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20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale, Afternoon Session New York, 14 November 2018, 3pm

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310. Tomoo Gokita

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Executives.

Ed Dolman

Cheyenne Westphal

Chief Executive Ofcer +1 212 940 1241 edolman@phillips.com

Chairman +44 20 7318 4044 cwestphal@phillips.com

Š Brigitte Lacombe

20th Century & Contemporary Art.

Jean-Paul Engelen

Robert Manley

Worldwide Co-Head of 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Deputy Chairman +1 212 940 1390 jpengelen@phillips.com

Worldwide Co-Head of 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Deputy Chairman +1 212 940 1358 rmanley@phillips.com

Senior Advisors.

Hugues Jofre

Arnold Lehman

Ken Yeh

Senior Advisor to the CEO +44 207 901 7923 hjofre@phillips.com

Senior Advisor to the CEO +1 212 940 1385 alehman@phillips.com

Senior International Specialist +1 212 940 1257 kyeh@phillips.com

Deputy Chairmen.

Svetlana Marich

Jonathan Crockett

Peter Sumner

Miety Heiden

Alexander Payne

Vanessa Hallett

Vivian Pfeifer

Marianne Hoet

Worldwide Deputy Chairman +44 20 7318 4010 smarich@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Asia, Head of 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Asia +852 2318 2023 jcrockett@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Europe, Senior International Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art +44 20 7318 4063 psumner@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Head of Private Sales +44 20 7901 7943 mheiden@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Europe, Worldwide Head of Design +44 20 7318 4052 apayne@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Americas, Worldwide Head of Photographs +1 212 940 1243 vhallett@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Americas, Head of Business Development, Americas +1 212 940 1392 vpfeifer@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Europe Senior Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art +32 3257 3026 mhoet@phillips.com

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New York.

Scott Nussbaum

Rachel Adler Rosan

Kevie Yang

Amanda Lo Iacono

John McCord

Rebekah Bowling

Sam Mansour

Katherine Lukacher

Head of Department +1 212 940 1354 snussbaum@phillips.com

Senior Specialist +1 212 940 1333 radlerrosan@phillips.com

Senior Specialist +1 212 940 1254 kyang@phillips.com

Head of Evening Sale +1 212 940 1278 aloiacono@phillips.com

Head of Day Sale, Morning +1 212 940 1261 jmccord@phillips.com

Head of Day Sale, Afernoon +1 212 940 1250 rbowling@phillips.com

Head of New Now Sale +1 212 940 1219 smansour@phillips.com

Head of Online Sales +1 212 940 1215 klukacher@phillips.com

Jeannette van Campenhout

Annie Dolan

Olivia Kasmin

Carolyn Mayer

Maiya Aiba

Avery Semjen

Patrizia Koenig

Cataloguer +1 212 940 1260 adolan@phillips.com

Cataloguer +1 212 940 1312 okasmin@phillips.com

Cataloguer +1 212 940 1206 cmayer@phillips.com

Cataloguer +1 212 940 1387 maiba@phillips.com

Cataloguer +1 212 940 1207 asemjen@phillips.com

Researcher/Writer +1 212 940 1279 pkoenig@phillips.com

Nathalie Zaquin-Boulakia

Jonathan Horwich

Matt Langton

Rosanna WidĂŠn

Henry Highley

Tamila Kerimova

Senior Specialist +44 20 7901 7935 jhorwich@phillips.com

Senior Specialist +44 20 7318 4074 mlangton@phillips.com

Senior Specialist +44 20 7318 4060 rwiden@phillips.com

Head of Evening Sale +44 20 7318 4061 hhighley@phillips.com

Head of Day Sale +44 20 7318 4065 tkerimova@phillips.com

Specialist +1 212 940 1391 jvancampenhout@phillips.com

London.

Dina Amin Head of Department +44 20 7318 4025 damin@phillips.com

International Specialist +44 20 7901 7931 nzaquin-boulakia@ phillips.com

Simon Tovey

Kate Bryan

Lisa Stevenson

Charlotte Gibbs

Louise Simpson

Clara Krzentowski

Head of New Now Sale +44 20 7318 4084 stovey@phillips.com

Specialist +44 20 7318 4050 kbryan@phillips.com

Cataloguer +44 20 7318 4093 lstevenson@phillips.com

Cataloguer +44 20 7901 7993 cgibbs@phillips.com

Cataloguer +44 20 7901 7911 lsimpson@phillips.com

Researcher/Writer +44 20 7318 4064 ckrzentowski@phillips.com

Isaure de Viel Castel

Sandy Ma

Charlotte Raybaud

Danielle So

Delissa Handoko

Head of Department, Asia +852 2318 2025 isauredevielcastel @phillips.com

Head of Evening Sale +852 2318 2025 sma@phillips.com

Head of Day Sale +852 2318 2026 craybaud@phillips.com

Cataloguer +852 2318 2027 dso@phillips.com

Cataloguer +852 2318 2000 dhandoko@phillips.com

Hong Kong.

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International Specialists & Regional Directors. Americas.

Cândida SodrÊ

Carol Ehlers

Lauren Peterson

Melyora de Koning

Regional Director, Consultant, Brazil +55 21 999 817 442 csodre@phillips.com

Regional Director, Specialist, Photographs, Chicago +1 773 230 9192 cehlers@phillips.com

Regional Representative, Chicago +1 310 922 2841 lauren.peterson@phillips.com

Senior Specialist, 20th Century Regional Director, Los Angeles & Contemporary Art, Denver +1 323 383 3266 +1 917 657 7193 bkoh@phillips.com mdekoning@phillips.com

Blake Koh

Kaeli Deane

Valentina Garcia

Cecilia Lafan

Maura Smith

Silvia Coxe Waltner

Head of Latin American Art, Los Angeles +1 212 940 1352 kdeane@phillips.com

Specialist, Miami +1 917 583 4983 vgarcia@phillips.com

Regional Director, Consultant, Mexico +52 1 55 5413 9468 crayclafan@phillips.com

Regional Director, Palm Beach +1 508 642 2579 maurasmith@phillips.com

Regional Director, Seattle +1 206 604 6695 scwaltner@phillips.com

Laurence Calmels

Maria Cifuentes

Laurence Barret-Cavy

Dr. Nathalie Monbaron

Dr. Alice Trier

Regional Director, France +33 686 408 515 lcalmels@phillips.com

Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, France +33 142 78 67 77 mcifuentes@phillips.com

Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Paris +33 633 12 32 04 lbarretcavy@phillips.com

Regional Director, Geneva +41 22 317 81 83 nmonbaron@phillips.com

Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Germany +49 173 25 111 69 atrier@phillips.com

Carolina Lanfranchi

Maura Marvao

Kalista Fenina

Julia Heinen

Regional Director, Italy, Senior International Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art +39 338 924 1720 clanfranchi@phillips.com

International Specialist, Consultant, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Portugal and Spain +351 917 564 427 mmarvao@phillips.com

Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Moscow +7 905 741 15 15 kfenina@phillips.com

Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Regional Director, Zurich +41 79 694 3111 jheinen@phillips.com

Europe.

Asia.

Kyoko Hattori

Jane Yoon

Sujeong Shin

Wenjia Zhang

Alicia Zhang

Cindy Yen

Meiling Lee

Iori Endo

Christine Fernando

Regional Director, Japan +81 90 2245 6678 khattori@phillips.com

International Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Regional Director, Korea +82 10 7389 7714 jyy@phillips.com

Associate Regional Representative, Korea +82 10 7305 0797 sshin@phillips.com

Regional Director, Shanghai +86 13911651725 wenjiazhang@phillips.com

Associate Regional Representative, Shanghai +86 139 1828 6589 aliciazhang@phillips.com

Senior Specialist, Watches & Jewellery, Taiwan +886 2 2758 5505 cyen@phillips.com

International Specialist, Taiwan +886 908 876 669 mlee@phillips.com

Regional Representative, Japan +44 20 7318 4039 iendo@phillips.com

Associate Regional Representative, Singapore +65 9128 6277 christinefernando@ phillips.com

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Business Development. Americas.

Europe.

Asia.

Vivian Pfeifer

Guy Vesey

Lilly Chan

Deputy Chairman, Americas, Head of Business Development, Americas +1 212 940 1392 vpfeifer@phillips.com

Head of Business Development & Marketing, Europe +44 20 7901 7934 gvesey@phillips.com

Managing Director, Asia, Head of Business Development, Asia +852 2318 2022 lillychan@phillips.com

Client Advisory. New York.

Philae Knight

Jennifer Jones

Liz Grimm

Client Advisory Director +1 212 940 1313 pknight@phillips.com

Director of Trusts, Estates & Valuations +1 212 940 1272 jjones@phillips.com

Business Development Associate +1 212 940 1342 egrimm@phillips.com

Yassaman Ali

Vera Antoshenkova

Client Advisory Director +44 20 7318 4056 yali@phillips.com

Client Advisory Manager +44 20 7901 7992 vantoshenkova@phillips.com

Giulia Campaner Mendes

Europe.

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Associate Client Advisory Manager +44 20 7318 4058 gcampaner@phillips.com

Margherita Solaini Business Development Associate +39 02 83642 453 MSolaini@phillips.com

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320. Jonas Wood

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20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale, Afternoon Session New York, 14 November 2018

Auction & Viewing Location 450 Park Avenue New York 10022 Auction Wednesday, 14 November 2018, 3pm Viewing 2 – 14 November Monday – Saturday 10am – 6pm Sunday 12pm – 6pm Sale Designation When sending in written bids or making enquiries please refer to this sale as NY010918 or 20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale, Afernoon Session. Absentee and Telephone Bids tel +1 212 940 1228 fax +1 212 924 1749 bidsnewyork@phillips.com

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20th Century & Contemporary Art Department

Head of Sale Rebekah Bowling +1 212 940 1250 rbowling@phillips.com

Cataloguer Carolyn Mayer +1 212 940 1206 cmayer@phillips.com

Administrator Julia Hirschberg +1 212 940 1264 jhirschberg@phillips.com

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301. Harold Ancart

b. 1980

Grand Bambou signed and dated “Harold Ancart 2011” on the reverse of the sheet oilstick, pigment and pencil on paper mounted on panel, in artist’s frame 53 1/4 x 39 1/8 in. (135.4 x 99.4 cm.) Executed in 2011. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance C L E A R I N G, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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302. Harold Ancart

b. 1980

Untitled oilstick on paper mounted on panel, in artist’s frame 52 7/8 x 38 1/4 in. (134.5 x 97.3 cm.) Executed in 2011. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance C L E A R I N G, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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303. Josh Smith

b. 1976

Untitled signed, inscribed and dated “JOSH SMITH 2013 JSP13023” on the reverse oil on panel 48 x 35 7/8 in. (122 x 91.4 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance STANDARD (OSLO) Private Collection, New York Phillips, London, October 16, 2014, lot 288 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

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304. Ann Craven

b. 1969

Stepping Out With Cherries signed, titled and dated “Ann Craven 2011 “Stepping Out With Cherries” 2011” on the overlap oil on canvas 60 x 48 in. (152.4 x 121.9 cm.) Painted in 2011. Estimate $12,000-18,000

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Provenance Maccarone, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Helsinki, Galerie Forsblom, Ann Craven, March 11 - April 3, 2011 Paris, Galerie Perrotin, Souvenir, June 22 - July 27, 2013

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305. Petra Cortright

b. 1986

password angelfre digital painting on aluminum 48 x 64 in. (121.9 x 162.6 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Steve Turner, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner

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306. Kai Althof

b. 1966

O.T. spray paint, oil and collage on canvas 17 x 19 1/4 in. (43.2 x 48.9 cm.) Executed in 2004. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Galerie Neu, Berlin Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Kunsthalle Zürich, In any case I wish you ill, November 10, 2007 - January 13, 2008

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307. Secundino Hernández

b. 1975

Untitled (SH.15.03) signed and dated “Secundino Hernández 15” on the reverse acrylic, alkyd, oil and gouache on canvas, in artist’s frame 104 3/8 x 78 3/4 in. (265 x 200 cm.) Executed in 2015. Estimate $80,000-120,000 Provenance Galería Heinrich Ehrhardt, Madrid Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2015

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308. Derek Fordjour

b. 1974

No. 36 signed and dated “FORDJOUR ‘14” on the reverse oil pastel, acrylic and newspaper on canvas 30 x 24 in. (76.2 x 61 cm.) Executed in 2014. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Jack Bell Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited London, Jack Bell Gallery, Meritocracy, April 8 - May 1, 2015

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309. Mark Bradford

b. 1961

Untitled signed, titled and dated “Untitled Mark Bradford 2015” on the reverse mixed media on board 8 7/8 x 15 in. (22.5 x 38.1 cm.) Executed in 2015. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance The Artist LAND Beneft Live Auction, Los Angeles, October 28, 2015, lot 1 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

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310. Tomoo Gokita

b. 1969

Club Mature signed, titled and dated “CLUB MATURE Tomoo Gokita 2015” on the reverse acrylic gouache on linen 76 x 102 in. (193 x 259.1 cm.) Executed in 2015. Estimate $250,000-350,000 Provenance Bill Brady Gallery, Miami Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Miami, Bill Brady Gallery, DAMAGE CONTROL, November 30, 2015 - January 9, 2016

In his signature monochrome paintings, Tokyobased artist Tomoo Gokita draws upon traditions of portraiture, photo-realism, and Pop art, creating canvases that are at once luxuriously seductive yet eerily disquieting. Gokita began as a graphic designer in the late 1990s, and continued working in this feld until 2005, when he abandoned graphic design altogether in favor of a fulltime career as a studio artist. Undeniably inspired by his former career, Club Mature from 2015, hails from Gokita’s mature body of work. In these paintings, Gokita culls found imagery from classic flm stills, Playboy magazines, and pinup posters, rendering his subjects in a lush range of greyscale. In the present lot, four scantily clad, voluptuous women are seated in an ambiguous setting, which is somewhat elucidated by the painting’s cheeky title, Club Mature. The women appear to be looking out at the viewer, yet their faces are shrouded by a neoexpressionistic haze of smeared paint. The resulting image is psychologically charged, as the artist blurs, obscures and erases facial features and expressions, lending an unsettling anonymity to his subjects. The scene is made all the more seductive by the artist’s expert use of light, as intense blacks contrast with bright whites, and a dramatic, chiaroscuro-esque lighting likens the painting to a flm noir. In 2017, Gokita debuted a series of new portrait paintings titled Mature, as part of his solo exhibition, Beauty, at Mary Boone Gallery in New York. Club Mature is a precursor to this series, in which Gokita continues to explore the theme of aging pinup models as unconventional, fetishized objects of desire.

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Gerhard Richter, Spanish Nudes (150), 1967. © Gerhard Richter 2018 (0216).

Operating within a larger tradition of artists who preceded him, Gokita explores the indistinct border between realism and abstraction. Like Gerhard Richter’s photo-realist canvases of the late 1960s, Gokita employs found imagery as a starting point, yet intentionally obscures and degrades the images through a masterful manipulation of paint. Executed at the height of Richter’s Pop period, Spanish Nudes, 1967, is emblematic of the artist’s signature hazy, photo-realist paintings in which he utilizes gradations of a single color and an allover blurring technique to achieve an array of visual efects. The subdued, subversive atmospheric quality of the work is decidedly enigmatic and distinct from those of his American Pop contemporaries such as Rosenquist and Warhol. Dietmar Elger, director of the Gerhard Richter Archive, posits, “in montages like Spanish Nude, Richter insists upon a distance between the female object and the observer. He sets up a kind of peep show, inviting the viewer to look and simultaneously frustrating the gaze through technique: the grisaille palette and sof blurring serve to defuse any erotic charge.” (Dietmar Elger, Gerhard Richter: A Life in Painting, Chicago, 2009, p. 114) Executed nearly sixty years later, Club Mature can be understood through a similar lens. Like Richter, who blurs the picture to a point of intentional degradation, Gokita deliberately obscures his models’ faces, similarly “frustrating the gaze through technique.” In Club Mature, Gokita continues in Richter’s tradition, with a contemporary investigation of the challenges of representation and the role of the viewer in a style that is uniquely his own.

