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New York, 29 February 2016

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23. Michel Majerus

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Chairmen.

Edward Dolman

Hugues Jofre

Svetlana Marich

August Uribe

David Georgiades

Matt Carey-Williams

Chairman and Chief Executive Ofcer +1 212 940 1207 +44 207 318 4029

Chairman, UK and Europe, and Worldwide Head of 20th Century Art +44 207 901 7923 hjofre@phillips.com

International Deputy Chairman +44 207 318 4010 smarich@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Americas +1 212 940 1208 auribe@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Americas +1 212 940 1280 dgeorgiades@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Europe and Asia +44 207 318 4089 mcarey-williams@phillips.com

Finn Schouenborg Dombernowsky Deputy Chairman, Europe and Asia +44 207 318 4034 fdombernowsky@phillips.com

20th Century & Contemporary Art.

Jean-Paul Engelen

Bart van Son

Arnold Lehman

Francesco Bonami

Worldwide Head of Contemporary Art +1 212 940 1390 jpengelen@phillips.com

International Business Director, 20th Century & Contemporary Art +44 207 901 7912 bvanson@phillips.com

Senior Advisor to the Chairman and CEO +1 212 940 1385 alehman@phillips.com

Senior Advisor to the Chairman and CEO fonami@phillips.com

Americas.

Jean-Michel Placent

Zach Miner

Melyora de Koning

Kate Bryan

John McCord

Rebekah Bowling

Rachel Adler Rosan

Katherine Lukacher

Senior Director, Senior Specialist +1 212 940 1263 jplacent@phillips.com

Director, Senior Specialist +1 212 940 1256 zminer@phillips.com

Senior Specialist +1 917 657 7193 mdekoning@phillips.com

Head of Evening Sale +1 212 940 1267 kbryan@phillips.com

Head of Day Sale +1 212 940 1261 jmccord@phillips.com

Head of New Now +1 212 940 1250 rbowling@phillips.com

Specialist +1 212 940 1333 radlerrosan@phillips.com

Associate Specialist +1 212 940 1215 klukacher@phillips.com

Peter Sumner

Henry Allsopp

Henry Highley

Tamila Kerimova

Matt Langton

Simon Tovey

Senior Director, Head of Contemporary Art +44 207 318 4063 psumner@phillips.com

Senior Director, Worldwide Head of Latin American Art +44 207 318 4060 hallsopp@phillips.com

Head of Day Sale +44 207 318 4061 hhighley@phillips.com

Head of New Now +44 207 318 4065 tkerimova@phillips.com

Specialist +44 207 318 4074 mlangton@phillips.com

Associate Specialist +44 207 318 4084 stovey@phillips.com

Maria Cifuentes Caruncho

Oksana Katchaluba

Niklaus Kuenzler

Carolina Lanfranchi

Maura Marvao

Specialist, Geneva +41 22 906 80 00 okatchaluba@phillips.com

Specialist, Zurich + 41 79 533 90 00 nkuenzler@phillips.com

Specialist, Italy +39 338 924 1720 clanfranchi@phillips.com

Specialist, Portugal +351 917 564 427 mmarvao@phillips.com

London.

Europe.

Martin Klosterfelde Director, International Specialist, Berlin + 49 30 887 29744 mklosterfelde@phillips.com

Specialist, Paris + 33 142 78 67 77 mcifuentes@phillips.com

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12. Tim Noble and Sue Webster

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New Now Evening & Day Sales New York, 29 February 2016, 11am & 6pm

Auction & Viewing Location 450 Park Avenue New York 10022 Auctions 29 February 2016, 11am & 6pm Evening Lots 1–27, 6pm Day Lots 101–368, 11am Viewing 22 – 29 February Monday – Saturday 10am–6pm Sunday 12pm–6pm

20th Century & Contemporary Art Department Head of Sale Rebekah Bowling +1 212 940 1250 rbowling@phillips.com Associate Specialist Katherine Lukacher +1 212 940 1215 klukacher@phillips.com Cataloguer Nicole Smith +1 212 940 1387 nsmith@phillips.com Administrator Annie Dolan +1 212 940 1288 adolan@phillips.com

Sale Designation When sending in written bids or making enquiries please refer to this sale as NY010116 or New Now Day Sale, or NY010216 or New Now Evening Sale. Absentee and Telephone Bids tel +1 212 940 1228 fax +1 212 924 1749 bidsnewyork@phillips.com

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5. KAWS

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New Now Evening Sale Lots 1–27, 6pm

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1. Korakrit Arunanondchai

b. 1986

Untitled (History Painting), 2013 bleach on denim over inkjet print, over canvas 76 x 56 in. (193 x 142.2 cm) Signed and dated “Krit 2013” along the overlap. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance C-L-E-A-R-I-N-G, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

Korakrit Arunanondchai has emerged as one of the most innovative young artists coming to the fore of the international contemporary art scene. Blending elements of history, performance, abstraction, and digital media, “Krit” has developed a wholly unique practice that directly refects the personal conditions he has experienced growing up in a highly digitized and globalized world. Born in Thailand, the artist initially found acclaim as a musician but quickly relinquished that creative mantel for fne art. His most highly sought afer works are part of his History Paintings series, of which the current Untitled (History Painting), 2012, is a superb example. Built of many layers, both conceptually and physically, Untitled (History Painting) is both an object unto itself and a recording of its own creation. Using denim, bleach, and fre the artist begins the composition with these

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“It’s like an object, and then the performance, and then the picture you take of it which kind of looks like a picture of an action.” Korakrit Arunanondchai

democratic and performative elements. Then, photographing the process of their destruction and transformation, he is able to layer the prints of the material “in motion” beneath the material itself. A multitier and multidisciplinary “art” object, Untitled (History Painting) references and manifests a surfeit of contemporary and historical concepts and methodologies all while being a deeply personal refection of the artist and appealing to the very immediate, visual and tactile experience of the viewer.

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2. John Gerrard

b. 1974

Lufin (near Hugo, Colorado), 2009-10 simulation dimensions variable Signed, titled, numbered and dated “John Gerrard Lufin (Near Hugo, Colorado), 2009 1/6 2010” on a card inside artist’s box. This work is number 1 from an edition of 6 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Thomas Dane Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited London, Thomas Dane Gallery, John Gerrard, February 2 - March 25, 2010 (another example exhibited) Berlin, Die Junge Akademie, John Gerrard, April 25 - May 28, 2010 (another example exhibited) Madrid, Ivorypress, John Gerrard, February 7 - April 2, 2011 (another example exhibited) Perth Institute of Contemporary Art, John Gerrard, February 16 - April 3, 2011 (another example exhibited)

First exhibited at Thomas Dane Gallery in 2010, John Gerrard’s Lufin (near Hugo, Colorado), 2009-10 depicts a Lufin brand oil derrick silhouetted against a blue sky. Gerrard’s digital practice is facilitated by the utilization of realtime 3D to capture surrealist scenes of industry. Gerrard has chosen this subject in order to capture the slow and steady nature of the lever arm of the machine as it see-saws back and forth, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. As the artist comments, “I tend to call the works simulations. In terms of what drew me to this particular working space of simulation it dates back to the mid 90’s… Two things became clear at that time. One was that the computer, with its ability to model reality, was something to absorb and put to work artistically. Secondly, the 3D scan allowed me to think of photography as a three dimensional form.”

Gerrard has digitally mimicked a rather mundane real time event using a technology typically associated with fast paced, “player controlled images of video games.” Referring to his video pieces as “portraits of places,” Gerrard explains that he “tries not to get too bound up in invention and stereotype – which is so very common in the wider medium of realtime 3D / gaming engines.” The uninhabited and derelict landscape in Lufin (near Hugo, Colorado), 2009-10 is activated only by a manufactured power, the element of weather and human workers have been removed. The only humans are Gerrard’s viewers, miles away surrounded by a digital world, unable to alter the perpetual cycle of time as seen through the eye of Gerrard’s orbital, 360-degree camera. Gerrard’s audiences are, as the artist’s describes, positioned in a “slippery space between the real and the representation of the real.”

Alternate still from the present lot, image courtesy the artist, Simon Preston Gallery, New York and Thomas Dane Gallery, London

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3. Mark Grotjahn

b. 1968

Untitled (Black and White Butterfy 330), 2004 colored pencil on paper 17 x 14 in. (43.2 x 35.6 cm) Initialed and dated “MG 04” on the reverse. Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago Acquired from the above by the present owner

Mark Grotjahn’s series of skillfully rendered butterfy drawings have, over the past two decades, become an icon of 20th century art. The present lot, Untitled (Black and White Butterfy 330) from 2004 is an early example composed of creamy white and inky black chords of radiating tonality. Grotjahn’s butterfy drawings take on a life of their own; like sheet music, the present lot appears to read as a seemingly minimalistic black and white composition yet as the viewer further delves into the sheet more is to be revealed. The slight smudginess to the creamy areas of the paper traces the artist’s process, his hand resting steadily upon the paper while he time stakingly executes his butterfies, like a child pressing their steady pencil into the paper in order to imitate the perfect cursive alphabet. Grotjahn explains that

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while “The ‘butterfies’ are fairly planned out. They’re still intuitive, but I generally know where they’re going. It’s a diferent kind of freedom, a diferent kind of expressionism. It’s personal without being overly personal.” This described self-liberty within his practice is counter-balanced by the multitude of art historical references to which he visually alludes including the perspectival ingenuity of Renaissance art as well as the graphic illusions of 1960’s Opt art. Grojtjahn’s meditative drawing practice, as seen in Untitled (Black and White Butterfy 330), 2004 while partially rooted in historical context gives the sense “that everything’s possible, for me, that’s kind of a given. I don’t feel restricted, or I don’t want to feel restricted, by any rules.” (Mark Grotjahn)

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4. Jean-Michel Basquiat

1960-1988

Untitled, 1983 oilstick and ink on paper 29 3/4 x 22 in. (75.6 x 55.9 cm)

Estimate $80,000-120,000 Provenance Galerie Daniel Templon, Paris Christie’s East, New York, November 12, 1991, lot 190 Acquired from the above by the present owner

Jean-Michel Basquiat’s drawings act as a swif visual recorder, absorbing the rapid sensory of his surroundings in a furry of vivid markings. Untitled, 1983 depicts the face of a ferocious canine beast, a glaring jaw full of pointed teeth gapes open while his round, clown-like black nose seems to foat between his wide open eyes. Thin lines of sergeant blue oil stick highlight his eyes and teeth, forming blue glasses around his eyes adding a playful, cartoonish nature to this furry animal. Fred Hofman has commented that “with the exception of Picasso, few acclaimed painters of the 20th century invested the same time or energy to works on paper that is evidenced in their painting.” (Fred Hofman, JeanMichel Basquiat Drawings: Work from the Schorr Family Collection, exh. cat., Acquavella Galleries, New York, 2014, p. 37) Drawing, for Basquiat allows

his symbols to stand alone at their most basic level, they act as succinct, spontaneous forms. Whether friend or foe is depicted in Untitled, 1983, one could imagine this creature, barking at the city street sounds, appearing to Basquiat as a menacing or comical character feeting in front of him. Robert Storr elaborates that for the artist, drawing “was something you did rather than something done, an activity rather than a medium. The seemingly throwaway sheets that carpeted his studio might appear little more than warm-ups for painting, except that the artist, a shrewd connoisseur of his own of-hand and under foot inventions did not in fact throw them away, but instead kept the best for constant reference and re-use. Or, kept them because they were, quite simply, indestructibly vivid.” (Robert Storr, “Two Hundred Beats Per Min,” Basquiat Drawings, exh. cat., The Robert Miller Gallery, New York, 1990, n.p.)

“Basquiat was compelled to tell the truth as he saw it and realize his vision, but his hypersensitivity, which was so innately connected to his process, detected many demons and enemies—some real, some exagerated, and some imagined.” Glenn O’Brien

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5. KAWS

b. 1974

NYT, 2013 acrylic on canvas 48 x 42 in. (121.9 x 106.7 cm) Signed and dated “KAWS 13” on the reverse. Estimate $150,000-200,000 Provenance Honor Fraser, Los Angeles Private Collection, New York Exhibited Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, KAWS @ PAFA, October 12, 2013 January 5, 2014

Defly operating at the intersection of street art and commercialism with a decidedly Pop sensibility, KAWS’s body of work has become titanic in its own right. Possessing a disenchanted humor within a discerning graphic language, his larger-than-life subjects are gutsy, vibrant and mischievous—and instantly recognizable, with their tell-tale X icons. In the present lot NYT, we enter a window into an unusual visual landscape and glimpse a scene in which a warped SpongeBob SquarePants has forcefully pressed his face upon the glass before us. While we are seeing only a bulbous nose and hints of the eyes and lips, the cultural immediacy of the Nickelodeon giant and the distinct iconography of KAWS’s X covered-eyes render the work immediately identifable and yet startlingly awry. The sinister motif of the X adopted by KAWS allows each of his cartoon characters to undergo a sardonic mutation. His use of acrylic paint can be traced back to his beginnings in animation for Jumbo Pictures

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and painting the scenes for the live-action 101 Dalmations in 1996. In the present lot, SpongeBob’s iconic yellow has been traded for a bright indigo blue, with purple lips and contrasting neon eyes, yet he is still familiar to a mediasavvy audience. Of his propensity to represent SpongeBob, who appears throughout his works, KAWS has explained, “I started doing SpongeBob paintings for Pharrell. Then I started doing smaller paintings, which got much more abstract. And SpongeBob was something I wanted to do because graphically I love the shapes. But honestly, when I’m painting SpongeBob, I’m not thinking, Oh, I loved this episode. Honestly, I’ve never even watched it” (T. Maguire, “KAWS,” Interview, May 2010). The cleverly-named KAWSBOB series, of which the present lot is quintessential, continues to challenge our perceptions about how artists and their avenues of production can both represent the efects of mass media and still turn it on its own head.

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6. Yayoi Kusama

b. 1929

Nets, 1997 acrylic on canvas 16 1/8 x 12 1/2 in. (41 x 31.8 cm.) Signed, titled and dated “Yayoi Kusama 1997 Nets” on the reverse. This work is accompanied by Yayoi Kusama’s Art Work Registration Card. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Galerie Thelen, Essen Phillips de Pury & Company, New York, November 11, 2005, lot 395 Private Collection Phillips, New York, March 7, 2014, lot 138 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

“My art originates from hallucinations only I can see. I translate the hallucinations and obsessional images that plague me into sculptures and paintings.” Yayoi Kusama

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7. Elizabeth Peyton

b. 1965

Star, Elliott, 1999 oil on board 12 x 9 in. (30.5 x 22.9 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Star, Elliott Elizabeth 1999” on the reverse. Estimate $200,000-300,000 Provenance Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, New York Acquired directly from the above by the present owner in 1999 Exhibited New York, Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, Elizabeth Peyton, March 25 - May 1, 1999

Elizabeth Peyton combines the luxuriant brushwork of 19th century portraiture, the compositional dynamism of geometric abstraction and the bold, emotive color palette of surrealism to impart a dramatic air to her sitters. Transformed into a small votive image, this intimate icon, Star, Elliott, 1999, throws into relief Peyton’s use of devotional portraiture in her treatment of her unambiguously modern subject matter. Star, Elliott, like all of her subjects is androgynous, “pretty,” feline, and stylized, glowing with godly incandescence. Shown here is Elliott Smith, a musician known for

his ethereal and haunting songwriting whose song Miss Misery won the artist wide renown when it was Oscar nominated for Best Original Song in Good Will Hunting released in 1997. Unfortunately, Smith’s depression and substance abuse were only exacerbated by this increased attention paid to the artist, and these personal demons are touchingly refected in this loaded little image.

“There is no separation for me between people I know through their music or photos and someone I know personally.” Elizabeth Peyton

Peyton holds a unique position among artists of her generation. Her quiet, ofen small, and cool portraits present a very particular expression of various relational systems. There is something beguiling about Peyton’s portraiture. Despite its modest scale and deceptively casual manner, Peyton’s intimate portrait of Smith draws the viewer like a magnet, condensing emotion into the picture plane. The viewer both understands the beauty of the individual and his creative genius while also glimpsing, however briefy, the pain attendant to his ghostly beauty.

Elliott Smith in concert (Photo by Frank Mullen/ WireImage)

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8. Ed Ruscha

b. 1937

Spots, 1972 gunpowder, pastel and graphite on paper 11 3/8 x 29 in. (29 x 73.7 cm) Initaled and dated “E.R. 1972” lower lef. Estimate $250,000-350,000 Provenance Annely Judd, London Larry Gagosian Gallery, New York John Berggruen Gallery, San Francisco Sotheby’s, New York, 16 November 16, 1995, lot 371 Private Collection Phillips, London, July 2, 2014, lot 15 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

In the 1960s, American titan Ed Ruscha began a lifelong exploration of the dialogue between trivial words or nonsensical phrases and two-dimensional surfaces. While his immensely-scaled paintings have achieved iconic status, the artist’s commitment to text in the American lexicon of signal and signifed is perfectly captured in the more intimatelyscaled and equally arresting works on paper. As celestial testaments to their media with only elemental compositional tools, these works aesthetically resolve the quotidian framework of the written word. The present lot, Spots of 1972, is a masterfully-executed example of these trompe-l’oeil pictures, in which rhythmically arranged letters eclipse their physicality and materialize as savory linguistic riddles. Rendered against a misty and infnite background of warm grey swaths, white ribbons swirl and twist to form the word “SPOTS ,” and instantly, we experience the exquisite handling of a truly eccentric medium—gunpowder. Allowing the artist a greater degree of control in his compositions, this non-

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traditional medium inherently reshapes our semiotic understanding of the word from its original context and additionally enhances the sublime atmosphere of the work. Ruscha rubbed the fne powder in billowy motions across the paper, which partially absorbed certain particles while others rest atop the paper’s surface. The result is a sumptuous, efortless ombré efect that transforms the temporal text into a gritty yet sensational texture. As the word slopes across the top edge of the sheet and disappears toward an invisible horizon, “SPOTS” becomes less a concept and more an oblique placement of sinuous forms. Ruscha has explained the impermanence conveyed in these works, “When I see a word or phrase, or hear one (on the radio or in the street), I have to capture it immediately. Otherwise it will slip away from me, disappear” (Ed Ruscha in Margit Rowell, Cotton Pufs, Q-Tips©, Smoke and Mirrors: The Drawings of Ed Ruscha, New York, The Whitney Museum of American Art, 2004, p. 15). The present lot Spots invites us to puzzle what is symbol and what is sign, a mastery of linguistic pictorial representation and its aesthetic power.

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“I am observing that these words, which sometimes represent objects and meanings, are made of these squigly little forms we call an alphabet.� Ed Ruscha

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9. John Baldessari

b. 1931

Sediment: Leg and Shirt, 2010 inkjet print and acrylic on canvas 54 x 70 in. (137.2 x 177.8 cm) Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Margo Leavin Gallery, Los Angeles Acquired directly from the above by the present owner Exhibited Los Angeles, Margo Leavin Gallery, John Baldessari: Sediments, May 22 August 31, 2010 Literature “Art Review: John Baldessari at Margo Leavin Gallery”, Los Angeles Times, June 4, 2010 (online)

“You just have to give [the viewer] something to hang on to and they can begin to unravel it themselves. It’s kind of like reading a detective story, you get a clue, you follow that.” John Baldessari

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John Baldessari has spent his decades-long career exploring and expounding on the nature of the photographic image, of the cult of California, and of the complexity of narrative imagery and the associative power of language. Having grown up in Southern California, and subsequently attending numerous schools in the region, Baldessari’s work has always refected the culture and climate of his surroundings, be it in the appropriated imagery pulled from flm and other pictorial media, to the ability of west coast artists to shun and reject established artistic norms codifed out east. The style of work for which he is best known involves his masking components of found photographs, obfuscating their original intent while imbuing them with newfound meaning. His Sediment series, which he began in 2010, is a dramatic evolution of this theme. Sediment: Leg and Shirt, frst exhibited in his Margo Leavin exhibition in 2010, is an incredible and enigmatic work from the series.

Depicting simply the plaid pattern of what appears to be a man’s shirt, wrapped by a svelte leg, Sediment: Leg and Shirt is by turns illuminating and mysterious. Baldessari has eliminated any other signifers within the composition to focus solely on these two elements, but he goes one further by clearly printing “LEG AND SHIRT” along the lower margin. Baldessari gives the viewer the barest of hints and in doing so achieves a powerfully composed image built on the barest economy of means. By turning viewers into detectives, Baldessari compels them to relinquish the passive processing of imagery in lieu of proactive construction of meaning. His works are accordingly imbued with riddles, puns, cryptic signs and loops in logic. By repossessing (or reenacting) found imagery, Baldessari calls into question notions of authorship and identity. The one thing lef for the viewer to ascertain, the work seems to imply, is the absence of truth.

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10. Yayoi Kusama

b. 1929

Infnity Dots, 2006 acrylic on mannequin 69 x 26 x 13 1/2 in. (175.3 x 66 x 34.3 cm) Signed, titled and dated “YAYOI KUSAMA 2006 INFINITY-DOTS” on the base. Estimate $225,000-375,000 Provenance Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo Acquired from the above by the present owner

At once both jarring and enticing, Yayoi Kusama’s Infnity Dots, 2006, engages us in a battle between reality and neuroses. The artist’s paradigmatic obsession with dots has evolved throughout her lifetime struggle with mental illness, frst manifesting in her childhood when her entire optical feld became overwhelmed by images covered in dots. This experience, later coined as her “self-obliteration”, remains a vital element of her aesthetic attempt to give visual form to the thoughts that deluge her mind. When woven together by the artist’s hand, the sheer number of dots and their pattern produce Infnity Nets, the name given to her paintings of the same technique that appear to unearth the complexities of the human brain. The present lot, comprised of a lifeless mannequin covered in a snake-like pattern of dots, similarly transports us to a psychedelic dreamscape in which the chartreuse yellow humanoid is transformed by its making. Kusama’s meticulous application of paint to the standard storefront mannequin removes the object from its commercial connotations and utterly reimagines it as a relic

of surrealism. The repetitive nature of the black dots is a physical manifestation of the solace the artist fnds in artistic production, and yet to us it recalls sensations of a trance-like state. While her contemporaries in the 1960s were largely concerned with eradicating recognizable content in their work, Kusama created sculptures that were replete with autobiographical, psychological connotations. Infnity Dots is part of a continuing series the artist has deemed her “aggregation sculptures”, a coalescence of everyday objects with repetitious shapes. Of this series, she has described, “My aggregationsculpture is a logical development of everything I have done since I was a child. It arises from a deep, driving compulsion to realize in visible form the repetitive image inside of me. When this image is given freedom, it overfows the limits of time and space” (Kusama, interview by Gordon Brown for WABC radio, June 1964). The present lot Infnity Dots is exemplary of the immersive nature inherent to Kusama’s process and serves as a powerfully resonant reminder of the origins of her deeply personal practice.

detail of the present lot

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11. Seth Price

b. 1973

Untitled (Pearlescent White Jacket), 2005 vacuum formed high-impact polystyrene 55 x 36 1/2 in. (139.7 x 92.7 cm) Estimate $200,000-300,000 Provenance Reena Spaulings Fine Art, New York Private Collection (acquired from the above in 2005)

The Wild One by Laszlo Benedek with Marlon Brando, 1953, Bridgeman Images

“At this point the elasticity of the thing is so great that anything can be called a bomber. That history is just an essence you, like, spray on.” Seth Price

A subtle, slick, and ghostly impression of a vintage leather bomber jacket, Seth Price’s Untitled (Pearlescent White Jacket) depicts a cascading form in shimmering iridescent vacuum-formed plastic. A material typically associated with commercial packaging and mass production, the process of heating a sheet of plastic to a malleable state and then molding its surface to a form contained within, blurs the lines between traditional modes of artistic production- printing and casting- and that of a commercially produced, everyday product. In a nod to Duchamp’s readymade, Price’s series of wall reliefs present domestic items as objects to be dissected and unpacked. The form of Untitled (Pearlescent White Jacket) is literal - a result of a material being formed around an object that it depicts - yet it is highly subjective. A bomber jacket itself conjures multiple impressions: the embodiment of punk subversion, the uniform of a World War I fghter pilot, the subculture of the 1950’s greaser,

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or the early hip-hop fashion of the 1980’s. Self-refexively juxtaposing form and meaning, Price’s use of the vacuum-form process, and the material’s envelopment of an object to take on that form, refects both the corporeal function of a jacket to envelop one’s body - the physical function of packaging to enclose and contain objects, and the packaging of meaning, memory, and history. Price’s studio practice is a refection of the manufacturing technology of today, and Untitled (Pearlescent White Jacket) playfully employs these modes of production to indict the history of sculpture. Stylistically, Price’s composition lends itself to the canon of relief sculpture, with the vacuum-formed process compressing three-dimensional space towards the two-dimensional, and the pearlescent plastic mimicking the multifaceted surface of marble; however, the relative ease of Price’s method dispels these antiquated modes of production, along with the associated myth of the artist as a master crafsman.

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12. Tim Noble and Sue Webster b. 1966/1967 $, 2001 204 ice white turbo refector caps, lamps, holders and daisy washers, lacquered brass, electronic light sequencer (3-channel shimmer efect) 72 x 51 x 9 3/4 in. (182.9 x 129.5 x 24.8 cm) This work is number 3 from an edition of 5 plus 1 artist’s proof. Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance Modern Art, London Acquired directly from the above by the present owner Exhibited Los Angeles, Gagosian Gallery, Tim Noble & Sue Webster: Instant Gratifcation, November 10 - December 22, 2001, (another example exhibited), n.p. (illustrated) New York, Friedrich Petzel Gallery, Electrify Me, June, 2001 (another example exhibited) New York, MoMA PS 1, Tim Noble and Sue Webster, October 12 - December 29, 2003 (another example exhibited) Boston, Museum of Fine Arts, Tim Noble & Sue Webster, April 21 - September 6, 2004, (another example exhibited), n.p. (illustrated) Dresden, Deutsches Hygiene-Museum, Die Zehn Gebote: Politik – Moral – Gesellschaf, (another example exhibited), 2004, p. 45 (illustrated) New York, Pace Gallery, Burning, Bright: A Short History of the Light Bulb, October 28 - November 26, 2011 (another example exhibited)

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Tim Noble and Sue Webster have been exploiting the kitschy detritus of contemporary culture since their frst exhibition, British Rubbish, opened in 1996. Having made a name for themselves making art out of found litter, Noble and Webster, in their 2001 Gagosian Gallery exhibition, set out to make art from the trashy, not merely the trash. Instead of scavenging only at the lowest rung of their own British hierarchies of taste, they looked to the sensibilities of lowbrow in the area where they were to exhibit, America, and more specifcally the swanky Los Angeles enclave of Beverly Hills. Opening at Gagosian Gallery, Instant Gratifcation immediately brought the duo stateside acclaim for the insightful vision this non-American couple had of the American west, the glimmering, shining fantasy of Las Vegas, of Los Angeles. Perfectly encapsulating this outsiders’ understanding, $, 2001, stands as a beacon and testament to the capitalist ideals of American opportunity. Wonderfully manifesting the form of carnival signs in English seaside towns,

the history of cabaret, the gritty glow of Times Square, and every Vegas casino marquee, $ ignores the usual postulating and promise of empty gaming happiness and strikes directly at the heart of the matter, money. This of course, is never money to be won, though that is the false pretense, but rather only money to be lost, turned to the rubbish of defeat, the heaps of it swept into bags and carted of to the cofers of others like trash to the dump. However, one cannot help but notice their own illumination and “enlightenment” standing before the polished glory of $, the synchronized fashing of all 204 bulbs refected of the gleaming brass of the dollar-sign form. Harkening back to the most seminal of American artists of the 20th century, Andy Warhol, Noble & Webster appropriate the dollarsign for their own ends, their own sardonic and dry British wit. Indeed, the viewer cannot help but allow a slight chuckle at the work’s own self-evidence, and self-debasement; its physical beauty is both part and parcel of its message, and it is stunning.

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13. Yoshitomo Nara

b. 1959

Household Dog, 2000 acrylic and lacquer on fberglass reinforced plastic, cotton and plywood house 41 x 23 1/2 x 95 1/8 in. (104.1 x 59.7 x 241.6 cm) dog 11 1/2 x 8 1/2 x 16 1/2 in. (29.2 x 21.6 x 41.9 cm) Signed and dated “2000 Nara” on the interior of the house. This work is a variant from an edition of 6, in 3 difering roof colors. Estimate $200,000-300,000 Provenance Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York Acquired directly from the above by the present owner in 2001

Exhibited Saarbrucken, Stadtgalerie Saarbrucken; Erlangen, Stadtische Galerie Erlangen; Leiden, Stedelijk Museum de Lakenhal, Trading Views: 4 x Japanische Kunst, February 6 - October 1, 2000 (another variant exhibited) Santa Monica, Santa Monica Museum of Art, Lullaby Supermarket, March 25 May 27, 2000 (another variant exhibited), pp. 160-61 London, Stephen Friedman Gallery, Yoshitomo Nara, May 26 - June 24, 2000 (another variant exhibited) Kanagawa, Yokohama Museum of Art; Hyogo, Ashiya City Museum of Art and History; Hiroshima, Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art; Hokkaido, Asahikawa Museum of Art, Yoshitomo Nara: I Don’t Mind, If You Forget Me, August 11, 2001 - August 14, 2002 (another variant exhibited), cat. no. 4, pp. 28-31 (illustrated) Literature Noriko Miyamura, Shinko Suzuki, ed., Yoshitomo Nara: The Complete Works: Paintings, Sculptures, Editions, Photographs, San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 2011, cat. no. S-2000-005, pp. 271, 396 (illustrated)

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“Rather than merely ofering the work for the viewers to see face-on, I want to triger their imaginations. This way, each individual can see my work with his or her own unique, imaginative mind. People with imaginative minds can perhaps see something more than I can.” Yoshitomo Nara

Executed in 2000, Household Dog is one of Yoshimoto Nara’s sculptures whose outwardly innocent forms encapsulate a deeply held set of emotions that spans childhood memory, spirituality, and loneliness. Executed in his characteristically playful style, these cartoon-like renditions of two puppies – one lef out and roaming free, the other trapped within the confnes of his house – provoke a strong emotional reaction, but they also possess strong spiritual and autobiographical qualities, which reach into the heart of Nara’s unique brand of art-making. The puppy as alterego is one of the most pervasive motifs within Nara’s oeuvre. Here, the viewer is confronted with a discordant image, that of a dog whose body manages to span the entirety of its house – its head and forequarters protruding from the front while its tail and hindquarters jut out the back. This creature manages not simply to have one

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foot in and one foot without, but rather is both inside and outside simultaneously. Its companion gazes on, but the blank expressions on both obfuscate a clear reading of their relationship. The viewer can only understand the distance and disconnect between the two while projecting a connection based on proximity and likeness. Nara’s sculptures and paintings speak to memories and emotions from our childhood that we may have forgotten, but which, as is made evident upon refection in front of the work, still exist somewhere in the deep recesses of our subconscious. Exemplary examples of his sculptural work, such as Household Dog, beg the viewer to question perceived boundaries between the established ideas of childhood and adulthood in contemporary society, all in a visually stunning and innocently disarming fashion.

