercolour and pencil on Velin Arches 75 Ă— 57 cm London, 2010

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Meditations upon the Nature of Order XI Collage, acrylic and crayon on Velin Arches 75 Ă— 57 cm London, 2010

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Meditations upon the Nature of Order II Collage, acrylic paint, watercolour and pencil on Velin Arches 75 Ă— 57 cm London, 2010

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Meditations upon the Nature of Order XIV Collage, acrylic and crayon on Velin Arches 75 Ă— 57 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 10.59


Meditations upon the Nature of Order V Collage, acrylic and crayon on Velin Arches 75 Ă— 57 cm London, 2010

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Single Paint Tube Pencil and Winsor and Newton labels on Velin Arches 121 Ă— 80 cm London, 2009

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01-02-11 10.59


Paint Tubes Organised by Colour Pencil, Winsor and Newton and sweet wrapper labels on Velin Arches 121 Ă— 80 cm London, 2010

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Line of Paint Tubes Pencil and Winsor and Newton labels on Velin Arches 121 Ă— 80 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 10.59


Paint Tubes and Pallette Pencil and Winsor and Newton labels on Velin Arches 121 Ă— 80 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.00


Table of Paint Tubes Pencil and Winsor and Newton labels on Velin Arches 121 Ă— 80 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.00


SŽance of Paint Tubes Pencil, Winsor and Newton labels and watercolour on Velin Arches 121 × 80 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.00


Table of Paint Tubes and Caramels Pencil, Winsor and Newton labels and sweet wrappers on Velin Arches 121 Ă— 80 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 17.18


Chocolate Caramels and Paint Tubes Pencil, Winsor and Newton labels and sweet wrappers on Velin Arches 121 Ă— 80 cm London, 2010

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Golden Caramels Pencil and sweet wrappers on Velin Arches 121 Ă— 80 cm London, 2009

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01-02-11 17.18


Silver Caramels Pencil and sweet wrappers on Velin Arches 121 Ă— 80 cm London, 2009

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01-02-11 17.18


Plate of Caramels Pencil and sweet wrappers on Velin Arches 121 Ă— 80 cm London, 2009

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01-02-11 17.18


Self Portrait as Plan of Skull with Caramels Pencil, sweet wrappers and collage on Velin Arches 121 Ă— 80 cm London, 2009

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01-02-11 17.18


Caramel Alone Pencil and sweet wrapper on Velin Arches 121 Ă— 80 cm London, 2009

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01-02-11 17.18


Giant Caramel Pencil and sweet wrappers on Velin Arches 121 Ă— 80 cm London, 2009

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01-02-11 17.18


The Literature Windows 1Ð10 Black ink and book pages on Velin Arches. Polyptych on 10 sheets 205 × 123 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.02


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01-02-11 11.02


The Literature Windows 11Ð20 Black ink and book pages on Velin Arches. Polyptych on 10 sheets 205 × 123 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.02


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01-02-11 11.03


Gothic Window I White crayon and silver metallic ink on paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.04


Gothic Rose Window II White crayon, silver metallic ink and collage on paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.04


Gothic Rose Window I White crayon on paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.04


One Spitfire I Silver metallic ink and collage on paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.04


Six Spitfires White crayon and silver metallic ink on black paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.04


Two Spitfires I Silver metallic ink on paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.04


One Spitfire VI Silver metallic ink and collage on black paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2011

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01-02-11 11.04


Twenty eight Porsche Silver metallic ink and collage on black card 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2011

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01-02-11 11.04


Thirteen Spitfires Silver metallic ink and collage on black paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2011

Brian_Clarke_UK_Feb11_04-105_V2.indd 88

01-02-11 11.05


Jan KaplickyÕs Champagne Bucket Silver metallic ink and collage on black paper 84 × 59 cm London, 2011

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01-02-11 11.05


Three Porsche Silver metallic ink and collage on black paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2011

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01-02-11 11.05


One Spitfire IV Silver metallic ink on black paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.05


One Spitfire III Silver metallic ink and collage on black card 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.05


Four Spitfires Silver metallic ink on black paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.05


Two Spitfires II Silver metallic ink and collage on black card 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.05


Two Porsche I Silver metallic ink on black paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.05


One Spitfire IV Silver metallic ink on black paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

Brian_Clarke_UK_Feb11_04-105_V2.indd 96

01-02-11 11.06


One Spitfire V Silver metallic ink on black card 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.06


Four Porsche Silver metallic ink on black paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.06


One Porsche I Silver metallic ink and collage on black paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.06


Gothic Window II Silver metallic ink on black paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.06


One Porsche II Silver metallic ink on black paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.06


One Porsche III Silver metallic ink on black paper 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.06


One Spitfire II Silver metallic ink and collage on black card 84 Ă— 59 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.06


One Hundred and Twelve Porsche Silver metallic ink and collage on black card 168 Ă— 118 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.07


One Hundred and Twelve Spitfires Silver metallic ink on paper 168 Ă— 118 cm London, 2010

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01-02-11 11.07


Giant Gothic Rose Window White crayon on paper 168 Ă— 118 cm London, 2010

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Published to coincide with the exhibition Brian Clarke: Works on Paper 28 February Ð 27 March 2011 Phillips de Pury & Company Space at The Saatchi Gallery Duke of YorkÕs HQ, KingÕs Road, London SW3 4SQ

Phillips de Pury & Company Howick Place, London SW1P 1BB Enquiries +44 20 7318 4010

Front cover: Gothic Rose Window II, 2010 Back cover: SŽance of Paint Tubes, 2010 All text © the authors 2011 All works © the artist 2011 Printed in the United Kingdom Phillips de Pury & Company

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P H I L L I P S D E P U RY.C O M

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Brian Clarke Works on Paper  

Exhibition 28Feb - 27 Mar 2011 London

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