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311. Tomoo Gokita

b. 1969

A Suspect signed, titled and dated ““A SUSPECT” Tomoo Gokita 2007” on the reverse acrylic gouache on canvas 28 3/4 x 28 3/4 in. (73 x 73 cm.) Executed in 2007. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Honor Fraser Gallery, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Los Angeles, Honor Fraser Gallery, Vanity Drunko, March 24 - May 19, 2007

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312. George Condo

b. 1957

The Athlete signed and dated “Condo 07” on the reverse oil on canvas 24 x 18 in. (61 x 45.7 cm.) Painted in 2007. Estimate $100,000-150,000

Provenance Luhring Augustine, New York Michelle Rosenfeld Gallery, New York Marc Johnson, Miami Christie’s, New York, May 14, 2009, lot 349 Private Collection, New York Private Collection Sotheby’s, New York, December 14, 2010, lot 112 Private Collection Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Michelle Rosenfeld Gallery, Winter Legends, January - February, 2008 New York, Luhring Augustine, George Condo: Recent Paintings, February - March, 2008

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313. KAWS

b. 1974

Untitled signed and dated “KAWS..2000” on the reverse acrylic on canvas 16 1/8 x 16 1/8 in. (41 x 41 cm.) Painted in 2000. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Private Collection (acquired directly from the artist) Phillips de Pury & Company, London, February 13, 2010, lot 138 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

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314. KAWS

b. 1974

At This Time stamped with the artist’s signature and date “KAWS..16” on the underside of the lef foot; further stamped with the number “15/25” on the underside of the right foot painted bronze 11 1/2 x 5 3/8 x 4 3/8 in. (29.2 x 13.7 x 11.1 cm.) Executed in 2016, this work is number 15 from an edition of 25 plus 5 artist’s proofs. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Pace Prints, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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315. Alex da Corte

b. 1981

Untitled (DIE REM) digitally printed poplin, sequin pins, foamcore, anodized metal frames, Plexiglas, velvet, rubber, wife ball bat, banana, satin, ribbon, paper and dyed US one dollar bill, in artist’s frame 56 x 56 in. (142.2 x 142.2 cm.) Executed in 2015.

Exhibited North Adams, Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, Alex Da Corte: Free Roses, April 16, 2016 - January 15, 2017, pls. 121, 128, pp. 124, 140-141, 202, 204 (illustrated p. 124, installation view illustrated pp. 140-141)

Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Luxembourg & Dayan, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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(i)

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

316. Adam Pendleton

b. 1984

Four Works: (i) History (Lab 01 Red); (ii) History (People Yellow); (iii) History (So I White); (iv) History (‘68 Grey) each signed and dated “Adam Pendleton 2005” on the overlap silkscreen on canvas each 30 1/4 x 22 1/8 in. (76.8 x 56.2 cm.) Executed in 2005. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner

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Property from an Important Australian Collector

317. Richard Prince

b. 1949

Free Love #233 signed, partially titled and dated “Richard Prince 2015 #233� on the overlap inkjet, acrylic and oilstick on canvas 74 3/8 x 54 3/4 in. (189 x 139 cm.) Executed in 2015. Estimate $400,000-600,000 Provenance Sadie Coles HQ, London Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited London, Sadie Coles HQ, Richard Prince: Free Love, April 12 - June 18, 2016, no. 12, n.p. (illustrated)

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Image Todd White, Artwork © Richard Prince, courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London

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Installation view of Richard Prince Free Love at Sadie Coles HQ, London, April 12 – June 18, 2016 (present work exhibited). Image Sadie Coles HQ, London, Artwork © Richard Prince, courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London.

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“Richard collected some nudist cartoons by this guy John Dempsey. He inked jetted them up and drew a kind of hippie cartoon… kind of like his hippie drawings that he did back in the late eighties. He turned the nudist cartoon into something about free love. Richard always wanted to be part of a commune, but he knew that kind of utopia would never work out. At least that’s what he told me. He fgured it was a good idea, the commune… but in the end… he ended up painting the commune.” Joan Katz

As detailed in the above excerpt by Joan Katz, a close friend of Prince’s since 1989, Free Love #233 belongs to a recent body of work in which the artist fuses diferent elements from many of his earlier, acclaimed series, including his Hippie Drawings, Jokes, and Cartoons. The background of the composition is a reproduction of a Playboy magazine cartoon, enlarged to life size and rendered in full color. Prince then overlays the cartoon with a bold quasi-abstract fgure, in the style of his widely recognizable Hippie Drawings from the late 1980s that pay homage to modernist masters like Picasso and de Kooning. The painted fgure obscures the cartoon with its elongated arms and oversized hands, while its vivid yellow hue enhances the composition with a joyful overtone only heightened by the fgure’s wide, laughing smile. Carefully selected gaps in the hippie’s reach reveal candid moments in the original source material. In the upper lef, an embracing couple seems more loving than obscene. On the lower right, the original cartoonist’s signature is revealed, but overlaid with a spiral line - Prince’s way of adding his own mark. His decision to incorporate an abstract shape rather than an identifable signature is typical of the artist’s irreverent questioning of traditional notions of authorship. As Prince himself writes: “You can take my work and do anything you want with it. I will not

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object… What’s genuine anyway?” (Richard Prince, quoted in “Rock Lobster: October 20”, Birdtalk, 2017, online) Another hallmark feature of Prince’s practice highlighted in this body of work is his iconic use of text, also appropriated and ofen humorous. In a nod to his Joke paintings, the lower section of the canvas includes a caption that reads: “Can’t you fnd a shady nook somewhere else, Mr. Martinez?” The question is presumably posed by the woman sitting in the foreground of the busy outdoor scene whose lap cradles the head of a mustache-bearing man – the shade she references is cast by her sizeable bosom. The man’s position is surprisingly unsexual and almost fetal in nature, further emphasized by his peaceful face and gently closed eyes. This intimate position, in stark contrast with the formality in which she addresses the gentleman, creates an unsettling mood paramount to the cheeky nature of Prince’s works. Many of these subtle details would likely have gone unnoticed in the original cartoon, as both the scale and the context of a magazine promote casual skimming rather than detailed analysis. However, through his particular style of appropriation, Prince redefnes the source material, blurring the lines between social codes, destabilizing hierarchies, and opening up a new world of free love.

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318. Takashi Murakami

b. 1962

Kurage-bo signed and dated “Takashi 04� on the reverse acrylic on canvas mounted on panel 31 1/2 x 31 1/2 in. (80 x 80 cm.) Painted in 2004. Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance Blum & Poe, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2004

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319. Takashi Murakami

b. 1962

Hey! We are skulls signed, titled, inscribed and dated “May 2003 Hey! We are skulls Takashi Murakami and Kaikai Kiki & Chiso [in Japanese]” lower right silk, wood, acid dyes, platinum foil and metal image 15 3/4 x 15 3/4 in. (40 x 40 cm.) overall 51 1/8 x 20 3/8 in. (129.9 x 51.8 cm.) Executed in 2003, this work is unique, and is accompanied by an artist’s wood box. Estimate $80,000-120,000 Provenance Tomio Koyama Gallery, Tokyo Acquired from the above by the present owner

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320. Jonas Wood

b. 1977

Chico signed with the artist’s initials, titled and dated “CHICO JBRW 2008” on the reverse oil on linen 48 x 48 in. (121.9 x 121.9 cm.) Painted in 2008. Estimate $300,000-500,000 Provenance Anton Kern Gallery, New York Private Collection Phillips, New York, November 8, 2015, lot 50 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited New York, Anton Kern Gallery, Jonas Wood, November 20 - December 23, 2008

Jonas Wood’s Chico from 2008 is an homage to American professional boxer Diego Corrales, commonly known as “Chico”, in the artist’s distinctive style of contemporary portraiture. A masterful blending of modernist abstraction and realistic fguration, Chico expertly captures a split-second moment in time, just as the boxer draws his arm back in preparation for the fnal blow. In discussing a common misconception in his sports portraits, Wood explains: “The sports thing is funny. A lot of people think my work on the subject is based on being a super sports fan, because I’m from Boston or because I make these nostalgic pictures, but really the whole sports theme is just a vehicle for practicing portraiture.” (Jonas Wood, quoted in Emily Leisz Carr, “Super Sports Fan: An Interview with Jonas Wood”, Art in America, October 9, 2013, online) For Wood, the subject matter becomes tangential to the formal qualities of portraiture, as he expertly navigates techniques of fragmentation, fattened dimension, and highly-stylized geometric abstraction. In Chico, Wood imbues the painting with an emotional depth that belies the fatness of the composition.

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Wood’s reduction of the background to a nearmonochromatic black, apart from a few visual cues of the boxing arena, serves to heighten the intensity of the boxer’s physique, which, in contrast, is rendered with dramatic tonal variation. Rather than painting from his imagination, Wood works almost exclusively from photographs and self-made collages, creating paintings that are re-organizations of pre-existing images. As such, his paintings are twice, or sometimes three-times removed from the real-life fgures they depict, resulting in an idiosyncratic blend of realism and abstraction that distorts the subject and adds new layers of meaning. In all of his portraits, Wood aims to capture distinguishing features of his subjects. Here, the boxer’s recognizable tattoos and belt that reads “Chico” serve to commemorate the iconic athlete who passed away a year prior to the work’s execution. Rendered in his instantly recognizable painterly style, Wood captures Chico in this moment of strength, re-contextualizing the traditional art form of portraiture in a distinctly contemporary realm.

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321. Jonas Wood

b. 1977

Shadow Collage signed with the artist’s initials, titled and dated “SHADOW COLLAGE JBRW 2009” on the reverse cardboard, oil and linen on canvas 30 x 24 in. (76.2 x 61 cm.) Executed in 2009. Estimate $100,000-200,000 Provenance Anton Kern Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2016 Exhibited Los Angeles, Hammer Museum, Hammer Projects: Jonas Wood, February 5 - May 9, 2010, pp. 12, 20 (illustrated)

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322. George Condo

b. 1957

Eric Dolphy signed, titled and dated “Condo 99 Eric Dolphy� on the reverse acrylic and collage on canvas 60 x 60 in. (152.4 x 152.4 cm.) Executed in 1999.

Exhibited New York, PaceWildenstein, George Condo Jazz Paintings, December 3, 1999 - January 15, 2000 Literature George Condo, Portraits Lost in Space, Minneapolis, 1999-2000, pp. 36, 38-39 (illustrated)

Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance PaceWildenstein, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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323. Glenn Ligon

b. 1960

Untitled (I Live on My Shadow) neon and paint 4 x 56 in. (10.2 x 142.2 cm.) Executed in 2009, this work is number 5 from an edition of 5 plus 1 artist’s proof. Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance Regen Projects, Los Angeles Private Collection, Washington D.C. Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Luhring Augustine, Glenn Ligon: Neon, October 26, 2012 - January 19, 2013, pp. 40-41 (another example exhibited and illustrated)

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324. Nick Cave

b. 1959

Soundsuit Easter grass, mirror, cotton and paint appliquĂŠ 79 x 31 x 26 in. (200.7 x 78.7 x 66 cm.) Executed in 2006. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Jack Shainman Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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“We the People is not about going to the past. Since it’s one of the most important icons for Western liberty I think [it] is very much about the present and our future.” Danh Vo

325. Danh Vo

b. 1975

We the People (Detail) hammered copper 81 x 135 x 36 in. (205.7 x 342.9 x 91.4 cm.) as installed Executed in 2011. Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2012 Exhibited Aspen Art Museum, Danh Võ, November 4, 2016 - May 21, 2017

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326. Ellen Gallagher

b. 1965

Counterft oil, ink and paper on linen 72 x 84 in. (182.9 x 213.4 cm.) Executed in 2001. Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Gagosian Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Gagosian Gallery, Blubber, March 10 - April 14, 2001 Boston, Institute of Contemporary Art, Ellen Gallagher, October 17 - December 30, 2001 Detail of the present lot

Ellen Gallagher’s subtly intricate artworks straddle the delicate line between fguration and abstraction. Her ethereal compositions are ofen likened to the elegant, austere works of Agnes Martin, who the artist cites as a primary source of inspiration. Yet when examined closely, Gallagher’s canvases reveal richly patterned surfaces, infused with a unique vocabulary of signs and symbols. The product of a father whose heritage was from Cape Verde, Africa and a Caucasian, Irish Catholic mother, Gallagher employs a cosmology of personal symbols throughout her oeuvre as a means of exploring larger themes like race and gender. Executed in 2001, Counterft draws upon this visual vocabulary and, in doing so, unveils the complex historical development of racial identity in America. In this work, repeated, ovular forms scattered across the composition suggest lips or vulvas, while a small, wide-eyed brown fgure, perhaps resting atop a tree trunk, sticks its pink tongue out at the viewer. These motifs,

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drawn from the canon of racist, sexualized caricatures such as blackface and bufoonery, are saturated with subtle references to black history transformed by the artist’s hand. The process of transformation is central to Gallagher’s practice, rubbing, erasing, smudging, stitching and collaging materials until they become unidentifable from their original states. This painstaking process mimics the development of racial and gender norms that Gallagher seeks to investigate in her works – constantly morphing, repeating, being digested and transformed. Both in content and in the laborious process by which it was created, Counterft exquisitely illustrates Gallagher’s enduring exploration into what it means to be a bi-racial, female artist working at the turn of the twenty-frst century in America.

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327. Wade Guyton

b. 1972

Untitled Epson UltraChrome inkjet on linen 64 1/4 x 44 in. (163.2 x 111.8 cm.) Executed in 2004, this work is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance Galerie Francesca Pia, Zurich Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2005

Executed just two years afer Wade Guyton began experimenting with the Epson printer as a tool for investigating the traditional bounds of painting, Untitled, 2004, is a stellar, early example of the artist’s signature and enduring body of work. Over the past two decades, Guyton has continued to explore this mechanized medium, in which he pulls linen through a digital printer, embracing chance, spontaneity, and error in his fnal compositions. In the present lot, which hangs unstretched on the wall, imperfect rectangles overlap, just barely border one another, and fade, candidly recording the printer’s every jam, smudge, and blemish. In discussing Guyton’s unique process, Museum of Modern Art, New York, curator Ann Temkin notes, “You tap a keyboard with one fnger and this very large painting emerges. It’s gone against everything we think of as a painting…Pollock fung it; Rauschenberg silkscreened it; Richter took a squeegee; Polke used chemicals. Wade is working in what by now is a pretty venerable tradition, against the conventional idea of painting” (Ann Temkin quoted in ‘Painting, Rebooted,’ The New York Times, September 27, 2012, online). Untitled, 2004, is an important, early example of Guyton’s continued interest in the notion of what it means to be an artist – or painter – in the twenty-frst century.

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328. Sol LeWitt

1928-2007

Wall Drawing #408 A-E Stars with four, fve, six, seven, and eight points on black, blue, red, yellow, and gray walls, respectively. The stars are the white of the wall. A: Star with four points B: Star with fve points C: Star with six points D: Star with seven points E: Star with eight points India ink and color ink wash, in 5 parts installation dimensions variable

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Conceived in 1983, this work is accompanied by a diagram and certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $150,000-200,000 Installation view of Wall Drawing #408 [part E], Locus Solus, Genoa, Italy, 1983. Š Estate of Sol LeWitt, 2018

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Provenance Paula Cooper Gallery, New York James Hedges, New York Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York and James Cohan, New York (acquired from the above in 1998) Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2004

Installation view of Wall Drawing #408 [part C], Locus Solus, Genoa, Italy, 1983. © Estate of Sol LeWitt, 2018

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Exhibited Genoa, Locus Solus, December 1983 New York, Gladstone Gallery, Boetti, Darboven, LeWitt, January 9 - Februrary 6, 1999 (parts B-D exhibited)

Literature Adachiara Zevi, L’Italia nei wall drawings di Sol LeWitt, Milan, 2012, pp. 32, 85, 169, 201 (part E, Locus Solus, Genoa, 1983 installation illustrated) Sol LeWitt in Italia, exh. cat., Centro Espositivo della Rocca Paolina, Perugia, 1998, pp. 120-121 (parts B-E, Locus Solus, Genoa, 1983 installation illustrated) Susanna Singer, ed., Sol LeWitt Wall Drawings 1968-1984, Amsterdam, 1984, pp. 158-159, 196, 201, 206 (parts B-E, Locus Solus, Genoa, 1983 installation illustrated, erroneously numbered, p. 159) Lindsay Aveilhé, ed., Sol LeWitt Wall Drawings Catalogue Raisonné, New York: Artifex Press, 2018, online (illustrated)

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Diagram of the present lot

Sol LeWitt began his celebrated wall drawings in 1968, when he frst drew directly on the walls of Paula Cooper Gallery’s exhibition space in New York City. Over the next forty years, LeWitt continued to work in this innovative sphere, conceiving of over 1,300 wall drawings in total, with 3,000 plus installations realized during his lifetime. Even afer LeWitt’s passing in 2007, the wall drawings are continually brought to life with new installations, each one difering slightly from the last, as new drafsmen execute the artist’s plan. LeWitt was a pioneer among his contemporaries, challenging the notion of what it means to be an artist versus producer in the latter half of the 20th century. Like Donald Judd, whose renowned wall-bound sculptures were conceived of in the artist’s studio and manufactured in a factory, LeWitt championed the belief that an idea is ultimately the most important aspect of an artwork. Yet unlike Judd, whose fabricated works are mechanically produced, LeWitt invites interpretation and diversity in his wall drawings, positioning himself as choreographer or composer, rather than dancer or instrumentalist, in his fnal compositions. The present two lots – Wall Drawing #408 A-E and Wall Drawing #1002 Splat – conceived of in 1983

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and 2001, respectively, illustrate the evolution of this important part of LeWitt’s practice during these decades. Twelve years afer frst exhibiting his wall drawings, he moved from Manhattan to Spoleto, Italy in 1980, where the infuence of Renaissance painting breathed new life into his artworks. As demonstrated in Wall Drawing #408 A-E, 1983, LeWitt began working in ink-wash, incorporating geometric forms, and favoring a refned color palette of primary colors and grey tones, all of which were directly inspired by frescoes that covered the walls of churches in Europe. LeWitt notes, “One lesson learnt from the fresco painters of the Quattrocento in Italy was that they had a sense of surface, of fatness where linear perspective was not used but a system of isometric perspective that fattened the forms… I have always tried to keep the depth as shallow as possible and the integrity of the wall.” (Sol LeWitt, quoted in Andrew Wilson, “Sol LeWitt Interviewed”, Art Monthly, no. 164, March 1993, pp. 3-9) In Wall Drawing #408 A-E, fve stars, with four, fve, six, seven, and eight points, are drawn directly on the wall. Per the artist’s specifc instructions, the stars themselves are the negative space of the white wall, and each star’s background corresponds to a specifc color. Through his use of geometric form and muted palette, LeWitt minimizes spatial depth, embracing fatness as the ultimate goal.