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14. Danh Vo

b. 1975

We the people (detail), 2011 copper 100 3/8 x 33 1/8 x 22 3/8 in. (255 x 84.3 x 56.7 cm) Estimate $200,000-300,000 Provenance Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris Private Collection Exhibited New York, The New Museum, The Ungovernables, 2012 New Museum Triennial, February 15 - April 22, 2012, n.p. (illustrated) New York, Public Art Fund, Danh Vo: We The People, May 17, 2014 – December 5, 2014 Literature Holland Cotter, “Quiet Disobedience,” New York Times, February 16, 2012 (illustrated)

An elegant and undulating patchwork of copper, conceptual artist Danh Vo’s We the people (detail), 2011, is as subtle as it is monumental. Part of the artist’s most ambitious project to date, the present lot is one of around 400 unique detail objects cast from an exact replica of the leviathan Statue of Liberty, an icon that has watched over New York Harbor for over 120 years. As much a symbol of New York City as it is of Western democracy, the dismembered goddess has been transformed into an impossible puzzle of gleaming abstractions. Danh Vo’s We the people project is a characteristic example of the artist’s sophisticated and nuanced interpretation of the Duchampian ready-made. A transplant from Vietnam to Denmark, Vo’s own history manifests, as it does for many, as a series of individual vignettes, discrete pieces of a puzzle, unifed by the physical body present therein. Understanding this fragmented

history and exploring it has been a constant motif throughout Vo’s oeuvre. Indeed, even in the production of We the people – the original sculpture was fabricated in France and erected in New York whereas Vo’s was fabricated in Shanghai, dissected, and installed the world over in private and public collections alike – Vo has established a continuity through disconnect. The physical, material beauty of We the people (detail) belies its tortured conceptual existence, and yet, this beauty is similarly integral to the nature of the work itself. The undulating folds of the original Statue’s robes both harken back to a time of Grecian and Roman democratic idealism and also seem to reference the welcoming nature of a mother’s nightgown. Monumental, personal, fuid and static, Vo’s We the people (detail) is an enigmatic and stunning work by one of the most intellectually rigorous artists working today.

“I wanted to do something that everyone had a relationship to, and make it a bit unfamiliar. It’s kind of like creating a Frankenstein that gets its own life.” Danh Vo

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15. Nate Lowman

b. 1979

Orders From Corporate (Randall’s Island?), 2014 alkyd on linen, in 2 parts 40 x 60 in. (101.6 x 152.4 cm) Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Maccarone, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

“A lot of the images I use are already out there in the public or in the news. I just steal them or photograph them or repaint them, so they’ve already been talked about, already been consumed.” Nate Lowman

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Nate Lowman’s varied body of work, from the iconic bullet holes to the graphic Marilyn series, reads much like a story, a burst of imagery and charged moments in time that never quite leave our collective consciousness. His practice of chopping, repeating, reimagining and appropriating glimpses of the world in a whole new way imbues his works with a whole new meaning. Overrun by themes of sex, death, violence, fame, and commercialism, Lowman’s oeuvre is distinctly American in its audacious, intense glory, and yet not

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without the catastrophe for its own context. The present lot Orders from Corporate (Randall’s Island?) of 2014 is indicative of the artist’s ability to create space without its explicit presence—haunting, profound and rich all at once. In Orders from Corporate (Randall’s Island?), the Manhattan skyline appears in a warm glowing haze, as seen from Randall’s Island, located of the East Harlem shore in the East River. In a technique highly similar to that of the Marilyns,

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Lowman explores the relationship of positive and negative forms, and we sense color as the primary tool of communicating both subject and space. The night sky of the city is rendered in an indigo blue, capturing and refecting the lights of the city. Lowman’s clever juxtaposition of palette and subject borrows much from the blurry, coarse style of grafti, resulting in an inimitable combination of classic and contemporary. Lowman’s relationship to New York City serves as a creative impetus to his work.

Afer graduating college, his lack of direction in life came into focus afer the attacks on the Twin Towers on September 11, 2001. He has described, “Soon afer that, I got my frst studio in Bed-Stuy. It was like, ‘If you want to go do something, do it now’” (J. Bernstein, “Why Isn’t This Man Smiling?”, The New York Times, December 2012). Orders from Corporate (Randall’s Island?) captures this artistic immediacy and a deeply-felt connection to the artist’s city with its hazy skyline shapes, almost fragile in their glow.

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“I like art that is capable of organizing a space of perpetual and indefnite accumulation of time and language and image in an immobile place.” Ugo Rondinone

16. Ugo Rondinone

b. 1964

ACHTERFEBRUARZWEITAUSEN­ DUNDSIEBEN (February 8, 2007), 2007 acrylic on linen, Plexiglas plaque with caption diameter 86 5/8 in. (220 cm) Signed “Ugo Rondinone” on a label afxed to the reverse. Estimate $200,000-300,000 Provenance Eva Presenhuber, Zurich Acquired directly from the above by the present owner

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Ugo Rondinone’s ACHTERFEBRUAR­ ZWEITAUSENDUNDSIEBEN (February 8, 2007) from 2007, is a mesmerizing example from the series of target paintings that the Swiss-born artist has been making since the mid-nineties. While reminiscent of the work of the American Color Field painter Kenneth Noland and the target paintings of Jasper Johns, Rondinone’s circular, fat, vibrantly colored out-of-focus paintings have a contemporary aesthetic. These target paintings create a powerful visual experience – the viewer’s gaze is drawn hypnotically into the depths of the painting by the concentric circular bands of glowing color. By appropriating these key works of his predecessors, Rondinone’s work contains a subtle irony directed at modernism. Although the target is closely linked with the acts of looking and aiming, the concentric circles of his version are blurred, annihilating the essence of a target. Any Abstract Expressionist spirituality to be perceived in the work is banished by the banality of the work’s title which, as with every painting in this series, simply refers to the date of its creation – in the case of this work, February

8, 2007. The artist’s intention is to enthrall the viewer at frst sight by simultaneously questioning our engagement with art in a very pure way. The monumental pictorial quality accelerates our desire towards the mystical work of art and invites us to dive into its sphere of new reality. The magical sphere is romantic in a naïve way, allowing the idea of a dream to take over the everyday. Rondinone’s artistic strategy is based on a precise vocabulary that he shares with fellow Swiss artists such as Peter Fischli & David Weiss and Urs Fischer. Together with other key series of work, Rondinone reuses the target paintings for many exhibitions, reassembling them in repeated arrangements. In this sense, the artist is building up a poetic monologue of a personal artistic reality. “It’s a monologue … The viewer has the symbols from which they can create their own story, but it’s not required that you decode my motivation. It’s a bit like Duchamp. He had his own monologue.” (in M.Falconer, “Masquerade: Ugo Rondinone Uncovered”, Modern Painters, March 2006)

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17. Dan Flavin

1933-1996

Untitled (to Barnett Newman) one, 1971 red, yellow, blue fuorescent light 96 x 48 x 9 in. (243.8 x 121.9 x 22.9 cm) This work is the sole fabrication from a planned edition of 5 and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $350,000-450,000 Provenance Leo Castelli Gallery, New York Private Collection Phillips, New York, November 13, 2015, lot 17 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited New York, Dwan Gallery, untitleds (to Barnett Newman) 1971 from Dan Flavin, March 6 - 31, 1971 Literature Carter Ratclif, “Reviews and Previews,” Art News 70, no. 2, April 1971, p. 12 Willis Domingo, “New York Galleries: Dan Flavin At Dwan,” Arts Magazine 45, no. 6, April 1971, p. 83, p. 82 (illustrated) drawings and diagrams from Dan Flavin 1963 - 1972, exh. cat., St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, 1973a, p. 76 Anne Bertrand, Guide de la Collection: Carré d’Art, Musée d’art contemporain de Nîmes, Paris: Réunion des musée nationaux, Nîmes: Carré d’Art, Musée d’art contemporain de Nîmes, 2001, p. 56 (illustrated) Michael Govan and Tifany Bell, eds., Dan Flavin: The Complete Lights, 19611996, New York: Dia Art Foundation in association with Yale University Press, 2004, no. 266, p. 296 (illustrated)

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Untitled to Barnett Newman one, 1970 like many of Dan Flavin’s luminous light pieces is dedicated to a character in his life. Created the year in which Newman passed away, the present lot is medley of hues in a soothing geometric formation. Seated in the corner of a room, bulbs of yellow fuorescence form the top and bottom of the composition while tones of red and blue bounce of the corner walls casting a spectrum of colorful washes across the room. A respective ode to his lost friend Flavin has admirably and artfully paid homage to Newman’s master series of paintings entitled Who’s Afraid of Red, Yellow and Blue, a group of four paintings created by Newman from 1966-1970. The sof projecting colors of Untitled to Barnett Newman one stand in direct contrast to the austerity of the Flavin’s formal construction. His

precisely rendered sculpture utilizes the corner of a room, a seeming somber intersection in a strategic and thoughtful manner. Flavin explains, “I knew that the actual space of a room could be broken down and played with by planting illusions of real light (electric light) at crucial junctures in the room’s composition. A piece of wall can be visually disintegrated from the whole.”(Dan Flavin in 1965 quoted in J. Brox, Brilliant: The Evolution of Artifcial Light, London 2010) Untitled to Barnett Newman one, 1970 synthesizes the seemingly primary colored forescent lights to successfully created what Barnett Newman aptly referred to as “the living quality of color without the use of color.” (B. Newman, “A Conversation: Barnett Newman and Thomas B. Hess,” 1966)

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18. Alex Israel

b. 1982

Untitled (Flat), 2011 acrylic on stucco, wood and aluminum frame 96 x 60 in. (243.8 x 152.4 cm) Stamped “MADE AT WARNER BROS. STUDIOS BURBANK, CA.” on the reverse; further signed and dated “Alex Israel ’11” on the reverse. Estimate $200,000-300,000 Provenance Peres Projects, Berlin Acquired directly from the above by the present owner Exhibited Berlin, Peres Projects, Alex Israel, September 10 - November 5, 2011

For Los Angeles born artist Alex Israel, “Hollywood is not simply a town, but also an attitude and a way of moving and being.” His series of Flats are intended to evoke the experience of “Hollywooding,” a term used by the artist to describe the unique character of the city. Although they hang on the wall, the Flats are never described by Israel as paintings; rather, he defnes them as “fats,” a technical term used in the flm and television industry to describe backdrops for sets. This terminology implies the hierarchical relationship between background and foreground, stage and action. These works are but a stage set for the performance of objects or actors. Israel explored this relationship most fully in his 2011 exhibition at Peres Projects, in which this work was frst shown. Concurrently with the Flats, Israel exhibited another series of work, Property, which consisted of a number of rented cinema props. These objects operated as a site-specifc installation of found sculpture staged among and in front of the Flats. The Flats, including this Untitled, therefore, operated explicitly as stage artifce,

but within the gallery setting, they also manifest an original and real setting. Breaking down the notion of foreground and background, or artifce and reality, Israel’s work is a beautiful invocation of aspiring Hollywood doublethink. Additionally, these Flats are related to Israel’s hometown in one other important and distinct manner – they take their form from the architectural elements of the Spanish Colonial Revival style pervasive in Southern California. This particular arch could be a window, or door. Always operating across a multitude of meanings, this Flat is both the sky brought back in through the window and the window itself; in it the stage becomes a particular and discrete reality as an object within the gallery and the backdrop for the performance of the sculptures placed in its presence. Untitled, 2010, is one of Israel’s earliest and most successful Flats; its sublime ethereal beauty and rigorous conceptual underpinnings clearly elucidate the reasons for which Israel has become one of his generation’s most important representatives working today.

detail of the present lot

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19. Neil Jenney

b. 1945

Atmosphere, 1977-85 oil on panel, in artist’s frame 33 3/ 16 x 79 5/ 16 in. (84.3 x 201.5 cm) Signed and dated “Neil Jenney 1977” on the reverse; further signed and dated “Neil Jenney 1985” on the reverse of the frame. Estimate $70,000-90,000 Provenance Foster Goldstrom, Dallas 7-ELEVEN, Inc., Dallas Sotheby’s, New York, November 15, 2006, lot 464 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

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An active rejection of photorealism combined with loosely-inspired landscapes of the 19th-century Hudson River School bear the visionary apertures of Neil Jenney, with refreshing intellectual directness and def painterly skill. Audaciously rejecting the ephemeral nature of what is trendy, the artist has all but branded a homegrown verisimilitude, absent of technology or photographic means, of which the present lot Atmosphere is exemplary. In a career spanning over forty years, Jenney has progressively achieved a technique harkening back to the hazy flm of Old Master paintings, with sophisticated brushwork, chromatic accuracy, and the illustration of pure space and an opaque atmosphere. However, in his ever-present attempt to foil any intimation of traditional realism, Jenney’s paintings reveal a singular perception of idealized nature that is impassible and seen only in glimpses and impressions.

Presented in a thick black frame, Atmosphere is a slice of a colossal, backlit sky which might suggest a specifc environment but rather is a scrupulously rendered universal composite. Elegantly lit and exquisitely smooth, we experience not just the presence but acutely feel the efects of atmosphere, infected by the alabaster glow and the azure blue sky of an afernoon sun. The title functions as a legend, stenciled in grey block letters, allowing our eyes to come to terms with the vista before us. Not quite painting, resolutely not photography, the present lot functions primarily as a three-dimensional wall structure characterized by a custom-built, spacious frame essential to the work it encompasses. Reminiscent of the density and austerity of 16th century Dutch frames, Jenney ofen prepares his canvases to ft the frame openings, as opposed to retroactively adding a frame to the painting for sheer embellishment. The idiosyncratic result is a style in which narrative truths are cultivated in the most simple of relationships existing between objects. Atmosphere is Jenney’s answer to a world glorifying both the matterof-fact and the conceptual.

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20. Hiroshi Sugimoto

b. 1948

Red Sea, 1992 gelatin silver print 47 x 55 in. (119.4 x 139.7 cm) Signed, titled, numbered and dated “Hiroshi Sugimoto Red Sea 1992 1/5” on a label afxed to the reverse of the backing board. This work is number 1 from an edition of 5. Estimate $250,000-350,000 Provenance Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York Private Collection, New York Sotheby’s, New York, September 21, 2012, lot 109 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art; Houston, Contemporary Arts Museum; Gunma, Hara Museum ARC; Akron, Akron Art Museum, Sugimoto, November 21, 1995 - June 7, 1998 (another example exhibited) Tokyo, Maison Hermès, L’histoire de l’histoire, October 20 - December 28, 2003 (another example exhibited) Literature Thomas Kellein, Hiroshi Sugimoto: Time Exposed, exh. cat., Basel, Kustmuseum Basel, 1995, p. 81 (illustrated)

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“Mystery of mysteries, water and air are right there before us in the sea.” Hiroshi Sugimoto

Hiroshi Sugimoto’s series Seascapes majestically captures the infnitesimal nature of two of life’s building blocks — water and air — at times sharpening the horizon that delineates the two, at others blurring them together into a seamless, formless entity. Red Sea from 1992, is one of Sugimoto’s most ghostly compositions, and, printed as it is in the larger of the artist’s two formats, presents an enveloping oceanic panorama. By leaving a prolonged exposure on his camera, Sugimoto successfully collapses any of the associations of the immediate and instantaneous within the feld of photography, transforming the fnal image into an ethereal time capsule. The inky blackness of the ocean meets the moonless gray of the night sky along a perfect horizon line, undisturbed by the inconsistencies of a distinct moment, smoothed out by the

essence of time. All of the images in this series focus less on the physical attributes of the sea and more directly on their metaphysical essences. Accuracy in form is usurped by a spiritual presence. As such, the image is untethered from the notions of discrete time or specifc location. Indeed, outside the titles, Sugimoto removes any allusions to human presence or Earthly relevance. His ability to bridge and to marry notions of the real with the “unreal” through the medium of photography has been an enduring quality of Sugimoto’s most famous series – from the portraits of wax fgures to his landscape images of dioramas at the natural history museum. Red Sea, 1992, wonderfully encapsulates this incredibility within Sugimoto’s oeuvre and exists as a testament to man’s enduring desire to capture the sublime quality of nature in art.

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21. Thomas Struth

b. 1954

Todai-Ji Interior, Nara, 1999 chromogenic print 72 x 96 in. (182.9 x 243.8 cm) Signed “Th. Struth” on a label afxed to the reverse of the backing board; further numbered “4/10” on the reverse of the backing board. This work is number 4 from an edition of 10. Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance Marian Goodman Gallery, New York Acquired directly from the above by the present owner in 2000 Exhibited Houston, Museum of Fine Arts, Contemporary Art and Photography: Spotlight on the Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, September 30, 2001 - February 3, 2002 (another example exhibited) Houston, Museum of Fine Arts, Acquisitions of the Last Five Years: Selections of Modern and Contemporary Art, July 15 - October 15, 2005 (another example exhibited) Houston, Museum of Fine Arts, Ruptures and Continuities: Photography Made afer 1960 from the MFAH Collection, February 21 - May 9, 2010 (another example exhibited) Zurich, Kunsthaus Zurich; Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen; Museu de Arte Contemporãnea Fundação de Serralves, Thomas Struth: Photographs 1978 - 2010, June 11, 2011 - February 26, 2012) (another example exhibited), pp. 90, 204 (illustrated)

Dedicated disciple and international star of the celebrated Dusseldorf School, Thomas Struth frst captured people’s attention with the well-known cycle of Museum Photographs, exhibited internationally to much critical acclaim. Struth’s medium format photography lies in a deep-rooted tradition of conceptualism, but his approach to it combines a humanitarian expression of the viewer engaging with subjects. His work ofen depicts people visiting museums, churches and cultural institutions, and as such, explores the relationship between those works of art and the public, which comfortably circulates throughout those inhabited spaces – spaces that not only tell the story of time, but manifest the present within the photograph. Depicting the Daibutsuden, or Great Buddha Hall of the Todai-Ji temple in

Nara, Japan, Todai-Ji Interior, Nara, 1999, is a superb example of Struth’s ability to cleverly compress time, space and spirituality in his photographs. The massive scale of the print imbues it with the monumental air of the Daibutsuden itself, housing the largest bronze Buddha statue in the world. The result is a composition that sofens the lines dividing past from present and subject from object. As the faithful in the Daibutsuden become objects of study under Struth’s lens, viewers of the photograph inadvertently echo the composition, becoming unwitting participants in the seemingly endless nature of the work. Todai-Ji Interior, Nara superbly manifests many of the conceptual and practical concerns Struth has grappled with throughout his celebrated career and does so in a fashion both revelatory and exclamatory.

Other examples from this edition are held in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston and of the Modern Art Museum of Forth Worth, Fort Worth. Literature Anette Kruszynski, Tobia Bezzola and James Lingwood (ed.s), THOMAS STRUTH: Photographs 1978-2010, Munich: Schirmer/Mosel, 2010, cat. no. 7481, p. 90, 205 (illustrated)

“I hope that the photographs possess a symbolic power that the viewer can connect with. That they have a symbolic power is very important to me, even if it is often a quiet one.” Thomas Struth

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22. Ghada Amer

b. 1963

Grey Iman, 2001 acrylic, embroidery and gel on canvas 72 x 64 in. (182.9 x 162.6 cm) Signed “Ghada Amer” along the overlap. Further signed and dated “Ghada Amer 01” along the overlap. Estimate $70,000-100,000 Provenance Gagosian Gallery, London Private Collection Christie’s, London, June 22, 2006, lot 66 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Concealed behind a curtain of hanging threads, the sultry fgures in Ghada Amer’s Grey Iman, 2001 transcend their physical form and at once give us a sensation of both pleasure and frustration. As our eyes dart throughout the picture plane to unravel the image, oscillating between the veiling and unveiling of female bodies, we are confronted by Amer’s own relationship to the canvas, painted with needle and thread. Though it is ambiguous where one fgure begins and another ends, the foreground is littered with women in an array of suggestive poses, layered one over the other in black thread raining down the canvas to create a jarring optical illusion. Amer’s chosen medium of embroidery, an exercise drawing close connections to a domestic art, becomes a subversive tool in the artist’s hands. Pornographic images are not repudiated in Grey Iman, nor are they merely rejected as a symbol of submission. Instead, they are investigated, borrowed and transformed into an understated representation of female satisfaction. Notions of repetition are particularly signifcant both in the present lot and throughout the artist’s oeuvre, evident from the sheer multiplicity of fgures to the physically repetitious nature of weaving, in and out with the needle and thread, and further echoed in the daily rituals for traditionally feminine roles in the

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decorative arts. Amer’s laborious process begins with photographic stills drawn onto vellum, then either reproduced onto stretched canvases or magnifed, projected, and then outlined on the surfaces of the canvases, which are then unstretched and fnally embroidered. The canvases are stretched once again, and the hanging threads are carefully adhered to the surface with a gel medium to mimic the efect of dripping paint. The total metamorphosis of the original photographs into a series of embroidered paintings highlights a marked shif from the traditional emblems of sex to a far more manifold and intimate visual expression. Of her method, Amer has explained, “I used very thin color because I was always afraid that if I used too much, it would move towards craf. My main goal is to make it look like paint. So if I go too much towards thread, there is too much material, and then it would only be regarded as craf or women’s work” (M. Walsh and R. Enright, “The Thread of Painting: An Interview with Ghada Amer”, Borders Crossing, Issue 111, August 2009). It is abstraction in Grey Iman which dominates our perceptions, and ultimately, the appearance and disappearance of female bodies that enables the work to seduce us and invite us to explore our own emotional responses.

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23. Michel Majerus

1967-2002

MoM block Nr. 88, 1999 acrylic on canvas 63 x 55 1/4 in. (160 x 140.3 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Majerus 99 MoM block Nr. 88” on the reverse. Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance neugerriemschneider, Berlin Private Collection, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present ownerr Exhibited Luxembourg, Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean, Michel Majerus, December 13, 2006 - August 16, 2007

Michel Majerus in his studio, 1996 Artwork © Estate of Michel Majerus, courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery. Photography © Albrecht Fuchs

The temporal, poetic and deeply esoteric body of work lef in the wake of Michel Majerus’s untimely death represents a vast amalgamation of expressive brushwork, bold text, and sampled imagery. His art is unimposing, yet ofen tremendously scaled, woven into the fabric of popular culture and still distinct, enduring and somehow radical even today. While graphics pulled from magazine pages and towering billboards played a signifcant role in many of his works, the experimental approach he took to letters and color prove profoundly imaginative, operating independently as visual stimuli in a rhythmic narrative. It is of this profound union of text and color that the present lot MoM block Nr. 88 is born, and we come to experience the ease with which Majerus was able to relinquish long-held arguments over the validity of painting that had plagued the previous era. The present lot, MoM block Nr. 88 of 1999, brazenly broadcasts the phrase “love you” in German in grassy-green block lettering against a brilliant barrage of pastel peach, sky blue and rosy acrylic swaths. In 1996, the artist established a makeshif studio in an abandoned factory in Berlin, formerly the East German Modezentrum Mitte, colloquially, “MoM”. So was the inception of the MoM blocks, methodically arranged canvases with the criteria of acrylic paint

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media and in two sizes only. Continuing the series long afer departing his small studio, he completed over 170 MoM blocks by the dawn of the new millennium. Though the defnition of this series might seem restrictive or even contrary to artistic experimentation, it is a painter who reveals himself in the MoM blocks, inspired by Willem de Kooning’s color and his teacher Joseph Kosuth’s language-driven compositions. MoM block Nr. 88 is an electric example from the visual vocabulary of Majerus, a world of infnite possibility, in which any combination of the alphabet or colors could instantaneously surface in a painting. Curator Daniel Birnbaum emphatically states, “What’s interesting in Majerus’ work is the radical sense of presence it conveys, and its complete lack of sentimentality. It’s ugly, it’s spectacular, it’s superfcial, but there is no reason to moralize or indulge in melancholic refections upon the loss of authenticity. Majerus does not mourn the death of painting, but instead celebrates the abundance of imagery accumulated throughout the history of art, and generated today with increasing speed by the media and new information technologies” (D. Birnbaum, “The Power of Now”, in Frieze, Issue 34, May 1997). At once, the MoM blocks each detail a particular universe of the artist’s own making.

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24. Martin Kippenberger

1953-1997

Untitled, 1994-95 oil on canvas 35 7/8 x 29 7/8 in. (91.1 x 75.9 cm) Signed and dated “Kippenberger 94/95” on the reverse. Estimate $200,000-300,000 Provenance Eleni Koroneou Gallery, Athens Private Collection, Athens Private Collection Emily Tsingou Fine Art, London Acquired from the above by the present owner Detail of verso

Literature Gisela Capitain, Regina Fiorito and Lisa Franzen (eds.), Martin Kippenberger: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings, Vol. IV 1993-1997, Cologne: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, 2014, cat. no. MK.P 1994/95.02, p. 192 (illustrated)

Martin Kippenberger’s relatively brief yet thunderous career forged a pathway unprecedented in the realm of eastern European art. Kippenberger’s intent to avoid stylistic simplifcation not only succeeded, but it made his work unequaled in diversity of medium, message, and complexity. Kippenberger’s artistic output ranged from painting to sculpture, drawings and prints, performance and onwards through to his life itself. By the time he died in 1997, Kippenberger had amassed an oeuvre so diverse in its myriad styles that he remains one of the most enigmatically unclassifable artists of all time – a true wunderkind of talent whose star shone far too brightly to age with ignominy. Loaded with political and social commentary as well as compositional innovation, his later work, including the present lot, Untitled from 1994-95 fnds him revisiting and fusing themes from his earlier work—a perfect encapsulation of the artistic life he strove so strongly to achieve. Here, Kippenberger’s commentary on the nature of creation resounds with the propinquity of life and vigor. This work is one of four smaller-

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scale works made while Kippenberger was living and working on the island of Syros, Greece, that reference his earlier Santa Claus sculpture from 1994. The large central foot has been thoroughly transformed from the booted appendage of the oversized elf, to a sandal clad trotter more beftting a classical sculpture. Interwoven into this painting, Kippenberger stitched another work, which he had purchased at a local Athenian street market, of a traditional Grecian cofee-shop scene. The multiplicity of form, composition, physical structure, and even conceptual intent all relate back to the diverse and prolifc output of Kippenberger’s practice and this reinvestigation clearly illustrates his willingness to repurpose and reexamine elements of his own oeuvre. In Untitled, 1994-95 Kippenberger revisits a past “interesting picture” in order to keep it interesting—to reload it with the symbolic worth. This conscientious pursuit makes Kippenberger’s later years so bittersweet and brilliant—the fusion of the many tropes of a style-less artist’s work, bound inextricably to each other in a realm above the rest.

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25. Franz West

1947-2012

Divan (Prototype), before 1997 steel, wood, foam and linen 40 7/8 x 85 x 35 in. (104 x 216 x 89 cm) This work is a unique prototype. Estimate $70,000-100,000 Provenance Private Collection, Mexico Gallery Matthias Arndt, Berlin Acquired from the above by the present owner

Born amidst the ruins of Post-war Vienna in 1947, Franz West’s work is both steeped in the fgurative traditions of the European avant–garde, while also existing largely as a caricature of those practices. Ofen regarded as an anti-formalist and praised for his work’s accessibility, West’s aim was never to critique or protest that of his predecessors or his contemporaries. Rather, he sought to cultivate an additional dimension in the practice of making and exhibiting art, wherein the audience is activated, and their engagement with the work and the space surrounding it becomes art unto itself.

West rose to notoriety in the 1970s with pieces that he called Passtücke or Adaptives—white sculptural objects formed of plaster, papier-mâché or other found media—that he continued to produce into the 1980s and would later elaborate and expand upon through the end of his life. West’s intention with this body of work was that the viewer engage with, handle, the sculptures in order to fully experience their “ergonomic” nature. Pushing this concept to its furthermost conclusion, West began designing “everyday adaptives”, which, as opposed to discrete handle-able objects, took the form of common furniture – tables, lamps, chairs, etc. Divan (Prototype), 1997 speaks to a decidedly more engaging and immersive process and practice while further emphasizing the eccentricities that initially set it apart.