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“In many of the wall pieces there is very little latitude for the draftsman or draftswoman to make changes, but it is evident anyway, visually, that diferent people make diferent works…The visual aspect can’t be understood without understanding the system. It isn’t what it looks like but what it is that is of basic importance.” Sol LeWitt

The 1990s saw a dramatic shif in the artist’s wall drawings, which coincided with his move back to the United States. Previously favoring simple compositions and restrained use of color, LeWitt expanded his visual language to include more vivid hues and complex designs, made possible by his transition to acrylic paints as his preferred medium. Wall Drawing #1002 Splat, executed in 2001, is illustrative of this shif in style, as dazzling blues, greens, oranges, yellows, and purples are arranged in a whimsical array of bands on the wall. He explains of these later works, “I had by this time reached a point in my use of color that had fulflled

all that was possible. I wanted to do something that was opposite [from the ink washes]. Instead of subtle, restrained, muted color, I wanted color (and form) that was raucous and vulgar.” (Sol LeWitt, quoted in Gary Garrels, “Interview with Sol LeWitt”, New Art Examiner, vol. 28, no. 5, December 2000, pp. 13-15) The evolution of style evidenced in the present lots demonstrates LeWitt’s continued commitment to the wall drawings throughout his illustrious career. Even afer his passing, the drawings are timeless in their innate ability to be re-installed, a resounding testament to the artist’s enduring and infuential contribution to the canon of contemporary art.

Sol LeWitt at the Israel Museum, Installation of Wall Drawing, 1975. © Estate of Sol LeWitt, 2018

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329. Sol LeWitt

1928-2007

Wall Drawing #1002 Splat acrylic paint installation dimensions variable Conceived in 2001, this work is accompanied by a diagram and a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $150,000-200,000 Provenance Texas Gallery, Houston Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Lindsay AveilhĂŠ, ed., Sol LeWitt Wall Drawings Catalogue RaisonnĂŠ, New York: Artifex Press, 2018, online (illustrated)

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330. Sol LeWitt

1928-2007

Folding Screen: B-7 Asymmetrical Pyramid ink wash on panel, in 5 parts, double sided each 72 x 30 in. (182.9 x 76.2 cm.) overall 72 x 150 in. (182.9 x 381 cm.) Executed in 1987-1988. Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance Parasol Press, LTD, New York B.R. Kornblatt Gallery, Inc., Washington, D.C. Virginia Gomprecht (acquired from the above in 1988) Galere, West Palm Beach (acquired from the above in 2017) Private Collection, Cleveland (acquired from the above in 2018) Exhibited Washington, D.C., B.R. Kornblatt Gallery, Inc., Sol LeWitt: Installation and Sculpture, October 15 - November 16, 1988 Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore Collects: Painting & Sculpture Since 1960, May 27 - July 22, 1990

“In my case, I used the elements of these simple forms – square, cube, line and color – to produce logical systems. Most of these systems were fnite; that is, they were complete using all possible variations. This kept them simple.” Sol LeWitt

Alternative view

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331. Robert Mangold

b. 1937

Untitled signed, titled and dated “R Mangold Untitled 1979� on the reverse acrylic and pencil on canvas, in 3 parts 51 x 42 in. (129.5 x 106.7 cm.) Executed in 1979. Estimate $400,000-600,000 Provenance Nordenhake Gallery, Stockholm and Berlin L.A. Louver, Los Angeles (acquired from the above) Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1986

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detail of the present lot

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“I’ve always had the desire to make the work be a unity…I wanted the elements, which were the periphery line and the internal line, the surface, color, etc., to be equal. I wanted them to be so totally locked together that they were inseparable. No one area of the painting should be more important than another – even the idea.” Robert Mangold

Vivid in color and subtle in silhouette, Robert Mangold’s Untitled from 1979 occupies the liminal space between picture and object. From the onset of his career, Mangold championed the expressive and direct power of Minimalist art. Yet unlike many of his contemporaries, who began working in sculpture and the three-dimensional sphere, Mangold maintained an unwavering commitment to painting as a viable and essential art form. Challenged by the limitations of the traditional canvas, he developed a new system of irregular, shaped canvases, ofen comprised of multiple parts, without any sacrifce to what he termed the most essential component of painting – the planar identity of the canvas surface.

Robert Mangold, 1970s. Image Bernard Gotfryd/Getty Images.

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Untitled is a studied exploration of geometric rigor, in which Mangold investigates the tension between color, surface, line and shape. The painting is comprised of three adjoined canvases, unifed by their bright marigold hue and the singular graphite rectangle that extends across all three elements. Equally important to the drawn graphite line are the internal canvas borders, which extend across the composition as integral components of the pictorial feld. Despite being comprised of several parts, Mangold considered his paintings to be self-contained, holistic objects, united by the fat formality of the canvas plane. In Untitled, the repetition of rectangular forms – both in the shapes of the canvases and the graphite line – adds a further sense of cohesion, creating a composition that transcends the limitations of painting as a traditional art form.

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332. John McCracken

b. 1934

12-III incised with the artist’s initials, title and date “JM 1971 12-III” on the underside resin, fberglass and plywood 12 x 12 x 12 in. (30.5 x 30.5 x 30.5 cm.) Executed in 1971. Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Douglas Gallery, Vancouver Private Collection, Canada (acquired from the above circa 1972-73) David Zwirner, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

“My works are minimal and reduced, but also maximal. I try to make them concise, clear statements in threedimensional form, and also to take them to a breathtaking level of beauty.” John McCracken

California-based artist John McCracken’s singular oeuvre occupies a unique position in the history of Minimalism. Often likened to the works of Donald Judd and Carl Andre in aesthetic, his signature monochromatic sculptures are in fact the result of an intense, handmade process executed by the artist himself. Coated in a glossy black resin, 12-III from 1971 is a stellar early example of McCracken’s hallmark style, in which he sands, bevels and polishes wood to a point of near-perfection, belying the laborious process by which it was created. In discussing the handmade nature of his works, he explains, “I think it does make some difference – even beyond what’s physically perceivable – whether or not I do the work myself. Anything one touches and forms will have subtle refections of the maker’s energy in it” (John McCracken, quoted in “John McCracken and Matthew Higgs”, Early Sculpture, Zwirner & Wirth, exh. cat., New York, p. 9).

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McCracken’s approach to the process of creation is drastically different from that of Judd and Andre, whose industrially fabricated works intentionally eliminate the artist’s hand. Selecting materials specifcally for their refective qualities, McCracken’s practice is perhaps better aligned with the California Light and Space movement. In 12-III, McCracken pares down form to the most fundamental element – the cube. The smooth, highly polished surface activates its surroundings and serves as a mirror for light, architecture, and passersby. In all of his sculptures, McCracken saturates color to a point of extreme density, and his black works take on a distinct otherworldly quality. Perhaps an allusion to his belief in UFOs, or to his fascination with the Ancient Egyptian sculpture, Chephren, executed in black diorite, the color black holds an unmistakably special place within the artist’s oeuvre.

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333. Dan Flavin

1933-1996

untitled daylight and cool white fuorescent light 48 x 48 in. (121.9 x 121.9 cm.) square across a corner Executed in 1970, this work is number 1 from an edition of 5, and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist.

Exhibited Cologne, Galerie Heiner Friedrich, three near square cornered installations from Dan Flavin, November 3 - 21, 1970 Munich, Galerie Tanit, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Sol LeWitt, March 8 - May 15, 1985

Estimate $180,000-250,000

Literature Laszlo Glozer, “Quadrat im Lichthof”, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, 1970, p. 9 Michael Govan and Tiffany Bell, Dan Flavin, The Complete Lights 1961-1996, New York, 2004, no. 259, p. 294 (another example illustrated)

Provenance Galerie Heiner Friedrich, Munich Private Collection (acquired from the above in 1970) Sotheby’s, New York, November 12, 2003, lot 50 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Beginning in 1963, Dan Flavin embarked on what would become a career-long investigation into light as his signature artistic medium, radically laying the groundwork for installation and environmental art in the second half of the twentieth century. A pioneer of Minimalism, Flavin rejected the gestural, emotional abstraction championed in the immediate afermath of the War in favor of clean lines, austerity, and purity of form. Working with mass-produced, fuorescent light bulbs, he explored the potential of infnite variation through a fxed system of color, line, and of course, luminosity. Remarkably, Flavin worked with just ten hues – blue, green, pink, yellow, red, ultraviolet, and four shades of white – and a few commercially available tube lengths throughout his prolifc career, producing a body of work that is at once both extraordinarily diverse and distinctly his own. As demonstrated in untitled, 1970 and untitled, 1984, Flavin’s light works are architectural masterpieces, designed specifcally for the environments they transform. In both of these works, which are installed in the corner of a room, Flavin integrates the surrounding architecture, explaining, “I knew that the actual space of a room could be broken down and played with by planting illusions of real light (electric light) at crucial junctures in the room’s composition.” (Dan Flavin, quoted in Jefrey Weiss, ed., Dan Flavin: New Light, New Haven, 2006, p. 126) Flavin designed works for walls, foors, ceilings, hallways, and entire rooms, sometimes taking over full museums or galleries – but the corner remained his most revered space. He was unequivocally inspired by Russian avant-garde artists

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Vladmir Tatlin and Kazemir Malevich, who, in the early 1900s, daringly installed their works in corners as a means of eschewing the traditional frame and instead projecting art into “real space”. In designing works specifcally for the corner, Flavin too challenged conventional notions of painting and sculpture, pushing this concept one step further by utilizing an industrially produced material as the foundation of his practice. untitled from 1970 is an elegant exploration of atmospheric rigor in the purest of colors. Flavin experimented with four variations of white throughout his career: cool white, daylight, warm white, and soft white. In untitled, a mixture of daylight and cool white saturates the environment with an intense luminosity. Bathed in a reverberating diffuse of atmospheric light, the viewer is transported into an alternate world of meditative calm. Like Robert Ryman, whose monochromatic paintings expertly explore the boundless subtleties of the color white, Flavin similarly experiments with delicate tonal variation in untitled. The similarities between the two minimalist masters can also be seen in the importance they placed on their respective art objects’ effect on and relationship with the environments they inhabit, both establishing the tenets of installation art before it became a formal movement. As such, untitled exists as a unique bridging of art historical precedents – both a reference to the tradition of painting vis-à-vis Ryman, and also a bold, novel art form in his radical choice of medium and formal concerns.

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“One might not think of light as a matter of fact, but I do. And it is, as I said, as plain and open and direct an art as you will ever fnd.� Dan Flavin

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334. Dan Flavin

1933-1996

untitled blue and red fuorescent light 48 in. (121.9 cm.) wide across a corner Executed in 1984, this work is number 2 from an edition of 5, and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $150,000-200,000 Provenance Greenberg van Doren Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2004

“One might not think of light as a matter of fact, but I do. And it is, as I said, as plain and open and direct an art as you will ever fnd.” Dan Flavin

Executed fourteen years later, untitled, 1984 is a stunning example of Flavin’s experimentation with color, and demonstrates the artist’s continued preoccupation with the corner as a sacred space. Flavin was acutely aware of the implications of his color choices and understood that certain pairings conjure memories and preconceptions within the viewer’s psyche. In the present lot, Flavin juxtaposes a horizontal 4-foot band of blue between two, 2-foot bands of red. When illuminated, the surrounding space is fooded with cobalt blue light, punctuated only by a red diamond-shaped pattern projected in the corner. Perhaps an allusion to Jasper John’s American Flag from 1954, or an homage to Andy Warhol’s Brillo Box from 1964, untitled, 1984 powerfully probes a plethora of visual references.

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The viewer’s eye wanders between the blue and red hues and ultimately surrenders to the boundless, blended ambient light that emanates from this nuanced pairing. The present two lots, though executed over a decade apart, illustrate Flavin’s unwavering commitment to his light works for over thirty years, until his passing in 1996. His works are inextricably engrained within the canon of art history, paying respect to Constructivist masters Tatlin and Malevich, to Pop icons Johns and Warhol, and ultimately, to his own contemporaries such as Ryman. To this day, Flavin’s works exist as conceptual icons of modernism, radically transforming the environments they inhabit and immersing those who approach in their exquisite luminosity.

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335. Joel Shapiro

b. 1941

Untitled bronze 65 3/4 x 21 x 28 in. (167 x 53.3 x 71.1 cm.) Executed in 2013, this work is number 1 from an edition of 4. Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance L.A. Louver, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2013 Exhibited Los Angeles, L.A. Louver, Joel Shapiro, November 14, 2013 - January 11, 2014

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336. Richard Tuttle

b. 1941

26th Line Piece wood, colored paper, glue and graphite 3 1/4 x 2 1/4 in. (8.3 x 5.7 cm.) installation dimensions variable Executed in 1990. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Stuart Shave/Modern Art, London Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2009

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O

337. Robert Gober

b. 1954

Untitled (Red Shoe) signed, numbered and dated “Gober 90 2/35” on the underside pigmented wax 3 x 7 3/4 x 2 3/4 in. (7.6 x 19.7 x 7 cm.) Executed in 1990, this work is number 2 from an edition of 35 plus 6 artist’s proofs. Another work from the edition is housed in the permanent collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Estimate $40,000-60,000

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Provenance The Artist Josh Baer Gallery, The Andrew Glover Youth Program Beneft Auction, New York, November 1990 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Literature Alexander Braun, Robert Gober: Werke von 1976 bis heute, Nuremberg, 2003, p. 273 (another example illustrated) Theodora Vischer, ed., Robert Gober: Sculptures and Installations 1979-2007, Basel, 2007, pp. 264-265 (another example illustrated)

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338. Doris Salcedo

b. 1958

Untitled wood, cement, iron and glass 38 1/4 x 47 1/8 x 16 1/4 in. (97.2 x 119.7 x 41.3 cm.) Executed in 1995. Estimate $300,000-400,000 Provenance Private Collection, São Paulo Christie’s, New York, November 19, 2001, lot 58 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Modern Art, Carnegie International 1995, November 5, 1995 - February 18, 1996, p. 249

“Memory, of course, is the essence of my work.” Doris Salcedo

Colombian artist Doris Salcedo’s haunting and deeply poignant artworks explore universal themes of loss and memory. Profoundly afected by the Civil War that ravished her nation for decades, Salcedo turned to sculpture in the 1980s as a means of memorializing the hundreds of thousands of lives lost as a result of this political confict. Her sculptures, which are comprised of household objects such as chairs, tables, beds and cabinets, make manifest the void lef behind by such loss and serve as lasting reminders of the victims’ absence. In Untitled, executed in 1995, Salcedo flls a traditional, wooden cabinet with cement and iron bars, resulting in a work that is both worn in appearance and beautiful in the memory it serves to commemorate. This tomb-like sculpture not only explores the plight of the victim, but also alludes to the pain and sufering of remembrance and those who are lef behind. The physical weight of the concrete lends a permanence to Untitled, and mimics the enduring emotional weight

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carried by family members and survivors who lost loved ones to the war. Yet despite such sorrow, Salcedo nevertheless fnds beauty in her artistic process. She notes, “I believe that if you want to dignify a human life then you have to come back to beauty because that is where we fnd dignity. And almost turn it into a sacred space. That is the level of beauty that should be present in the work.” (Doris Salcedo, quoted in “Doris Salcedo: Memory as the essence of work”, SFMOMA, 2004, online) For Salcedo, works such as Untitled become sacred in their ability to dignify, honor, and remember the lives of those they commemorate. As such, Untitled exists at a unique crossroad – on the one hand, deeply personal and inextricably imbedded within the history of Colombia’s political strife; and on the other, powerfully universal, addressing omnipresent concerns such as loss, love, and ultimately, beauty.

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339. Antony Gormley

b. 1950

Lif III 6mm square section mild steel bar bodyform 17 3/4 x 74 3/4 x 21 5/8 in. (45 x 190 x 55 cm.) installation dimensions variable Executed in 2012. Estimate $300,000-400,000 Provenance White Cube, London Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2012

Over ten feet tall and comprised of a singular 6mm square section steel bar, Lif III is an abstract sculpture of a life-size human form belonging to Antony Gormley’s “Liner” series. The “Liners” are all dependent on walls and ceilings, making you take account of the architecture or structures around you. They imply human space as a kind of interference in a connective system. Inspired by the principles of Euclidean geometry, Gormley explores the threedimensional mapping of the place of the body through a dynamic line that evokes the fow and return of an energy system. In refecting upon the importance of line in his work, Gormley cites Paul Klee’s Pedagogal Sketchbook (published in 1925), as a source of inspiration. In this book, Klee discusses the notion of active line, limited in its movement by fxed points, versus passive line, the result of an activation of planes. Klee ultimately postulates that every line has an intrinsic energy. In Lif III, Gormley draws upon these tenets, yet transforms the notion of line on paper into a

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three-dimensional, tangible form. For Gormley, the wall becomes paper – a blank canvas on which he can explore the infnite possibilities of line in space. In Lif III, the steel rod takes a very deliberate path; there is a palpable intensity where it meets the wall, and a series of calculated pressure points at every 90-degree turn. Gormley transforms something as simple as a line into a charged sculpture that invites the viewer to refect on his or her own being in space. In the artist’s words, the “Liners” “not only allude to the infrastructure of the building but to the substructure on which we now all depend – the urban grid is mirrored in the Internet or in our dependency on communication systems that are hidden but nevertheless determine the way we relate both to space and time. Nobody can get anywhere or do anything without a smartphone with a GPS. It’s incredible how quickly the grid-like determinism of digital technology is now totally embedded in our lives.” (Antony Gormley, quoted in Antony Gormley: States and Conditions, White Cube Hong Kong, 2014, pp. 24-25)

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© Stephen White, London.

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340. Joel Shapiro

b. 1941

Untitled bronze 23 1/2 x 14 x 8 3/4 in. (59.7 x 35.6 x 22.2 cm.) Executed in 1982, this work is number 2 from an edition of 3 plus 1 artist’s proof. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Private Collection (acquired directly from the artist) Sotheby’s, New York, November 14, 1991, lot 179 Gallery Seomi, Seoul Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Baltimore Museum of Art; Des Moines Art Center; Miami, Center for the Fine Arts, Joel Shapiro: Tracing the Figure, August 21, 1990 - June 2, 1991, pl. 7, p. 76 (illustrated)

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Property from a Distinguished Private Collection, Florida

341. Alan Saret

b. 1944

Spring Nickel Network nickel wire 30 x 26 x 26 in. (76.2 x 66 x 66 cm.) Executed in 1975. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance James Cohan Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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342. Pat Steir

b. 1940

Top of Niagara Daylight Waterfall oil on canvas 48 x 72 in. (121.9 x 182.9 cm.) Painted in 1993. Estimate $200,000-300,000 Provenance Robert Miller Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

Executed in 1993, Top of Niagara Daylight Waterfall is an expressive tour-de-force hailing from Pat Steir’s most renowned body of work, the waterfall paintings. Profoundly infuenced by the Chinese Yi-pin painters of the eighth and ninth centuries and Taoist philosophy, Steir began this meditative series in the late 1980s, in which she drips, splashes and pours paint onto an upright canvas, allowing action, gravity and chance to determine her fnal compositions. The efect is both mesmerizing and seductive. In Top of Niagara Daylight Waterfall, Steir captures the movement and dynamism of a waterfall as a tantalizing cascade of cherry-red drips down the deep blue canvas. Yet for Steir, the painting does not exist as a mere representation of a waterfall. Instead, the viewer, positioned in front of this all-encompassing composition, is overcome with a sense of awe, as though he or she is in fact standing at the top of Niagara Falls. Steir’s early waterfall paintings were executed in a monochrome palette of greys, whites and blacks; however, the 1990s saw a dramatic shif in her practice. During these years, Steir began incorporating bold primary hues, championing the expressive power of color in her compositions. This transition coincided with the artist’s growing international recognition, as she participated in the 45th Venice Biennale in 1993, the same year

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in which the present lot was created. Steir discusses the public’s reaction to her use of color in works such as Top of Niagara Daylight Waterfall, noting, “When I did my frst colored paintings. I had been looking at Tibetan painting. People had violent reactions either against or for them when I frst showed that work. Now they are among the most desired of all my paintings.” (Pat Steir, quoted in Anne Waldman, “Interview with Pat Steir”, BOMB, no. 83, April 1, 2003, online) In Top of Niagara Daylight Waterfall, Steir both works within and distinctly challenges the hegemony of Jackson Pollock’s celebrated drip paintings of the 1940s and 50s. Borrowing from Pollock’s famed action paintings, Steir too practices the act of splashing and splattering paint on canvas, with the ultimate goal of recording such movement on a twodimensional surface. However, while Pollock worked on the foor, Steir positions her paintings upright, exploring chance through gravity as she allows paint to drip down the canvas. For Steir, there is a studied, deliberate release of control associated with this practice, and a ritualistic aspect inspired by Chinese and Japanese artists of prior centuries. As such, Top of Niagara Daylight Waterfall explores several dichotomies – action versus meditation, fguration versus abstraction, East versus West – and ultimately situates Steir amongst a long tradition of artists who have tirelessly explored these indeterminate borders.

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343. Tunga

1952-2016

Revolution stamp signed and inscribed “ART TUNGA” on a wax seal afxed to one of the wing elements brass, cast aluminum, black chromatized aluminum, braided iron wires covered with nylon, fabric lamp shade, wiring, light bulb 120 1/8 x 72 x 73 in. (305.1 x 182.9 x 185.4 cm.) as installed dimensions variable Executed in 2007. Estimate $80,000-120,000 Provenance Luhring Augustine, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Luhring Augustine, Tunga, February 16 - March 24, 2007 New York, Luhring Augustine, Sculpture, March 23 - May 5, 2018 Literature Hans Werner Holzwarth and Lutz Eitel, eds., Tunga: Laminated Souls, Berlin, 2007, pp. 50, 59-61 (illustrated) Will Heinrich, “Sculpture”, The New York Times, April 5, 2018, online (illustrated) Jillian McManemin, “The Political Resonance of Contemporary Sculpture”, Hyperallergic, April 14, 2018, online (illustrated)

Since the 1970s, Brazilian artist Tunga worked primarily with sculpture, installation, and performance art, inviting viewers into a continuous dialogue with his practice. His artworks are intentionally enigmatic, meant to confound viewers and, in turn, probe new meanings and ideas, which for the artist become embedded within the pieces themselves. In his sculptures, Tunga draws upon Surrealism as a primary infuence, juxtaposing familiar objects in mysterious, ofen unsettling ways. Revolution, executed in 2007, reveals such infuences and, in doing so, engages the viewer at the delicate border between the real and the imaginary. A tall, standing lamp exists at the core of the sculpture, swathed in a tangled web of seemingly unidentifable forms. Upon closer examination, this web reveals itself as larger-than-life insect wings, oversized pins, and hanging chains, arranged in a frenzy of opposing elements. In an interview with Beverly Adams in 2007, the same year in which the present lot was created, Tunga

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discusses the process by which sculptures such as Revolution evolve with continued viewership. He notes, “the work is nothing more than the sum of the living experiences around it, like a depository…And in a way, this is evoked by flies flying around a lamp. You see the flies here with fragments reflecting light like small particles that are magnetized and maintained by the heat of this light. The lamp is not unadulterated clarity but the combination of clarity and the fragments of opacity that oscillate around it at all times” (Tunga, quoted in Beverly Adams, “Interview with Tunga”, Laminated Souls, p. 101). The lamp thus serves as a mirror, reflecting not only the surface of the flies’ wings, but also the ever-changing shadows produced by passersby. In Revolution, Tunga dismantles the formal boundaries between sculpture, artist and viewer, as the work ultimately becomes – in the artist’s own words – “the sum of the living experiences around it.”

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344. David Salle

b. 1952

Nadar’s Grey acrylic and oil on canvas, with two inserted panels 84 x 114 in. (213.4 x 289.6 cm.) Executed in 1990. Estimate $350,000-450,000 Provenance Gagosian Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Gagosian Gallery, David Salle, March 21 - May 4, 1991, pl. 5, n.p. (illustrated) London, Skarstedt, Cindy Sherman David Salle: History Portraits and Tapestry Paintings, October 1 - November 26, 2016, pp. 7, 19-21, 54-57, 67, 76, 88, 90 (illustrated)

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detail of the present lot

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“The tapestry paintings…were a culmination. They have an energy, an invention, a kind of gorgeousness, and an atmosphere of success, of having pulled something of against heavy odds, that set them apart from Salle’s other works.” Janet Malcolm, The New Yorker, June 1994

A riotous expanse of color, depth, texture and form, Nadar’s Grey, 1990, belongs to one of David Salle’s most accomplished bodies of work, the Tapestry Paintings. While marking a new maturity in his oeuvre, this monumental composition embodies Salle’s distinct visual language and is a testament to his decisive role in the artistic developments of the 1980s. Salle was among the vanguard artists of his generation who reacted against the cool rationalism of Conceptualism and Minimalism. While incorporating the techniques and ideologies of the contemporaneous Neo-Expressionist painters and Pictures Generation artists, Salle developed his own inimitable style. Nadar’s Grey belongs to a particularly prolifc period for Salle, during which his continued explorations into sculpture, theater, flm and blackand-white photography, informed the evolution of his painterly style. The pictorial backdrops of his Tapestry Paintings derive from sixteenth and seventeenth century tapestries, as well as modern copies by a Russian tapestry-maker, whose work Salle discovered in a magazine. Delicately tinted and deliberately rococo, these rhythmic backgrounds luminesce like cinematic screens. The background of Nadar’s Grey is saturated with fgures collaged in an undefnable space. Draped in togas and exhibiting chiseled muscles rendered in careful chiaroscuro, the anonymous fgures resemble classical sculptures – their fgures set in motion by a rhythmic force. This theatrical pastiche of dancing bodily forms establishes a spatial cadence – an undulating grey background, from which sparkling, disparate forms emerge. While the grand scale of the canvas references the monumental proportions of historical tapestries, the cacophony of motifs eschews the narrative tendencies inherent to their source

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material. Emerging from the embroidered grey background, the conglomerate of visual cues provides endless points of entry, inviting the viewer into the fabric of the painting. Weaving through the composition, the viewer discovers African masks, phallic forms and outlines of chairs and a fan. A pair of smaller canvases are set within the composition – their emphasis of light and shadow reminding the viewer that their subjects derive from black-and-white photographs. One of a nude, dark haired woman holding a wooden mannequin and the other of a headless harlequin, the grisaille renderings appear as windows into private worlds – intimate snapshots, quietly existing within the larger composition. Blue and orange speech bubbles hover in the foreground, teasing at a train of thought. As the viewer attempts to decipher the link between the collaged images, the emptiness of the speech bubbles thwarts any narrative conclusions. Of his artistic practice, Salle explains, “Sometimes I think of myself like an orchestrator, working with this palette of sounds. I think about instrumentation in composition. A composer writes a melodic line, let’s say. And then he must think about what instruments can express that line, at what tempo and timbre, etc. Certain composers have a gif for orchestration.” (David Salle, quoted in Emily Nathan, “David Salle: Don’t Understand Me Too Quickly,” artnet Magazine, 2011, online) Nadar’s Grey is a testament to Salle’s unparalleled compositional instinct – the seemingly disparate motifs at once resist and harmonize with one another, like instruments expressing the same melodic line. Meaning hovers over the composition, but never sticks, as the velocity of the surface never settles. Nadar’s Grey remains tantalizingly elusive – its unprecedented gestalt ofering perpetually shifing perspectives.

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345. A.R. Penck

1939-2017

Figure and two eyes signed “ar. penck” lower right; further signed and indistinctly inscribed “ar. penck” on the overlap acrylic on linen 23 5/8 x 15 3/4 in. (60 x 40 cm.) Painted circa 1980s. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Galerie de La Tour, Groningen Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Groningen, Galerie de La Tour, A.R. Penck, January 4 - February 12, 1989

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346. A.R. Penck

1939-2017

Eagle and fgure signed “ar. penck” lower lef; further signed and indistinctly inscribed “ar. penck” on the overlap acrylic on linen 23 5/8 x 15 3/4 in. (60 x 40 cm.) Painted circa 1980s. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Galerie de La Tour, Groningen Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Groningen, Galerie de La Tour, A.R. Penck, January 4 - February 12, 1989

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347. Enzo Cucchi

b. 1950

Untitled signed and dated “1985 Enzo Cucchi” on the reverse oil and rusted tin on canvas, in 4 parts each 31 1/2 x 39 1/2 in. (80 x 100.3 cm.) overall 31 1/2 x 147 1/2 in. (80 x 374.7 cm.) Executed in 1985. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Anthony d’Ofay Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1986 Exhibited Madrid, Sala de Exposiciones de la Fundacion Caja de Pensiones, Enzo Cucchi, December 12 - February 2, 1986 Musée d’Art Contemporain Bordeaux, Enzo Cucchi, March 7 - April 26, 1986, pp. 92-93 (illustrated)

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348. Günther Förg

1952-2013

Two Works: (i-ii) 9 Farben (From a Series of 40 Unique Color Paintings) each signed, numbered and dated “One of Forty [in German] Förg 2000” on the reverse acrylic on aluminum each 19 5/8 x 23 5/8 in. (49.8 x 60 cm.) Executed in 2000, this work is from a series of 40 unique variants. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Schellmann Art, New York Gow Langsford Gallery, Auckland Acquired from the above by the present owner

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349. Heimo Zobernig

b. 1958

Untitled signed, inscribed and dated “Heimo Zobernig 2010 HZ 2010-078� on the overlap acrylic on canvas 78 3/4 x 78 3/4 in. (200 x 200 cm.) Painted in 2010. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Galerie Nagel Draxler, Cologne Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2014

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350. Heimo Zobernig

b. 1958

Untitled signed, inscribed and dated “Heimo Zobernig 2014 HZ 2014-035� on the overlap acrylic on canvas 78 3/4 x 78 3/4 in. (200 x 200 cm.) Painted in 2014. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Galerie Nagel Draxler, Cologne Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2014

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O

351. Joe Bradley

b. 1975

Top Hat Trick signed and dated “Joe Bradley 09” on the overlap; further signed and dated “Joe Bradley 09” on the stretcher oil on canvas 96 x 66 in. (243.8 x 167.6 cm.) Painted in 2009. Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance CANADA, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

“In approaching this body of work, I have been thinking of Painting as a metaphor for the original creative act. The Word made Flesh. The transmutation of Schmagoo into Alchemical Gold.” Joe Bradley

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352. Herbert Brandl

b. 1959

Untitled signed and dated “BRANDL 95” on the reverse oil on canvas 102 3/8 x 86 5/8 in. (260 x 220 cm.) Painted in 1995. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Jack Tilton Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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22/10/18 15:47


353. Per Kirkeby Querschnitt signed, titled and dated “PER KIRKEBY 1986 Querschnitt 28-9-86” on the reverse oil on linen 78 3/4 x 59 in. (200 x 149.9 cm.) Painted in 1986. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Galerie Michael Werner, Cologne Mary Boone Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1988 Exhibited Cologne, Museum Ludwig, Per Kirkeby. A Retrospective. Paintings, Hand Drawings, Sculptures, June 26 - August 16, 1987, no. 63, p. 117 New York, Mary Boone Gallery and Michael Werner Gallery, Per Kirkeby, November 26 - December 24, 1988 Literature Ane Hejlskov Larsen, ed., Per Kirkeby: Paintings 19781989, Catalogue Raisonné, Volume II, Cologne, 2017, no. M 864, pp. 318, 453 (illustrated)

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354. Celia Paul

b. 1959

Interior, Night signed and dated “Celia Paul 2009� on the stretcher oil on canvas 60 x 65 in. (152.4 x 165.1 cm.) Painted in 2009. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Marlborough Fine Art, London Victoria Miro, London Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2015

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355. Terry Winters

b. 1949

Model System oil on canvas 76 x 96 in. (193 x 243.8 cm.) Painted in 1992. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Sonnabend Gallery, New York Texas Gallery, Houston Acquired from the above by the present owner

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“I make diferent bodies of work in diferent media. I don’t think too much about what’s in or out of style. My heroes are people like Man Ray and Bruce Nauman, who just do what they want to do.” Richard Prince

356. Richard Prince

b. 1949

Untitled silkscreen, paper and pigment on foamcore, in 2 parts 96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm.) Executed in 1998. Estimate $150,000-200,000 Provenance Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York Private Collection, Beverly Hills Heritage Auctions, Texas, October 26, 2011, lot 72031 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

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357. Christopher Wool

b. 1955

Untitled signed, dedicated and dated “WOOL 1988 FOR GEORGE MY LEFT HAND CHRISTOPHER 9/88” on the reverse alkyd and fashe on aluminum 12 x 12 in. (30.5 x 30.5 cm.) Executed in 1988. Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance Private Collection (gifed by the artist, September 1988) Wright, Chicago, April 25, 2013, lot 153 Private Collection Acquired from the above by the present owner

Untitled, 1988 is an intimate painting executed during Christopher Wool’s meteoric rise to prominence in the New York art scene in the late 1980s. In 1987, Wool hired a young college student as his studio assistant, and over the next six years they worked closely together developing the artist’s signature practice. A testament to their friendship, Wool gifed his assistant the present lot, dedicating the work “For George My Lef Hand.” Together, they constructed aluminum panels and experimented with the artist’s signature rolling technique, both of which would become important, defning characteristics of Wool’s distinctive practice. Untitled was executed in this very manner, in which Wool uses a pattern roller to achieve a repetitive motif of dots on painted aluminum. Wool does not strive for perfection in his works; rather, he invites irregularities – smudges, blemishes and inconsistencies – into his painterly process. Untitled is a unique and deeply personal gem within the artist’s oeuvre, foreshadowing Wool’s hallmark style as it would continue to develop over the following decade.