Portrait of Austrian artist Franz West, Venice, Italy, 1996 (Photo by Chris Felver/ Getty Images)

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26. Mark Grotjahn

b. 1968

Untitled, 2012 oil paint and collage on record sleeve 12 x 12 x 5 in. (30.5 x 30.5 x 12.7 cm) Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance White Columns Beneft Exhibition + Auction, New York, 2012 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Rugged and primitive, distinctly tactile and dignifed in its pronounced features, Mark Grotjahn’s Untitled of 2012 borrows much of the sculptural elements found in his celebrated bronze masks through its keen examination of the painted object. The work is uniquely a manifold composite of painting and sculpture, reafrming itself as a three-dimensional object while at once sofening into a sumptuously painted façade. When hung upon the wall, we fnd ourselves coming face-to-face with it, somehow without ever becoming aware of our interaction. This intimatelyscaled example from Grotjahn’s oeuvre allows its physical composition to create its own kind of subject, though the artist subtlety directs our perspective with the bold text announcing its musical pedigree. Oozing almost hallucinogenic energy, Untitled is comprised of oil paint layered in thin geometric waves on a found record sleeve, musician Malcolm Mooney’s

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name brazenly brushed in black, and a cardboard toilet paper tube planted atop. Coming to fame through his tremendously scaled and richly colored Butterfy paintings, Grotjahn would playfully experiment with empty boxes or cardboard cartons on his studio foor, adhering toilet paper tubes as noses with coarsely painted noses and eyes. Though the present lot lacks the distinguishing facial features of his typical mask, it retains their primal, childlike spirit. Grotjahn has reminisced of his cardboard creations, “I looked at them all the time. And now, I’m watching them become more like traditional paintings. I think you’ll see them infuencing my painting in the future. I’m sure of it” (J. Finkel, “Childlike, but Hardly Child’s Play,” International New York Times, May 2014). What Untitled exudes is a profound lyrical spirit, in much the same way that Mooney’s band Can transcended mainstream sensibilities for minimalist musical themes in their psychedelic anthems.

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27. Wade Guyton

b. 1972

Untitled, 2010 Epson UltraChrome inkjet on linen 34 x 24 in. (86.4 x 61 cm) Signed and dated “Wade Guyton 2010” along the overlap. Estimate $180,000-220,000 Provenance Friedrich Petzel Gallery, New York Acquired directly from the above by the present owner

In only pure black ink, Guyton’s Untitled, 2010, possesses a simple, powerful monochromatic composition, where the presence of the areas flled in by the inkjet “paint” of the printer contrast strikingly with the absence of the unpainted, primed areas. This series of work was initially conceived in response to a failure in a previous series whereby the large “X” form Guyton was attempting to print would not register on the preprimed linen; seeking to make use of the foiled works, Guyton printed over them with a simple, monolithic black rectangle. Repeatedly feeding the linen through a large format Epson printer, Guyton created a striking image that is nothing so much as the means of its own production. Simple lines of black repeat upon the surface of the “painting”, placed at regular intervals by the hypnotizing carriage of the inkjet printer. Untitled derives its optically arresting and unique quality from the slippages and errors of this painting-printing machine

– as each smear, drip and smudge assumes a powerful visual impact. The work is never wholly defned by the fnal visual result, but rather, the piece traces its own development and that of Guyton’s unique process of “painting.” Establishing Guyton’s bona fdes within the radical developments within the western contemporary canon, Ann Temkin noted that, “Pollock fung it; Rauschenberg silkscreened it; Richter took a squeegee; Polke used chemicals. Wade is working in what by now is a pretty venerable tradition, against the conventional idea of painting” (A. Temkin quoted in, R. Smith, “Dots, Stripes, Scans: Wade Guyton at the Whitney Museum of American Art.” New York Times, October 4, 2012). An intimately scaled, powerful composition, Untitled, 2010, manifests and reinforces all those qualities of Guyton’s oeuvre which have established him as one of the foremost contemporary artist’s working today.

“I have become interested in when something starts as an accident and then becomes a template for other things, or reproduces itself and generates its own logic until something else intervenes to change it.” Wade Guyton

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111. Keltie Ferris

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New Now Day Sale Lots 101–368, 11am

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“I strugle to have a strong sense of self, and I think these fgures are trying to invent and protect a self.” Sascha Braunig

101. Sascha Braunig

b. 1983

Edith, 2013 oil on panel 14 x 11 in. (35.6 x 27.9 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Sascha Braunig ‘EDITH’ 2013” on the reverse. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Foxy Production, New York Rodolphe Janssen Gallery, Brussels

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102. Will Boone

b. 1982

Death Wish III, 2014 acrylic on canvas 50 x 48 in. (127 x 121.9 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Bill Brady Gallery, Kansas City

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103. Aaron Garber-Maikovska

b. 1978

Untitled, 2014 ink and chalk pastel laid on archival gator board, in artist’s frame 97 x 48 7/8 in. (246.4 x 124.1 cm) Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Greene Exhibitions, Los Angeles

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104. Guy Yanai

b. 1977

Bye Torino, 2014-15 oil on linen 58 1/4 x 47 1/4 in. (148 x 120 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Guy Yanai 14/15 BYE TORINO” on the reverse. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

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105. Jean-Baptiste Bernadet

b. 1978

Untitled (Fugue VII), 2013 oil on canvas 78 3/4 x 70 3/4 in. (200 x 179.7 cm) Signed “Jean-Baptiste Bernadet” along the overlap. Further signed, titled and dated “Jean-Baptiste Bernadet 2013 ‘Untitled (Fugue VII)’” on the reverse. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Galerie Torri, Paris

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106. Valerie Snobeck

b. 1980

Reverb, 2011 partially erased mirror, peeled print on plastic, debris netting, screen protector, and door barricade brackets 52 x 40 x 2 in. (132.1 x 101.6 x 5.1 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Essex Street, New York Private Collection

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107. Nick Darmstaedter

b. 1988

The French Connection II and the Temple of Doom, 2012 oxidized copper on canvas 108 x 36 in. (274.3 x 91.4 cm) Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance RITTER/ZAMET, London Exhibited London, RITTER/ZAMET, Bells and Whistles Can of Worms, September 21 October 27, 2012.

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108. Ida Ekblad

b. 1980

Untitled, 2014 oil on linen 75 x 59 in. (190.5 x 149.9 cm) Initialed “I.E.” on the reverse. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Greene Nafali, New York Private Collection, Los Angeles

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109. Petra Cortright

b. 1986

Untitled, 2014 digital painting on aluminum 78 3/8 x 59 1/8 in. (199.1 x 150.2 cm) Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

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110. Matias Faldbakken

b. 1973

Untitled (Canvas #61), 2012 acrylic Molotow Tagger pen on Belgian linen 60 x 60 in. (152.4 x 152.4 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Canvas #61 Matias F 2012” along the overlap. Estimate $18,000-22,000 Provenance Ernström & Co AB, Sweden

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111. Keltie Ferris

b. 1977

Turn Turn Step Step, 2012 oil and acrylic on canvas 90 x 80 in. (228.6 x 203.2 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Turn Turn Step Step 2012 Keltie Ferris” on the reverse. Estimate $30,000-40,000

Exhibited New York, Mitchell-Innes & Nash, Keltie Ferris, November 29, 2012 – January 12, 2013 Literature Nathaniel Lee, “Keltie Ferris, MITCHELL-INNES & NASH | CHELSEA,” Artforum, November 2013 (illustrated)

Provenance Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York

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112. Eric Baudart

b. 1972

Concave, 2015 aerosol paint on paper 88 x 61 x 15 in. (223.5 x 154.9 x 38.1 cm) Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Private Collection

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113. Kour Pour

b. 1987

Tetris, 2011 acrylic on canvas laid on panel 84 1/8 x 48 1/8 in. (213.7 x 122.2 cm) Signed and dated “Kour Pour 2011� along the overlap. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles Exhibited Los Angeles, Roberts & Tilton, In the Making, February 25 March 31, 2012

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114. Kasper Sonne

b. 1974

TXC66, 2014 industrial paint and chemicals on canvas 59 7/8 x 47 3/4 in. (152.1 x 121.3 cm) Signed and titled “Kasper Sonne TXC66” along the overlap. Further signed, titled, and dated “Kasper Sonne TXC66 2014” on the stretcher. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Duve Gallery, Berlin

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115. Sterling Ruby

b. 1972

DRFTRS (4415), 2013 collage and paint on paper 18 x 12 in. (45.7 x 30.5 cm) Signed and dated “Sterling Ruby 13” lower right. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Xavier Hufens, Brussels

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116. Kyle Thurman

b. 1986

Untitled (120 West 28th Street, New York, NY, 10001), 2013 fower pigment on canvas 96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm) Signed and dated “K Thurman 2013” along the overlap. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Ofce Baroque, London

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117. Matt Sheridan Smith

b. 1980

Pattern portrait (cyclist), 2014 acrylic gel transfer and paper on linen 80 x 56 in. (203.2 x 142.2 cm) Signed and dated “MSS 2014� along the overlap. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Kaufmann Repetto, Milan

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118. Sebastian Black

b.1985

Puppy Painting (Pomegranate), 2013 oil on linen 20 x 26 in. (50.8 x 66 cm) Signed and dated “Sebastian Black 2013� on the reverse. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

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119. Mike Bouchet

b. 1970

Teen, 2008 oil on canvas 78 3/4 x 78 3/4 in. (200 x 200 cm) Signed, titled and dated twice “Mike Bouchet 2008 ‘Teen’” on the reverse. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Peres Projects, Los Angeles

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120. JPW3

b. 1981

Face of Smoke, 2014 wax and ink on canvas 107 7/8 x 72 in. (274 x 182.9 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Private Collection (acquired directly from the artist)

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121. Scott Campbell

b. 1977

Paperma, 2013 watercolor on paper 60 x 40 in. (152.4 x 101.6 cm) Signed and dated “Scott Campbell 2013” on the reverse. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance OHWOW, Los Angeles Exhibited Los Angeles, OHWOW, Things Get Better, May 23 – June 22, 2013

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122. Lucien Smith

b. 1989

A River Runs Through It, 2013 enamel on canvas 96 x 131 in. (243.8 x 332.7 cm) Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Bill Brady Gallery, Kansas City Exhibited Kansas City, Bill Brady Gallery, Lucien Smith: Scrap Metal, June 28 – August 20, 2013

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123. Adam Pendleton

b. 1984

Afro-Futuristic (bottom type), 2006 silkscreen on linen, in 2 parts 70 3/4 x 48 in. (179.7 x 121.9 cm) Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Perry Rubenstein Gallery, New York

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Exhibited New York, Perry Rubenstein Gallery, Adam Pendleton: BAM SPLIT LAB AND THE AFRO FUTURISTIC UNDERGROUND, November 2 December 22, 2006 Literature Ellen Gamerman, “Adam Pendleton: The Making of an Art-World Star,” The Wall Street Journal, April 16, 2015

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124. Sergej Jensen

b. 1973

Scary Eyes 5, 2011 stretched and sewn cotton 51 1/8 x 43 1/4 in. (130 x 110 cm) Signed and dated twice “Sergej Jensen 2011� along the overlap. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Anton Kern Gallery, New York Private Collection (acquired from the above in 2011)

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125. John Armleder

b. 1948

The End, 2013 mixed media on canvas 79 x 53 in. (200.7 x 134.6 cm) Signed, titled and dated “John Armleder THE END 2013” along the overlap. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Massimo De Carlo Gallery, London

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Dynamic.

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126. Jean-Michel Basquiat

1960-1988

Untitled, 1987 oilstick on paper 30 x 22 in. (76.2 x 55.9 cm) Signed and dated “Jean-Michel Basquiat 87” on the reverse. Estimate $80,000-120,000 Provenance Vrej Baghoomian, Inc., New York (acquired directly from the artist) Sotheby’s, New York, November 14, 1991, lot 251 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Jean-Michel Basquiat’s works address a series of socio-political themes ranging from racial inequality to consumer culture. A self-taught artist born in Brooklyn to an American Haitian father and a Puerto Rican mother, Basquiat’s career was tragically short but incredibly prolifc. He possessed both self-awareness and an acute comprehension of the social and cultural environment in which he lived - a knowledge he explored iconographically in his oeuvre. Repeatedly, his art investigates subjects such as music, anatomy, sports, comics, work, money, and history— both the history of African Americans and the history of art. The artist’s open and unstructured presentation of reality is marked by irony and displacement.

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The present work reveals an astonishing mastery of line. Here one sees Basquait’s hieroglyphics dancing across the paper, with a humorously copyrighted fgure at the center inscribed “Detail of Stonehenge.” The mix of text and fgures suggest an abbreviated course in Western History. Drawing was an essential element to his practice, and he produced over a thousand works on paper during his short career. The artist drew little distinction between painting and drawing, as themes, motifs, iconographies easily translated from one medium to the other. In the act of drawing, Basquiat discovered his ideal form of visual expression - one that was compatible with one of his biggest interests - his inherent appreciation of naïve, childlike fgures, cartoons, scribblings, cryptic signs, and letter printing.

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127. Andy Warhol

1928-1987

Trump Tower, 1981 graphite on paper 30 1/2 x 40 1/2 in. (77.5 x 102.9 cm) Stamped by The Estate of Andy Warhol and numbered “71.019” on the reverse. This work is accompanied by a photo certifcate of authenticity issued by The Andy Warhol Art Authentication Board and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Stellan Holm Gallery, New York

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128. Urs Fischer

b. 1973

Thinking About My Grandmother, 2004 acrylic marker on media board, in artist’s polyurethane resin frame 26 5/8 x 22 3/8 x 1 1/8 in. (208 x 273 x 6 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Urs Fischer 2004 ‘Thinking About My Grandmother’” on the reverse. Estimate $80,000-120,000 Provenance Sadie Coles HQ, London Exhibited London, Sadie Coles HQ, Elton John?, December 1, 2004 - January 15, 2005

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“It’s a two way street. Your thoughts determine the images, and it is the images, in turn, which determine your thoughts.” Urs Fischer

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129. Mike Kelley

1954-2012

Feudal War, 1987 acrylic on canvas laid down on panel 48 1/8 x 60 in. (122.2 x 152.4 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Mike Kelley 1987 ‘Feudal War’” on the reverse. Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Rosamund Felsen Gallery, Los Angeles Exhibited Tokyo, Museum of Modern Art, Toyama Now ‘87, 1987

Mike Kelley’s Feudal War from 1987 portrays the Japanese folkloric Kappa (river-child), a mischievous water deity traditionally depicted as a child-sized humanoid in legends. The Kappa character lies between the “crossfre” of intensely profane slangs between Toyama and Tokyo, two feuding Japanese cities. At the time the present lot was created, Kelley had completed a series of work which dealt with themes from Japanese culture and history, including the 1986

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flm Kappa which he collaborated with Bruce Nauman and Norman Yonemoto. The work’s imagery derives from legendary Kappa portrayals seen throughout Japan. As troublemakers, their pranks range from the relatively innocent to the more menacing kidnapping of children, feeding on the blood of their victims. Even today, signs warning children against the presence of Kappa are seen in some Japanese towns and villages.

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Property from an Important Parisian Collection

130. Raymond Pettibon

b. 1957

Scratch / The White Album, circa 1997 ink on paper 9 x 6 in. (22.9 x 15.2 cm) Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Regen Projects, Los Angeles

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Property from an Important Parisian Collection

131. Mike Kelley

1954-2012

White or Yellow?, 1987 crayon, pencil and ink on paper 25 7/8 x 20 1/2 in. (66 x 52 cm) Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Patrick Painter Gallery, Santa Monica

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Exhibited Kassel, Documenta 10; Tokyo, The Watari Museum of Contemporary Art; Santa Monica, Patrick Painter Gallery; New York, Metro Pictures; New York, Lehmann Maupin Gallery; Paris, Centre Georges Pompidou, London, Barbican Centre, The Curve, The Poetics Project: 1977 - 1997 A Collaboration between Tony Oursler and Mike Kelley, June September 1997

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132. Andy Warhol

1928-1987

Two Girls Laughing, 1954 ofset lithograph and watercolor on paper 14 x 9 1/2 in. (35.6 x 24.1 cm) Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Anthony d’Ofay, London

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08/02/16 08:14


133. Andy Warhol

1928-1987

Mother & Child, 1986 pencil on paper 31 1/2 x 23 1/2 in. (80 x 59.7 cm) Estimate $18,000-22,000 Provenance Anthony d’Ofay, London Private Collection Exhibited Edinburgh, Royal Scottish Academy, Andy Warhol: A Celebration of Life…and Death, August 4 – October 7, 2007

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“We got our frst color TV in 1965. It was one of the happiest days of my life...I used to just sit and hallucinate in front of the TV.” Kenny Scharf

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08/02/16 08:15


134. Kenny Scharf

b. 1958

Untitled, 1982 acrylic and Day-Glo on canvas 94 x 170 in. (238.8 x 431.8 cm) Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Fun Gallery, New York Private Collection (acquired directly from the above in 1982) Phillips de Pury & Company, New York, December 17, 2010, lot 46 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited New York, Fun Gallery, Kenny Scharf, 1982

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Untitled, 1982 is a quintessential example of Scharf’s formative works from the early 1980’s when he was solidifying what would become his own unique and fantastical style. Infuenced by such varying movements as Surrealism and Pop Art, Scharf blends playful, yet dark, creatures sourced from pop culture with a fantastical backdrop, creating a large-scale surreal landscape. In Scharf’s composition a futuristic Elroy Jetson depicted as a sea monster escorts a primitive Wilma Flinstone smiling as a slightly sinister, pre-historic bird, through a lush, Daliesque landscape of Day-Glo colors. Untitled, 1982 not only embodies the anarchic and expressionistic spirit of many artists working in downtown

New York at this time, but it’s also an important relic from the notorious Fun Gallery, which operated in Manhattan’s East Village from 1981-1985, where Scharf, along with other artists including Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring, exhibited their work and gained exposure to a mainstream audience for the frst time. Untitled, 1982 was included in an exhibition at Fun Gallery the year it was created and was conceived as a backdrop for one of Scharf’s famous, immersive black light rooms. An incredibly special piece of art history, Untitled, 1982 is a brilliant example of Scharf’s unique ability to create fascinating alternate worlds that are at once optimistic and subversive.

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135. André Butzer

b. 1973

Untitled (mit N-Haus), 2007 oil on canvas 51 1/4 x 67 in. (130.2 x 170.2 cm) Signed and dated “A. Butzer ’07” on the reverse. Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance Metro Pictures, New York Exhibited New York, Metro Pictures, André Butzer, March 28 – May 3, 2008

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136. Joyce Pensato

“To me it’s all about drawing. Maybe with my painting, I’m drawing with a paintbrush and with my drawing, I’m drawing with charcoal.” Joyce Pensato

b. 1941

Donald as a Crossdresser, 1999 charcoal and pastel on paper, in 2 parts 120 x 169 in. (304.8 x 429.3 cm) Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance Elga Wimmer Gallery, New York Private Collection, New York Edelman Arts, New York Exhibited New York, Elga Wimmer Gallery, Joyce Pensato, 2003 New York, Sarah Bowen Gallery, Medium Rare: Works on Paper, May 20, 2005 June 17, 2005 Literature Nancy Princenthal, “Joyce Pensato at Elga Wimmer,” Art in America, May 2003

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Property from a Private Collection, Chicago

137. George Condo

b. 1957

Expanding Color Painting, 1987 oil on canvas 98 1/4 x 78 1/2 in. (249.6 x 199.4 cm) Signed, inscribed and dated “the days of color Condo 87” on the reverse. Further signed “Condo” on the stretcher. Estimate $150,000-200,000 Provenance Pace Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1988 Exhibited New York, Pace Gallery, George Condo: Paintings and Drawings, March 11 – April 2, 1988, no. 12 (illustrated) Literature Roberta Smith, Condo Creates a Future With Layers of Nostalgia, New York Times, March 1988 Holland Cotter, George Condo at Pace, Art in America, May 1988 (illustrated)

“Expanding Color Painting is an extremely attractive mélange of motifs recalling those in Gorky’s late paintings, and it even approximates the chromatic tonalities of The Betrothal II.” Holland Cotter, “George Condo at Pace,” Art in America, May 1988 As George Condo has cited “abstractions are pictures of the artist’s mind” and the present lot, Expanding Color Painting, 1987 is an example of Condo’s most vivid imagination. Bulbous, natural forms rendered in primary reds, yellow, greens and blues seem to grow upward from the lower quadrant of the composition. Swirling like colorful ivy, crawling across the creamy background Condo has created an intricate pattern of delicate modular structures emerging at various stages of formation, slowly rising to the surface of the composition. A blend

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of historical references can be seen, from Gorky’s breakthrough series entitled Garden in Sochi to Joan Miró’s surrealist shapes, Condo places himself at the crux of New York’s 1980’s painterly revival. The philosopher Félix Guattari, who lived on the Rue de Condé in the same building as Condo in the 1980’s when Expanding Color Painting was executed describes “a very specifc ‘Condo efect,’” stating that Condo “sacrifces everything to this efect, particularly pictorial structure, which he systematically destroys, thus removing a protective guardrail, a frame of reference which might reassure the viewer, who is denied access to a stable set of meanings.” Expanding Color Painting, 1987 lies at the heart of Condo’s practice, a dive into the depths of what the artist refers to as “psychological cubism.”

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138. Donald Baechler

b. 1956

Tulip, 2012 acrylic and sand on canvas 47 1/4 x 35 1/2 in. (120 x 90.2 cm) Estimate $18,000-22,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Private Collection, United States

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08/02/16 08:24


139. Billy Childish

b. 1959

Stood Before Juniper Trees - High Atlas, 2010 oil and charcoal on linen 59 1/2 x 36 in. (151.1 x 91.4 cm) Estimate $20,000-25,000 Provenance neugerriemschneider, Berlin Private Collection, New York

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140. Jim Dine

b. 1935

Hawaian Dream, 2013 acrylic and sand on canvas 47 1/4 x 35 1/2 in. (120 x 90.2 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Hawaian Dream - 2013 Jim Dine” on the reverse. Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Rosenbaum Contemporary, Boca Raton Private Collection, United States

Jim Dine’s prolifc career has spanned over ffy years. Since his frst solo show in 1960, he’s been the subject of nearly 300 solo shows worldwide. The present work, Hawaian Dream, depicts his iconic heart; a subject he has revisited for more than forty years. He is ofen associated with Pop Art, and one sees the movement’s infuence in this work though his repetition of the heart symbol and reworking of its image throughout his career. In the present work, Dine antagonizes the limits of acrylic paint; he combats the medium’s inherent properties of fatness and quick drying time by sanding, power grinding, and using an air compressor. The result is a textural and colorful rendering of his emblematic heart which seems to loose clarity and sharpness within the artist’s molding of the paint layers. Despite the reuse of the same image, each heart work brings about a diferent reaction from the viewer through the artist’s use of color and gesture.

Ilka Skobie: And what’s the fascination with the hearts? How many hearts have you made? Millions? Jim Dine: Millions. . . . I have no idea but it’s mine and I use it as a template for all my emotions. It’s a landscape for everything. Excerpt from “LONE WOLF: An interview with Jim Dine,” Artnet

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Property from an Important Parisian Collection

141. Mel Bochner

b. 1940

Counting Alternatives Series (The Wittgenstein Illustrations), 1972 colored pencil and felt-tip pen on paper 29 7/8 x 22 in. (76 x 56 cm) Signed, titled and inscribed “COUNTING ALTERNATIVES SERIES (THE WITTGENSTEIN ILLUSTRATIONS) “*” BRANCH, FIRST READING MEL BOCHNER” lower lef. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Sonnabend, New York Exhibited Paris, Galerie Georges-Philippe & Nathalie Vallois, Entre La Géometrie Et Le Geste, 1965-1975, Oeuvres sur papier par: Mel Bochner, Eva Hesse, Barry Le Va, Bruce Nauman, Alan Saret, Richard Serra, Robert Smithson, Keith Sonnier et Richard Tuttle, September 15, 1990 October 30, 1990, p. 7 (illustrated)

From corner to corner, side to side and up and down, a series of numbers foat elegantly across the paper in Mel Bochner’s Counting Alternatives (The Wittgenstein Illustrations), 1972. A pioneer of Conceptual art, Bochner found a level of comfort in the certainty of a grid and within the universal language of numbers, ofen using only letters or numbers as the aesthetic embodiment of his subject matter. Radiating out like a star from the number 26, both upwards to 53 and down to zero, Counting Alternatives (The Wittgenstein Illustrations), 1972 is Bochner’s artistic attempt to illustrate the famous 20th century philosopher, Ludwig Wittgenstin’s collection of notes, On Certainty. The idea for the Counting Alternatives series frst came to Bochner when he saw an advertisement for an illustrated copy of Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason. Bochner immediately went out to purchase a copy and was disappointed to fnd that the

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only illustration in the book was an engraving of Kant’s portrait. This led him to ponder what illustrations of philosophy would look like and how one would go about illustrating a philosophical idea. Wittgenstein spent much of his work debunking the theories of other philosophers and discussing questions of language and how one uses it. His work On Certainty was compiled posthumously from his notebooks and explores the relationship between knowledge and doubt. This resonated with the young Bochner at the time, as he was constantly confronted with doubt in his own artwork. His works in this series typically have a grid and a sequence of numbers, the grid represent certainty and unchanging rules while the numeric sequences represent decisions made in a context of uncertainty. Over 40 years later, this series remains one of the few successful attempts made by an artist to illustrate a philosophical text, and this specifc piece is a graceful and superb example of Bochner’s early work.

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Property from an Important Parisian Collection

142. Sol LeWitt

1928-2007

Working Drawing, Come & Go, for Dale McConathy (Harper’s Bazaar), 1969 ink on paper 14 7/8 x 21 1/8 in. (38 x 53.5 cm) Signed and dated “Sol LeWitt April 1969” lower right. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Private Collection, Belgium Private Collection, Paris

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08/02/16 08:26


143. Sol LeWitt

1928-2007

Table, 1967 wood and acrylic with glass top 16 1/2 x 48 3/4 x 48 3/4 in. (41.9 x 123.8 x 123.8 cm) This work is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity from The Estate of Sol LeWitt. This work is unique. Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance The Estate of Sol LeWitt, New York Private Collection (acquired directly from the above)

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08/02/16 08:26


144. Allan McCollum

b. 1944

Mock-Up (from Constructed paintings), 1973 grease pencil, silicone adhesive and canvas 45 x 48 in. (114.3 x 121.9 cm) Signed, titled and dated “‘Mock-Up’ Allan McCollum April 1973” on the reverse. This work is recorded in the artist’s archives under number MCC_MOC_1973.

Provenance Estate of Daniel Melnick, Los Angeles Bonhams, New York, November 9, 2010, lot 160 Messine Galerie & Conseil, Paris Pierre Berge & Associés, Paris, December 12, 2013, lot 56 Private Collection, New York

Estimate $15,000-20,000 Exhibited Los Angeles, Nicholas Wilder Gallery, 1973 Paris, Messine Galerie & Conseil, Selection d’oeuvres modernes et contemporaines, June 7 - July 27, 2012

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145. Sherrie Levine

b. 1947

Une Pipe, 2001 cast copper alloy 1 3/4 x 1 x 5 1/4 in. (4.4 x 2.5 x 13.3 cm) This work is number 12 from an edition of 12. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Margo Leavin Gallery, Los Angeles Exhibited Los Angeles, Margo Leavin Gallery, Sherrie Levine: CeÇi n’est pas une pipe, April 24 - May 26, 2001 Los Angeles, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Magritte and Contemporary Art: The Treachery of Images, November 19, 2006 – March 4, 2007, p. 183 (illustrated)

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Sherrie Levine frst gained attention as part of a school of postConceptualist Appropriationists in the 1980’s. As a rule, she only appropriates art by deceased white male artists with a goal to, in her own words, “contaminate history.” (Kristin McKenna, Sherrie Levine and the Art of the Remake, Los Angeles Times, November 17, 1996.) Through her practice, Levine is able to reprise both images and objects and place them in front of a new audience, demonstrating how art can accumulate new meanings over time. In the present work Une Pipe, we see Levine referencing René Magritte’s The Treachery of Images (“Ceci n’est pas une pipe.”). Even though Levine’s pipe is threedimensional, it is no more real than Magritte’s drawing of a pipe. Both works serve as a materialization of a representation, undermining the assumptions behind what a realistic representation is and can be.