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Property from an Important East Coast Collection

Property from an Important East Coast Collection

358. Lynda Benglis

b. 1941

Three works: (i) Racer Series: Sugal; (ii) Racer Series: Kiss; (iii) Racer Series: Sprite stainless steel, mesh, bronze and silver (i) 10 1/2 x 9 x 3 1/2 in. (26.7 x 22.9 x 8.9 cm.) (ii) 9 1/2 x 7 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. (24.1 x 19.1 x 8.9 cm.) (iii) 9 1/2 x 12 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. (24.1 x 31.8 x 8.9 cm.) Executed in 1995. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

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Property from a Distinguished Private Collection, Florida

359. Sherrie Levine

b. 1947

Small Check: 6 signed with the artist’s initials, numbered and dated “SL 6 1999” on the reverse duo oil on oak 20 1/4 x 6 1/2 in. (51.4 x 16.5 cm.) Executed in 1999. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Paula Cooper Gallery, New York Marvin Ross Friedman & Co., Miami Acquired from the above by the present owner

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Property of a Private European Collector

360. Cindy Sherman

b. 1954

Untitled Film Still #64 signed, numbered and dated “Cindy Sherman 1/3 1980” on the reverse gelatin silver print 30 x 40 in. (76.2 x 101.6 cm.) Executed in 1980, this work is number 1 from an edition of 3. Estimate $220,000-280,000 Provenance Metro Pictures, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2007

Cindy Sherman’s Untitled Film Still #64, 1980, belongs to the landmark series of Untitled Film Stills that established the artist’s early reputation and made her a mainstay in the canon of post-modernist art theory and practice. Created between 1977 and 1980, the series consists of seventy blackand-white photographs that mimic the format of stills used to promote flms. In each photograph, the artist – assuming the role of director, set designer, make-up artist, costume designer and actress – poses in the guises of generic female flm characters from 1950s and 1960s Hollywood, flm noir and B movies. In dialogue with Laura Mulvey’s seminal 1975 essay, “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema,” Sherman considers the traditional exhibitionist role of the passive female object, styled according to the fantasy of the active male gaze. Sherman’s photographs simultaneously construct and critique the cinematic codes of femininity, highlighting the artifce that pervades our scopophilic culture beyond the silver screen. Of the Untitled Film Stills, Laura Mulvey explains, “The accoutrements of the feminine struggle to conform to a façade of desirability haunt Sherman’s iconography. Makeup, high heels, black-combed hair, respectable but eroticized clothes are all carefully ‘put on’ and ‘done.’ Sherman, the model, dresses up into character while Sherman, the artist, reveals her character’s masquerade. The juxtaposition begins to refer to a ‘surfaceness,’ so that nostalgia begins to dissolve into unease. Sherman accentuated the uneasiness by inscribing vulnerability into both the mise en scène of the photographs and the women’s poses and expressions.” (Laura Mulvey, “Cosmetics and Abjection: Cindy Sherman 1977-87,” in Johanna Burton, OCTOBER Files 6, Cindy Sherman, Cambridge, 2006, p. 68)

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Exhibited Los Angeles, Museum of Contemporary Art; Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art; Prague, Galerie Rudolfnum; London, Barbican Art Gallery; Musee d’Art Contemporain de Bordeaux; Sydney, Museum of Contemporary Art; Toronto, Art Gallery of Ontario, Cindy Sherman: Retrospective, November 2, 1997 - January 2, 2000, pl. 65, pp. 92-93, 197 (another example exhibited and illustrated) New York, Museum of Modern Art, Cindy Sherman: The Complete Untitled Film Stills, June 26 - September 2, 1997, pp. 28-29 (another example exhibited and illustrated) Paris, Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume; Austria, Kunsthaus Bregenz; Copenhagen, Louisiana Museum for Moderne Kuns; Berlin, Martin Gropius Bau, Cindy Sherman, May 16, 2006 - September 10, 2007, n.p. (another example exhibited and illustrated) New York, Museum of Modern Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Minneapolis, Walker Art Center; Dallas Museum of Art, Cindy Sherman, February 26, 2012 - June 9, 2013, pl. 15, pp. 95, 242 (another example exhibited and illustrated)

In Untitled Film Still #64, Sherman employs cinematic compositional tools with consummate fnesse. The elegantly dressed subject stands at the center of the composition – on display and unprotected. The architectural elements of the mise en scène parallel the verticality of her solitary form, looming over her as if to confne her to the focal point. The contrast between the light pouring through the arches and the deep shadows cast by the columns heightens the drama of the composition. The wide angle of the camera’s gaze implicates the viewer as a privileged voyeur, glimpsing the unaware protagonist at an unguarded moment. Sherman explains, “Some of the women in the outdoor shots could be alone, or being watch or followed— the shots I would choose were always the ones in-between the action, these women are on their way to wherever the action is (or to their doom)…or have just come from a confrontation (or tryst).” (Cindy Sherman, “The Making of Untitled,” The Complete Untitled Film Stills, NY, 2004, p. 9) The format of the tableau, as a flm still, and the pose of the subject, caught mid-gesture, suggest the presence of a story, yet, the isolation of this moment within Sherman’s one-woman-show denies the spectator the satisfaction of a narrative arc. The viewer is lef to contemplate the nature of their gaze and the construction of the object they behold. Held at a distance and masked in anonymity, the fgure exists as a fetishized prototype of femininity – her purpose contingent on the desires of her audience. Created at the beginning of Sherman’s illustrious career, the Untitled Film Stills became the foundation of Sherman’s practice – their protagonists, the frst of endless identities. Sherman’s process is one of constant metamorphosis – each character providing a new perspective on challenging questions of feminist aesthetics, while underscoring the artifce and performance of everyday life.

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© Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York.

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361. John Baldessari

b. 1931

Airplanes / Parachutes two black-and-white photographs 60 x 26 in. (152.4 x 66 cm.) Executed in 1988. Estimate $80,000-120,000 Provenance Marian Goodman Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

John Baldessari’s visually arresting photocollages investigate themes of disjunction, juxtaposition, and collision, three central tenants to the artist’s enduring and infuential practice. A key fgure in the Conceptualist Movement which arose in the late 1960s, Baldessari’s distinctive works explore how photographic images communicate. This concern is clearly evidenced in the artist’s signature photomontages, from which the present lot originates, where he meticulously crops, rearranges, and structures found images and photo stills into seemingly random compositions. In Airplanes / Parachutes from 1988, Baldessari structures the canvas around the fortuitous relationship between two elements – airplanes and parachutes – and provides little to no context for this chance happening. By intentionally cropping out any subtext that ofers clues to the original images, Baldessari probes the viewer to dig deeper into his or her subconscious to construct new narratives. In discussing his photomontages, the artist notes, “I am interested in what happens when two images abut each other. It’s like when two words collide and some new word in some new meaning comes out of it.” (John Baldessari, quoted in Ann Goldstein and Christopher Williams, “The Things We Sweep Under the Rug: A Conversation with John Baldessari”, John Baldessari: Life’s Balance, 1984-2004, exh. cat., Kunsthaus Graz, 2005, p. 81) In Airplanes /

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Exhibited Brussels, Palais des Beaux-Arts, John Baldessari, Oeuvres Récentes, September 18 - November 6, 1988 Hannover, Kestner-Gesellschaf, John Baldessari: Photoarbeiten, December 9, 1988 - January 29, 1989, no. 21, p. 55 New York, Sonnabend Gallery, John Baldessari: Laurence Sterne’s The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, January 7 - 28, 1989 Literature Patrick Pardo and Robert Dean, eds., John Baldessari Catalogue Raisonné, Volume Three: 1987-1993, New Haven, 2015, no. 1988.69, p. 141 (illustrated)

Parachutes, the two vertically-stacked, black-andwhite photographs initially appear to exist in isolation. Yet the sky and monochrome palette provide the composition a sense of cohesion, begging the questions – Are these events occurring at the same time? In the same sky? And thus, a narrative begins to unfold. Airplanes / Parachutes can also be examined in the context of Baldessari’s preoccupation with war-time imagery during the 1980s. During this period, he incorporated images of soldiers and wounded fgures in many of his photocollages, and, in 1987, he executed the provocative and chilling work, Inventory. In this collage, Baldessari juxtaposes images of suburban supermarkets with one of nude corpses in a Nazi concentration camp. Airplanes / Parachutes similarly illustrates Baldessari’s fascination with war, albeit in a more subtle manner. In the present lot, the V-formation of airplanes coupled with the cascading parachutes recall that of a military scene, once again encouraging the viewer to fabricate his or her own plot: Are we witnessing a celebratory display or an actual attack? The static nature of the photographs which contrasts with the implied dynamism of these wartime acts lends a cinematic quality to the composition. Like two stills from the same flm, Baldessari’s unique juxtaposition leaves the viewer searching for answers to the larger questions this socially and politically charged artwork powerfully probes.

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“I am interested in what gets us to stop and look, as opposed to simply consuming images passively.” John Baldessari

John Baldessari, Inventory, 1987. Museum Ludwig, Cologne. Image © Rheinisches Bildarchiv, Artwork © 2018 John Baldessari.

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362. Hank Willis Thomas

b. 1976

Zero Hour (from Wayfarer) digital chromogenic print and Plexiglas with Lumisty flm, in 6 parts each 27 x 20 in. (68.6 x 50.8 cm.) overall 27 x 120 in. (68.6 x 304.8 cm.) Executed in 2012, this work is number 1 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Jack Shainman Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Jack Shainman Gallery, Question Bridge: Black Males, July 11 – August 23, 2013 (another example exhibited)

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363. Ana Mendieta

1948-1985

Untitled: Silueta Series, Iowa stamped “Ana Mendieta Raquel Mendieta Harrington Administratix of The Estate� on the reverse lifetime color photograph 20 x 13 1/4 in. (50.8 x 33.7 cm.) Executed in 1979, this work is unique. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Estate of Ana Mendieta Collection Galerie Lelong, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Whitney Museum of American Art; Washington D.C., Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Des Moines Art Center; Miami Art Museum, Ana Mendieta: Earth Body, Sculpture and Performance 1972-1985, July 1, 2004 - January 15, 2006, pp. 173, 274 (illustrated)

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364. Catherine Opie

b. 1961

Untitled #7 (Icehouses) signed, titled, numbered and dated “Catherine Opie Untitled #7 (Icehouses) 2001 AP 1/2” on the reverse chromogenic print 50 x 40 in. (127 x 101.6 cm.) Executed in 2001, this work is artist’s proof 1 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $12,000-18,000

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Provenance Regen Projects, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Los Angeles, Regen Projects, Catherine Opie: Icehouses, May 11 - June 15, 2002 (another example exhibited) New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Catherine Opie: American Photographer, September 26, 2008 - January 7, 2009, pp. 192, 285 (another example exhibited and illustrated)

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365. Anne Collier

b. 1970

Questions (Evidence) signed “Anne Collier� on an label afxed to the reverse chromogenic print 65 x 50 in. (165.1 x 127 cm.) Executed in 2011, this work is number 3 from an edition of 5. Another work from the edition is housed in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Estimate $20,000-30,000

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Provenance Marc Foxx, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Anton Kern Gallery, Anne Collier, April 5 - May 12, 2012, p. 5 (another example exhibited and illustrated) New York, The Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College; Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; Aspen Art Museum; Toronto, The Art Gallery of Ontario, Anne Collier, June 27, 2014 - January 10, 2016, pp. 95, 103 (another example exhibited and illustrated)

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366. Christopher Williams

b. 1956

Untitled Focal length: 180mm Aperture: f/5.6 Image ratio: 2:1 Distance lens to focal plane: 27cm Distance flm layer to focal plane: 81cm Bellows extension: 36cm Depth of feld: 1.932mm Studio Rhein Verlag, Düsseldorf, August 13, 2016 selenium toned silver gelatin print image 18 x 18 in. (45.7 x 45.7 cm.) sheet 24 x 24 in. (61 x 61 cm.) Executed in 2016, this work is artist’s proof 1 from an edition of 10 plus 4 artist’s proofs, and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist on a label afxed to the reverse.

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Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Private Collection (gifed by the artist) Exhibited London, David Zwirner, Christopher Williams: Open Letter: The Family Drama Refunctioned? (From the Point of View of Production), March 17 - May 20, 2017 (another example exhibited)

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367. Christopher Williams

b. 1956

AFRI-COLA (ASHTRAY), MANUFACTURER: E. & A. BÖCKLING, 6956 NEUDENAU, GERMANY, DATE OF PRODUCTION 1980 - 1989, PHOTOGRAPHY BY THE DOUGLAS M. PARKER STUDIO, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, NOVEMBER 26, 2005. (NR. 1 & 2) each signed, partially titled, respectively numbered and dated “AFRI-COLA 05 [#1-2] AP C. Williams” on the reverse chromogenic print, diptych each 20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61 cm.) Executed in 2005, this work is an artist’s proof from an edition of 10 plus 4 artist’s proofs. Estimate $25,000-35,000

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Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited Berlin, Sammlung Haubrok, Christopher Williams, April 29 - July 15, 2007 (another example exhibited) Kunsthalle Zürich, Christopher Williams: 97,5 Mhz*, August 25 - October 28, 2007, n.p. (another example exhibited and illustrated) Literature Mark Godfrey, “Christopher Williams in Conversation with Mark Godfrey”, Aferall: A Journal of Art, Context and Enquiry, vol. 16, 2007, p. 69 (another example illustrated) Chiara Costa, “Christopher Williams”, Mousse Magazine, vol. 6, January 2007 (another example illustrated, online)

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Property from the Collection of Kippy Stroud

368. Roni Horn

b. 1955

Doubt by Water (Who) each titled respectively “WHO [A-F]” on the underside of the channel 12 pigment-printed photographs produced as 6 two-sided units, UV acrylic and aluminum stanchions, in 6 parts each photograph 16 1/2 x 22 in. (41.9 x 55.9 cm.) each unit overall height 70 1/2 in. (179.1 cm.) installation dimensions variable Executed in 2003-2004, this work is number 1 from an edition of 4. Estimate $70,000-100,000 Provenance Matthew Marks Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2004 Exhibited New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, Whitney Biennial, March 11 - May, 2004, pp. 190, 258 (another variant exhibited and illustrated) London, Hauser & Wirth, Roni Horn Rings of Lispector (Agua Viva), November 17 - December 24, 2004 (another variant exhibited) Edinburgh, Inverleith House, Roni Horn: Angie and Emily Dickinson, January 21 - March 26, 2006, pp. 7-8, 40, 64-67 (another variant exhibited and illustrated) Reykjavík Art Museum, Roni Horn - MY OZ, May 11 - August 19, 2007, pp. 94-101 (another variant exhibited and illustrated) Seoul, Kukje Gallery, Roni Horn, September 20 - October 20, 2007, p. 71 (another variant exhibited and illustrated) Magala, Centro de Arte Contemporàneo, Roni Horn, January 18 - March 30, 2008 (another variant exhibited) London, Tate Modern; New York, Whitney Museum of American Art; Boston, The Institute of Contemporary Art, Roni Horn aka Roni Horn, February 25, 2009 - June 13, 2010 (another variant exhibited and illustrated, pp. 66-68, subject index, pp. 170-179, exh. cat.) Arles, Grande Halle, Parc des Ateliers, Roni Horn, Rencontres d’Arles, July 7 - September 13, 2009 (another variant exhibited) Literature Marybeth Sollins, ed., Art 21: Art in the Twenty-First Century, New York, 2005, pp. 182-183 (another variant illustrated)

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369. Hiroshi Sugimoto

b. 1948

Yellow Sea, Cheju signed “Sugimoto” lower right of mount; further blindstamped with the title, number and date “YELLOW SEA CHEJU 1992 2/25 381” lower margin gelatin silver print image 16 5/8 x 21 3/8 in. (42.2 x 54.3 cm.) sheet 18 7/8 x 22 3/4 in. (47.9 x 57.8 cm.) Executed in 1992, this work is number 2 from an edition of 25. Estimate $20,000-30,000

Provenance Private Collection Shiro Kuramata & Hiroshi Sugimoto: Works from the Absent Past, Wright, Chicago, January 15, 2015, lot 114 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited Los Angeles, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sugimoto, December 19, 1993 - February 6, 1994, n.p. (another example exhibited and illustrated) New York, Tripoli Gallery, Hiroshi Sugimoto: Seascapes, August 27 - October 21, 2014 (another example exhibited) Literature Takaaki Matsumoto, Hiroshi Sugimoto: Seascapes, New York, 2015, pp. 98, 271 (another example illustrated)

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370. Hiroshi Sugimoto

b. 1948

Lake Superior, Cascade River signed “Sugimoto” lower right of mount; further blindstamped with the title, number and date “LAKE SUPERIOR CASCADE RIVER 2003 18/25 570” lower margin gelatin silver print image 16 5/8 x 21 3/8 in. (42.2 x 54.3 cm.) sheet 18 7/8 x 22 3/4 in. (47.9 x 57.8 cm.) Executed in 2003, this work is number 18 from an edition of 25.

Provenance Private Collection Shiro Kuramata & Hiroshi Sugimoto: Works from the Absent Past, Wright, Chicago, January 15, 2015, lot 111 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited New York, Tripoli Gallery, Hiroshi Sugimoto: Seascapes, August 27 - October 21, 2014 (another example exhibited)

Estimate $20,000-30,000

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371. Florian Maier-Aichen

b. 1973

Untitled signed, numbered and dated “Florian Maier-Aichen 2001 6/6� on the backing board chromogenic print 48 1/2 x 67 1/2 in. (123.2 x 171.5 cm.) Executed in 2001, this work is number 6 from an edition of 6. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Blum & Poe, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner

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372. Vera Lutter

b. 1960

View of Cleveland Flats (V Crittenden Court Apartments, 955 W. St. Clair Ave., 18th Floor, July 6, 1997) gelatin silver pin hole negative 55 1/4 x 99 in. (140.3 x 251.5 cm.) Executed in 1997, this work is unique. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Private Collection (acquired directly from the artist) Christie’s, New York, November 14, 2002, lot 439 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

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373. Wolfgang Tillmans

b. 1968

Lucca gradation signed, titled, numbered and dated “Lucca, gradation 2002 1/3 + 1 Wolfgang Tillmans” on the reverse chromogenic print 20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61 cm.) Executed in 2002, this work is number 1 from an edition of 3 plus 1 artist’s proof. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2007

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374. Wolfgang Tillmans

b. 1968

8407-27 signed, titled and dated “8407-27 2000 Wolfgang Tillmans 8407-27 TW 2007-090-0� on the reverse chromogenic print 16 x 12 in. (40.6 x 30.5 cm.) Executed in 2007, this work is unique. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2007 Exhibited New York, Andrea Rosen Gallery, Atair, October 19 November 24, 2007

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375. Vik Muniz

b. 1961

Floor Scrapers, afer Gustave Caillebotte from Pictures of Magazines 2 signed and dated “Vik Muniz 2011” on a label afxed to the reverse chromogenic print 71 x 102 1/2 in. (180.3 x 260.4 cm.) Executed in 2011, this work is number 4 from an edition of 6 plus 4 artist’s proofs. Estimate $25,000-35,000

Exhibited Atlanta, High Museum of Art, Vik Muniz, February 28 - May 29, 2016, no. 86, p. 157 (another example exhibited and illustrated) Literature Pedro Corrêa do Lago, ed., Vik Muniz: Catalogue Raisonné 1987 - 2015: Everything So Far (Tudo Até Agora), Rio de Janeiro, 2015, p. 783 (another example illustrated)

Provenance Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York Private Collection, California

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376. Vik Muniz

b. 1961

The Raf of the Medusa, afer Géricault from Pictures of Chocolate cibachrome print, diptych each 79 1/4 x 61 7/8 in. (201.3 x 157.2 cm.) Executed in 1999, this work is number 1 from an edition of 2 plus 2 artist’s proofs, and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity issued by the Vik Muniz Studio. Estimate $60,000-80,000

Exhibited New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, 2000 Biennial Exhibition, March 23 - June 4, 2000, pp. 168169 (another example exhibited and illustrated) Miami Art Museum; Tampa, Contemporary Art Museum, University of South Florida; Seattle Art Museum; New York, P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center; Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego; Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, Vik Muniz: Refex, February 10, 2006 - January 6, 2008, p. 63 (another example exhibited)

Provenance Brent Sikkema Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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377. Andreas Gursky

b. 1955

Zurich Bankproject no. 8 signed, partially titled, numbered and dated “Zurich ‘97 No. 8 5/6 A. Gursky” on the reverse chromogenic print 56 1/2 x 46 5/8 in. (143.5 x 118.4 cm.) Executed in 1997, this work is number 5 from an edition of 6. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner in 2000 Exhibited Kunsthaus Zürich, Zürich - A Photographic Portrait, June 6 - August 24, 1997, p. 203 (another example exhibited and illustrated)

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378. Thomas Ruf

b. 1958

Nudes ye26 signed, titled, numbered and dated “ye26 Thomas Ruf 1/5 2006” on the backing board chromogenic print 60 3/4 x 41 in. (154.3 x 104.1 cm.) Executed in 2006, this work is number 1 from an edition of 5. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Galerie Nelson-Freeman, Paris Private Collection, Europe Christie’s, London, October 15, 2011, lot 375 Private Collection Sotheby’s, London, October 16, 2015, lot 175 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

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379. Richard Prince

b. 1949

Untitled (Portrait) signed and dated “Richard Prince 2014” on the overlap inkjet on canvas 65 3/4 x 48 3/4 in. (167 x 123.8 cm.) Executed in 2014. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Private Collection (acquired directly from the artist) Phillips, London, October 14, 2015, lot 36 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

“This past spring, and half the summer, the iPhone became my studio. I signed up for Instagram. I pushed things aside. I made room. It was easy. I ignored Tumblr, and Facebook had never interested me. But Instagram...” Richard Prince

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380. Mike Kelley

1954-2012

The Divided House of Faith and Reason titled “THE DIVIDED HOUSE OF FAITH AND REASON” lower edge acrylic on woven-screen paper, in 2 parts 42 x 50 in. (106.7 x 127 cm.) Executed in 1983. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Gof & Rosenthal Gallery, New York Private Collection, Europe (acquired from the above in 2005) Sotheby’s, New York, May 11, 2011, lot 492 David Zwirner Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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381. Cady Noland

b. 1956

Untitled signed and dated “CADY NOLAND cady noland 1991” on the reverse silkscreen ink on paper 32 1/8 x 43 7/8 in. (81.6 x 111.4 cm.) Executed in 1991. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner circa 2008

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382. Jean-Michel Basquiat

1960-1988

Untitled signed and dated “Jean-Michel Basquiat ‘87” on the reverse crayon and watercolor on paper 30 x 22 1/2 in. (76.2 x 57.2 cm.) Executed in 1987, this work is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity issued by the Authentication Committee of the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Estimate $500,000-700,000 Provenance Galerie Mathias Fels, Paris Private Collection Christie’s, New York, November 17, 2000, lot 526 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

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detail of the present lot

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“I don’t think about art when I’m working. I think about life.” Jean-Michel Basquiat

Executed in 1987, Untitled is an exceptional window into the mind of one of the most celebrated artists of the twentieth century. An all-encompassing visual melding of text and imagery, the present lot is a testament to Jean-Michel Basquiat’s tenacity as a creator during his far too short, yet wildly prolifc career. Untitled was executed just a year before the artist’s untimely passing at the age of 27, during a time in which he was struggling with the loss of his dear friend and mentor, Andy Warhol. As with all of his best works, Untitled serves as a map of the artist’s brilliant and complicated mind. Here, Basquiat invites the viewer into his own universe – an encyclopedic display of symbols, signs and motifs that was the very foundation of his unique and powerful visual lexicon. Drawing held a very special place within the artist’s oeuvre, as he was attracted to the immediacy of the medium and its similarities with the unbridled nature of his origins as a grafti artist. Rather than laboring over his works for extended periods of time, Basquiat is famous for saying, “I start a picture and I fnish it.” Untitled was executed in this very manner – a candid recording of hieroglyphics and phrases – drawn in the artist’s typical, primitive style. The primary source for many of these symbols was Henry Dreyfuss’ Symbol Sourcebook: An Authoritative Guide to International Graphic Symbols published in 1972. Basquiat studied this textbook at length and integrated many of the motifs directly into the narrative of his works. In Untitled, “PUMP, ROTARY AND CENTRIFUGAL”

and “FATAL INJURY” seem to leap of the page. Intertwined with these phrases are the graphic symbols Dreyfus codifed, such as the circle with a diagonal line protruding from the top corner with a “G” at the end. Additional recognizable motifs like the Batman logo, pig’s eye, and sword punctuate the composition, interspersed with a few bright green swaths of watercolor, and scattered blue and red scribbles that feel almost automatic or subliminal. These symbols of mortality, anatomy and alchemy, along with the juxtaposition of words like “SPIRIT” and “CRUCIBLE”, are palpable indications of Basquiat’s mental state during a time when he was struggling with addiction and intense personal loss. Perhaps a foreshadowing of his untimely death the following year, Untitled can be seen as a visual manifestation of the artist wrestling with ideas about both the physical and spiritual world, questioning what might lie beyond. Creating and destroying, writing and crossing out, Basquiat challenges the viewer to decode the messages within this map of disparate symbols. The seemingly random distribution of words and signs mirror Basquiat’s inner train of thought, or stream of consciousness, which, combined with the raw style of drawing, imbues the composition with a sense of intimacy and personal signifcance. A late work executed during a time in which the artist was receiving unparalleled acclaim, Untitled is a powerful example of the visual immediacy and candid authenticity that made Basquiat one of the most important artists of his generation.

Henry Dreyfuss, Symbol Sourcebook: An Authoritative Guide to International Graphic Symbols (source image for the present lot).

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383. Keith Haring

1958-1990

Untitled signed, inscribed and dated “K. Haring 1980 NYC ⊕” lower right marker on wood 11 x 54 x 2 in. (27.9 x 137.2 x 5.1 cm.) Executed in 1980, this work is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity issued by the Estate of Keith Haring. Estimate $70,000-90,000 Provenance Debra Arman, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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384. Jean-Michel Basquiat

1960-1988

Dog Shit in the Head of the Pope wax crayon on paper mounted to card 13 7/8 x 10 7/8 in. (35.2 x 27.6 cm.) Executed in 1981, this work is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity issued by the Authentication Committee of the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Estimate $70,000-100,000 Provenance Nohra Haime Gallery, New York Phillips de Pury & Company, London, November 16, 2007, lot 191 Private Collection (acquired at the above sale) Phillips, New York, May 17, 2013, lot 149 Karl Hutter Fine Art, Los Angeles Private Collection

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385. Jef Koons

b. 1955

Untitled (Study for Vacuum Cleaner Sculpture) signed and dated “Jef Koons 1981-1986” on the reverse ink on paper 12 1/2 x 8 in. (31.8 x 20.3 cm.) Executed in 1981-1986. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Private Collection (gifed by the artist)

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386. Jef Koons

b. 1955

Mychal Nike poster, in artist’s frame sheet 36 x 22 in. (91.4 x 55.9 cm.) frame 46 x 31 in. (116.8 x 78.7 cm.) Executed in 1985, this work is number 2 from an edition of 2, and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Private Collection Sotheby’s, Online, Beneft of the Gay Men’s Health Crisis, November 2001, lot 36WFY Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited New York, International Center for Photography Midtown; Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, The Indomitable Spirit, February 9 - June 17, 1990, no. 20, n.p. (another example exhibited and illustrated)

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387. Pat Steir

b. 1940

The Austria Group No. 1 signed with the artist’s initials and dated “PS 91” lower lef tempera, ink and pencil on paper laid on canvas 61 x 61 in. (154.9 x 154.9 cm.) Executed in 1991. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Robert Miller Gallery, New York Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Paris Private Collection, New York Phillips de Pury & Company, New York, May 12, 2006, lot 269 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

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388. Yoshitomo Nara

b. 1959

UKIYO signed, inscribed and dated “painted by Michi the picture of frst skiing Yoshitomo Nara [in Japanese] ‘99” lower edge pen, colored pencil and acrylic on book page 10 1/2 x 13 3/4 in. (26.7 x 34.9 cm.) Executed in 1999. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Blum & Poe, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Noriko Miyamura and Shinko Suzuki, eds., Yoshitomo Nara: The Complete Works, Volume 2: Works on Paper, San Francisco, 2011, no. D-1999-103, pp. 147, 359 (illustrated)

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389. Kehinde Wiley

b. 1977

Investiture of Bishop Harold Study, Variation II signed and dated “Kehinde Wiley 05� lower center graphite, ink and gouache on paper 23 x 18 7/8 in. (58.4 x 47.9 cm.) Executed in 2005. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Rhona Hofman Gallery, Chicago Acquired from the above by the present owner

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390. George Condo

b. 1957

Cardinal with Three Emeralds signed and dated “Condo 94” upper lef; further signed, titled and dated “Condo 94 Cardinal with 3 Emeralds” on the reverse colored pencil and pastel on velvet paper 25 3/4 x 20 in. (65.4 x 50.8 cm.) Executed in 1994.

Provenance Galerie Templon, Paris Galerie Bischoferger, Zurich Christie’s, New York, April 1, 2008, lot 39 Crane Kalman Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owner

Estimate $20,000-30,000

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391. Marlene Dumas

b. 1953

392. Elizabeth Peyton

b. 1965

Manly Struggles signed, titled and dated “Manly Struggles M Dumas 1986” lower edge ink on paper 12 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. (31.8 x 24.1 cm.) Executed in 1986.

Julian (Grey) signed with the artist’s initials and numbered “.EP 3022” on the reverse monotype on handmade paper 30 1/4 x 22 1/4 in. (76.8 x 56.5 cm.) Executed in 2004.