08/02/16 08:26


146. Lee Ufan

b. 1936

Untitled, 2004 gouache on paper 22 1/2 x 30 in. (57.2 x 76.2 cm) Signed and dated “L. Ufan ’04” lower right. Estimate $18,000-22,000 Provenance Lisson Gallery, London

“It is difcult to say what is perfect or what is balanced, but the movement of vision in relation to similarity and diference is endless.” Lee Ufan

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08/02/16 08:27


147. Takuro Kuwata

b. 1981

Gold Kairagi Shino Drips, 2011 porcelain 20 1/2 x 21 x 19 in. (52.1 x 53.3 x 48.3 cm) Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Tomio Koyama Gallery, Tokyo

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08/02/16 08:27


148. Kishio Suga

b. 1944

Kinsa-nairi, 1999 plywood, vinyl chloride tube, rope and paint 15 5/8 x 11 x 2 in. (39.7 x 27.9 x 5.1 cm) rope length 196 1/2 in. (499.1 cm) Signed and dated “Kishio Suga 1999” on the reverse. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Gallery Yamaguchi, Osaka

149. Kishio Suga

b. 1944

Series of Ikai, 1975 tape on coated paper and cellophane tape 28 x 20 1/2 in. (71.1 x 52.1 cm) Signed, dated, and inscribed “菅 木志雄 1975 依界シリーズ [Suga Kishio, 1975, Jokai Series] Kishio Suga 1975” on the reverse. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Gallery Yamaguchi, Osaka Exhibited Gallery Yamaguchi, Osaka, LINE — Kishio Suga | Yoko Sawai, January 17 - February 28, 2014

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150. Kishio Suga

b. 1944

to the center, 1973 iron net, wood, and paint 26 7/8 x 18 1/2 in. (68.3 x 47 cm) Signed, dated and inscribed in Japanese “Kishio Suga 1973� on the reverse. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Gallery Yamaguchi, Osaka

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08/02/16 08:27


151. Michelle Grabner

b. 1962

Untitled, 2005 fashe and gesso on canvas 30 x 30 in. (76.2 x 76.2 cm) Signed and dated “Michelle Grabner 2005� on the reverse. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

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08/02/16 08:27


152. Yaacov Agam

b. 1928

Two works: (i) Fond Marin I; (ii) Fond Marin II, 2005 poliforne mixed technique, oil and relief on paper each 13 3/8 x 19 5/8 in. (34 x 50 cm) (i) Signed, titled, dated and inscribed “Agam Fond Marin I Paris 2005” on the reverse. (ii) Signed, titled, dated and inscribed “Agam Fond Marin II Paris 2005” on the reverse. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Espace Meyer Zafra, Paris

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08/02/16 08:28


153. Daniel Lefcourt

b. 1975

Drawing Board, 2013 graphite on machined fberboard panel, in artist’s pine frame 32 x 42 in. (81.3 x 106.7 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York Exhibited New York, Mitchell-Innes & Nash, Modeler, May 23 - July 18, 2013

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154. Mark Grotjahn

b. 1968

Untitled (Butterfy for the Kitchen Black, Yellow and Tuscan Red 45.16), 2013 colored pencil on paper 11 x 6 in. (27.9 x 15.2 cm) Signed, dated and inscribed “Named butterfy for the kitchen black yellow and Tuscan red - 2013 Mark Grotjahn� on the reverse. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance The Kitchen Beneft Auction, New York, 2013, courtesy of the artist

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08/02/16 08:28


155. Toby Ziegler

b. 1972

Study for True North (2nd version), 2007 paper, PVA, pencil, plastic and metal overall 34 1/4 x 20 1/2 x 21 1/2 in. (87 x 52 x 55 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Toby Ziegler 2008 True North� on the reverse of one element. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Patrick Painter Inc., Los Angeles Collection of Blake Byrne, Los Angeles Exhibited Santa Monica, Patrick Painter, Selections From the Collection of Blake Byrne: Curated by Barbara Schwan, November 22 - December 27, 2014

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Property from a Private Collection, Chicago

156. Marc Quinn

b. 1964

Stuart Penn, 2000 marble 79 x 39 x 19 3/4 in. (200.7 x 99.1 x 50.2 cm) This work is number 2 from an edition of 3. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance White Cube, London Exhibited London, The Victoria and Albert Museum, Give and Take, January 30 - April 1, 2001 New York, Mary Boone Gallery, The Complete Marbles, January 10 - February 28, 2004 (another example exhibited)

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08/02/16 08:34


157. Claes Oldenburg

b. 1929

Inverted Q, 1976 painted plaster 17 7/8 x 18 1/8 x 14 5/8 in. (45.6 x 46 x 37 cm) This work is unique. Estimate $18,000-22,000 Provenance James Corcoran Gallery, Los Angeles Private Collection Christies, New York, May 10, 2000, lot 689 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Exhibited Minneapolis, Walker Art Center, Claes Oldenburg: In the Studio, August 1992-February 1993 (other variants exhibited) Akron Art Institute, Oldenburg/The Inverted Q, October-December 1977 (another variant exhibited) New York, Leo Castelli Gallery, Claes Oldenburg, November 1976 (another variant exhibited) Cleveland, BP Art Collection, Larger than Life: Monument Proposals by Claes Oldenburg and Large-Scale Outdoor Sculpture by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, November 1991-January 1992 (another variant exhibited) Literature Nancy Foote, “Oldenburg’s Monuments to the Sixties,” Artforum, January, 1977, p. 55 (other variants illustrated)

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158. Fred Wilson

b. 1954

Shatter, 2003 5 Murano glass candlesticks, water, food coloring overall 17 3/8 x 23 5/8 x 23 5/8 in. (44.1 x 60 x 60 cm) This work is from an edition of 10. Estimate $35,000-45,000 Provenance Metro Pictures, New York Collection of Blake Byrne, Los Angeles

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08/02/16 08:35


159. Bill Viola

b. 1951

Catherine’s Dream, 2002 video installation, black and white video on LCD fat panel mounted on wall 27 7/8 X 17 3/8 in (70.8 x 44.1 cm) 9:22 minutes This work is number 3 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. This work is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed and dated by the artist. Estimate $70,000-90,000 Provenance James Cohan Gallery, New York Exhibited New York, James Cohan Gallery, Between the Lines, May-June 2004

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160. Ian Wallace

b. 1943

At the Crosswalk III, 2007 photolaminate with acrylic on canvas, in 4 parts overall 96 x 193 in. (244 x 488 cm) Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Yvon Lambert, New York

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08/02/16 08:35


161. Mona Hatoum

b. 1952

Depressed, 1997-2002 granite 18 x 25 x 3/4 in. (45.7 x 63.5 x 1.9 cm) This work is number 2 from an edition of 6. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Alexander & Bonin, New York Private Collection, Canada Acquired from the above by the present owner

Palestinian artist Mona Hatoum’s deeply political and acutely poetic body of work characteristically examines uncanny relationships of media, size, and form. At her hands, commonplace relics of daily life transcend their original domestic or banal context to achieve an element of peril, violence, or anguish. Her unconventional range of materials captures our collective tactile imagination, and her sculptures particularly urge us to actively conceptualize ourselves in dialogue with her objects. The present lot Depressed, executed over a period of fve years, is exemplary of a beguiling dimension derived from her use of familiar materials, laden with personal signifcance on an intimate scale. Depressed, like many of Hatoum’s works, harbors a deep psychological concern. Upon frst glance, we notice a smooth, clean-edged slab of granite in a midnight shade—and yet when we approach it, the work

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confesses a more dismal aspect, with the spelling of “DEPRESSED” neatly engraved into its surface. Afer even closer inspection, the refection of the letters is in fact a diferent phrase entirely: “DEEP REST.” A play on words, the conficting text alludes at once to despair and to death, and presciently challenges our perceptions of reality clouded by overwhelming desolation. While many are quick to connect the artist’s tangled history of Middle Eastern emigration to her subjects, she has emphatically stated of her works, “The basis of it is a feeling of wanting to be free of all those restrictions, whether it’s social or political, that are always put on people, so I can be whatever I want to be” (F. Nayeri, “The Many Contradictions of Mona Hatoum,” International New York Times, July 2015). Quietly disturbing and palpably emotive, Depressed courses with tension beneath the polished stone.

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162. Robert Wilson

b. 1941

Salma Hayek (VOOM Series), 2006 video with sound, on artist’s viewing monitor duration 53 seconds, on continuous loop monitor 22 22 1/2 x 38 1/2 in. (57.2 x 97.8 cm) This work is number 2 from an edition of 2 and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Private Collection

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08/02/16 08:36


163. Tatiana Trouvé

b. 1968

Untitled, 2007 metal, epoxy paint and leather 77 1/2 x 53 1/8 x 25 7/8 in. (197 x 135 x 66 cm) Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Galerie Emmanuel Perrotin, New York Private Collection

“...making sculpture is not simply a matter of style and syntax, but a practice that attempts to seduce the spectator.” Tatiana Trouvé

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∆

164. Elmgreen & Dragset

b. 1961/1969

Powerless Structures, fg. 159, 2001 wood, aluminum and plastic 49 x 72 x 35 1/2 in. (124.5 x 182.9 x 90.2 cm) Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Bonakdar Jancou Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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165. Trevor Paglen

b. 1974

Symbology, 2007 20 fabric patches, in artist’s frame 14 3/8 x 117 7/8 in. (36.5 x 299.4 cm) Signed “Trevor Paglen” on a label afxed to the reverse. This work is unique. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Bellwether Gallery, New York Exhibited New York, Bellwether Gallery, Black World, 2006

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166. Walead Beshty

b. 1976

Three Color Curl (CMY: Irvine, California, August 24th 2008, Fuji Crystal Archive Type C), 2010 color photographic paper 40 x 30 in. (101.6 x 76.2 cm) Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Wallspace, New York

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167. Walead Beshty

b. 1976

Large Copper (Fedex® Large Box ©2005 FEDEX 139751 REV 10/05 SSCC), International Priority, Los AngelesBrussels trk# 7934489709 41, March 15 - 22, 2010, 2010 polished copper box, accrued FedEx tracking and shipping labels 12 x 17 3/4 x 3 1/4 in. (30.5 x 45.1 x 8.3 cm) Estimate $35,000-45,000 Provenance Galerie Rodolphe Janssen, Paris

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08/02/16 08:36


168. Tony Matelli

b. 1971

Cunt Fuck, 2011 enamel on mirror 60 x 36 in. (152.4 x 91.4 cm) Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Koenig & Clinton, New York Private Collection (acquired from the above in 2013) Exhibited Berlin, Kunstlerhaus Bethanien, Falkenrot Prize 2011: Tony Matelli:Glass of Water, April 29 - May 22, 2011, n.p.

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08/02/16 08:37


169. Anselm Reyle

b. 1970

Untitled, 2005 mixed media on canvas 88 1/4 x 74 3/8 in. (224.2 x 188.9 cm) Signed and dated “Anselm Reyle 2005� along the overlap Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Gagosian Gallery, New York Private Collection (acquired from the above in 2007)

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08/02/16 08:37


170. Mark Francis

b. 1962

Tondo, 2006 oil, acrylic and resin on canvas 65 3/4 x 44 in. (167 x 111.8 cm) Signed and dated “M. Francis 2006” on the reverse. Further signed “Mark Francis” on the stretcher. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Galerie Thomas Schulte, Berlin Acquired from the above by the present owner

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08/02/16 08:38


171. Doug Argue

b. 1962

Little Sorrows, 2013 oil on canvas 89 1/2 x 75 in. (227.3 x 190.5 cm) Signed and dated “Argue 2013” on the reverse. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Edelman Arts, New York Private Collection, New York Exhibited New York, Edelman Arts, Doug Argue: The Art of Translation, February 22 - March 30, 2013

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08/02/16 08:38


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08/02/16 09:01


Cutting-edge. NY NEW NOW_FEB16_146-233_BL.indd 147

08/02/16 10:16


96399

172. Gabriel Kuri

b. 1970

Quick Standard, 2005 emergency blanket taped on wooden sticks dimensions variable Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Galerie Esther Schipper, Berlin Private Collection, Belgium Acquired from the above by the present owner

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08/02/16 09:01


173. Allora & Calzadilla

b. 1974/1971

Solar Catastrophe, 2011 solar panel fragments on linen 92 7/8 x 74 3/4 in. (235.9 x 189.9 cm) Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Gladstone Gallery, New York Private Collection

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08/02/16 09:01


174. Danh Vo

b. 1975

Untitled, 2009 Japanese imari octogonal ceramic plates, in 2 parts overall 9 3/8 x 9 3/8 x 2 in. (23.8 x 23.8 x 5.1 cm) This work is number 7 from an edition of 12. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Galerie Daniel Buchholz, Cologne Collection of Blake Byrne, Los Angeles

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08/02/16 16:06


175. Raúl Cordero

b. 1971

A painting the same size as John Baldessari’s “Tips for artists who want to sell”, 2012 oil on canvas 67 7/8 x 56 1/2 in. (172.4 x 143.5 cm) Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Mai 36 Galerie, Zurich

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08/02/16 09:02


176. Tara Donovan

b. 1969

Untitled (Paper Plates), 2003 paper plates and glue 13 x 38 x 32 in. (33 x 96.5 x 81.3 cm) Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Pace Gallery, New York, 2005 Ace Gallery, Los Angeles Private Collection

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08/02/16 09:02


177. Matt Johnson

b. 1963

Equestrian, 2006 silver plated cast bronze 12 x 15 x 7 1/2 in. (30.5 x 38.1 x 19.1 cm) This work is number 2 from an edition of 3 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Taxter & Spengemann, New York Private Collection

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08/02/16 09:02


178. Henry Codax

since 2011

Untitled (Silver), 2014 acrylic on canvas 84 x 84 in. (213.4 x 213.4 cm) Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Martos Gallery, New York

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08/02/16 09:14


179. Thomas Canto

b. 1979

Triangle Burst, 2014 acrylic on wood and nylon wires, in artist’s Plexiglas box 73 x 73 x 9 in. (185.4 x 185.4 x 23 cm) Signed and dated “Thomas Canto 2014” on the reverse. Estimate $20,000-25,000 Provenance Private Collection, Switzerland

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08/02/16 09:14


180. Tony Lewis

b. 1986

Be a self-starter, 2012 graphite powder, glitter and tape on 2 adjoined sheets of paper 49 1/2 x 71 1/2 in. (125.7 x 181.6 cm) Estimate $18,000-22,000 Provenance Private Collection, Europe

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08/02/16 09:14


181. Adam McEwen

b. 1965

Untitled, 2014 inkjet printed sponge, mounted on aluminum panel 38 x 28 1/4 in. (96.5 x 71.8 cm) Signed and dated “A. McEwen 2014� on the reverse. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance David Zwirner, New York

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08/02/16 09:15


182. Jutta Koether

b. 1958

Untitled (Mylar Drawing), 2006 mylar on cardboard 20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61 cm) Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Reena Spaulings Fine Art, New York Private Collection (acquired from the above in 2007)

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08/02/16 09:15


183. Jutta Koether

b. 1958

Untitled (Mylar Panel), 2006 mylar and pushpins on wood 77 x 21 x 26 in. (195.6 x 53.3 x 66 cm) Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Reena Spaulings Fine Art, New York Private Collection (acquired from the above in 2007)

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08/02/16 09:15


184. Marianne Vitale

b. 1973

Shingle Painting (C1), 2014 tar shingles and liquid nails on canvas 40 x 30 in. (101.6 x 76.2 cm) Signed and dated “Marianne Vitale 2014� on the reverse. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles

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08/02/16 09:15


185. Hugo McCloud

b. 1980

To be titled, 2015 patina, aluminum coating, and oil on tar paper, mounted on wood 74 x 60 in. (188 x 152.4 cm) Signed and dated “Hugo McCloud 15” on the reverse. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Luce Gallery, Turin

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08/02/16 09:16


186. Katharina Grosse

b. 1961

This is Not My Cat, 2007 acrylic on polystyrene, plywood and resin 59 1/4 x 59 1/4 x 18 1/2 in. (150.5 x 150.5 x 47 cm) Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Gow Langsford Gallery, Auckland Fontainebleau Resort, Las Vegas Exhibited Auckland, Gow Langsford Gallery, This Is Not My Cat, July 5 August 3, 2007

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08/02/16 09:16


187. Oliver Laric

b. 1981

察察 (Cha Cha), 2013 tamper evident security hologram stickers on twin-wall polycarbonate sheet and airbrushed clear coating, in artist’s frame 55 1/8 x 39 1/8 in. (140 x 99.4 cm) Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Seventeen Gallery, London

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08/02/16 09:16


188. Matthew Chambers

b. 1982

Immediately We Always Try to Sympathize with our Narrator, 2012 oil, acrylic and enamel on canvas 96 x 48 in. (243.8 x 121.9 cm) Signed and dated “Matthew Chambers 2012� on the reverse. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Untitled, New York

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08/02/16 09:17


189. Eddie Peake

b. 1981

Mash Up The Dance, 2013 lacquered spray paint on polished stainless steel 39 1/2 x 27 1/2 in. (100.3 x 69.9 cm) Signed and dated “Eddie Peake 2013” on the reverse. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Peres Projects, Berlin

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08/02/16 09:17


190. Adam Pendleton

b. 1984

BAND, 2009 HD digital video, 12 minutes 27 seconds This work is number 3 from an edition of 5. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited Amsterdam, Kunstverein / de Appel arts centre, Adam Pendleton: EL T D K Amsterdam, December 13-14, 2009 New York, The Kitchen, Adam Pendleton: BAND, November 3 – December 23, 2010 Montréal, Parisian Laundry, BAND, April 28 - June 4, 2011 (another example exhibited) San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Adam Pendleton: BAND, September 15, 2011 Literature Tom Williams, “Adam Pendleton,” Art in America, February 9, 2011 Thom Donovan, “Adam Pendleton,” BOMB Magazine, Winter 2011 David Balzer, “Adam Pendleton: Band Leader,” Canadian Art, May 12, 2011

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08/02/16 09:17


191. Kaz Oshiro

b. 1967

Two works: (i) Fender Reverb #2, 2003; (ii) Fender Showman Amp with Cabinet #2 (Duct Tape & Cigarette Burn), 2002 (i) acrylic and Bondo on stretched canvas over wood (ii) acrylic and Bondo on stretched canvas over wood, in 2 parts (i) 25 x 24 x 10 1/2 in. (63.5 x 61 x 26.7 cm) (ii) 48 x 30 x 11 in. (121.9 x 76.2 x 27.9 cm) (i) Signed, titled and dated “Fender Super Reverb #2 2003 Kaz Oshiro” on the reverse. (ii) Signed, titled, and dated twice “Kaz Oshiro Fender Showman Amp Head 02” on the reverse. Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance Rosamund Felsen Gallery, Los Angeles

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08/02/16 09:17


192. Sadie Laska

b. 1974

Swamp Thing, 2013 rug, spray paint, plastic bag, acrylic, canvas, paper clip, nails, board, textile and shoelace 68 1/4 x 44 1/4 in. (173.4 x 112.4 cm) Signed and dated “Sadie Laska 2013� on the reverse. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Kerry Schuss, New York Exhibited Geneva, Galerie Bernard Ceysson, Sadie Laska, March 20 - May 17, 2014

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08/02/16 09:18


193. Amanda Ross-Ho

b. 1975

Administering Sabotage Through Craf, 2010 cotton jersey, embroidery thread, aluminum thumbtacks, acrylic paint, latex paint, cabernet sauvignon and other mixed media 90 x 76 in. (228.6 x 193 cm) Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York

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08/02/16 09:18


194. Sam Moyer

b. 1983

Untitled, 2012 ink and bleach on canvas mounted to wood panel 47 7/8 x 35 3/4 in. (121.6 x 90.8 cm) Initialed and dated “SCM. 2012” on the reverse. Estimate $7,000-10,000 Provenance Rachel Ufner Gallery, New York

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08/02/16 09:18


195. Raha Raissnia

b. 1968

Untitled, 2005 oil on canvas 55 x 60 in. (139.7 x 152.4 cm) Signed and dated “Raha R. 2005� on the reverse. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York Private Collection, Michigan Private Collection, California

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08/02/16 09:18


196. David Ostrowski

b. 1981

F (The Receptionist), 2013 oil and paper on canvas, in artist’s frame 40 x 31 7/8 in. (101.6 x 81 cm) Signed and dated “David Ostrowski ’13” along the overlap. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Peres Projects, Berlin

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08/02/16 09:19


197. Analia Saban

b. 1980

Kohler 5931 Kitchen Sink #3, 2013 marble on linen 35 3/8 x 23 15/ 16 x 2 15/ 16 in. (89.9 x 60.8 x 7.5 cm) Estimate $18,000-22,000 Provenance Thomas Soloman Gallery, Los Angeles Private Collection, Los Angeles

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08/02/16 09:19


198. Zak Prekop

b. 1979

Untitled (Black), 2010 oil on canvas 46 1/8 x 40 1/8 in. (117 x 102 cm) Signed and dated “Zak Prekop 2010” on the reverse. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago

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08/02/16 09:19


199. Garth Weiser

b. 1979

Untitled (grey #3), 2007 acrylic, gouache, graphite and fashe on paper 30 x 22 1/4 in. (76.2 x 56.5 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Garth Weiser 2007 Untitled (grey #3)� on the reverse. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York

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08/02/16 09:19


200. Kika Karadi

b. 1975

Untitled, 2014 oil based ink on linen 80 x 46 in. (203.2 x 116.8 cm) Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance The Journal Gallery, Brooklyn

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08/02/16 09:20


201. Jean-Baptiste Bernadet

b. 1978

Untitled (Retour), 2014 oil on canvas 39 x 33 1/2 in. (99.1 x 85.1 cm) Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance American Contemporary, New York

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08/02/16 09:21


202. Nicolas Deshayes

b. 1983

Sebums, 2012 anodized aluminum, wood and vacuum-formed plastic 43 1/2 x 27 3/4 in. (110.5 x 70.5 cm) Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Jonathan Viner, London Acquired from the above by the present owner

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08/02/16 09:21


203. Daniel Turner

b. 1983

Untitled 5150 4-28-12, 2012 bitumen emulsion, vinyl and wood 16 3/4 x 14 in. (42.5 x 35.6 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Daniel Turner Untitled 5150 4-28-12” on the stretcher. Further signed twice “Daniel Turner” on the reverse. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance The Journal Gallery, Brooklyn

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08/02/16 09:21


204. Dan Rees

b. 1982

Artex Painting, 2012 oil on canvas, in artist’s frame 56 3/8 x 40 1/2 in. (143.2 x 102.9 cm) Signed and dated “Dan Rees 2012” on the reverse. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance T293 Gallery, Naples

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08/02/16 09:21


205. Leo Gabin

since 2000

Poppin Floppin Season, 2011 acrylic, spraypaint and silkscreen on canvas 78 1/2 x 117 7/8 in. (199.4 x 299.4 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Leo Gabin 2011 ‘Poppin Floppin Season’” on the reverse. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Peres Projects, Berlin

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08/02/16 09:21


206. Israel Lund

b. 1980

Untitled (34-38), 2013 acrylic on raw canvas, in 5 parts each 44 x 34 in. (111.8 x 86.4 cm) (38) Signed, dated and numbered “Israel Lund 2013 38 1/5” along the overlap. (37) Numbered “2/5” along the overlap. (36) Numbered “3/5” along the overlap. (35) Numbered “4/5” along the overlap. (34) Numbered “5/5” along the overlap. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles

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08/02/16 09:22


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08/02/16 09:22


207. Chris Succo

b. 1979

Untitled (Steel Painting #5), 2012 lacquer, steel and aluminum composite mirror panel 90 1/2 x 47 1/4 in. (229.9 x 120 cm) Initialed and dated “CS ’12” on the reverse. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance RH Contemporary, New York Exhibited Cologne, Galerie Fiebach, Minninger, Nu Era, 2012

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08/02/16 09:22


208. Ned Vena

b. 1982

Untitled, 2011 adhesive vinyl on aluminum honeycomb panel 88 x 48 in. (223.5 x 121.9 cm) Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance SociĂŠtĂŠ, Berlin Private Collection

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08/02/16 09:22


209. Nikolas Gambarof

b. 1979

Untitled, 2011 newsprint and acrylic on Alumalite panel 96 x 48 in. (243.8 x 121.9 cm) Signed and dated “N. Gambarof 2011” on the reverse. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance White Cube, London Private Collection, Los Angeles Exhibited London, White Cube, Nikolas Gambarof: Male Fantasies, December 9, 2011 – February 26, 2012

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08/02/16 09:23


210. Lucien Smith

b. 1989

TBT, 2013 toner, pigment and solvent on canvas 114 x 91 in. (289.6 x 231.1 cm) Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Bill Brady Gallery, Kansas City

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08/02/16 09:23


211. Louis Eisner

b. 1988

Knucklehead 0000000 XXXXXXX XXXXXXX, 2013 ink and chalk on panel, in artist’s aluminum frame 46 1/2 x 36 1/2 in. (118.1 x 92.7 cm) Titled “0000000 XXXXXXX XXXXXXX” lower right; further signed and dated “Louis Eisner 2013” on the reverse. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance RITTER/ZAMET, London

212. Parker Ito

b. 1986

Inkjet painting #28 (8 color ink), 2013 hand applied inkjet on silk 64 x 44 in. (162.6 x 111.8 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Luce Gallery, Turin

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08/02/16 09:23


213. Sebastian Black

b.1985

Period Piece (........), 2012 enamel on engraved dibond 20 x 12 in. (50.8 x 30.5 cm) Signed and dated “Sebastian Black 2012� on the reverse. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

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08/02/16 09:23


214. Graham Collins

b. 1980

Park Slope Food Coop VI, 2013 spray and enamel on canvas, reclaimed wood, glass and window tint 70 1/2 x 49 3/8 in. (179.1 x 125.4 cm) Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance The Journal Gallery, Brooklyn

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08/02/16 09:25


215. Carter Mull

b. 1977

Eleven, 2009 Type C-print on metallic paper and Type R-print 25 7/8 x 27 7/8 in. (65.7 x 70.8 cm) Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Marc Foxx, Los Angeles

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08/02/16 09:29


216. Travess Smalley

b. 1986

Composition in Clay #27, 2012 chromogenic print 46 x 33 in. (116.8 x 83.8 cm) Signed and dated “Travess Smalley 2012” on the reverse. This work is unique. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Higher Pictures, New York

217. Grear Patterson

b. 1988

Wendy, 2014 acrylic on canvas 60 x 96 in. (152.4 x 243.8 cm) Initialed, titled and dated “GP 2014 Wendy” along the overlap. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Bill Brady Gallery, Kansas City

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08/02/16 09:30


218. Matias Faldbakken

b. 1973

Untitled (Garbage Bag #26), 2010 marker, pencil and fre extinguisher powder on plastic bag, in artist’s frame 52 x 34 3/4 x 2 in. (132.1 x 88.3 x 5.1 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Standard Oslo, Oslo Private Collection

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08/02/16 09:30


219. Dean Levin

b. 1988

Untitled, 2014 oil and pigment on canvas 39 7/8 x 30 in. (101.3 x 76.2 cm) Signed and dated “Dean Levin 2014” on the reverse. Further signed and inscribed “Dean Levin 2199” on the stretcher. Estimate $7,000-10,000 Provenance Private Collection

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08/02/16 09:32


220. Fredrik Værslev

b. 1979

Untitled, 2012-2013 primer and pigment on canvas 86 3/4 x 78 1/8 in. (220.3 x 198.4 cm) Signed and dated “Fredrik Værslev 2012/2013” on the reverse.

Exhibited Milan, Giò Marconi, Fredrik Værslev: Choppy Times, September 27 November 9, 2013

Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Giò Marconi, Milan Acquired from the above by the present owner

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08/02/16 09:30


221. Nina Beier

b. 1975

Portrait Mode, 2012 found garments, in artist’s frame 40 x 28 in. (101.6 x 71.1 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Laura Bartlett Gallery, London

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08/02/16 09:31


222. Mark Flood

b. 1957

GLIMPSE, 2013 acrylic and spray paint on digitally printed canvas 108 x 108 in. (274.3 x 274.3 cm) Signed and dated “Mark Flood 11-2013” along the overlap. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Peres Projects, Berlin

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08/02/16 09:30


223. Ibrahim Mahama

b. 1987

Untitled, 2014 jute coal sacks 72 x 36 1/4 in. (182.9 x 92.1 cm) Signed and inscribed “Ibrahim Mahama LXVI� on the reverse. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Private Collection, Los Angeles (acquired directly from the artist) Private Collection, New York

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08/02/16 09:32


224. Ethan Cook

b. 1983

Untitled, 2013 hand woven cotton canvas, in artist’s frame 30 1/2 x 24 1/2 in. (77.5 x 62.2 cm) Signed and dated “E. Cook 2013” along the overlap. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

225. Nina Beier

b. 1975

Fatigues, 2012 furniture fabric, dye, ink, pigment and bleach, in artist’s frame 52 1/2 x 40 5/8 in. (133.4 x 103.2 cm) Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Laura Bartlett Gallery, London

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08/02/16 09:32


226. Lucien Smith

b. 1989

Untitled (Scrap Metal 4358), 2013 scrap metal 17 x 13 x 12 in. (43.2 x 33 x 30.5 cm) Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Bill Brady Gallery, Kansas City

227. Nate Lowman

b. 1979

Courtesy Professionalism Respect (Black), 2010 painted and welded steel 29 7/8 x 32 x 1 1/2 in. (75.9 x 81.3 x 3.8 cm) This work is number 13 from an edition of 20 plus 7 artist’s proofs. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance The New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York Private Collection Bonhams, New York, November 12, 2012, lot 15 Acquired from the above by the present owner

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08/02/16 09:34


228. George Herms

b. 1935

MOTHER BOARD, 2013 collage on panel 72 x 55 in. (182.9 x 139.7 cm) Signed “G. Herms” on the gallery label afxed to the reverse. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance OHWOW, Los Angeles Exhibited Los Angeles, OHWOW, EMERGIO, September 14 - October 26, 2013

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08/02/16 09:34


229. Dan Rees

b. 1982

Vacuum Painting, 2012 oil on canvas, plastic and glass 51 1/8 x 43 1/4 x 9 7/8 in. (130 x 110 x 25 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Tanya Leighton, Berlin Private Collection, Los Angeles

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08/02/16 09:34


230. Dustin Yellin

b. 1975

Porcelain Pagoda, 2011 glass, collage and acrylic 15 1/4 x 10 x 5 1/2 in. (38.7 x 25.4 x 14 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Private Collection, London

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08/02/16 09:34


231. Michael Staniak

b. 1982

PSD_692 (green/blue/purple), 2013 acrylic on board, in artist’s steel frame 48 x 36 in. (121.9 x 91.4 cm) Signed and dated “Michael Staniak 2013” on the reverse. Estimate $7,000-10,000 Provenance Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles

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08/02/16 09:35


232. Michael Manning

b. 1985

Still Burning (Sheryl Crow Pandora Painting), 2014 digital print and acrylic on canvas 72 x 48 in. (182.9 x 121.9 cm) Signed and dated “Michael Manning 2014� along the overlap. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist from the present owner

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08/02/16 09:35


233. Davis Rhodes

b. 1983

Untitled (Pink) Painting, 2007 latex on canvas 35 1/2 x 23 7/8 in. (90.2 x 60.6 cm) Signed and dated “Davis Rhodes ‘07” along the overlap. Estimate $2,000-3,000 Provenance Casey Kaplan, New York Exhibited New York, Casey Kaplan, Davis Rhodes, October 18 - November 24, 2007

234. Jon Pestoni

b. 1969

Untitled, 2010 oil on canvas 24 x 24 in. (61 x 61 cm) Signed and dated “Jon Pestoni 2010” on the reverse. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Lisa Cooley, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

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08/02/16 09:36


235. Dylan Lynch

b. 1987

Bent Steel, 2013 acrylic on steel 27 3/4 x 25 x 20 in. (70.5 x 63.5 x 50.8 cm) Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Still House Group, New York

236. Joe Reihsen

b. 1979

I should have gotten your number afer the orgy, 2013 acrylic on panel 18 x 19 in. (45.7 x 48.3 cm) Signed and dated “Joe Reihsen 2013” on the reverse. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Anat Ebgi, Los Angeles Exhibited Los Angeles, Anat Ebgi, Joe Reihsen: ‘Clean Title No Accidents,’ April 13 May 25, 2013

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08/02/16 09:36


237. Brendan Lynch

b. 1985

Da Bull, 2013 surf wax on wood panel 83 7/8 x 120 in. (213 x 304.8 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Brendan Lynch ’13 ‘Da Bull’” on the reverse. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private Collection

238. Nick Darmstaedter

b. 1988

10 Cards 100 Paintings 1, 2013 silkscreen and fabric ink on canvas 35 x 22 1/8 in. (88.9 x 56.2 cm) Initialed, titled and dated “ND 2013 ‘Card #8’” along the overlap. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance The Still House Group, Brooklyn

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08/02/16 09:37


239. Grear Patterson

b. 1988

Mean Green Machine, 2014 tarpaulin laid on board, in 3 parts overall 54 x 54 in. (137.2 x 137.2 cm) Initialed and numbered “GP 1-3/3” on the reverse of all 3 elements. Further inscribed “Even though you love it it still makes you sad” on the reverse of one element. Further inscribed “Even though you love it it still makes you sad green light & dark.” on a label afxed to the reverse of one element. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Bill Brady Gallery, Kansas City

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Compelling.