Estimate $7,000-10,000

Estimate $35,000-45,000

Provenance The Artist Galerie Paul Andriesse, Amsterdam Acquired from the above by the present owner

Provenance Sadie Coles HQ, London Love Fine Art, Inc., New York Private Collection, London Acquired from the above by the present owner

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393. A.R. Penck

1939-2017

Four Works: (i-iv) Untitled (i) signed “ar penck” lower right (ii-iii) signed with the artist’s initials “a.r.” lower right (iv) signed with the artist’s initials “a.r.” lower right; further inscribed “BASEL” lower lef gouache on paper each 8 1/4 x 11 1/4 in. (21 x 28.6 cm.) Executed in 1980. Estimate $18,000-22,000 Provenance Galerie Michael Werner, Cologne Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1987

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394. Albert Oehlen

b. 1954

Untitled signed and dated “A Oehlen 93” lower right ink and watercolor on paper 18 1/8 x 12 7/8 in. (46 x 32.7 cm.) Executed in 1993. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Galerie Samia Saouma, Paris Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin Thomas Dane Gallery, London Private Collection, United Kingdom (acquired from the above in 2006) Sotheby’s, New York, March 5, 2015, lot 79 Private Collection Sotheby’s, London, June 29, 2016, lot 156 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

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Alternative view

395. Georg Baselitz

b. 1938

Mann mit gestrecktem Arm dated “20.XII.80” lower right; further signed with the artist’s initials and inscribed “G.B.Z. 974” on the reverse watercolor and pencil on paper, double sided 24 x 17 in. (61 x 43.2 cm.) Executed in 1980. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Luhring Augustine and Hodes Gallery, New York Private Collection Sotheby’s, New York, March 9, 2012, lot 52 Private Collection, Chicago

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396. Sterling Ruby

b. 1972

Stellar Cannibals signed and dated “Sterling Ruby 10” lower right spray paint and photo collage on paper 72 x 67 in. (182.9 x 170.2 cm.) Executed in 2010. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Xavier Hufens Gallery, Brussels Private Collection Christie’s, New York, November 11, 2015, lot 549 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

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397. Mark Grotjahn

b. 1968

Untitled acrylic on paper 10 7/8 x 8 1/4 in. (27.6 x 21 cm.) Executed in 2002. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago Private Collection

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Property from an Important East Coast Collection

398. Anish Kapoor

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b. 1954

Untitled signed and dated “Anish Kapoor 2008” on the reverse gouache and acrylic on paper 26 3/8 x 39 3/4 in. (67 x 101 cm.) Executed in 2008.

Provenance Regen Projects, Los Angeles Private Collection Phillips de Pury & Company, London, October 11, 2012, lot 142 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Estimate $50,000-70,000

Exhibited Los Angeles, Regen Projects, Anish Kapoor: Drawings, January 7 - February 27, 2009

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(i)

(ii)

(iii)

399. Tomma Abts

b. 1967

Untitled (i) signed and dated “T. Abts 96” on the reverse (ii) signed and dated “T. Abts 97” on the reverse (iii) signed and dated “T. Abts 2002” on the reverse (iv) signed and dated “T. Abts 99” on the reverse (v) signed and dated “T. Abts 2011” on the reverse (i) colored pencil and collage on paper (ii) oil paint, pencil and collage on paper (iii) colored pencil, graphite and collage on paper (iv) colored pencil, watercolor, graphite and collage on paper (v) felt tip pen, fne liner, colored pencil and graphite on paper each 11 5/8 x 8 1/4 in. (29.5 x 21 cm.) Executed in 1996-2011. Estimate $12,000-18,000

(iv)

(v)

Provenance David Zwirner, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2012 Exhibited New York, David Zwirner, Stand still like the hummingbird, June 28 - August 3, 2012

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400. Ken Price

1935-2012

Rock Cup signed, titled and dated “”ROCK CUP” PRICE ‘70” lower edge gouache, acrylic and ink on board 14 x 11 in. (35.6 x 27.9 cm.) Executed in 1970. Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance James Corcoran Gallery, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1978

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401. Jonathan Lasker

b. 1948

Where Things Can Be signed, titled and dated ““WHERE THINGS CAN BE” -J. Lasker 1996” on the reverse oil on linen 24 1/8 x 30 1/8 in. (61.3 x 76.5 cm.) Painted in 1996. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Sperone Westwater Gallery, New York Private Collection

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402. Barry McGee

b. 1966

Untitled mixed media, in 31 parts 113 x 157 in. (287 x 398.8 cm.) installation dimensions variable Executed in 2013. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Ratio 3, San Francisco Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, FOCUS: Barry McGee, March 31 - June 2, 2013

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403. John Dog

1986-2003

Untitled (covered tire) signed and dated “Dogg 86� on the reverse vinyl and rubber 30 x 30 x 9 in. (76.2 x 76.2 x 22.9 cm.) Executed in 1986. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance American Fine Arts Co., New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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404. Adam McEwen

b. 1965

Untitled signed and dated “A. McEwen 2013� on the reverse inkjet print on cellulose sponge 79 1/2 x 59 3/8 in. (201.9 x 150.8 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $35,000-45,000

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Provenance Marc Selwyn Fine Art, Beverly Hills Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2013 Exhibited Beverly Hills, Marc Selwyn Fine Art, Group Show: Curated by Clarissa Dalrymple, March 21 - April 27, 2013

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405. Nigel Cooke

b. 1973

The New Moderns signed, titled and dated “NIGEL COOKE THE NEW MODERNS 2012 N. Cooke” on the overlap oil on linen backed with sailcloth 91 1/2 x 126 in. (232.4 x 320 cm.) Painted in 2012. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Stuart Shave/Modern Art, London Acquired from the above by the present owner

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406. Kiki Smith

b. 1954

Butterfy Head incised with the artist’s signature and date “KIKI SMITH 1995” on the underside bronze, in 2 parts 13 x 10 1/2 x 6 in. (33 x 26.7 x 15.2 cm.) Executed in 1995, this work is number 2 from an edition of 3 plus 1 artist’s proof. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance PaceWildenstein, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1996

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407. David Altmejd

b. 1974

Untitled plaster, synthetic hair, epoxy putty, paint, glitter and quartz 7 1/2 x 19 x 11 1/2 in. (19.1 x 48.3 x 29.2 cm.) Executed in 2007, this work is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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408. Jaume Plensa

b. 1955

Anna VI alabaster 70 x 25 5/8 x 26 in. (177.8 x 65.1 x 66 cm.) Executed in 2010. Estimate $250,000-350,000 Provenance Richard Gray Gallery, Chicago Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Wakefeld, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Jaume Plensa, April 9, 2011 - January 22, 2012, n.p. Literature Jean Fremon and Wendy Parramore, The Secret Heart: Interviews, Paris, 2016, p. 94 (illustrated)

Over the past thirty years, Brazilian artist Jaume Plensa’s monumental sculptures and installations have been exhibited across the globe, as part of the artist’s ongoing pursuit to bring beauty into everyday life. In all of his works, Plensa explores dualities – the collective versus the individual, the intellectual versus the poetic, and the spiritual versus the material. Executed in 2010, Anna VI makes manifest such dualisms, as the head of a young female girl emerges from within a pristine alabaster stone, recalling that of ancient Greek sculpture. Her facial features are elongated and abstracted, with eyes closed, suggesting a withdrawal from the external world in favor of connection with the inner self. In the artist’s own words, these elongated heads “try to touch the spirituality of the face, to transform the face into something more general…so it’s more the portrait of the soul and not the face” (Jaume Plensa, quoted in F. Douglass Schatz, “Interview with Jaume Plensa”, Nashville Arts Magazine, October 2015, online).

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Apart from form, material is equally important to Plensa’s practice. His sculptures lend a physical weight and volume to the spiritual, and transform the environments they inhabit into havens for self-exploration. Executed in pale, semi-translucent alabaster, Anna VI emanates an inner light which, for the artist, is refective of the soul. To create these sculptures, Plensa utilizes computer modeling to render photographic images three-dimensional, elongating features and manipulating the volume of the face to a level of near-abstraction. In discussing the fnal product, he notes, “When you fnish the portrait you realize you are not doing any specifc person, you are making a kind of mural where we can feel refective. It’s taking this kind of spiritual position, with the eyes closed, as always” (Jaume Plensa, quoted in Ginny Van Alyea, “Interview with Jaume Plensa”, Chicago Gallery News, November 8, 2017, online). Anna VI is a stunning personifcation of intangibles such as memory, psychology, and serenity, in which Plensa invites the viewer to meditate on his or her own position within the universe at large.

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409. Dan Rees

b. 1982

Artex Painting oil on canvas 78 3/4 x 118 1/8 in. (200 x 300 cm.) Painted in 2013. Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance Jonathan Viner Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owner

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410. Kon Trubkovich

b. 1979

Untitled oil on linen 108 x 84 in. (274.3 x 213.4 cm.) Painted in 2013. Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance OHWOW, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner

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411. Hernan Bas

b. 1978

The Giant (Caved Wellars) signed with the artist’s initials and dated “HB 05” lower lef; further signed with the artist’s initials, titled and dated “HB 05 The Giant (Caved Wellars)” on the reverse oil on panel 48 x 72 in. (121.9 x 182.9 cm.) Painted in 2005. Estimate $35,000-45,000 Provenance Fredric Snitzer Gallery, Miami Private Collection Acquired from the above by the present owner

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412. Rob Pruitt

b. 1964

Summer signed, titled and dated “Rob Pruitt 2016 Summer” on the overlap acrylic, enamel and glitter on linen 96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm.) Executed in 2016. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Massimo De Carlo, London Acquired from the above by the present owner

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413. Juan MuĂąoz

1953-2001

Three Figure Balcony terracotta, wooden base and metal bar, in 5 parts each fgure 37 1/2 x 13 1/2 x 5 1/2 in. (95.3 x 34.3 x 14 cm.) overall 39 x 47 3/4 x 10 1/4 in. (99.1 x 121.3 x 26 cm.) Executed in 1990. Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Lisson Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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Property from a Distinguished Private Collection, Florida

414. Robert Graham

1938-2008

Elisa indistinctly incised with the date “94� on the underside of the base bronze with unique patina and brass base 59 x 16 x 16 in. (149.9 x 40.6 x 40.6 cm.) Conceived in 1993 and executed in 1994, this work is from an unnumbered edition of unique variants. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Robert Graham Studio Marvin Ross Friedman & Co., Miami Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Gagosian Gallery, Robert Graham: Eight Statues, April 21 - June 4, 1994, no. 6, n.p. (another example exhibited and illustrated)

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415. Julio Larraz

b. 1944

His Last Dream, 29 July signed “Larraz” lower lef; further signed and titled ““His Last Dream” 29 July Julio Larraz” on the reverse oil on canvas 72 x 72 in. (183 x 183 cm.) Painted in 2007, this work is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $80,000-120,000

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Provenance Galleria d’Arte Contini, Venice Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Venice, Galleria d’Arte Contini, Julio Larraz, June 5 - September 30, 2010, pp. 18-19 (illustrated, erroneously dated 2010) Catania, Fondazione Puglisi Cosentino, Julio Larraz: Del mare, dell’aria e di altre storie, March 8 - June 8, 2014, pp. 66-67, 223 (illustrated, cover)

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Photo by Jean Vong © Courtesy the artist and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles

416. Tomás Saraceno

b. 1973

417. Teresita Fernández

b. 1968

12 Space Elevator fabric webbing installation dimensions variable Executed in 2008, this work is number 1 from an edition of 3 plus 1 artist’s proof, and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist.

Quiet Ice (Blue) Plexiglas cubes with photographic image overlay, in 36 parts 72 x 72 x 12 in. (182.9 x 182.9 x 30.5 cm.) Executed in 2006, this work is from an edition of 2 plus 1 artist’s proof.

Estimate $15,000-20,000

Estimate $30,000-50,000

Provenance Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

Provenance Lehmann Maupin, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2006

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418. Pae White

b. 1963

Poelia cotton, silver, lurex and polyester 56 3/4 x 80 3/4 in. (144 x 205 cm) Executed in 2014. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Kaufmann Repetto, Milan Acquired from the above by the present owner

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Property from an Important East Coast Collection

419. Nabil Nahas

b. 1949

Untitled (Red Sea #4) signed and titled ““Red Sea #4” Nabil Nahas N.R. Nahas” on the reverse acrylic and pumice on canvas 55 x 52 in. (139.7 x 132.1 cm.) Executed in 1993. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

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420. Harmony Korine

b. 1973

Burst Manny signed, titled and dated “Harmony Korine BURST MANNY 2014� on the reverse ink on canvas 64 x 41 in. (162.6 x 104.1 cm.) Executed in 2014. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Gagosian Gallery, New York Private Collection, New York

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421. Ghada Amer

b. 1963

The Dance on Red Rhythm signed, titled and dated “Ghada Amer 04 DANCE ON A RED RYTHM” on the overlap; further signed “Ghada Amer” on the stretcher acrylic, gel and embroidery on canvas 60 x 64 in. (152.4 x 162.6 cm.) Executed in 2004. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Gagosian Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2006

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422. David Zink Yi

b. 1973

Neusilber (New Silver) stamped with the foundry mark “KUNST GIESSEREI ST. GALLEN” on the inside of the tree trunk aluminum and stainless steel 132 x 37 x 35 in. (335.3 x 94 x 88.9 cm.) Executed in 2009, this work is unique. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance 80M2 Livia Benavides, Lima Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Switzerland, Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen, Borrowed Light, July 4 - September 6, 2009

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423. Zhang Huan

b. 1965

American Flag No. 7 signed, titled and dated “American Flag [in Chinese] No. 7 Zhang Huan 2008� on the reverse ash on linen 59 x 78 3/4 in. (149.9 x 200 cm.) Executed in 2008. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance ProjectB Contemporary Art, Milan Phillips, New York, May 16, 2014, lot 179 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited Milan, ProjectB Contemporary Art, Zhang Huan: Rebirth, May 15 - July 10, 2009, n.p. (illustrated)

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424. Mr.

b. 1969

Penyo-Henyo Pyopyo Edition signed and dated “Mr. 2006” on the underside of the base acrylic, synthetic resin, iron and fabric sculpture 681/4 x 223/4 x 223/4 in. (173.4 x 57.8 x 57.8 cm.) base 5 x 22 3/4 x 22 3/4 in. (12.7 x 57.8 x 57.8 cm.) Executed in 2006, this work is number 1 from an edition of 1 plus 1 artist’s proof. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Galerie Perrotin, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner

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425. Invader

b. 1969

BXL_08 incised with the artist’s monogram, title and date “BXL_08 2013” on the reverse mosaic tiles on Perspex panel 26 1/8 x 28 1/8 in. (66.4 x 71.3 cm.) Executed in 2013, this work is accompanied by an ID card issued by the artist. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

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426. Max Frintrop

b. 1982

untitled (Rai Uno) signed, titled and dated “RAI uno max frintrop 2014� on the reverse ink, acrylic and pigments on canvas 67 x 90 3/4 in. (170.2 x 230.5 cm.) Executed in 2014. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Berhold Pott, Cologne Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2014

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Property from a Distinguished New York collector

427. Christian Rosa

b. 1982

Hell on earth signed and dated “2013 Christian Rosa” on the overlap pencil, corn oil, oilstick and oil on canvas 70 x 94 in. (177.8 x 238.8 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Ibid Gallery, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Los Angeles, Ibid Gallery, Christian Rosa, the shits and the 7 dwarfs, August 10 – September 7, 2013

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428. Hugh Scott-Douglas

b. 1988

Chopped Bill difused direct to substrate print on linen 60 x 30 in. (152.4 x 76.2 cm.) Executed in 2014. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco Acquired from the above by the present owner

429. Louis Eisner

b. 1988

Danish Standard VI (I) signed with the artist’s initials, partially titled and dated “LE 2014 D.S. VI” on the reverse oil on canvas 84 x 64 in. (213.4 x 162.6 cm.) Painted in 2014. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

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430. Tomoo Gokita

b. 1969

Health Care signed, titled and dated ““HEALTH CARE” Tomoo Gokita 2007” on the reverse acrylic gouache on canvas 29 3/4 x 19 3/4 in. (75.6 x 50.2 cm.) Executed in 2007. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Honor Fraser Gallery, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Los Angeles, Honor Fraser Gallery, Vanity Drunko, March 24 - May 19, 2007

431. Jonas Lund

b. 1984

Auction acrylic on fabric 63 x 48 in. (160 x 121.9 cm.) Painted in 2015. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Steve Turner, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Los Angeles, Steve Turner, Jonas Lund: Strings Attached, March 21 – May 2, 2015

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432. Ugo Rondinone

b. 1964

Seven Small Mountains each signed with the artist’s initials, titled respectively and dated “small [color] mountain u.r. 2016” on the underside of the base painted stone on concrete base, in 14 parts smallest 3 1/2 x 5 1/2 x 3 3/8 in. (8.9 x 14 x 8.6 cm.) largest 5 1/2 x 4 x 4 in. (14 x 10.2 x 10.2 cm.) base each 1 1/8 x 5 1/2 x 5 1/2 in. (2.9 x 14 x 14 cm.) Executed in 2016, these works are unique. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Art Production Fund, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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433. Jef Koons

b. 1955

Dom Pérignon Balloon Venus impressed with the artist’s name and title “Dom Pérignon BALLOON VENUS by Jef Koons” on the suede interior lining lacquered polyurethane resin, in 2 parts 19 1/4 x 14 1/8 x 19 3/4 in. (48.8 x 35.8 x 50.3 cm.) Executed in 2013, this work is from an edition of 650 plus 40 artist’s proofs. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Neiman Marcus, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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Pre-Sale Estimates Pre-sale estimates are intended as a guide for prospective buyers. Any bid within the high and low estimate range should, in our opinion, ofer a chance of success. However, many lots achieve prices below or above the pre-sale estimates. Where “Estimate on Request” appears, please contact the specialist department for further information. It is advisable to contact us closer to the time of the auction as estimates can be subject to revision. Pre-sale estimates do not include the buyer’s premium or any applicable taxes.