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00. artist

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240. Thomas Ruf

b. 1958

Nudes ez03, 1999 chromogenic print with Diasec face, in artist’s wooden frame 60 1/8 x 43 1/2 in. (152.7 x 110.5 cm) Signed and dated “Thomas Ruf 1999” and numbered 1 of 5 on a label afxed to the reverse. This work is number 1 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Johnen + Schöttle, Cologne Literature Matthais Winzen, ed,. Thomas Ruf: 1979 to the Present, New York, 2003, p. 236 (illustrated) Michel Houellebecq, Thomas Ruf Nudes, New York, 2003, p. 13 (illustrated)

241. Vik Muniz

b. 1961

Anatomy, Afer Francesco Bertinatti (from Pictures of Junk), 2009 chromogenic print, in artist’s frame 96 1/2 x 74 5/8 in. (245.1 x 189.5 cm) Signed and dated “Vik Muniz 2009” on a gallery label afxed to the reverse. This work is artist’s proof 1 from an edition of 6 plus 4 artist’s proofs. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York Exhibited New York, Sikkema Jenkins & Co., Leonard Drew and Vik Muniz, January 30 – March 6, 2010 Literature Vik Muniz and Pedro Corrêa do Lago, Vik Muniz: Complete Works, 1987-2009: Catalogue Raisonné, Rio de Janeiro, 2009, p. 557 (illustrated)

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242. Thomas Ruf

b. 1958

Haus Nr. 11 (II), 1989 chromogenic print, face-mounted to Plexiglas 81 1/2 x 79 1/2 x 1 3/4 in. (207 x 201.9 x 4.4 cm) Signed, dated and numbered “Thomas Ruf 1989 2/4” on the reverse. This work is number 2 from an edition of 4. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance David Zwirner Gallery, New York Literature Matthias Winzen, ed., Thomas Ruf: 1979 to the Present, Distributed Art Publishers, New York, pl. HÄU 14 p. 192 (illustrated)

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243. Catherine Opie

b. 1961

Untitled #14 (Icehouses), 2001 chromogenic print on Fuji Crystal Archive paper 50 x 40 in. (127 x 101.6 cm) This work is number 3 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance Gorney Bravin + Lee, New York

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Exhibited Minneapolis, Walker Art Center, Catherine Opie: Skyways and Icehouses, April 28 - July 21, 2002 (another example exhibited, n.p.) Los Angeles, Regen Projects, Catherine Opie: Icehouses, May 11 - June 15, 2002 (another example exhibited) Milan, Studio Guenzani, Catherine Opie: Icehouses, October 2 - November 16, 2002 (another example exhibited)

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244. James Welling

b. 1951

0467, 2009 inkjet print 11 x 17 in. (27.9 x 43.2 cm) Signed, titled, numbered and dated “James Welling 0467 2009 23/25” on the reverse. This work is number 23 from an edition of 25. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Glass House Editions, New Canaan Exhibited New York, David Zwirner, James Welling: Glass House, March 24 April 24, 2010 (another example exhibited) Literature Arthur Ou, “James Welling: 500 Words”, Artforum, January 26, 2010 (illustrated)

245. James Welling

b. 1951

4531, 2007 inkjet print 11 x 17 in. (27.9 x 43.2 cm) Signed, titled, numbered and dated “James Welling 4531 2007 18/25” on the reverse. This work is number 18 from an edition of 25. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Glass House Editions, New Canaan

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246. Zoe Leonard

b. 1961

Two Trees, 1998 gelatin silver print 15 x 10 in. (38.1 x 25.4 cm) This work is number 2 from an edition of 6. This work is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity issued by Galleria Rafaella Cortese, Milan. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Tracey Williams Ltd., New York Private Collection (acquired directly from the above)

247. Edward Burtynsky

b. 1955

China Recycling #9, Circuit Boards, Guiyu, Guandong Province, China, 2004; printed 2007 digital chromogenic color print 16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm) Signed “Edward Burtynsky� on a label afxed to the reverse. This work is number 10 from an edition of 25. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Private Collection

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248. Various Artists amfAR Photography Portfolio, 2004 portfolio of 18 signed, dated and numbered photographs curated by Jack Pierson contained within a white portfolio box, comprising: (i) David Armstrong, Johnny Thunders Wedding, Queens, 1977, gelatin silver print (ii) Tina Barney, The Puppy, 1994, chromogenic color print (iii) Dawoud Bey, A Girl in Hyde Park, Chicago, 2001, chromogenic print (iv) Cecily Brown, Big Film Still, 2003, chromogenic print (v) Bill Burke, Military Hospital Phnom Penh, 1995, silver gelatin print (vi) Alejandro Cesarco, Untitled, 2003, lambda print (vii) Jessica Craig-Martin, Dragon Red & Cherry Blossom Pink, 2000, chromogenic print (viii) William Eggleston, Untitled (Portugal Market), 2003, light jet print (ix) Marina Karella, Untitled (Self Portrait), chromogenic print (x) Steven Klein, Justin no. 09, 2011, chromogenic print (xi) David McDermott and Mr. Peter McGough (McGuf), Joel at Lower Baldonell House, Dublin, 1910, palladium print (xii) Ryan McGinley, Untitled, 2003, chromogenic print (xiii) Marilyn Minter, Crisco, 2002, chromogenic print (xiv) Kembra Phahler and Bruce La Bruce “Wall of Vagina� at the Highland Gardens Hotel, 2001 chromogenic print (xv) Jack Pierson, Technicolor, 2003, chromogenic print (xvi) Stephen Shore, NYC 3/25/03, 2003, chromogenic print (xvii) Sam Taylor-Wood, Beautiful Boy, 2001, chromogenic print (xviii) Bruce Weber, Tara and her pal Chris, San Onfre, CA, 1998, archival print sheet size 16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm) This portfolio is number 21 from an edition of 25. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance amfAR Foundation, 2012

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249. Cliford Ross

b. 1952

Hurricane III, 2000 gelatin silver print 46 x 56 5/8 in. (116.8 x 143.8 cm) Signed “Cliford Ross” on a label afxed to the reverse. This work is number 1 from an edition of 5. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Sonnabend Gallery, New York

250. Wolfgang Tillmans

b. 1968

Casita, 1995 chromogenic print 16 x 12 in. (40.6 x 30.5 cm) Signed, titled, dated, numbered and inscribed “Wolfgang Tillmans Casita ph 5 95 pr WT 10 99 9/10 + 1 95-111-9/10” on the reverse. This work is number 9 from an edition of 10 plus 1 artist’s proof. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York

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251. Roni Horn

b. 1955

Becoming a Landscape (7), 1999 2 chromogenic prints each 14 1/2 x 22 in. (36.8 x 55.9 cm) overall 44 1/2 x 59 in. (113 x 149.9 cm) This work is number 2 from an edition of 7. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

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252. Adam Fuss

b. 1961

Untitled, 1994 unique cibachrome photogram 14 x 11 in. (35.6 x 27.9 cm) Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Robert Miller Gallery, New York Phillips de Pury & Company, New York, November 17, 2006, lot 390 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

253. Scott McFarland

b. 1975

Analyzing, Ryan Otto Conducts Water Test, 2003 digital chromogenic print 41 1/2 x 49 1/4 in. (105.4 x 125.1 cm) Signed “Scott McFarland� on a label afxed to the reverse. This work is number 6 from an edition of 7. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Union Gallery, London

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254. Elad Lassry

b. 1977

Silk Rope, 2010 gelatin silver print, in painted artist’s frame 11 1/2 x 14 1/2 in. (29.2 x 36.8 cm) This work is number 4 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Luhring Augustine, New York Exhibited New York, Luhring Augustine, Elad Lassry, October 30 – December 18, 2010, p. 21 Aspen, Aspen Art Museum; Austin, Arthouse, The Anxiety of Photography, May 13 – July 17, 2011 Literature Matthew Thompson, The Anxiety of Photography, Aspen Art Press, 2011, p. 38-39

255. Elad Lassry

b. 1977

Coyfsh, 2011 chromogenic print, in painted artist’s frame 11 1/2 x 14 1/2 in. (29.2 x 36.8 cm) This work is number 1 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles Exhibited London, White Cube Hoxton Square, Elad Lassry, September 23 November 12, 2011 Literature André Rottmann, Elad Lassry, White Cube, Hong Kong, 2012, p. 10 Akira Mizuta Lippit, Elad Lassry, Rat Hole Gallery, Tokyo, 2012, p. 29 Vivian Sky Rehberg, “Costume Drama,” Frieze, Number 151, November December 2012, p. 11 Tim Grifn, Elad Lassry: 2000 Words, DESTE Foundation for Contemporary Art, Athens, 2013, p. 91

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256. Collier Schorr

b. 1963

In The Collage (Marie), 2013 archival pigment ink print 64 1/2 x 42 in. (163.8 x 106.7 cm) This work is number 1 from an edition of 5. Estimate $7,000-10,000 Provenance 303 Gallery, New York Literature Francesca Gavin, “Collier Schorr: still chasing the frst high,” Dazed, 2015 Andrew M. Goldstein, “11 Revelatory Artworks at Frieze New York,” Artspace, May 12, 2013 William Van Meter, “When Fashion Meets Art,” The New York Times, March 12, 2014

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257. Hans-Peter Feldmann

b. 1941

Lovers, 2008 cut photograph, in artist’s frame 20 3/4 x 14 1/2 in. (52.7 x 36.8 cm) This work is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance 303 Gallery, New York Exhibited Bologna, P420 Arte Contemporanea, Lumpenfotografe. Towards a photography without vainglory: Hans-Peter Feldmann, Peter Piller, Alessandra Spranzi, Joachim Schmid, Franco Vaccari, May 4 - July 13, 2013 (another variant exhibited)

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258. Dan Graham

b. 1942

Roll, 1970 gelatin silver print 8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm) Signed, titled, dated and inscribed “‘Roll’ 1970 2 super-8 flm loops Dan Graham” on the reverse. Estimate $7,000-10,000 Provenance Carole Thompson Fine Photographs, Santa Barbara

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259. Sam Samore

b. 1963

Allegories of Beauty #44 from the series Allegories of Beauty (Incomplete), circa 1990-1999 gelatin silver print, mounted image 20 1/2 x 49 3/4 in. (52.1 x 126.4 cm) sheet 31 x 59 3/4 in. (78.7 x 151.8 cm) Signed, numbered and dated “Sam Samore AP 1990s” lower right. This work is artist’s proof 1 from an edition of 2 plus 1 artist’s proof. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Private Collection Literature Exh. cat., Sam Samore:allegories of beauty (incomplete), New York: D.A.P., 1996 (illustrated)

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260. Justine Kurland

b. 1969

Swamp, 1999 chromogenic print, in artist’s frame 30 3/4 x 40 3/4 in. (78.1 x 103.5 cm) Signed “J. Kurland” on a label afxed to the reverse. This work is number 1 from an edition of 6. Estimate $2,000-3,000 Provenance Lawrence Rubin/Greenberg van Doren Fine Art, New York

261. Candida Höfer

b. 1944

Marine-museum Lissabon I, 1989 chromogenic print 20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61 cm) Signed, titled, numbered and dated “Candida Höfer 6/6 Marine Museun Lissabon 1989 I” on the reverse. This work is number 6 from an edition of 6. Estimate $2,000-3,000 Provenance Nicole Klagsbrun, New York Literature Gregorio Magnani, Candida Hofer: Raume, Berlin: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther Konig, 1992, p. 44 (illustrated)

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262. Sam Taylor-Johnson

b. 1967

Travesty of a Mockery (diptych), 1995 diptych: chromogenic prints each sheet 20 x 26 3/4 in. (50.8 x 67.9 cm) This work is from an edition of 3. Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance White Cube, London Exhibited New York, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Speaking with Hands: Photographs from The Buhl Collection, June - September 2004, pp. 137 & 251 (another example exhibited) Literature Bruce Ferguson, “Sam Taylor-Wood, BOMB — Artists in Conversation,” BOMB Magazine, 1998 Jennifer Blessing, Speaking with Hands: Photographs from The Buhl Collection, Guggenheim Foundation, 2004, pp. 137 & 251 (illustrated)

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263. Cang Xin

b. 1967

To Add One Meter to an Anonymous Mountain, 1995 chromogenic print 26 1/2 x 39 1/4 in. (67.3 x 99.7 cm) Signed and dated “Cang Xin 1995” on the reverse. This work is number 6 from an edition of 10. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Private Collection

264. Hellen van Meene

b. 1972

zonder titel, 1995 chromogenic print, in artist’s wooden frame 11 7/8 x 11 7/8 in. (30.2 x 30.2 cm) Signed “Hellen v. Meene” and stamped “Galerie Paul Andriesse” on the reverse of the frame. This work is number 3 from an edition of 10. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Galerie Paul Andriesse, Amsterdam Exhibited Amsterdam, De Kabinetten van De Vleeshal, Hellen van Meene, January 25 March 12, 2000 Literature Hellen Van Meene: Untitled, Gabrius Edizioni, Milan, 2000, p. 11 (illustrated)

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265. Cindy Sherman

b. 1954

Untitled, 2002/04 chromogenic print 30 x 20 in. (76.2 x 50.8 cm) This work is from an edition of 300. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Choice Art Auction, New York Acquired from the above sale by the present owner

266. Mickalene Thomas

b. 1971

Just an old-fashioned girl, 2009 mounted chromogenic print 30 x 20 in. (76.2 x 50.8 cm) Signed and dated “M. Thomas 2009� on the reverse. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Lehmann Maupin, New York

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267. David Corio

b. 1960

Sixteen works: (i) Marvin Gaye; (ii) Horace Andy; (iii) Peter Tosh; (iv) Dennis Brown; (v) Augustus Pablo; (vi) Bob Marley; (vii) Gregory Isaacs; (viii) Al Green; (ix) Lee Perry; (x) Niney the Observer; (xi) James Brown; (xii) Bunny Wailer; (xiii) Black Uhuru; (xiv) Alton Ellis; (xv) David Hinds; (xvi) Barry White, 1980 - 1988 gelatin silver print 14 x 11 in. (35.6 x 27.9 cm) Each signed, dated and titled respectively on the reverse. Each work is number 1 from an edition of 25. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

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268. Sharon Lockhart

b. 1964

Chihiro Nishijima, Sayaka Miyamoto & Takako Yamada, Kumiko Shirai & Eri Hashimoto, Kumiko Kotaka, 1997 chromogenic print, in 4 parts each 37 1/2 x 32 in. (95.3 x 81.3 cm) This work is number 1 from an edition of 8. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Leo Koenig Inc., New York Exhibited New York, Petzel Gallery, SHARON LOCKHART, March 6 - April 4, 1998 Tokyo, Wako Works of Art; Santa Monica, Blum & Poe, SHARON LOCKHART, Goshogaoka Girls Basketball Team, January 28 - March 28, 1998

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269. Gedi Sibony

b. 1973

A Sense of The, 2006 sticks, plywood, wood glue, and wood fller 72 x 45 x 27 in. (182.9 x 114.3 x 68.6 cm) Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance 303 Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, 303 Gallery, A Broken Arm, July 20 - August 18, 2006

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270. Will Ryman

b. 1969

Rose #7, 2009 steel, epoxy resin, plaster, paint, and aluminum mesh, in 3 parts overall 78 1/8 x 73 1/2 x 41 1/2 in. (198.4 x 186.7 x 105.4 cm) Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Marlborough Gallery, New York

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271. Hans-Peter Feldmann

b. 1941

Flower Pot, 2009 15 synthetic fowers and soil in plastic pots dimensions variable This work is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance 303 Gallery, New York Exhibited Malmö, Malmö Konsthall, Hans-Peter Feldmann, February 20 - May 2, 2010 (another example exhibited) Madrid, Museo Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Hans-Peter Feldmann: “An Art Exhibition,” September 22, 2010 – February 28, 2011 (another example exhibited) London, Serpentine Gallery, Hans-Peter Feldmann, April 11 - June 12, 2012 (another variant exhibited) Literature Adrian Hamilton, “Hans-Peter Feldmann: Serpentine Gallery meets anarchic conceptual art,” Independent, April, 2012

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272. Anselm Reyle and Franz West b. 1970/1947-2012 Caruso, 2011 steel, pressed chipboard, and acrylic 38 1/4 x 25 5/8 x 25 5/8 in. (97 x 65 x 65 cm) This work is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artists. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Galerie Almine Rech, Paris

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273. Max Coyer

1954 – 1988

Madame de Sade #4, 1984 oil on canvas 42 x 36 in. (106.7 x 91.4 cm) Stamped “Max Coyer” lower right. Signed, titled and dated “Max Coyer ’84 Madam de Sade #4” on the reverse. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Harm Bouckaert Gallery, New York

274. Roger Selden

b. 1945

Untitled, 2008 acrylic and mixed media on canvas 48 x 37 1/2 in. (121.9 x 95.3 cm) Signed and dated “Roger Selden 2008” on the reverse. Estimate $7,000-10,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

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275. Donald Baechler

b. 1956

Yellow Tulip, 2006 gesso, fashe and collage on paper 27 x 21 in. (68.6 x 53.3 cm) Initialed and dated “DB 2006” lower right. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Cheim & Read, New York

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276. Jonathan Meese

b. 1970

Babymetabolism De River Deep Mountain High, 2009 ink, collage and graphite on paper 18 7/8 x 12 7/8 in. (48 x 33 cm) Estimate $2,000-3,000 Provenance Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Contemplating the Void Beneft Auction, New York, 2010 Exhibited New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Contemplating the Void: Interventions in the Guggenheim Museum, February 12–April 28, 2010

277. Joshua Smith

b. 1978

Untitled, 2009 acrylic on canvas 20 x 16 in. (50.8 x 40.6 cm) Signed and dated “Joshua Smith 2009” on the reverse. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles Beneft Auction Collection of Blake Byrne, Los Angeles

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278. Jonathan Meese

b. 1970

Napoleon II, 2006 bronze on artist’s wooden plinth with marble sculpture 28 1/2 x 18 1/4 x 12 1/2 in. (72.4 x 46.4 x 31.8 cm) plinth 39 1/2 x 13 3/4 x 15 3/4 in. (100.3 x 34.9 x 40 cm) Initialed, titled, numbered and dated “JM 06 NAPOLEON 1/3” lower lef of fgure. Further stamped by the foundry “H. Noack Berlin” lower lef of fgure. This work is number 1 from an edition of 3. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Galerie Daniel Blau, Munich

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279. Charlie Hammond

b. 1979

Portrait of the Bureaucrat (Lurking in Dark Paint), 2008 oil on canvas 24 7/8 x 20 3/4 in. (63.2 x 52.7 cm) Signed and dated “Charlie Hammond 2008” along the overlap. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Sorcha Dallas, Glasgow

280. Tomás Saraceno

b. 1973

Ladies and Gentlemen we’re foating in space, 2006 architect’s lamp, nylon string, magnet, screw and staple remover table 62 7/8 x 23 5/8 in. (160 x 60 cm) installation dimensions variable This work is number 2 from an edition of 3 plus 1 artist’s proof and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist and installation instructions. Estimate $7,000-10,000 Provenance Andersen’s Gallery, Copenhagen Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Camogli, Fondazione Pier Luigi e Natalina Remotti, Tomás Saraceno: from Camogli to San Felipe, spiders weaving stars, March 13 – September 12, 2010

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281. Angel Otero

b. 1981

Untitled, 2013 oil paint skins on canvas 26 1/2 x 20 1/2 in. (67.3 x 52.1 cm) Estimate $7,000-10,000 Provenance Walter Otero Contemporary Art, Puerto Rico

282. Eddie Martinez

b. 1977

Untitled, 2009 mixed media on canvas 16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm) Signed and dated “E. Martinez 09� twice on the reverse. Estimate $7,000-10,000 Provenance ZieherSmith, New York

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283. Justen Ladda

b. 1978

Two works: (i) Dress, 2001; (ii) Untitled, 2004 (i) Swarovski crystals on painted steel wire frame; (ii) pigment and lacquer on wood (i) 51 x 24 x 20 in. (129.5 x 61 x 50.8 cm.); (ii) 62 1/2 x 18 in. (158.8 x 45.7 cm.) (ii) Signed and dated “Justin Ladda 2004” on the reverse. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance R. Louis Boferding Fine Arts, New York

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284. Michael Raedecker

b. 1963

Matter, 2001 acrylic and thread on canvas 60 x 90 in. (152.4 x 228.6 cm) Signed, titled, dated and inscribed “ - Michael Raedecker - 2001 - 60” x 90” - (153 x 229 cm) - ‘Matter’ - acrylic & thread on canvas - Berge A7 hand primed linen - ” along the overlap.

Provenance The Approach, London Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Arlene Bonnant, CAP Collection, Switzerland, 2005, p. 238 (illustrated)

Estimate $18,000-22,000

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285. Troy Brauntuch

b. 1954

Untitled (Pills), 2002 conté on cotton 20 x 30 in. (50.8 x 76.2 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Troy Brauntuch Untitled (Pills) 2002” on the stretcher. Estimate $2,000-3,000 Provenance Mai 36 Galerie, Zurich Acquired from the above by the present owner

286. Tomoo Gokita

b. 1969

Can’t Be Funky, 2007 acrylic and gouache on canvas 15 x 18 in. (38.1 x 45.7 cm) Signed, titled, and dated “Tomoo Gokita ‘Can’t Be Funky’ 2007” on the reverse. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance ATM Gallery, New York

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287. Avner Ben-Gal

b. 1966

Untitled, 2006 acrylic on canvas 82 5/8 x 78 in. (209.9 x 198.1 cm) Signed and dated “Avner Ben-Gal 2006” on the reverse. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Sadie Coles HQ, London

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288. Andrew Kuo

b. 1977

Forest (Bright), 2007 acrylic on canvas 40 x 30 1/8 in. (101.6 x 76.5 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Andrew Kuo ‘Forest (Bright)’ 07” on the stretcher. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance 33 Bond Street Gallery, New York

289. Hernan Bas

b. 1978

Untitled L #496, 2006 oil and sand on canvas 12 x 9 in. (30.5 x 22.9 cm) Initialed and dated “HB 06” lower right. Estimate $7,000-10,000 Provenance Fredric Snitzer Gallery, Miami

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290. Alfred Boman

b. 1981

Body Paint #4, 2014 glue emulsion, acrylic, enamel varnish and spraypaint on linen 75 1/2 x 57 1/2 in. (191.8 x 146.1 cm) Signed and dated “Alfred Boman 2014” on the reverse. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Prism, Los Angeles Exhibited Los Angeles, Prism, Alfred Boman: Body Paint, May 20 June 28th, 2014

291. Allison Katz

b. 1980

Augur, 2009 acrylic and plaster on canvas 28 x 22 in. (71.1 x 55.9 cm) Signed, dated and titled “Allison Katz 2009 Augur” along the overlap. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Rachel Ufner Gallery, New York

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292. Matthew Chambers

b. 1982

It Took all she Had Been to Make her All that she Was, 2012 oil on canvas 96 x 48 in. (243.8 x 121.9 cm) Signed and dated “Matthew Chambers 2012� on the reverse. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Untitled, New York

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293. Kehinde Wiley

b. 1977

James Quin Actor, 2008 oil on canvas 26 x 22 in. (66 x 55.9 cm) Signed and dated “Kehinde Wiley 08” on the reverse. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles

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294. Serban Savu

b. 1978

Inner Life, 2010 oil on canvas 63 x 86 5/8 in. (160 x 220 cm) Signed and dated “Serban Savu 2010” on the reverse. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Gallery Éric Hussenot, Paris, France Collection of Blake Byrne, Los Angeles

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295. Patrick Hughes

b. 1939

There, There, 1998 oil on board construction 36 x 48 x 9 in. (91.4 x 121.9 x 22.9 cm) Signed, titled and dated “There There Patrick Hughes 1998� on the reverse. Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance Private Collection

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296. Daniel Oates

b. 1964

Trophy (Ursula the Cow) I, 1991 polyester resin, urethane foam, latex, wood, steel and painted fberglass with acrylic yarn, extruded polystyrene, painted macaroni and plastic necklace 16 x 17 1/2 x 17 1/4 in. (40.6 x 44.5 x 43.8 cm) This work is from an edition of 5. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Private Collection, New York

297. Will Ryman

b. 1969

Businessman, 2008 epoxy, resin, steel and paint 11 3/4 x 12 x 12 in. (30 x 30.5 x 30.5 cm) Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Marlborough, New York

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298. Michael Queenland

b. 1970

Mille Pogany and Breads, 2007 wicker basket and 9 pieces of glazed ceramic basket 15 x 25 x 21 1/2 in. (38.1 x 63.5 x 54.6 cm) 9 ceramic pieces, largest 3 1/4 x 6 3/4 x 17 1/2 in. (8.3 x 17.1 x 44.5 cm) Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Private Collection, New York

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299. Thomas Zipp

b. 1966

Montagne, 2005 sculpture and painting installation sculpture 59 x 59 x 7 7/8 in. (149.9 x 149.9 x 20 cm) painting 19 3/4 x 15 7/8 in. (50.2 x 40.3 cm) Signed, titled and dated “’Ingrid (Mountain)’ Thomas Zipp 05” on the reverse of the painting. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Baronian Francey, Belgium Private Collection Exhibited Brussels, Baronian Francey, Thomas Zipp: Man muss das Adjektiv abschafen, February 15–March 12, 2005 New York, Marc Jancou Contemporary, Paintings 2002 - 2007, 2008

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300. Rosson Crow

b. 1982

The Year of Infnity, 2005 oil, enamel and spray enamel on canvas 66 x 94 7/8 in. (167.6 x 241 cm) Signed and dated “Rosson Crow 2005” along the overlap. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Canada Gallery, New York

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301. Christian Frosi

b. 1973

Piraha Song, 2006 black and white photo fush mounted to aluminum and neoprene 39 1/2 x 27 1/2 x 8 in. (100.3 x 69.9 x 20.3 cm) Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle, Munich Exhibited Munich, Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle, Christian Frosi, September 9, 2006 October 28, 2006 Literature Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Ambient Tour: Christian Frosi, Flavio Favelli, Deborah Ligorio, Milan: Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, 2007, p. 1 (illustrated)

302. Ry Rocklen

b. 1978

Untitled, 2005 tree branch, metal hoop, Styrofoam, granite, metal hoop, plaster and string 33 x 13 x 3 in. (83.8 x 33 x 7.6 cm) This work is accompanied by a signed note written by the artist. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Black Dragon Society, Los Angeles Private Collection

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303. Aaron Young

b. 1972

Eastwood Royale (still smokin’), 2007 silkscreen on custom distorted mirror 72 x 40 in. (182.9 x 101.6 cm) Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Gagosian Gallery, New York Exhibited London, Gagosian Gallery, Pop Art Is..., September 27 - November 21, 2007

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304. Ry Rocklen

b. 1978

Extruded Cage, 2010 bird cage, dowels and paint 25 x 24 x 24 in. (63.5 x 61 x 61 cm) Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Black Dragon Society, Los Angeles Private Collection Exhibited Paris, Marc Jancou Contemporary, Rive Gauche / Rive Droite, September 9 - 25, 2010

305. Ryan Johnson

b. 1978

Clara Bow (Flapper), 2008 synthetic clay, acrylic, paint, cheesecloth, plywood, steel and casting tape 81 x 33 x 23 in. (205.7 x 83.8 x 58.4 cm) Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Guild & Greyshkul, New York

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306. Tam van Tran

b. 1966

Untitled, 2012 glass on ceramic 18 x 13 in. (45.7 x 33 cm) Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles Beneft Auction Collection of Blake Byrne, Los Angeles

307. Li Zhenwei

b. 1987

Irrational Transcendent: Untitled #7, 2012 oil on canvas 59 x 59 in. (149.9 x 149.9 cm) Signed and dated “Li Zhenwei 2012� on the reverse. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Platform China Contemporary Art Institute, Hong Kong Private Collection, Beijing

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308. Mark Titchner

b. 1973

Poppa, 2007 acrylic, wood, plastic, motor and steel overall 87 7/8 x 19 5/8 x 19 5/8 in. (223.2 x 49.8 x 49.8 cm) Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Vilma Gold, London Exhibited London, Vilma Gold, The Eye Don’t See Itself, October 11 - November 18, 2007

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309. Chris Martin

b. 1954

Empty Frame Painting (Homage to Al Jensen), 1999-2007 oil on canvas 21 3/4 x 28 in. (55.2 x 71.1 cm) Initialed, titled and dated “CM CM CM Empty Frame 3/4 Homage to Al Jensen 1999 - 2000 - 2001� on the reverse. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York Edelman Arts, New York Private Collection, New York

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310. Jay Stuckey

b. 1968

Charles Whitman, 2012 oil and collage on canvas laid on panel 33 x 24 1/4 in. (83.8 x 61.6 cm) Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Anat Ebgi, Los Angeles

311. Michael Velliquette

b. 1971

They Set Of in Rafs and Arrived in Bones, 2005 paper and glue 12 x 12 in. (30.5 x 30.5 cm) Initialed and dated “MV05” lower right. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Chris Peres/Ratio 3, San Francisco Acquired from the above by the present owner

312. Michael Velliquette

b. 1971

Trickle, 2005 paper and glue 12 x 12 in. (30.5 x 30.5 cm) Initialed and dated “MV05” lower right and inscribed “In the midnight desert (a trickle, then river)” on the reverse. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Chris Peres/Ratio 3, San Francisco Acquired from the above by the present owner

311.