O Guaranteed Property Lots designated with the symbol O are the subject of a minimum price guarantee. In such cases Phillips has guaranteed to the seller of the lot that regardless of the outcome of the sale the seller shall receive no less than a minimum sum. This guarantee may be provided solely by Phillips or jointly with a third party.

All Lots are Subject to ‘Buyer’s Premium’ Phillips charges the successful bidder a commission, or buyer’s premium, on the hammer price of each lot sold. The buyer’s premium is payable by the buyer as part of the total purchase price at the following rates: 25% of the hammer price up to and including $300,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above $300,000 up to and including $4,000,000 and 12.5% of the portion of the hammer price above $4,000,000. Condition and Condition Reports Phillips does not warrant or guarantee condition on any lot. Solely as a convenience to clients, Phillips may provide condition reports on many lots, which are also available online on the lot detail pages. If there is not a condition report available, that is not a representation that a lot is in perfect condition. While condition reports are prepared honestly and carefully, our staff are not professional restorers or trained conservators. We therefore encourage all prospective buyers to inspect all lots at our pre-sale exhibitions, and contact our staff with any questions. Bidding at Auction You may bid in the auction in person, online, on the phone, or by placing an absentee bid. The easiest way to arrange or register to bid at auction is to set up a client account online. Go to our homepage, phillips.com and fill out the account form. When you want to register for an auction, click Register on sale pages or lot detail pages, and you’ll confirm your account details, be asked for a credit card number for identification purposes and our Bids Department will process your request. We recommend registering at least 24 hours prior to sale to ensure that you can bid. Good luck! Transport and Shipping As a free service for buyers, Phillips will wrap purchased lots for hand carry only. Alternatively, we will either provide packing, handling and shipping services or coordinate with shipping agents in order to facilitate such

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Some lots are sold under special conditions. Phillips uses the following symbols to designate these lots:

♦ Third Party Guarantee Where Phillips has agreed to a minimum price guarantee it assumes the fnancial risk of a lot failing to sell or selling for less than the minimum price guarantee. Because the sums involved can be signifcant Phillips may choose to share the burden of that fnancial risk with a third party. The third party shares the risk by committing in advance of the sale, usually by way of a written bid, to buy the lot for an agreed amount whether or not there are competing bidders for the lot. If there are competing bidders third party guarantors may also bid above any written bid. In this way the third party guarantor assumes the risk of the bidding not reaching the amount of the minimum price guarantee. In return for underwriting or sharing this risk Phillips will usually compensate the third party. The compensation may be in the form of a fxed fee or an amount calculated by reference to the hammer price of the lot. If the third party guarantor is the successful bidder Phillips will report the purchase price net of any fees paid to the third party guarantor.

Σ Regulated Species Items made of or incorporating certain designated plant or animal material, including but not limited to coral, crocodile, ivory, whalebone, Brazilian rosewood, rhinoceros horn or tortoiseshell, (irrespective of age, percentage, or value), may require a license or certificate prior to exportation and additional licenses or certificates upon importation to any foreign country. Please note that the ability to obtain an export license or certificate does not ensure the ability to obtain an import license or certificate in another country, and vice versa. We recommend that prospective bidders check with their own local restrictions regarding such requirements prior to placing a bid. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to obtain any necessary export or import licenses or certificates as well as any other required documentation. Please note that lots containing potentially regulated plant or animal material are marked as a convenience to our clients, but Phillips does not accept liability for errors or for failing to mark lots containing protected or regulated species. Privacy Our Privacy Policy is available at www.phillips.com or by emailing dataprotection@phillips.com and sets out: (i) the types of personal data we will or may collect and process; (ii) the purposes for which we will or may process your personal data; (iii) the lawful bases we rely on when processing your personal data; (iv) your rights in respect of our processing of your personal data; and (v) various other information as required by applicable laws. Phillips premises, sale, and exhibition venues are subject to CCTV video surveillance and recording for security, client service and bid monitoring purposes. Phillips’ auctions will be filmed for simultaneous live broadcast on Phillips’ and third party websites and applications. Your communications with Phillips, including by phone and online (e.g. phone and on-line bidding) may be recorded for security, client service and bid monitoring purposes. Where we record such information we will process it in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

Disclosure of fnancial interest by third parties Phillips requires third party guarantors to disclose their fnancial interest in the lot to anyone whom they are advising. If you are contemplating bidding on a lot which is the subject of a third party guarantee and you are being advised by someone or if you have asked someone to bid on your behalf you should always ask them to confrm whether or not they have a fnancial interest in the lot. ∆ Property in Which Phillips Has an Ownership Interest Lots with this symbol indicate that Phillips owns the lot in whole or in part or has an economic interest in the lot equivalent to an ownership interest. •No Reserve Unless indicated by a •, all lots in this catalogue are offered subject to a reserve. A reserve is the confidential value established between Phillips and the seller and below which a lot may not be sold. The reserve for each lot will not exceed the low pre-sale estimate.

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Watches. New York. Now. STYLED. Timeless Watches and How to Wear Them New York, 5 December 2018 Viewing 30 November-5 December Thursday-Saturday 10am-6pm Sunday 12-6pm Monday & Tuesday 10am-6pm Wednesday 10am-4pm 450 Park Avenue New York, NY 10022 Enquiries Paul Boutros pboutros@phillips.com

Patek Philippe, ref. 5078P-013, a possibly unique, platinum, self-winding minute repeating wristwatch with blue “soleil” dial with boxes, papers, and certifcate of origin. Estimate $250,000-500,000

Visit us at phillipswatches.com

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Sale Information Auction & Viewing Location 450 Park Avenue New York 10022

20th Century & Contemporary Art Department

Auction License 2013224

Auction Wednesday, 14 November 2018, 3pm

Head of Sale Rebekah Bowling +1 212 940 1250 rbowling@phillips.com

Auctioneers Hugues Joffre - 2028495 Sarah Krueger - 1460468 Henry Highley - 2008889 Adam Clay - 2039323 Jonathan Crockett - 2056239 Kaeli Deane - 2058810 Samuel Mansour - 2059023 Rebecca Tooby-Desmond - 2058901

Viewing 2 – 14 November Monday – Saturday 10am-6pm Sunday 12pm – 6pm Sale Designation When sending in written bids or making enquiries please refer to this sale as NY010918 or 20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale, Afernoon Session. Absentee and Telephone Bids tel +1 212 940 1228 fax +1 212 924 1749 bidsnewyork@phillips.com

Cataloguer Carolyn Mayer +1 212 940 1206 cmayer@phillips.com Administrator Julia Hirschberg +1 212 940 1264 jhirschberg@phillips.com Property Manager Ryan Russo rrusso@phillips.com Photography Kent Pell Matt Kroenig Jean Bourbon Marta Zagozdzon

Catalogues Danielle Polovets +1 212 940 1240 catalogues@phillips.com $35/€25/£22 at the gallery Client Accounting Sylvia Leitao +1 212 940 1231 Michael Carretta +1 212 940 1232 Buyer Accounts Dawniel Perry +1 212 940 1371 Seller Accounts Carolina Swan +1 212 940 1253 Client Services 450 Park Avenue +1 212 940 1200 Shipping Steve Orridge +1 212 940 1370 Oscar Samingoen +1 212 940 1373 Anaar Desai +1 212 940 1320 Deren Khan +1 212 940 1335

Front Cover David Salle, Nadar’s Grey, 1990, lot 344 (detail) © David Salle/VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY courtesy of Skarstedt, NY Inside Front Cover Tomoo Gokita, Club Mature, 2015, lot 310 (detail) © Tomoo Gokita/Mary Boone Gallery, New York Frontispiece Jonas Wood, Chico, 2008, lot 320 (detail) © Jonas Wood Inside back Richard Prince, Free Love #233, 2015, lot 317 (detail) © Richard Prince John Baldessari, Airplanes / Parachutes, 1988, lot 361 (detail) © John Baldessari Joel Shapiro, Untitled, 2013, lot 335 (detail) © Joel Shapiro/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Inside back cover Pat Steir, Top of Niagara Daylight Waterfall, 1993, lot 342 (detail) © Pat Steir Back cover Jean-Michel Basquiat. Untitled, 1987, lot 382 (detail) © 2018 The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat/ ADAGP, Paris/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Ready to go digital? Sign up. Phillips is investing in new digital services so you can explore and experience our auctions when and how you want. Create an online account today and see what’s new. Visit phillips.com/godigital to get started.

Bid anywhere. Participating in our auctions is easier than ever. Browse upcoming sales, track lots, watch our live auctions and place bids from your phone. Now available for iOS and Android. Download the app today to get started.

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450 Park Avenue New York 10022 phillips.com +1 212 940 1200 bidsnewyork@phillips.com Please return this form by email to bidsnewyork@phillips.com at least 24 hours before the sale. Please read carefully the information in the right column and note that it is important that you indicate whether you are applying as an individual or on behalf of a company. Please select the type of bid you wish to make with this form (please select one): Paddle Number

In-person Absentee Bidding Telephone Bidding

• Company purchases: If you are buying under a business entity we require a copy of government-issued identification (such as a resale certificate, corporate bank information or the certificate of incorporation) to verify the status of the company. • Conditions of Sale: All bids are placed and executed, and all lots are sold and purchased, subject to the Conditions of Sale printed in the catalogue. Please read them carefully before placing a bid. Your attention is drawn to Paragraph 4 of the Conditions of Sale.

Please indicate in what capacity you will be bidding (please select one):

As a private individual On behalf of a company

• If you cannot attend the sale, we can execute bids confidentially on your behalf.

Sale Title Title

• Private purchases: Proof of identity in the form of government-issued identification will be required.

Sale Number First Name

Sale Date

Surname Account Number

Company (if applicable) Address

• Phillips charges the successful bidder a commission, or buyer’s premium, on the hammer price of each lot sold. The buyer’s premium is payable by the buyer as part of the total purchase price at the following rates: 25% of the hammer price up to and including $300,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above $300,000 up to and including $4,000,000 and 12.5% of the portion of the hammer price above $4,000,000 on each lot sold.

• “Buy” or unlimited bids will not be accepted. Alternative bids can be placed by using the word “OR” between lot numbers.

City

• For absentee bids, indicate your maximum limit for each lot, excluding the buyer’s premium and any applicable sales or use tax. Your bid will be executed at the lowest price taking into account the reserve and other bidders. On no reserve lots, in the absence of other bids, your bid will be executed at approximately 50% of the low pre-sale estimate or at the amount specified, if less than 50% of the low estimate.

State/Country

Zip Code Phone

Mobile

Email

Fax

• Your bid must be submitted in the currency of the sale and will be rounded down to the nearest amount consistent with the auctioneer’s bidding increments.

Phone (for Phone Bidding only)

• If we receive identical bids, the first bid received will take precedence.

Phone number to call at the time of sale (for Phone Bidding only) 1.

2.

Please complete the following section for telephone and absentee bids only Lot Number

Brief Description

In Consecutive Order

US $ Limit* Absentee Bids Only

• Arranging absentee and telephone bids is a free service provided by us to prospective buyers. While we will exercise reasonable care in undertaking such activity, we cannot accept liability for errors relating to execution of your bids except in cases of willful misconduct. Agreement to bid by telephone must be confirmed by you promptly in writing or by fax. Telephone bid lines may be recorded. • Please submit your bids to the Bid Department by email to bidsnewyork@phillips.com or by fax at +1 212 924 1749 at least 24 hours before the sale. You will receive confirmation by email within one business day. To reach the Bid Department by phone please call +1 212 940 1228. • Absent prior payment arrangements, please provide a bank reference. Payment can be made by cash (up to $10,000), credit card (up to $50,000), money order, wire transfer, bank check or personal check with identification. • Lots cannot be collected until payment has cleared and all charges have been paid. • By signing this Bid Form, you acknowledge and understand that we may process your personal data (including potentially special category data) in accordance with Phillips’s Privacy Policy as published at www.phillips. com or available by emailing dataprotection@phillips.com. • Phillips’s premises may be subject to video surveillance and recording. Telephone calls (e.g., telephone bidding) may also be recorded. We may process that information in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

* Excluding Buyer’s Premium and sales or use taxes

Signature

Date

By checking this box, you confrm your registration/bid(s) as above and accept the Conditions of Sale of Phillips as stated in our catalogues and on our website.

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Please check this box to receive emails about upcoming sales, exhibitions, and special events ofered by members of the Phillips group, as referenced in our Privacy Policy available on our website at www.phillips.com, where you may also update your email preferences or unsubscribe at any time.

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Design New York Evening Sale 13 December 2018 Public viewing 9-13 December at 450 Park Avenue, New York. Enquiries Cordelia Lembo clembo@phillips.com

Property from an Important American Collection Wendell Castle Unique “Environment for Contemplation�, 1970 Estimate $250,000-350,000

Visit us at phillips.com

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317. Richard Prince

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Index Abts, T. 399

Haring, K. 383

Rees, D. 409

Althof, K. 306

Hernández, S. 307

Rondinone, U. 432

Altmejd, D. 407

Horn, R. 368

Rosa, C. 427 Ruby, S. 396

Amer, G. 421 Ancart, H. 301, 302

Invader 425

Ruf, T. 378

Baldessari, J. 361

Kapoor, A. 398

Salcedo, D. 338

Bas, H. 411

KAWS 313, 314

Salle, D. 344

Baselitz, G. 395

Kelley, M. 380

Saraceno, T. 416

Basquiat, J.-M. 382, 384

Kirkeby, P. 353

Saret, A. 341

Benglis, L. 358

Koons, J. 385, 386, 433

Scott-Douglas, H. 428

Bradford, M. 309

Korine, H. 420

Shapiro, J. 335, 340 Sherman, C. 360

Bradley, J. 351 Larraz, J. 415

Smith, J. 303

Lasker, J. 401

Smith, K. 406

Cave, N. 324

Levine, S. 359

Steir, P. 342, 387

Collier, A. 365

LeWitt, S. 328-330

Sugimoto, H. 369, 370

Condo, G. 312, 322, 390

Ligon, G. 323

Cooke, N. 405

Lund, J. 431

Tillmans, W. 373, 374

Cortright, P. 305

Lutter, V. 372

Trubkovich, K. 410

Brandl, H. 352

Tunga 343

Craven, A. 304 Cucchi, E. 347

Maier-Aichen, F. 371

Tuttle, R. 336

Mangold, R. 331 Da Corte, A. 315

McCracken, J. 332

Dogg, J. 403

McEwen, A. 404

Dumas, M. 391

McGee, B. 402

White, P. 418

Mendieta, A. 363

Wiley, K. 389

Mr. 424

Williams, C. 366, 367

Muniz, V. 375, 376

Willis Thomas, H. 362

Fernández, T. 417

Muñoz, J. 413

Winters, T. 355

Flavin, D. 333, 334

Murakami, T. 318, 319

Wood, J. 320, 321

Eisner, L. 429

Vo, D. 325

Wool, C. 357

Fordjour, D. 308 Förg, G. 348

Nahas, N. 419

Frintrop, M. 426

Nara, Y. 388

Zhang, H. 423

Noland, C. 381

Zink Yi, D. 422 Zobernig, H. 349, 350

Gallagher, E. 326 Gober, R. 337

Oehlen, A. 394

Gokita, T. 310, 311, 430

Opie, C. 364

Gormley, A. 339 Graham, R. 414

Paul, C. 354

Grotjahn, M. 397

Penck, A.R. 345, 346, 393

Gursky, A. 377

Pendleton, A. 316

Guyton, W. 327

Peyton, E. 392 Plensa, J. 408 Price, K. 400 Prince, R. 317, 356, 379 Pruitt, R. 412

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361. John Baldessari

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335. Joel Shapiro

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342. Pat Steir

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phillips.com

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Profile for PHILLIPS

20TH CENTURY & CONTEMPORARY ART DAY SALE AFTERNOON SESSION [Catalogue]  

Phillips presents the 20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale Afternoon Session on 14 November 2018 in New York.

20TH CENTURY & CONTEMPORARY ART DAY SALE AFTERNOON SESSION [Catalogue]  

Phillips presents the 20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale Afternoon Session on 14 November 2018 in New York.