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312.

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313. Gerald Davis

b. 1974

Discipline Essay, 2005 oil on canvas 24 x 18 in. (61 x 45.7 cm) Signed and dated “Gerald Davis 2005” on the reverse. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Black Dragon Society, Los Angeles Private Collection, New York

314. Gerald Davis

b. 1974

Wheelchair Drawing, 2005 oil on canvas 84 1/8 x 65 in. (213.7 x 165.1 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Gerald Davis Oct. 2005 Wheelchair Drawing” on the reverse. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Black Dragon Society, Los Angeles Private Collection, New York

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315. Hiroshi Sugito

b. 1970

Untitled, 1997 acrylic and graphite on canvas 8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm) Signed and dated “Hiroshi Sugito 1997” on the reverse. Estimate $2,000-3,000 Provenance Private Collection

316. John Walker

b. 1939

Untitled, 1989 oil on canvas 15 7/8 x 19 7/8 in. (40.3 x 50.5 cm) Signed and dated “Walker 1989” on the reverse. Estimate $2,000-3,000 Provenance M. Knoedler + Co., Inc., New York

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317. Djordje Ozbolt

b. 1967

Benares, 2005 acrylic on canvas 15 3/4 x 19 3/4 in. (40 x 50.2 cm) Signed and dated “Djordje Ozbolt 2005” on the reverse. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Herald St, London

318. Djordje Ozbolt

b. 1967

Pale Blue Eyes, 2006 acrylic on canvas 12 x 10 in. (30.5 x 25.4 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Djordje Ozbolt 2006 Pale Blue Eyes” on the reverse. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Herald St, London

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319. Jãnis Avotiņš

b. 1981

Untitled #39, 2005 acrylic on canvas 9 x 13 in. (22.9 x 33 cm) Signed and titled “Jãnis Avotiņš # 39” on the stretcher. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Ibid, London Private Collection, Switzerland

320. Andreas Diefenbach

b. 1973

Selbst Noch Wach Von Gestern, 2003 oil, lacquer and acrylic on canvas 28 3/4 x 19 5/8 in. (73 x 50 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Andreas Diefenbach Selbst Noch Wach Von Gestern 2003” along the overlap and on the stretcher. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Christian Nagel, Berlin

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321. Stanley Casselman

b. 1963

Luminor-6-35, 2015 oil on canvas 78 x 78 in. (198.1 x 198.1 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Stanley Casselmann ‘Luminor-6-35’ 2015” on the reverse. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Private Collection (acquired directly from the artist)

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Sold to Beneft the Dubin Breast Center at the Mount Sinai Health System Lots 322–334

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Phillips is honored to partner with the Dubin Breast Center on this important sale of 20th Century & Contemporary Art, comprised of both established and emerging works, with proceeds directly benefting the Center’s array of breast services and research initiatives. Founded in 2011 by Mount Sinai Trustees Glenn Dubin and Eva Andersson-Dubin, MD—a physician, philanthropist, and breast cancer survivor—the Dubin Breast Center of The Tisch Cancer Institute at the Mount Sinai Health System is a comprehensive breast health clinic that provides stateof-the-art patient care and conducts groundbreaking research. It is one of the few clinics in New York City to ofer innovative new technologies such as 3D mammography, which provides earlier and more accurate diagnosis of breast cancer, and advanced procedures such as seed localization, which allows surgeons to target and remove breast tumors more precisely. Compiling more than 100,000 patient visits since it opened, the Dubin Breast Center is a vital part of Mount Sinai, recognized for the quality of its medical care, the innovation of its research, and the compassion of its approach to patients. Representing a bold vision for breast cancer treatment and research, the Center focuses on the holistic health and wellbeing of individuals with, or at risk for, cancer. Patients receive highly

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personalized, multidisciplinary care in a calming, private, and supportive setting. The intricate relationship between art and health is evident at the Center, where carefully selected artworks are a key component of the healing environment, intended to provide patients, family members, and visitors with a sense of serenity. The Dubin Breast Center is dependent on philanthropy in order to provide optimal care to thousands of patients a year, regardless of their ability to pay. This beneft sale presents an outstanding opportunity both to raise funds for the Center’s important work and to showcase the talents of the artists represented in the auction. Proceeds from the sale of works generously donated by supporters of the Dubin Breast Center will directly contribute to the lifesaving services and industry-leading research that are the hallmarks of the Center. We wish to thank the artists, collectors, and galleries without whom this sale would not be possible; their commitment to the Dubin Breast Center is also a commitment to transforming the patient experience and advancing breast cancer research. Phillips is thrilled to ofer the platform upon which this important initiative can be supported and is honored to be a collaborator in this vital cause.

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322. Ellsworth Kelly

1923-2015

Blue/Black/Red/Green, 2001 colored lithograph 24 7/8 x 88 3/4 in. (63.2 x 225.4 cm) Published by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles, with their blindstamps and inkstamp on the reverse. This work is artist’s proof 4 from an edition of 45 plus 10 artist proofs. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Gif of the artist and Matthew Marks Gallery, New York Literature Richard H. Axsom, The Prints of Ellsworth Kelly: A Catalogue RaisonnÊ, Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation, 2012, no. 293.

Sold to Beneft the Dubin Breast Center

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323. Louise Nevelson

1899-1988

Series of an Unknown Cosmos CIII, 1979 wood and paper collage 20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61 cm) Signed and dated “Louise Nevelson - 79” lower right. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Richard Gray Gallery, Chicago Courtesy of Pace Gallery, New York Literature Suzanne Hudson, Louise Nevelson, Art Forum, Summer 2013 (illustrated)

Sold to Beneft the Dubin Breast Center

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324. Robert Lazzarini

b. 1965

M30-1, 2015 acrylic on canvas 17 x 22 in. (43.2 x 55.9 cm) Signed and dated “Lazzarini 2015� on the reverse. Estimate $5,000-10,000 Provenance Honor Fraser Gallery, Los Angeles

Sold to Beneft the Dubin Breast Center

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325. Kiki Smith

b. 1954

Untitled (Pink Bosoms), 1990-92, dated 1990 complete set of 4 screenprints with gouache on rice paper (i) sheet 20 1/2 x 32 1/4 in. (52.1 x 81.9 cm) (ii) sheet 20 3/4 x 32 in. (52.7 x 81.3 cm) (iii) sheet 20 5/8 x 32 1/8 in. (52.4 x 81.6 cm) (iv) sheet 20 1/2 x 32 in. (52.1 x 81.3 cm) (i) Signed, dated, and numbered “Kiki Smith 1990 7/16” lower right. (ii) Initialed, dated and numbered “KS 1990 7/16 2 of 4” on the reverse. (iii) Initialed, dated and numbered “KS 1990 7/16 3 of 4” on the reverse. (iv) Initialed, dated and numbered “KS 1990 7/16 4 of 4” on the reverse. This work is number 7 from an edition of 16.

Provenance Barbara Krakow Gallery, Boston Exhibited Another example from this edition is held in the permanent collection of The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Estimate $10,000-15,000

Sold to Beneft the Dubin Breast Center

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326. Hunt Slonem

b. 1951

Untitled (Rabbit), 2014 oil on wood, in artist’s frame 29 3/4 x 23 1/2 in. (75.6 x 59.7 cm) Signed and dated “Hunt Slonem 2014” on the reverse. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Courtesy of the artist

Sold to Beneft the Dubin Breast Center

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327. Keith Haring

1958-1990

Barking Dogs from Pop Shop Quad IV, 1989 silkscreen on paper 13 1/2 x 16 1/2 in. (34.3 x 41.9 cm) Signed, numbered and dated “40/200 K Haring 89� lower right. This work is number 40 from an edition of 200. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Pop Shop, New York Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York (acquired from the above in 1989)

Sold to Beneft the Dubin Breast Center

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328. Kristin Baker

b. 1975

Sturm and Drang, 2008 acrylic on PVC, in 2 parts each 120 1/4 x 80 in. (305.4 x 203.2 cm) overall 120 1/4 x 160 in. (305.4 x 406.4 cm) Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Deitch Projects, New York Private Collection, New York

“When I was young, my parents were really into racing. We’d go to races and watch races on TV. It was a really big part of our environment,” artist Kristin Baker explains. The present lot Sturm and Drang, 2008 forges a luscious image of visually tumultuous and viscerally emotional speed. The tactile surface of Sturm and Drang is achieved artistically through Baker’s uses of spray gloss and squeegee-painting techniques on PVC, resulting in smooth colorful surface similar to the slick paint jobs given to the exterior of NASCAR vehicles. Baker’s fascination with the thick heat of a racetrack led her to venture out physically to observe the scenes. “She went to racetracks, photographed and videotaped every aspect of the action there, and began to work elements of it into what were still mostly abstract renderings of crowds, tire burns on concrete, hurtling cars, logos, and sheer breakneck speed.” (Dodie Kazanjian, Vogue, 2008) The title of the present work is a play on the term Sturm und Drang, German for “Storm and Drive,” the name given to the 18th century literary movement characterized by free emotional expression from the constraints of rationalism and societal norms. Sturm and Drang, 2008 is the result of a careful balance between the tension of meticulous artistic execution and the vibrancy of Baker’s electric colors, longing to break free from the constraints of the picture plane.

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“I love painting large. It’s just a lot more fun to conquer. I want paintings to create an environment that envelops you.” Kristin Baker

Sold to Beneft the Dubin Breast Center

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329. Sarah Crowner

b. 1974

Untitled (Sawtooth) 2, 2014 acrylic on canvas, in artist’s painted wood frame 33 3/4 x 28 1/8 in. (85.7 x 71.4 cm) Signed and dated “Sarah Crowner 2014” on the stretcher.

Provenance Primary Information Beneft, New York, October 2014 Private Collection (acquired directly from the above)

Estimate $7,000-10,000

Sold to Beneft the Dubin Breast Center

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330. Alex da Corte

b. 1981

The Noise is a Thorn on The Side of Your Face, 2015 vinyl and inkjet on paper, in artist’s frame 56 1/4 x 56 1/4 in. (142.9 x 142.9 cm) Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Collection of the artist Courtesy Luxembourg & Dayan, New York

Sold to Beneft the Dubin Breast Center

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331. Cindy Sherman

b. 1954

Untitled (Madonna), 1975/1997 silver gelatin print 10 x 8 in. (25.4 x 20.3 cm) Signed and dated “Cindy Sherman 1975/97” on the reverse. This work is from an edition of 100. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Metro Pictures, New York Meridian Fine Art, New York (acquired directly from the above) Literature Gabriele Schor, Cindy Sherman: The Early Works 1975-1977 Catalogue Raisonné, Ostfldern, 2011, p. 119, no. 14 (illustrated)

Sold to Beneft the Dubin Breast Center

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332. Richard Phillips

b. 1962

Study for Nude, 1997 oil on linen 16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm) Signed and dated “Richard Phillips 97” on the stretcher. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Friedrich Petzel Gallery, New York

Sold to Beneft the Dubin Breast Center

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333. Anna Gaskell

b. 1969

Cherry Ripe, 1996 chromogenic print 50 x 40 in. (127 x 101.6 cm) Signed and dated “Anna Gaskell 1996” on the reverse. This work is artist’s proof number 1 from an edition of 3 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York

Sold to Beneft the Dubin Breast Center

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334. Rachel Feinstein

b. 1971

[Untitled], 2006 graphite on paper 11 1/2 x 9 in. (29.2 x 22.9 cm) Signed and dated “Rachel Feinstein 2006� on the reverse. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York

Sold to Beneft the Dubin Breast Center

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Now.

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335. Chris Ofli

b. 1968

Two works: (i) Untitled; (ii) Untitled, 2001 watercolor and pencil on paper 9 1/2 x 6 in. (24.1 x 15.2 cm) Each signed twice and dated “Chris Ofli 2001� on the reverse. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance David Zwirner Fine Art, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

i)

ii)

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336. Wangechi Mutu

b. 1972

Collage, 2002 gouache, ink, sequins and printed collage on paper 17 x 14 in. (43.2 x 35.6 cm) Signed and dated “Wangechi 2002” lower right. Estimate $30,000-40,000

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Provenance Arena Gallery, New York Private Collection, Europe Sotheby’s, New York, May 16, 2007, lot 401 Private Collection Sotheby’s, London, June 26, 2009, lot 260 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

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337. Fred Tomaselli

b. 1956

Mar. 17, 2009, 2009 gouache and photocollage on printed watercolor paper 8 1/2 x 11 in. (21.6 x 27.9 cm) Signed and dated “Fred Tomaselli 2009” lower right. Estimate $8,000-10,000 Provenance James Cohan Gallery, New York Exhibited Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Museum of Art; Newport Beach, Orange County Museum of Art, Fred Tomaselli: The Times, October 4, 2014 – May 24, 2015, p. 151

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338. Fred Tomaselli

b. 1956

Sleeping pills - constellations of Orion, Perseus, Gemini, Taurus, Pliedies, the kid, 1990 prismacolor on paper 14 1/4 x 17 1/2 in. (36.2 x 44.5 cm) Signed and dated “April 7, 1990 Tomaselli� lower right. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Paula Allen Gallery, New York Feature Inc., New York

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339. Amy Sillman

b. 1966

Untitled, 2004 watercolor, acrylic and glue on paper 24 1/4 x 30 in. (61.6 x 76.2 cm) Initialed and dated “AS04� at bottom center edge. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Brent Sikkema, New York

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340. Joe Bradley

b. 1975

Study for Study for Untitled (07), 2007 gouache on graph paper 6 3/4 x 4 1/4 in. (17.1 x 10.8 cm) Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, New York Private Collection, Los Angeles Exhibited Berlin, Peres Projects, Joe BRADLEY, April 27 – June 9, 2007

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341. Carol Bove

b. 1971

Playboy Magazine: July 1972, 2000 ink and graphite on vellum 14 x 11 in. (35.6 x 27.9 cm) Inscribed and dated “July 1972 September 2000” lower right. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Wendy Cooper Gallery, Chicago

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342. Karen Kilimnik

b. 1955

On your mark, Get Set, Go!, 1998 wax crayon, graphite and acrylic on paper 39 3/4 x 30 1/8 in. (101 x 76.5 cm) Dated “705 pm September 1998” lower right. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance 303 Gallery, New York Christie’s, New York, April 1, 2008, lot 3 Private Collection (acquired at the above sale) Phillips, London, October 13, 2011, lot 240 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

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∆

343. Yoshitomo Nara

b. 1959

Untitled, 2002 graphite and colored pencil on paper 8 1/2 x 7 1/2 in. (21.6 x 19.1 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Tomio Koyama Gallery, Tokyo

∆

344. Yoshitomo Nara

b. 1959

Untitled, 2002 graphite and crayon on paper 11 1/2 x 8 1/4 in. (29.2 x 21 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Tomio Koyama Gallery, Tokyo

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345. Yayoi Kusama

b. 1929

Muroto Peninsula, 1978 spraypaint on card 10 3/4 x 9 1/2 in. (27.3 x 24.1 cm) Signed and dated “YAYOI KUSAMA 1978” upper lef. Further signed, inscribed in Japanese and dated “1978 Yayoi Kusama” on the reverse. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Gallery Te, Tokyo Private Collection (acquired from the above in 1994)

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346. Tomory Dodge

b. 1974

Dead Mall, 2004 watercolor and pencil on paper 13 7/8 x 19 3/4 in. (35.2 x 50.2 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Tomory Dodge Dead Mall 2004� on the reverse. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance CRG Gallery, New York

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347. Laylah Ali

b. 1968

Four works: (i) Untitled; (ii) Untitled; (iii) Untitled; (iv) Untitled, 2002 gouache, watercolor pencil, and ink on paper (i) 7 x 4 1/8 in. (17.8 x 10.5 cm) (ii) 10 1/4 x 11 1/2 in. (26 x 29.2 cm) (iii) 9 1/2 x 6 1/2 in. (24.1 x 16.5 cm) (iv) 8 3/4 x 14 1/2 in. (22.2 x 36.8 cm) Signed and dated “L. Ali 2002� on the reverse of each work. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance 303 Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited St. Louis, Contemporary Art Museum, Laylah Ali: Paintings and Drawings, December 3, 2004 - February 27, 2005 ((ii), (iii), (iv) exhibited) Literature Arlene Bonnant, CAP Collection, Switzerland, 2005, pp. 29-31 (illustrated)

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348. Kristen Everberg

b. 1965

My Name is Ivan (Afer Tarkovsky), 2008 oil and enamel on paper 22 x 30 in. (55.9 x 76.2 cm) Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance 1301 PE, Los Angeles Private Collection

349. Bryan Crockett

b. 1970

Hope, 2002 colored pencil and graphite on paper, in artist’s frame diameter 34 1/2 in. (87.6 cm.) Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Lehmann Maupin, New York

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350. Ann Craven

b. 1969

Three works: (i) Summer; (ii) Fall; (iii) Winter Please, 2001 watercolor and pencil on paper (i) 15 x 11 in. (38.1 x 27.9 cm) (ii) 15 x 11 1/8 in. (38.1 x 28.3 cm) (iii) 14 3/4 x 11 1/4 in. (37.5 x 28.6 cm) (i) Signed, titled and dated “A Craven 2001 Summer” on the reverse. (ii) Signed and dated “A Craven 2001” lower center and further signed, titled and dated “A Craven Fall 2001” on the reverse. (iii) Signed, titled and dated “A Craven 2001 Winter Please” on the reverse. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

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351. Erwin Pfrang

b. 1951

Untitled, 1988 pencil on paper 7 1/8 x 5 1/8 in. (18.1 x 13 cm) Initialed and inscribed “EP #514” on the reverse. Estimate $1,000-2,000 Provenance David Nolan Gallery, New York Exhibited New York, David Nolan Gallery, Erwin Pfrang, Frank Gunzel, Rudi Tröger: Drawings, December 14, 1988 January 14, 1989

352. Gabriel Vormstein

b. 1974

(Untitled) Box, 2004 acrylic and pencil on newspaper 61 x 44 1/8 in. (154.9 x 112.1 cm) Signed “Gabriel Vormstein” on the reverse. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Casey Kaplan, New York Exhibited New York, Casey Kaplan, Seems to B: Soddisfaction, Incomplection, Putrefaction, 2004 Literature M.W., “Gabriel Vormstein-Casey Kaplan,” Artforum, February 2005 (illustrated)

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353. Ahmed Alsoudani

b. 1975

Untitled, 2007 graphite, pastel, watercolor, colored pencil and oilstick on paper 18 x 14 in. (45.7 x 35.6 cm) Signed and dated “Soudani 07� on the reverse. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Mehr Gallery, New York

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354. Douglas Pérez Castro

b. 1972

Retoños, 2007 watercolor and pencil on paper 22 3/8 x 15 in. (56.8 x 38.1 cm) Signed, titled, inscribed and dated “Douglas Pérez Castro ‘Retoños’ acuarela/cartulina 57 x 38cm 2007” on the reverse. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

355. Douglas Pérez Castro

b. 1972

Microbrigada, 2007 watercolor and pencil on paper 14 7/8 x 22 1/4 in. (37.8 x 56.5 cm) Signed, titled, inscribed, and dated “Douglas Pérez Castro ‘Microbrigado’ acuarela/cartulina 57 x 38cm 2007” on the reverse. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

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356. Arturo Herrera

b. 1959

Untitled, 2002 acrylic and printed paper collage 7 x 6 in. (17.8 x 15.2 cm) Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Brent Sikkema, New York

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357. Ilya Kabakov

b. 1933

10 Characters, Complete Set of Portfolios: (i) The Flying Komarov; (ii) The Joker Gorokhov; (iii) Generous Barmin; (iv) Agonizing Surikov (v) Anna Petrova Has A Dream; (vi) Sitting-in-the-Closet Primakov; (vii) Mathematical Gorsky; (viii) The Decorator Maligin; (ix) The Released Gavrilov; (x) The Looking-Out-TheWindow Arkhipov, 1994-1997 (i): boxed portfolio of 32 ofset facsimile prints mounted on cardboard and grey paper (ii): boxed portfolio of 48 ofset facsimile prints mounted on cardboard and grey paper and prints on glassine (iii): boxed portfolio of 50 ofset facsimile prints mounted on cardboard and grey paper (iv): boxed portfolio of 50 ofset facsimile prints mounted on cardboard and grey paper (v): boxed portfolio of 32 ofset facsimile prints mounted on cardboard and grey paper (vi): boxed portfolio of 47 ofset facsimile prints mounted on cardboard and grey paper (vii): boxed portfolio of 37 ofset facsimile prints mounted on cardboard and grey paper (viii): boxed portfolio of 72 ofset facsimile prints mounted on cardboard and grey paper (ix): boxed portfolio of 43 ofset facsimile prints mounted on cardboard and grey paper (x): boxed portfolio of 50 ofset facsimile prints mounted on cardboard and grey paper Each boxed portfolio contains an introduction insert translated in English, French, and German each, boxed: 20 5/8 x 14 3/8 x 2 in. (52.4 x 36.5 x 5.1 cm) (i): Signed, dated and numbered “20/20 Ilya Kabakov 94” on introduction insert. (ii): Signed, dated and numbered “S/P 20/20 Ilya Kabakov 97” on introduction insert. (iii): Signed, dated and numbered “20/20 Ilya Kabakov 96” on introduction insert. (iv): Signed, dated and numbered “20/20 Ilya Kabakov 95” on introduction insert. (v): Signed, dated and numbered “S/P 20/20 Ilya Kabakov 96” on introduction insert. (vi): Signed, dated and numbered “20/20 Ilya Kabakov 95” on introduction insert. (vii): Signed, dated and numbered “S/P 20/20 Ilya Kabakov 97” on introduction insert. (viii): Signed, dated and numbered “20/20 Ilya Kabakov 95” on introduction insert. (ix): Signed, dated and numbered “S/P 20/20 Ilya Kabakov 97” on introduction insert. (x): Signed, dated and numbered “S/P 20/20 Ilya Kabakov 97” on introduction insert. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Literature Amei Wallach, Ilya Kabakov: The Man Who Never Threw Anything Away, Harry Abrams Publishers, New York, 1996, pp. 56-62, 73, 79, 81, 114 - 131 (i, ii, iv, v, xi, vii, viii, illustrated) Ilya Kabakov, 60s, 70s… Notes on the Unofcial Life in Moscow, Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie, Moscow, 2008 (vii)

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∆

358. Kai Althof

b. 1966

Two works: (i) Untitled; (ii) Untitled, 2003 metallic paint, vinyl adhesive, ink, paper collage and found printed paper laid down on fabric (i) 19 1/2 x 23 1/2 in. (49.5 x 59.7 cm), (ii) 11 1/2 x 16 1/4 in. (29.2 x 41.3 cm) Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Corvi-Mora, London

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359. KAWS

b. 1974

Grey Companion, 2007 cast vinyl sculpture painted in colors 48 x 22 1/2 x 12 3/4 in. (121.9 x 57.2 x 32.4 cm) Incised “Medicom Toy 2007 KAWS 07� on the underside of the feet. This work is accompanied by the original cardboard box, styrofoam and hologram certifcate of authenticity. This work is from an edition of 100. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Private Collection

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360. Damien Hirst

b. 1965

Happy Head, 2007 gloss household paint on resin skull with metal hardware 6 1/2 x 5 1/2 x 8 in. (16.5 x 14 x 20.3 cm) Signed “Damien Hirst� on the reverse. This work is from a series of 20 unique variants. Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance Science Ltd., London

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361. KAWS

b. 1974

Paris, 1999 marker on poster print 23 7/8 x 18 in. (60.6 x 45.7 cm) Signed, dated, and titled “KAWS 99 ‘Paris’” lower right. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Private Collection, Paris

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362. JR

b. 1984

The Wrinkles of the City Los Angeles, 2012 photograph on wood 34 5/8 x 37 3/8 in. (88 x 95 cm) Signed, titled, dated and inscribed “The Wrinkles of the City Los Angeles - Oeil no. 1 JR 2012” on a label afxed to the reverse. Stamped “JR” on the reverse. Estimate $22,000-28,000 Provenance Lazarides Ltd., London

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363. Liu Bolin

b. 1973

Hide in the City #69, 2008 chromogenic print 37 3/8 x 47 1/4 in. (95 x 120 cm) Signed, numbered and dated “Liu Bolin AP 2/2 2008” lower right. This work is artist’s proof 2 from an edition of 8 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $7,000-10,000 Provenance Galerie Paris-Beijing, Paris

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Property from the Estate of Philip and Edna Minkin, Bloomfeld Hills

364. David Reed

b. 1946

288, 1989-90 oil and alkyd on linen 36 1/4 x 168 in. (92.1 x 426.7 cm) Signed, titled and dated “DAVID REED 288 1989-90” along the overlap. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Max Protetch Inc., New York

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365. Chris Bracey

b. 1954

No place like Utopia, 2013 acrylic on reclaimed wood, neon, aluminum and carnival light bulbs 29 7/8 x 59 x 5 1/8 in. (76 x 150 x 13 cm) Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Scream Gallery, London

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Exhibited London, Scream Gallery, Chris Bracey, I’ve Looked Up to Heaven and Been Down to Hell, April 12 June 1, 2013 Literature Charlotte Cripps,”The future is bright for Chris Bracey,” The Independent, April 9, 2013 (illustrated)

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366. Kristin Baker

b. 1975

Dirty Orange Cone #20, 2006 acrylic with plastic collage on mylar 66 x 50 in. (167.6 x 127 cm) Signed and dated “Kristin Baker 06” lower right. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Deitch Projects, New York Private Collection Private Collection

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367. Russell Young

b. 1959

Marilyn Monroe “And You Can Have It All, My Empire Of Dirt”, 2009 acrylic paint, enamel diamond dust, and screenprint on linen 62 x 48 in. (157.5 x 121.9 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Russel Young 2009 ‘and you can have it all my empire of dirt’” on the reverse.

Provenance Scream, London Private Collection Sotheby’s, New York, May 15, 2013, lot 608 Exhibited London, Scream, Russell Young: Dirty Pretty Things, February - March 2010

Estimate $20,000-30,000

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368. Futura

b. 1955

Love of Color, 1988 spraypaint on canvas 60 x 47 1/4 in. (152.4 x 120 cm) Signed, titled and dated “Futura 88 Love of Color” on the reverse. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Private Collection

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106. Valerie Snobeck

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Index Agam, Y. 152

da Corte, A. 330

Kabakov, I. 357

Oates, D. 296

Smalley, T. 216

Ali, L. 347

Darmstaedter, N. 107, 238

Karadi, K. 200

Ofli, C. 335

Smith, J. 277

Allora & Calzadilla 173

Davis, G. 313, 314

Katz, A. 291

Oldenburg, C. 157

Smith, K. 325

Alsoudani, A. 353

Deshayes, N. 202

KAWS 5, 359, 361

Opie, C. 243

Smith, L. 122, 210, 226

Althof, K. 358

Diefenbach, A. 320

Kelley, M. 131, 259

Oshiro, K. 191

Smith, M. S. 117

Amer, G. 22

Dine, J. 140

Kelly, E. 322

Ostrowski, D. 196

Snobeck, V. 106

amfAR Photography

Dodge, T. 346

Kilimnik, K. 342

Otero, A. 281

Sonne, K. 114

Portfolio 248

Donovan, T. 176

Kippenberger, M. 24

Ozbolt, D. 317, 318

Staniak, M. 231

Argue, D. 171

Koether, J. 182, 183

Struth, T. 21

Armleder, J. 125

Eisner, L. 211

Kour Pour 113

Paglen, T. 165

Stuckey, J. 310

Arunanondchai, K. 1

Ekblad, I. 108

Kuo, A. 288

Patterson, G. 217, 239

Succo, C. 207

Avotiņš, J. 319

Elmgreen & Dragset 164

Kuri, G. 172

Peake, E. 189

Suga, K. 148, 149, 150

Everberg, K. 348

Kurland, J. 260

Pendleton, A. 123, 190

Sugimoto, H. 20

Kusama, Y. 6, 10, 345

Pensato, J. 136

Sugito, H. 315

Kuwata, T. 147

Pérez Castro, D. 354, 355

Baechler, D. 138, 275 Baker, K. 328, 366

Faldbakken, M. 110, 218

Baldessari, J. 9

Feinstein, R. 334

Pestoni, J. 234

Taylor-Wood, S. 262

Bas, H. 289

Feldmann, H.-P. 257, 271

Ladda, J. 283

Pettibon, R. 130

Thomas, M. 266

Basquiat, J.-M. 4, 126

Ferris, K. 111

Laric, O. 187

Peyton, E. 7

Thurman, K. 116

Baudart, E. 112

Fischer, U. 128

Laska, S. 192

Phillips, R. 332

Tillmans, W. 250

Beier, N. 221, 225

Flavin, D. 17

Lassry, E. 254, 255

Phrang, E. 351

Titchner, M. 308

Ben-Gal, A. 287

Flood, M. 222

Lazzarini, R. 324

Prekop, Z. 198

Tomaselli, F. 337, 338

Bernadet, J.-B. 105, 201

Francis, M. 170

Lefcourt, D. 153

Price, S. 11

Trouvé, T. 163

Beshty, W. 166, 167

Frosi, C. 301

Leo Gabin 205

Black, S. 118, 213

Fuss, A. 252

Leonard, Z. 246

Queenland, M. 298

Bochner, M. 141

Futura 368

Levin, D. 219

Quinn, M. 156

Ufan, L. 146

Bolin, L. 363

Turner, D. 203

Levine, S. 145

Boman, A. 290

Gambarof, N. 209

Lewis, T. 180

Raedecker, M. 284

Værslev, F. 220

Boone, W. 102

Garber-Maikovska, A. 103

LeWitt, S. 142, 143

Raissnia, R. 195

van Meene, H. 264

Bouchet, M. 119

Gaskell, A. 333

Li Zhenwei 307

Reed, D. 364

Van Tran, T. 306

Bove, C. 341

Gerrard, J. 2

Lockhart, S. 268

Rees, D. 204, 229

Velliquette, M. 311, 312

Bracey, C. 365

Gokita, T. 286

Lowman, N. 15, 227

Reihsen, J. 236

Vena, N. 208

Bradley, J. 340

Grabner, M. 151

Lund, I. 206

Reyle and West,

Viola, B. 159

Braunig, S. 101

Graham, D. 258

Lynch, B. 237

A. and F. 272

Vitale, M. 184

Brauntuch, T. 285

Grosse, K. 186

Lynch, D. 235

Reyle, A. 169

Vo, D. 14, 174

Burtynsky, E. 247

Grotjahn, M. 3, 26, 154

Rhodes, D. 233

Vormstein, G. 352

Butzer, A. 135

Guyton, W. 27

Campbell, S. 121

Hammond, C. 279

Cang Xin 263

Mahama, I. 223

Rocklen, R. 302, 304

Majerus, M. 23

Rondinone, U. 16

Walker, J. 316

Manning, M. 232

Ross, C. 249

Wallace, I. 160

Haring, K. 327

Martin, C. 309

Ross-Ho, A. 193

Warhol, A. 127, 132, 133

Canto, T. 179

Hatoum, M. 161

Martinez, E. 282

Ruby, S. 115

Weiser, G. 199

Casselmann, S. 321

Henry Codax 178

Matelli, T. 168

Ruf, T. 240, 241

Welling, J. 244, 245

Chambers, M. 188, 292

Herms, G. 228

McCloud, H. 185

Ruscha, E. 8

West, F. 25

Childish, B. 139

Herrera, A. 356

McCollum, A. 144

Ryman, W. 270, 297

Wiley, K. 293

Collins, G. 214

Hirst, D. 360

McEwen, A. 181

Condo, G. 137

Hofer, C. 261

McFarland, S. 253

Saban, A. 197

Cook, E. 224

Horn, R. 251

Meese, J. 276, 278

Samore, S. 259

Cordero, R. 175

Hughes, P. 295

Moyer, S. 194

Saraceno, T. 280

Yanai, G. 104

Mull, C. 215

Savu, S. 294

Yellin, D. 230

Corio, D. 267

Wilson, F. 158 Wilson, R. 162

Cortright, P. 109

Israel, A. 18

Muniz, V. 241

Scharf, K. 134

Young, A. 303

Coyer, M. 273

Ito, P. 212

Mutu, W. 336

Schorr, C. 256

Young, R. 367

Craven, A. 350

Selden, R. 274

Crockett, B. 349

Jenney, N. 19

Nara, Y. 13, 343, 344

Sherman, C. 265, 331

Ziegler, T. 155

Crow, R. 300

Jensen, S. 124

Nevelson, L. 323

Sibony, G. 269

Zipp, T. 299

Crowner, S. 329

Johnson, M. 177

Noble and Webster,

Sillman, A. 339

Johnson, R. 305

T. and S. 12

Slonem, H. 326

JPW3 120 JR 362

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Guide for Prospective Buyers Buying at Auction The following pages are designed to ofer you information on how to buy at auction at Phillips. Our staf will be happy to assist you.

Pre-Auction Viewing Pre-auction viewings are open to the public and free of charge. Our specialists are available to give advice and condition reports at viewings or by appointment.

Conditions of Sale The Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty which appear later in this catalogue govern the auction. Bidders are strongly encouraged to read them as they outline the legal relationship among Phillips, the seller and the buyer and describe the terms upon which property is bought at auction. Please be advised that Phillips generally acts as agent for the seller.

Electrical and Mechanical Lots All lots with electrical and/or mechanical features are sold on the basis of their decorative value only and should not be assumed to be operative. It is essential that, prior to any intended use, the electrical system is verifed and approved by a qualifed electrician.

Buyer’s Premium Phillips charges the successful bidder a commission, or buyer’s premium, on the hammer price of each lot sold. The buyer’s premium is payable by the buyer as part of the total purchase price at the following rates: 25% of the hammer price up to and including $100,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above $100,000 up to and including $2,000,000 and 12% of the portion of the hammer price above $2,000,000. 1 Prior to Auction Catalogue Subscriptions If you would like to purchase a catalogue for this auction or any other Phillips sale, please contact us at +1 212 940 1240 or +44 20 7318 4010. Pre-Sale Estimates Pre-sale estimates are intended as a guide for prospective buyers. Any bid within the high and low estimate range should, in our opinion, ofer a chance of success. However, many lots achieve prices below or above the pre-sale estimates. Where “Estimate on Request” appears, please contact the specialist department for further information. It is advisable to contact us closer to the time of the auction as estimates can be subject to revision. Pre-sale estimates do not include the buyer’s premium or any applicable taxes. Pre-Sale Estimates in Pounds Sterling and Euros Although the sale is conducted in US dollars, the pre-sale estimates in the auction catalogues may also be printed in pounds sterling and/or euros. Since the exchange rate is that at the time of catalogue production and not at the date of auction, you should treat estimates in pounds sterling or euros as a guide only. Catalogue Entries Phillips may print in the catalogue entry the history of ownership of a work of art, as well as the exhibition history of the property and references to the work in art publications. While we are careful in the cataloguing process, provenance, exhibition and literature references may not be exhaustive and in some cases we may intentionally refrain from disclosing the identity of previous owners. Please note that all dimensions of the property set forth in the catalogue entry are approximate. Condition of Lots Our catalogues include references to condition only in the descriptions of multiple works (e.g., prints). Such references, though, do not amount to a full description of condition. The absence of reference to the condition of a lot in the catalogue entry does not imply that the lot is free from faults or imperfections. Solely as a convenience to clients, Phillips may provide condition reports. In preparing such reports, our specialists assess the condition in a manner appropriate to the estimated value of the property and the nature of the auction in which it is included. While condition reports are prepared honestly and carefully, our staf are not professional restorers or trained conservators. We therefore encourage all prospective buyers to inspect the property at the pre-sale exhibitions and recommend, particularly in the case of any lot of signifcant value, that you retain your own restorer or professional advisor to report to you on the property’s condition prior to bidding. Any prospective buyer of photographs or prints should always request a condition report because all such property is sold unframed, unless otherwise indicated in the condition report. If a lot is sold framed, Phillips accepts no liability for the condition of the frame. If we sell any lot unframed, we will be pleased to refer the purchaser to a professional framer.

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Symbol Key The following key explains the symbols you may see inside this catalogue. O ♦ Guaranteed Property The seller of lots designated with the symbol O has been guaranteed a minimum price fnanced solely by Phillips. Where the guarantee is provided by a third party or jointly by us and a third party, the property will be denoted with the symbols O ♦. When a third party has fnanced all or part of our fnancial interest in a lot, it assumes all or part of the risk that the lot will not be sold and will be remunerated accordingly. The compensation will be a fxed fee, a percentage of the hammer price or the buyer’s premium or some combination of the foregoing. The third party may bid on the guaranteed lot during the auction. If the third party is the successful bidder, the remuneration may be netted against the fnal purchase price. If the lot is not sold, the third party may incur a loss. Where Phillips has guaranteed a minimum price on every lot in the catalogue, Phillips will not designate each lot with the symbol(s) for the guaranteed property but will state our fnancial interest at the front of the catalogue. ∆ Property in Which Phillips Has an Ownership Interest Lots with this symbol indicate that Phillips owns the lot in whole or in part or has an economic interest in the lot equivalent to an ownership interest. No Reserve •Unless indicated by a •, all lots in this catalogue are ofered subject to a reserve. A reserve is the confdential value established between Phillips and the seller and below which a lot may not be sold. The reserve for each lot is generally set at a percentage of the low estimate and will not exceed the low pre-sale estimate. ∑ Endangered Species Lots with this symbol have been identifed at the time of cataloguing as containing endangered or other protected species of wildlife which may be subject to restrictions regarding export or import and which may require permits for export as well as import. Please refer to Paragraph 4 of the Guide for Prospective Buyers and Paragraph 11 of the Conditions of Sale.

2 Bidding in the Sale Bidding at Auction Bids may be executed during the auction in person by paddle, by telephone, online or prior to the sale in writing by absentee bid. Proof of identity in the form of government issued identifcation will be required, as will an original signature. We may also require that you furnish us with a bank reference. Bidding in Person To bid in person, you will need to register for and collect a paddle before the auction begins. New clients are encouraged to register at least 48 hours in advance of a sale to allow sufcient time for us to process your information. All lots sold will be invoiced to the name and address to which the paddle has been registered and invoices cannot be transferred to other names and addresses. Please do not misplace your paddle. In the event you lose it, inform a Phillips staf member immediately. At the end of the auction, please return your paddle to the registration desk. Bidding by Telephone If you cannot attend the auction, you may bid live on the telephone with one of our multi-lingual staf members. This service must be arranged at least 24 hours in advance of the sale and is available for lots whose low pre-sale estimate is at least $1,000. Telephone bids may be recorded. By bidding on the telephone, you consent to the recording of your conversation. We suggest that you leave a maximum bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and any applicable taxes, which we can execute on your behalf in the event we are unable to reach you by telephone.

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Online Bidding If you cannot attend the auction in person, you may bid online on our online live bidding platform available on our website at www.phillips.com. The digital saleroom is optimized to run on Google Chrome, Firefox, Opera and Internet Explorer browsers. Clients who wish to run the platform on Safari will need to install Adobe FlashPlayer. Follow the links to ‘Auctions’ and ‘Digital Saleroom’ and then pre-register by clicking on ‘Register to Bid Live.’ The frst time you register you will be required to create an account; thereafer you will only need to register for each sale. You must pre-register at least 24 hours before the start of the auction in order to be approved by our bid department. Please note that corporate frewalls may cause difculties for online bidders. Absentee Bids If you are unable to attend the auction and cannot participate by telephone, Phillips will be happy to execute written bids on your behalf. A bidding form can be found at the back of this catalogue. This service is free and confdential. Bids must be placed in the currency of the sale. Our staf will attempt to execute an absentee bid at the lowest possible price taking into account the reserve and other bidders. Always indicate a maximum bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and any applicable taxes. Unlimited bids will not be accepted. Any absentee bid must be received at least 24 hours in advance of the sale. In the event of identical bids, the earliest bid received will take precedence. Employee Bidding Employees of Phillips and our afliated companies, including the auctioneer, may bid at the auction by placing absentee bids so long as they do not know the reserve when submitting their absentee bids and otherwise comply with our employee bidding procedures. Bidding Increments Bidding generally opens below the low estimate and advances in increments of up to 10%, subject to the auctioneer’s discretion. Absentee bids that do not conform to the increments set below may be lowered to the next bidding increment. $50 to $1,000 $1,000 to $2,000 $2,000 to $3,000 $3,000 to $5,000 $5,000 to $10,000 $10,000 to $20,000 $20,000 to $30,000 $30,000 to $50,000 $50,000 to $100,000 $100,000 to $200,000 above $200,000

by $50s by $100s by $200s by $200s, 500, 800 (i.e., $4,200, 4,500, 4,800) by $500s by $1,000s by $2,000s by $2,000s, 5,000, 8,000 by $5,000s by $10,000s auctioneer’s discretion

The auctioneer may vary the increments during the course of the auction at his or her own discretion. 3 The Auction Conditions of Sale As noted above, the auction is governed by the Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty. All prospective bidders should read them carefully. They may be amended by saleroom addendum or auctioneer’s announcement.

backwards at his or her discretion until a bid is recognized and will then advance the bidding from that amount. Absentee bids on no reserve lots will, in the absence of a higher bid, be executed at approximately 50% of the low pre-sale estimate or at the amount of the bid if it is less than 50% of the low pre-sale estimate. If there is no bid whatsoever on a no reserve lot, the auctioneer may deem such lot unsold. 4 Afer the Auction Payment Buyers are required to pay for purchases immediately following the auction unless other arrangements are agreed with Phillips in writing in advance of the sale. Payment must be made in US dollars either by cash, check drawn on a US bank or wire transfer, as noted in Paragraph 6 of the Conditions of Sale. It is our corporate policy not to make or accept single or multiple payments in cash or cash equivalents in excess of US$10,000. Credit Cards As a courtesy to clients, Phillips will accept American Express, Visa and Mastercard to pay for invoices of $100,000 or less. A processing fee will apply. Collection It is our policy to request proof of identity on collection of a lot. A lot will be released to the buyer or the buyer’s authorized representative when Phillips has received full and cleared payment and we are not owed any other amount by the buyer. Promptly afer the auction, we will transfer all lots to our warehouse located at 29-09 37th Avenue in Long Island City, Queens, New York. All purchased lots should be collected at this location during our regular weekday business hours. As a courtesy to clients, we will upon request transfer purchased lots suitable for hand carry back to our premises at 450 Park Avenue, New York, New York for collection within 30 days following the date of the auction. We will levy removal, interest, storage and handling charges on uncollected lots. Loss or Damage Buyers are reminded that Phillips accepts liability for loss or damage to lots for a maximum of seven days following the auction. Transport and Shipping As a free service for buyers, Phillips will wrap purchased lots for hand carry only. We will, at the buyer’s expense, either provide packing, handling and shipping services or coordinate with shipping agents instructed by the buyer in order to facilitate such services for property purchased at Phillips. Please refer to Paragraph 7 of the Conditions of Sale for more information. Export and Import Licenses Before bidding for any property, prospective bidders are advised to make independent inquiries as to whether a license is required to export the property from the United States or to import it into another country. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to comply with all import and export laws and to obtain any necessary licenses or permits. The denial of any required license or permit or any delay in obtaining such documentation will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot. Endangered Species

Items made of or incorporating plant or animal material, such as coral, crocodile, ivory, whalebone, Brazilian rosewood, rhinoceros horn or tortoiseshell, irrespective

Interested Parties Announcement In situations where a person allowed to bid on a lot has a direct or indirect interest in such lot, such as the benefciary or executor of an estate selling the lot, a joint owner of the lot or a party providing or participating in a guarantee on the lot, Phillips will make an announcement in the saleroom that interested parties may bid on the lot.

of age, percentage or value, may require a license or certifcate prior to exportation and additional licenses or certifcates upon importation to any foreign country. Please note that the ability to obtain an export license or certifcate does not ensure the ability to obtain an import license or certifcate in another country, and vice versa. We suggest that prospective bidders check with their own government

Consecutive and Responsive Bidding; No Reserve Lots The auctioneer may open the bidding on any lot by placing a bid on behalf of the seller. The auctioneer may further bid on behalf of the seller up to the amount of the reserve by placing consecutive bids or bids in response to other bidders. If a lot is ofered without reserve, unless there are already competing absentee bids, the auctioneer will generally open the bidding at 50% of the lot’s low presale estimate. In the absence of a bid at that level, the auctioneer will proceed

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regarding wildlife import requirements prior to placing a bid. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to obtain any necessary export or import licenses or certifcates as well as any other required documentation. Please note that lots containing potentially regulated plant or animal material are marked as a convenience to our clients, but Phillips does not accept liability for errors or for failing to mark lots containing protected or regulated species.

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Conditions of Sale The Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty set forth below govern the relationship between bidders and buyers, on the one hand, and Phillips and sellers, on the other hand. All prospective buyers should read these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty carefully before bidding. 1 Introduction Each lot in this catalogue is ofered for sale and sold subject to: (a) the Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty; (b) additional notices and terms printed in other places in this catalogue, including the Guide for Prospective Buyers, and (c) supplements to this catalogue or other written material posted by Phillips in the saleroom, in each case as amended by any addendum or announcement by the auctioneer prior to the auction. By bidding at the auction, whether in person, through an agent, by written bid, by telephone bid or other means, bidders and buyers agree to be bound by these Conditions of Sale, as so changed or supplemented, and Authorship Warranty. These Conditions of Sale, as so changed or supplemented, and Authorship Warranty contain all the terms on which Phillips and the seller contract with the buyer. 2 Phillips as Agent Phillips acts as an agent for the seller, unless otherwise indicated in this catalogue or at the time of auction. On occasion, Phillips may own a lot directly, in which case we will act in a principal capacity as a consignor, or a company afliated with Phillips may own a lot, in which case we will act as agent for that company, or Phillips or an afliated company may have a legal, benefcial or fnancial interest in a lot as a secured creditor or otherwise. 3 Catalogue Descriptions and Condition of Property Lots are sold subject to the Authorship Warranty, as described in the catalogue (unless such description is changed or supplemented, as provided in Paragraph 1 above) and in the condition that they are in at the time of the sale on the following basis. (a) The knowledge of Phillips in relation to each lot is partially dependent on information provided to us by the seller, and Phillips is not able to and does not carry out exhaustive due diligence on each lot. Prospective buyers acknowledge this fact and accept responsibility for carrying out inspections and investigations to satisfy themselves as to the lots in which they may be interested. Notwithstanding the foregoing, we shall exercise such reasonable care when making express statements in catalogue descriptions or condition reports as is consistent with our role as auctioneer of lots in this sale and in light of (i) the information provided to us by the seller, (ii) scholarship and technical knowledge and (iii) the generally accepted opinions of relevant experts, in each case at the time any such express statement is made. (b) Each lot ofered for sale at Phillips is available for inspection by prospective buyers prior to the auction. Phillips accepts bids on lots on the basis that bidders (and independent experts on their behalf, to the extent appropriate given the nature and value of the lot and the bidder’s own expertise) have fully inspected the lot prior to bidding and have satisfed themselves as to both the condition of the lot and the accuracy of its description. (c) Prospective buyers acknowledge that many lots are of an age and type which means that they are not in perfect condition. As a courtesy to clients, Phillips may prepare and provide condition reports to assist prospective buyers when they are inspecting lots. Catalogue descriptions and condition reports may make reference to particular imperfections of a lot, but bidders should note that lots may have other faults not expressly referred to in the catalogue or condition report. All dimensions are approximate. Illustrations are for identifcation purposes only and cannot be used as precise indications of size or to convey full information as to the actual condition of lots. (d) Information provided to prospective buyers in respect of any lot, including any pre-sale estimate, whether written or oral, and information in any catalogue, condition or other report, commentary or valuation, is not a representation of fact but rather a statement of opinion held by Phillips. Any pre-sale estimate may not be relied on as a prediction of the selling price or value of the lot and may be

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revised from time to time by Phillips in our absolute discretion. Neither Phillips nor any of our afliated companies shall be liable for any diference between the presale estimates for any lot and the actual price achieved at auction or upon resale. 4 Bidding at Auction (a) Phillips has absolute discretion to refuse admission to the auction or participation in the sale. All bidders must register for a paddle prior to bidding, supplying such information and references as required by Phillips. (b) As a convenience to bidders who cannot attend the auction in person, Phillips may, if so instructed by the bidder, execute written absentee bids on a bidder’s behalf. Absentee bidders are required to submit bids on the Absentee Bid Form, a copy of which is printed in this catalogue or otherwise available from Phillips. Bids must be placed in the currency of the sale. The bidder must clearly indicate the maximum amount he or she intends to bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and any applicable sales or use taxes. The auctioneer will not accept an instruction to execute an absentee bid which does not indicate such maximum bid. Our staf will attempt to execute an absentee bid at the lowest possible price taking into account the reserve and other bidders. Any absentee bid must be received at least 24 hours in advance of the sale. In the event of identical bids, the earliest bid received will take precedence. (c) Telephone bidders are required to submit bids on the Telephone Bid Form, a copy of which is printed in this catalogue or otherwise available from Phillips. Telephone bidding is available for lots whose low pre-sale estimate is at least $1,000. Phillips reserves the right to require written confrmation of a successful bid from a telephone bidder by fax or otherwise immediately afer such bid is accepted by the auctioneer. Telephone bids may be recorded and, by bidding on the telephone, a bidder consents to the recording of the conversation. (d) Bidders may participate in an auction by bidding online through Phillips’s online live bidding platform available on our website at www.phillips.com. To bid online, bidders must register online at least 24 hours before the start of the auction. Online bidding is subject to approval by Phillips’s bid department in our sole discretion. As noted in Paragraph 3 above, Phillips encourages online bidders to inspect prior to the auction any lot(s) on which they may bid, and condition reports are available upon request. Bidding in a live auction can progress quickly. To ensure that online bidders are not placed at a disadvantage when bidding against bidders in the room or on the telephone, the procedure for placing bids through Phillips’s online bidding platform is a one-step process. By clicking the bid button on the computer screen, a bidder submits a bid. Online bidders acknowledge and agree that bids so submitted are fnal and may not under any circumstances be amended or retracted. During a live auction, when bids other than online bids are placed, they will be displayed on the online bidder’s computer screen as ‘foor’ bids. ‘Floor’ bids include bids made by the auctioneer to protect the reserve. In the event that an online bid and a ‘foor’ or ‘phone’ bid are identical, the ‘foor’ bid may take precedence at the auctioneer’s discretion. The next bidding increment is shown for the convenience of online bidders in the bid button. The bidding increment available to online bidders may vary from the next bid actually taken by the auctioneer, as the auctioneer may deviate from Phillips’s standard increments at any time at his or her discretion, but an online bidder may only place a bid in a whole bidding increment. Phillips’s bidding increments are published in the Guide for Prospective Buyers. (e) When making a bid, whether in person, by absentee bid, on the telephone or online, a bidder accepts personal liability to pay the purchase price, as described more fully in Paragraph 6 (a) below, plus all other applicable charges unless it has been explicitly agreed in writing with Phillips before the commencement of the auction that the bidder is acting as agent on behalf of an identifed third party acceptable to Phillips and that we will only look to the principal for such payment. (f) By participating in the auction, whether in person, by absentee bid, on the telephone or online, each prospective buyer represents and warrants that any bids placed by such person, or on such person’s behalf, are not the product of any collusive or other anti-competitive agreement and are otherwise consistent with federal and state antitrust law. (g) Arranging absentee, telephone and online bids is a free service provided by Phillips to prospective buyers. While we undertake to exercise reasonable care in

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Bernard Frize Fetil, 2003 (detail) Estimate £20,000-30,000

Sell with us. New Now Auction London, 13 April 2016, 2pm New Now showcases the best of what’s happening right now in contemporary art—all in one place. These diverse lots are equally seductive to savvy collectors and auction-curious newcomers. If you think our New Now sale might be the right ft for a work in your collection, get in touch. We’ll have an expert on hand to help you get your work to the right auction in the right place at the right time. Enquiries Tamila Kerimova +44 20 7318 4065 tkerimova@phillips.com

phillips.com

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undertaking such activity, we cannot accept liability for failure to execute such bids except where such failure is caused by our willful misconduct. (h) Employees of Phillips and our afliated companies, including the auctioneer, may bid at the auction by placing absentee bids so long as they do not know the reserve when submitting their absentee bids and otherwise comply with our employee bidding procedures. 5 Conduct of the Auction (a) Unless otherwise indicated by the symbol •, each lot is ofered subject to a reserve, which is the confdential minimum selling price agreed by Phillips with the seller. The reserve will not exceed the low pre-sale estimate at the time of the auction. (b) The auctioneer has discretion at any time to refuse any bid, withdraw any lot, re-ofer a lot for sale (including afer the fall of the hammer) if he or she believes there may be error or dispute and take such other action as he or she deems reasonably appropriate. Phillips shall have no liability whatsoever for any such action taken by the auctioneer. If any dispute arises afer the sale, our sale record is conclusive. The auctioneer may accept bids made by a company afliated with Phillips provided that the bidder does not know the reserve placed on the lot. (c) The auctioneer will commence and advance the bidding at levels and in increments he or she considers appropriate. In order to protect the reserve on any lot, the auctioneer may place one or more bids on behalf of the seller up to the reserve without indicating he or she is doing so, either by placing consecutive bids or bids in response to other bidders. If a lot is ofered without reserve, unless there are already competing absentee bids, the auctioneer will generally open the bidding at 50% of the lot’s low pre-sale estimate. In the absence of a bid at that level, the auctioneer will proceed backwards at his or her discretion until a bid is recognized and will then advance the bidding from that amount. Absentee bids on no reserve lots will, in the absence of a higher bid, be executed at approximately 50% of the low pre-sale estimate or at the amount of the bid if it is less than 50% of the low pre-sale estimate. If there is no bid whatsoever on a no reserve lot, the auctioneer may deem such lot unsold. (d) The sale will be conducted in US dollars and payment is due in US dollars. For the beneft of international clients, pre-sale estimates in the auction catalogue may be shown in pounds sterling and/or euros and, if so, will refect approximate exchange rates. Accordingly, estimates in pounds sterling or euros should be treated only as a guide. If a currency converter is operated during the sale, it is done so as a courtesy to bidders, but Phillips accepts no responsibility for any errors in currency conversion calculation. (e) Subject to the auctioneer’s reasonable discretion, the highest bidder accepted by the auctioneer will be the buyer and the striking of the hammer marks the acceptance of the highest bid and the conclusion of a contract for sale between the seller and the buyer. Risk and responsibility for the lot passes to the buyer as set forth in Paragraph 7 below. (f) If a lot is not sold, the auctioneer will announce that it has been “passed,” “withdrawn,” “returned to owner” or “bought-in.” (g) Any post-auction sale of lots ofered at auction shall incorporate these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty as if sold in the auction. 6 Purchase Price and Payment (a) The buyer agrees to pay us, in addition to the hammer price of the lot, the buyer’s premium and any applicable sales tax (the “Purchase Price”). The buyer’s premium is 25% of the hammer price up to and including $100,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above $100,000 up to and including $2,000,000 and 12% of the portion of the hammer price above $2,000,000. Phillips reserves the right to pay from our compensation an introductory commission to one or more third parties for assisting in the sale of property ofered and sold at auction. (b) Sales tax, use tax and excise and other taxes are payable in accordance with applicable law. All prices, fees, charges and expenses set out in these Conditions of Sale are quoted exclusive of applicable taxes. Phillips will only accept valid resale certifcates from US dealers as proof of exemption from sales tax. All foreign buyers should contact the Client Accounting Department about tax matters.

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(c) Unless otherwise agreed, a buyer is required to pay for a purchased lot immediately following the auction regardless of any intention to obtain an export or import license or other permit for such lot. Payments must be made by the invoiced party in US dollars either by cash, check drawn on a US bank or wire transfer, as follows: (i) Phillips will accept payment in cash provided that the total amount paid in cash or cash equivalents does not exceed US$10,000. Buyers paying in cash should do so in person at our Client Accounting Desk at 450 Park Avenue during regular weekday business hours. (ii) Personal checks and banker’s draf s are accepted if drawn on a US bank and the buyer provides to us acceptable government issued identifcation. Checks and banker’s draf s should be made payable to “Phillips.” If payment is sent by mail, please send the check or banker’s draf to the attention of the Client Accounting Department at 450 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10022 and make sure that the sale and lot number is written on the check. Checks or banker’s draf s drawn by third parties will not be accepted. (iii) Payment by wire transfer may be sent directly to Phillips. Bank transfer details: Citibank 322 West 23rd Street, New York, NY 10011 SWIFT Code: CITIUS33 ABA Routing: 021 000 089 For the account of Phillips Account no.: 58347736 Please reference the relevant sale and lot number. (d) As a courtesy to clients, Phillips will accept American Express, Visa and Mastercard to pay for invoices of $100,000 or less. A processing fee of 3.5% will apply. (e) Title in a purchased lot will not pass until Phillips has received the Purchase Price for that lot in cleared funds. Phillips is not obliged to release a lot to the buyer until title in the lot has passed and appropriate identifcation has been provided, and any earlier release does not afect the passing of title or the buyer’s unconditional obligation to pay the Purchase Price. 7 Collection of Property (a) Phillips will not release a lot to the buyer until we have received payment of its Purchase Price in full in cleared funds, the buyer has paid all outstanding amounts due to Phillips or any of our afliated companies, including any charges payable pursuant to Paragraph 8 (a) below, and the buyer has satisfed such other terms as we in our sole discretion shall require, including completing any anti-money laundering or anti-terrorism fnancing checks. As soon as a buyer has satisfed all of the foregoing conditions, he or she should contact our Shipping Department at +1 212 940 1372 or +1 212 940 1373 to arrange for collection of purchased property. (b) The buyer must arrange for collection of a purchased lot within seven days of the date of the auction. Promptly afer the auction, we will transfer all lots to our warehouse located at 29-09 37th Avenue in Long Island City, Queens, New York. All purchased lots should be collected at this location during our regular weekday business hours. As a courtesy to clients, Phillips will upon request transfer on a biweekly basis purchased lots suitable for hand-carry back to our premises at 450 Park Avenue, New York, New York for collection within 30 days following the date of the auction. Purchased lots are at the buyer’s risk, including the responsibility for insurance, from the earlier to occur of (i) the date of collection or (ii) seven days afer the auction. Until risk passes, Phillips will compensate the buyer for any loss or damage to a purchased lot up to a maximum of the Purchase Price paid, subject to our usual exclusions for loss or damage to property. (c) As a courtesy to clients, Phillips will, without charge, wrap purchased lots for hand-carry only. We will, at the buyer’s expense, either provide packing, handling, insurance and shipping services or coordinate with shipping agents instructed by the buyer in order to facilitate such services for property bought at Phillips. Any such instruction, whether or not made at our recommendation, is entirely at the buyer’s risk and responsibility, and we will not be liable for acts or omissions of third party packers or shippers. Third party shippers should contact us by telephone at +1 212 940 1376 or by fax at +1 212 924 6477 at least 24 hours in advance of collection in order to schedule pickup.

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(d) Phillips will require presentation of government issued identifcation prior to release of a lot to the buyer or the buyer’s authorized representative. 8 Failure to Collect Purchases (a) If the buyer pays the Purchase Price but fails to collect a purchased lot within 30 days of the auction, the buyer will incur a late collection fee of $10 per day for each uncollected lot. Additional charges may apply to oversized lots. We will not release purchased lots to the buyer until all such charges have been paid in full. (b) If a purchased lot is paid for but not collected within six months of the auction, the buyer authorizes Phillips, upon notice, to arrange a resale of the item by auction or private sale, with estimates and a reserve set at Phillips’s reasonable discretion. The proceeds of such sale will be applied to pay for storage charges and any other outstanding costs and expenses owed by the buyer to Phillips or our afliated companies and the remainder will be forfeited unless collected by the buyer within two years of the original auction. 9 Remedies for Non-Payment (a) Without prejudice to any rights the seller may have, if the buyer without prior agreement fails to make payment of the Purchase Price for a lot in cleared funds within seven days of the auction, Phillips may in our sole discretion exercise one or more of the following remedies: (i) store the lot at Phillips’s premises or elsewhere at the buyer’s sole risk and expense at the same rates as set forth in Paragraph 8 (a) above; (ii) cancel the sale of the lot, retaining any partial payment of the Purchase Price as liquidated damages; (iii) reject future bids from the buyer or render such bids subject to payment of a deposit; (iv) charge interest at 12% per annum from the date payment became due until the date the Purchase Price is received in cleared funds; (v) subject to notifcation of the buyer, exercise a lien over any of the buyer’s property which is in the possession of Phillips and instruct our afliated companies to exercise a lien over any of the buyer’s property which is in their possession and, in each case, no earlier than 30 days from the date of such notice, arrange the sale of such property and apply the proceeds to the amount owed to Phillips or any of our afliated companies afer the deduction from sale proceeds of our standard vendor’s commission and all sale-related expenses; (vi) resell the lot by auction or private sale, with estimates and a reserve set at Phillips reasonable discretion, it being understood that in the event such resale is for less than the original hammer price and buyer’s premium for that lot, the buyer will remain liable for the shortfall together with all costs incurred in such resale; (vii) commence legal proceedings to recover the hammer price and buyer’s premium for that lot, together with interest and the costs of such proceedings; (viii) set of the outstanding amount remaining unpaid by the buyer against any amounts which we or any of our afliated companies may owe the buyer in any other transactions; (ix) release the name and address of the buyer to the seller to enable the seller to commence legal proceedings to recover the amounts due and legal costs or (x) take such other action as we deem necessary or appropriate. (b) As security to us for full payment by the buyer of all outstanding amounts due to Phillips and our afliated companies, Phillips retains, and the buyer grants to us, a security interest in each lot purchased at auction by the buyer and in any other property or money of the buyer in, or coming into, our possession or the possession of one of our afliated companies. We may apply such money or deal with such property as the Uniform Commercial Code or other applicable law permits a secured creditor to do. In the event that we exercise a lien over property in our possession because the buyer is in default to one of our afliated companies, we will so notify the buyer. Our security interest in any individual lot will terminate upon actual delivery of the lot to the buyer or the buyer’s agent. (c) In the event the buyer is in default of payment to any of our afliated companies, the buyer also irrevocably authorizes Phillips to pledge the buyer’s property in our possession by actual or constructive delivery to our afliated company as security for the payment of any outstanding amount due. Phillips will notify the buyer if the buyer’s property has been delivered to an afliated company by way of pledge. 10 Rescission by Phillips Phillips shall have the right, but not the obligation, to rescind a sale without notice to the buyer if we reasonably believe that there is a material breach of the seller’s representations and warranties or the Authorship Warranty or an adverse claim is made by a third party. Upon notice of Phillips’s election to rescind the sale, the

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buyer will promptly return the lot to Phillips, and we will then refund the Purchase Price paid to us. As described more fully in Paragraph 13 below, the refund shall constitute the sole remedy and recourse of the buyer against Phillips and the seller with respect to such rescinded sale. 11 Export, Import and Endangered Species Licenses and Permits Before bidding for any property, prospective buyers are advised to make their own inquiries as to whether a license is required to export a lot from the US or to import it into another country. Prospective buyers are advised that some countries prohibit the import of property made of or incorporating plant or animal material, such as coral, crocodile, ivory, whalebone, Brazilian rosewood, rhinoceros horn or tortoiseshell, irrespective of age, percentage or value. Accordingly, prior to bidding, prospective buyers considering export of purchased lots should familiarize themselves with relevant export and import regulations of the countries concerned. It is solely the buyer’s responsibility to comply with these laws and to obtain any necessary export, import and endangered species licenses or permits. Failure to obtain a license or permit or delay in so doing will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot. As a courtesy to clients, Phillips has marked in the catalogue lots containing potentially regulated plant or animal material, but we do not accept liability for errors or for failing to mark lots containing protected or regulated species. 12 Data Protection (a) In connection with the supply of auction and related services, or as required by law, Phillips may ask clients to provide personal data. Phillips may take and retain a copy of government-issued identifcation such as a passport or driver’s license. We will use your personal data (i) to provide auction and related services; (ii) to enforce these Conditions of Sale; (iii) to carry out identity and credit checks; (iv) to implement and improve the management and operations of our business and (v) for other purposes set out in our Privacy Policy published on the Phillips website at www.phillips.com (the ‘Privacy Policy’) and available on request by emailing dataprotection@phillips.com. By agreeing to these Conditions of Sale, you consent to our use of your personal data, including sensitive personal data, in accordance with the Privacy Policy. The personal data we may collect and process is listed, and sensitive personal data is defned, in our Privacy Policy. Phillips may also, from time to time, send you promotional and marketing materials about us and our services. If you would prefer not to receive such information, please email us at dataprotection@phillips.com. Please also email us at this address to receive information about your personal data or to advise us if the personal data we hold about you is inaccurate or out of date. (b) In order to provide our services, we may disclose your personal data to third parties, including professional advisors, shippers and credit agencies. We will disclose, share with and transfer your personal data to Phillips’s afliated persons (natural or legal) for administration, sale and auction related purposes. You expressly consent to such transfer of your personal data. We will not sell, rent or otherwise transfer any of your personal data to third parties except as otherwise expressly provided in this Paragraph 12. (c) Phillips’s premises may be subject to video surveillance and recording. Telephone calls (e.g., telephone bidding) may also be recorded. We may process that information in accordance with our Privacy Policy. 13 Limitation of Liability (a) Subject to subparagraph (e) below, the total liability of Phillips, our afliated companies and the seller to the buyer in connection with the sale of a lot shall be limited to the Purchase Price actually paid by the buyer for the lot. (b) Except as otherwise provided in this Paragraph 13, none of Phillips, any of our afliated companies or the seller (i) is liable for any errors or omissions, whether orally or in writing, in information provided to prospective buyers by Phillips or any of our afliated companies or (ii) accepts responsibility to any bidder in respect of acts or omissions, whether negligent or otherwise, by Phillips or any of our afliated companies in connection with the conduct of the auction or for any other matter relating to the sale of any lot. (c) All warranties other than the Authorship Warranty, express or implied, including any warranty of satisfactory quality and ftness for purpose, are

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PHILLIPS SUPPORTS

KEHINDE WILEY: A NEW REPUBLIC AT THE SEATTLE ART MUSEUM

FEBRUARY 11 THROUGH

MAY 8 visitsam.org

The exhibition is organized by the Brooklyn Museum.

Shantavia Beale II (detail), 2012, Kehinde Wiley, American, b. 1977, oil on canvas, 60 x 48in., Collection of Ana and Lenny Gravier. Courtesy of Sean Kelly, New York. Š Kehinde Wiley. Photo: Jason Wyche.

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Authorship Warranty specifcally excluded by Phillips, our afliated companies and the seller to the fullest extent permitted by law. (d) Subject to subparagraph (e) below, none of Phillips, any of our afliated companies or the seller shall be liable to the buyer for any loss or damage beyond the refund of the Purchase Price referred to in subparagraph (a) above, whether such loss or damage is characterized as direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential, or for the payment of interest on the Purchase Price to the fullest extent permitted by law. (e) No provision in these Conditions of Sale shall be deemed to exclude or limit the liability of Phillips or any of our afliated companies to the buyer in respect of any fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation made by any of us or in respect of death or personal injury caused by our negligent acts or omissions. 14 Copyright The copyright in all images, illustrations and written materials produced by or for Phillips relating to a lot, including the contents of this catalogue, is and shall remain at all times the property of Phillips and such images and materials may not be used by the buyer or any other party without our prior written consent. Phillips and the seller make no representations or warranties that the buyer of a lot will acquire any copyright or other reproduction rights in it. 15 General (a) These Conditions of Sale, as changed or supplemented as provided in Paragraph 1 above, and Authorship Warranty set out the entire agreement between the parties with respect to the transactions contemplated herein and supersede all prior and contemporaneous written, oral or implied understandings, representations and agreements. (b) Notices to Phillips shall be in writing and addressed to the department in charge of the sale, quoting the reference number specifed at the beginning of the sale catalogue. Notices to clients shall be addressed to the last address notifed by them in writing to Phillips. (c) These Conditions of Sale are not assignable by any buyer without our prior written consent but are binding on the buyer’s successors, assigns and representatives. (d) Should any provision of these Conditions of Sale be held void, invalid or unenforceable for any reason, the remaining provisions shall remain in full force and efect. No failure by any party to exercise, nor any delay in exercising, any right or remedy under these Conditions of Sale shall act as a waiver or release thereof in whole or in part. 16 Law and Jurisdiction (a) The rights and obligations of the parties with respect to these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty, the conduct of the auction and any matters related to any of the foregoing shall be governed by and interpreted in accordance with laws of the State of New York, excluding its conficts of law rules.

Phillips warrants the authorship of property in this auction catalogue described in headings in bold or CAPITALIZED type for a period of fve years from date of sale by Phillips, subject to the exclusions and limitations set forth below. (a) Phillips gives this Authorship Warranty only to the original buyer of record (i.e., the registered successful bidder) of any lot. This Authorship Warranty does not extend to (i) subsequent owners of the property, including purchasers or recipients by way of gif from the original buyer, heirs, successors, benefciaries and assigns; (ii) property where the description in the catalogue states that there is a confict of opinion on the authorship of the property; (iii) property where our attribution of authorship was on the date of sale consistent with the generally accepted opinions of specialists, scholars or other experts; (iv) property whose description or dating is proved inaccurate by means of scientifc methods or tests not generally accepted for use at the time of the publication of the catalogue or which were at such time deemed unreasonably expensive or impractical to use or likely in our reasonable opinion to have caused damage or loss in value to the lot or (v) property where there has been no material loss in value from the value of the lot had it been as described in the heading of the catalogue entry. (b) In any claim for breach of the Authorship Warranty, Phillips reserves the right, as a condition to rescinding any sale under this warranty, to require the buyer to provide to us at the buyer’s expense the written opinions of two recognized experts approved in advance by Phillips. We shall not be bound by any expert report produced by the buyer and reserve the right to consult our own experts at our expense. If Phillips agrees to rescind a sale under the Authorship Warranty, we shall refund to the buyer the reasonable costs charged by the experts commissioned by the buyer and approved in advance by us. (c) Subject to the exclusions set forth in subparagraph (a) above, the buyer may bring a claim for breach of the Authorship Warranty provided that (i) he or she has notifed Phillips in writing within three months of receiving any information which causes the buyer to question the authorship of the lot, specifying the auction in which the property was included, the lot number in the auction catalogue and the reasons why the authorship of the lot is being questioned and (ii) the buyer returns the lot to Phillips to the saleroom in which it was purchased in the same condition as at the time of its auction and is able to transfer good and marketable title in the lot free from any third party claim arising afer the date of the auction. Phillips has discretion to waive any of the foregoing requirements set forth in this subparagraph (c) or subparagraph (b) above. (d) The buyer understands and agrees that the exclusive remedy for any breach of the Authorship Warranty shall be rescission of the sale and refund of the original Purchase Price paid. This remedy shall constitute the sole remedy and recourse of the buyer against Phillips, any of our afliated companies and the seller and is in lieu of any other remedy available as a matter of law or equity. This means that none of Phillips, any of our afliated companies or the seller shall be liable for loss or damage beyond the remedy expressly provided in this Authorship Warranty, whether such loss or damage is characterized as direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential, or for the payment of interest on the original Purchase Price.

(b) Phillips, all bidders and all sellers agree to the exclusive jurisdiction of the (i) state courts of the State of New York located in New York City and (ii) the federal courts for the Southern and Eastern Districts of New York to settle all disputes arising in connection with all aspects of all matters or transactions to which these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty relate or apply. (c) All bidders and sellers irrevocably consent to service of process or any other documents in connection with proceedings in any court by facsimile transmission, personal service, delivery by mail or in any other manner permitted by New York law or the law of the place of service, at the last address of the bidder or seller known to Phillips. 17 Sales Tax Unless the buyer has delivered a valid certifcate evidencing exemption from tax, the buyer shall pay applicable New York, California, Colorado or Florida sales tax on any lot picked up or delivered anywhere in the states of New York, California, Colorado or Florida.

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Executive Management Chairman & CEO Edward Dolman Senior Directors Jean-Paul Engelen Alexander Payne Peter Sumner Sam Hines Vanessa Kramer Hallett Henry Allsopp Jean-Michel Placent

Chairman, UK & Europe Hugues Joffre

Chief of Staf Lisa King

Deputy Chairman, International Svetlana Marich

Chief Financial Ofcer Annette Schwaer

Deputy Chairmen, Europe & Asia Matt Carey-Williams Finn Schouenborg Dombernowsky

Chief Creative & Marketing Ofcer Damien Whitmore

Senior Consultant Aurel Bacs Livia Russo

Deputy Chairmen, Americas David Georgiades August O. Uribe

Chief Communications and PR Ofcer Michael Sherman Chief Counsel Richard Aydon

Senior Advisors to Chairman & CEO Arnold Lehman Francesco Bonami

Chief Operating Ofcer, Americas Sean Cleary Chief Operating Ofcer, UK Europe & Asia Frank Lasry

Directors Alex Heminway Cary Leibowitz Kelly Troester Martin Klosterfelde Nazgol Jahan Paul Maudsley Zach Miner

International Business Directors Bart van Son, 20th Century & Contemporary Art Myriam Christinaz, Jewelry, Watches, & Business Development Strategic Projects Director Caroline Conegliano Associate General Counsel Jonathan Illari Senior Directors, Human Resources Jennifer Garvin Nicola Mason

International Specialists Berlin Martin Klosterfelde Director and International Specialist, Contemporary Art +49 177 628 4110 Chicago Carol Ehlers Specialist, Consultant, Photographs +1 773 230 9192 Denver Melyora de Koning Senior Specialist, Contemporary Art +1 917 657 7193 Geneva Oksana Katchaluba Specialist, Contemporary Art +41 22 906 80 00 Istanbul Deniz Atac Consultant +90 533 374 1198

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Worldwide Ofces Italy Carolina Lanfranchi Consultant +39 33 8924 1720 Paris Maria Cifuentes Caruncho Specialist +33 142 78 67 77 Portugal Maura Marvão Consultant, Contemporary Art +351 917 564 427 Zurich Niklaus Kuenzler Specialist, Contemporary Art +41 79 533 90 00

Sale Rooms

Regional Ofces

New York 450 Park Avenue New York, NY 10022, USA tel +1 212 940 1200 fax +1 212 940 1378

Berlin Kurfürstendamm 193 10707 Berlin, Germany tel +49 30 887 297 44

London 30 Berkeley Square London W1J 6EX, United Kingdom tel +44 20 7318 4010 fax +44 20 7318 4011 Geneva 23 quai des Bergues 1201 Geneva, Switzerland tel +41 22 906 80 00 fax +41 22 906 80 01 15 quai de l’Ile 1204 Geneva, Switzerland fax +41 22 317 81 80 Hong Kong Room 1301-13/F, York House, The Landmark Building, 15 Queen’s Road Central, Hong Kong tel +852 2318 2000 fax +852 2318 2002

Istanbul Meclisi Mebusan Caddesi Deniz Apartmani No. 79/8 Istanbul Beyoglu 34427, Turkey tel +90 533 374 1198 Milan Via Monte di Pietà, 1/A Milan 20121 Moscow Nikolskaya Str 19–21, 5th foor, 109012 Moscow, Russia tel +7 495 225 88 22 fax +7 495 225 88 87 Paris 46 rue du Bac, 75007 Paris, France tel +33 1 42 78 67 77 fax +33 1 42 78 23 07 Zurich Restelbergstrasse 89, 8044 Zurich, Switzerland tel +41 79 533 90 00

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Specialists and Departments 20th Century & Contemporary Art Hugues Joffre, Worldwide Head of 20th Century Art Jean-Paul Engelen, Worldwide Head of Contemporary Art David Georgiades August O. Uribe

+44 20 7318 7923 +1 212 940 1390 +1 212 940 1280 +1 212 940 1208

Bart Van Son

+44 20 7318 7912

New York Kate Bryan, Head of Evening Sale John McCord, Head of Day Sale Rebekah Bowling, Head of New Now Sale Jean-Michel Placent Zach Miner Rachel Adler Rosan Karen Garka-Prince Katherine Lukacher Samuel Mansour Nicole Smith Courtney Raterman Paula Campolieto Annie Dolan London Peter Sumner, Head of Contemporary Art, London Henry Highley, Head of Day Sale Tamila Kerimova, Head of New Now Sale Nathalie Zaquin-Boulakia Matt Langton Iori Endo Simon Tovey Hannah Tjaden Alex Dolman Ava Carleton-Williams Chiara Panarello Florencia Moscova Latin American Art Henry Allsopp, Worldwide Head Kaeli Deane, Head of Sale Natalia C. Zuluaga Carolina Scarborough Isabel Suarez

+1 212 940 1267 +1 212 940 1261 +1 212 940 1250 +1 212 940 1263 +1 212 940 1256 +1 212 940 1333 +1 212 940 1204 +1 212 940 1215 +1 212 940 1219 +1 212 940 1387 +1 212 940 1392 +1 212 940 1255 +1 212 940 1288

+44 20 7318 4063 +44 20 7318 4061 +44 20 7318 4065 +44 20 7901 7931 +44 20 7318 4074 +44 20 7318 4039 +44 20 7318 4084 +44 20 7318 4093 +44 20 7901 7911 +44 20 7901 7904 +44 20 7318 4073 +44 20 7318 4082

+44 20 7318 4060 +1 212 940 1352 +1 305 776 4439 +1 212 940 1391 +1 212 940 1227

Modern and Contemporary Editions Cary Leibowitz, Worldwide Co-Director Kelly Troester, Worldwide Co-Director

+1 212 940 1222 +1 212 940 1221

New York Jannah Greenblatt Audrey Lindsey Kaissa Karhu

+1 212 940 1332 +1 212 940 1322 +1 212 940 1238

London Robert Kennan, Head of Sale Anne Schneider-Wilson Ross Thomas Rebecca Tooby-Desmond Eliza Allan

+44 20 7318 4075 +44 20 7318 4042 +44 20 7318 4077 +44 20 7318 4079 +44 20 7318 4069

Jewels Nazgol Jahan, Worldwide Director

+1 212 940 1283

New York Kristen Dowling Christina Alford

+1 212 940 1302 +1 212 940 1365

London Lane Clements McLean

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Design Alexander Payne, Senior Director and Worldwide Head, Design New York Alex Heminway, New York Director Meaghan Roddy Cordelia Lembo Jillian Pfferling London Madalena Horta e Costa, Head of Sale Domenico Raimondo Marine Hartogs Marcus McDonald Marta De Roia Lisa Stevenson Sofia Sayn-Wittgenstein Photographs Vanessa Hallett, Senior Director and Worldwide Head, Photographs New York Sarah Krueger, Head of Sale Caroline Deck Rachel Peart Marijana Rayl Kelly Van Ingen London Genevieve Janvrin, Head of Photographs, Europe Yuka Yamaji Alexandra Bibby Sophie Busby

+44 20 7318 4052

+1 212 940 1269 +1 212 940 1266 +1 212 940 1265 +1 212 940 1268

+44 20 7318 4019 +44 20 7318 4016 +44 20 7901 7913 +44 20 7318 4095 +44 20 7318 4096 +44 20 7901 7926 +44 20 7318 4023

+1 212 940 1243

+1 212 940 1225 +1 212 940 1247 +1 212 940 1246 +1 212 940 1386 +1 212 940 1245

+44 20 7318 7996 +44 20 7318 4098 +44 20 7318 4087 +44 20 7318 4092

Chicago Carol Ehlers

+1 773 230 9192

Watches Sam Hines, International Head of Watches

+852 2318 2030

Geneva Aurel Bacs, Senior Consultant Bacs & Russo Livia Russo, Senior Consultant Bacs & Russo Dr. Nathalie Monbaron Virginie Liatard-Roessli Diana Ortega Justine SĂŠchaud

+41 22 317 81 85 +41 22 317 81 86 +41 22 317 81 83 +41 22 317 81 82 +41 22 317 8187 +41 22 317 8188

New York Paul Boutros Leigh Zagoory

+1 212 940 1293 +1 212 940 1285

London Paul David Maudsley Kate Lacey Hong Kong Jill Chen Amy Chow Tiffany To Joey Luk Angel Ho

+44 20 7901 7916 +44 20 7901 2907

+852 2318 2000 +852 2318 2035 +852 2318 2036 +852 2318 2032 +852 2318 2031

+44 20 7318 4032

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Specialists and Departments Exhibitions Brittany Lopez Slater Edwin Pennicott

+1 212 940 1299 +44 20 7901 2909

Executive Assistant to the Senior Executives Elizabeth Anne Wallace

Arts Partnerships New York Lauren Shadford Cecilia Wolfson London Isa Tharin Private Sales Susanna Brockman

Ofce of the Chairman and Chief Executive Ofcer Mariangela Renshaw +1 212 940 1207, +44 207 318 4029

+1 212 940 1257 +1 212 940 1258

+44 20 7318 4024

+44 20 7318 4041

Communications and Marketing Michael Sherman, Chief Communications and Public Relations Ofcer Trish Walsh, Marketing Manager Emma Miller Gelberg, Associate Manager, Marketing and Business Development Charlotte Adlard, Marketing Co-ordinator Alex Godwin-Brown, Head of Press and Events, Europe Georgia Trotter, Events Manager

+1 212 940 1303

+1 212 940 1384 +1 212 940 1224 +1 212 940 1291 +44 207 901 7905 +44 20 7318 4036 +44 20 7318 4085

Private Client Services New York Philae Knight Sara Tayeb-Khalifa London Dawn Zhu Adam Clay Lily Atherton Hanbury Fiona M. McGovern

+1 212 940 1313 +1 212 940 1383

+44 20 7318 4017 +44 20 7318 4048 +44 20 7318 4071 +44 20 7318 4054

Creative Services Andrea Koronkiewicz, Director of Creative Services Orlann Capazorio, Director of Production

+1 212 940 1326 +1 212 940 1281

New York Jef Velazquez, Production Artist Christine Knorr, Graphic Designer James Reeder, Graphic Designer

+1 212 940 1211 +1 212 940 1325 +1 212 940 1296

London Eve Campbell, Creative Services Manager Moira Gil, Graphic Designer Laurie-Ann Ward, Graphic Designer

+44 20 7901 7919 +44 20 7901 7917 +44 20 7901 7918

Proposals Lauren Zanedis

+1 212 940 1271

Sale Information New Now Evening & Day Sales

Sale Contacts

Auction & Viewing Location 450 Park Avenue New York 10022

Head of Sale Rebekah Bowling +1 212 940 1250 rbowling@phillips.com

Photography Kent Pell Matt Kroenig Jean Bourbon Marta Zagozdzon

Associate Specialist Katherine Lukacher +1 212 940 1215 klukacher@phillips.com

Auctioneers August Uribe Sarah Krueger

Cataloguers Samuel Mansour +1 212 940 1219 smansour@phillips.com

Catalogues +1 212 940 1240 catalogues@phillips.com $35/€25/£22 at the gallery

Auctions 29 February 2016, 11am & 6pm Evening Lots 1–27, 6pm Day Lots 101–368, 11am Viewing 22 – 29 February Monday – Saturday 10am–6pm Sunday 12pm–6pm Sale Designation When sending in written bids or making enquiries please refer to this sale as NY010116 or New Now Day Sale, or NY010216 or New Now Evening Sale. Absentee and Telephone Bids tel +1 212 940 1228 fax +1 212 924 1749 bidsnewyork@phillips.com

Front and back covers Yoshitomo Nara, Household Dog, 2000, lot 13 (detail) © Yoshitomo Nara, courtesy Pace Gallery

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Nicole Smith +1 212 940 1387 nsmith@phillips.com Administrator Annie Dolan +1 212 940 1288 adolan@phillips.com Property Manager Paul Stefens +1 212 940 1376 pstefens@phillips.com

Client Accounting Sylvia Leitao +1 212 940 1231 Buyer Accounts Michael Carretta +1 212 940 1232 Darrell Thompson +1 212 940 1338 Seller Accounts Carolina Swan +1 212 940 1253 Client Services 450 Park Avenue +1 212 940 1200 Shipping Carol Mangan +1 212 940 1320 Sara Polefka +1 212 940 1373 Lauren Castagna +1 212 940 1335

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450 Park Avenue New York 10022 phillips.com +1 212 940 1200 bidsnewyork@phillips.com Please return this form by fax to +1 212 924 1749 or email it to bidsnewyork@phillips.com at least 24 hours before the sale. Please read carefully the information in the right column and note that it is important that you indicate whether you are applying as an individual or on behalf of a company. Please select the type of bid you wish to make with this form (please select one): Paddle Number

In-person Absentee Bidding Telephone Bidding

• Company purchases: If you are buying under a business entity we require a copy of government-issued identification (such as a resale certificate, corporate bank information or the certificate of incorporation) to verify the status of the company. • Conditions of Sale: All bids are placed and executed, and all lots are sold and purchased, subject to the Conditions of Sale printed in the catalogue. Please read them carefully before placing a bid. Your attention is drawn to Paragraph 4 of the Conditions of Sale.

Please indicate in what capacity you will be bidding (please select one):

As a private individual On behalf of a company

• If you cannot attend the sale, we can execute bids confidentially on your behalf.

Sale Title Title

• Private purchases: Proof of identity in the form of government-issued identification will be required.

Sale Number First Name

Sale Date

Surname Account Number

Company (if applicable) Address

• Phillips charges the successful bidder a commission, or buyer’s premium, on the hammer price of each lot sold. The buyer’s premium is payable by the buyer as part of the total purchase price at the following rates: 25% of the hammer price up to and including $100,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above $100,000 up to and including $2,000,000 and 12% of the portion of the hammer price above $2,000,000 on each lot sold.

• “Buy” or unlimited bids will not be accepted. Alternative bids can be placed by using the word “OR” between lot numbers.

City

• For absentee bids, indicate your maximum limit for each lot, excluding the buyer’s premium and any applicable sales or use tax. Your bid will be executed at the lowest price taking into account the reserve and other bidders. On no reserve lots, in the absence of other bids, your bid will be executed at approximately 50% of the low pre-sale estimate or at the amount specified, if less than 50% of the low estimate.

State/Country

Zip Code Phone

Mobile

Email

Fax

Phone number to call at the time of sale (for Phone Bidding only)

• Your bid must be submitted in the currency of the sale and will be rounded down to the nearest amount consistent with the auctioneer’s bidding increments.

1.

• If we receive identical bids, the first bid received will take precedence.

Phone (for Phone Bidding only)

2.

Please complete the following section for telephone and absentee bids only Lot Number

Brief Description

In Consecutive Order

US $ Limit* Absentee Bids Only

• Arranging absentee and telephone bids is a free service provided by us to prospective buyers. While we will exercise reasonable care in undertaking such activity, we cannot accept liability for errors relating to execution of your bids except in cases of willful misconduct. Agreement to bid by telephone must be confirmed by you promptly in writing or by fax. Telephone bid lines may be recorded. • Please submit your bids to the Bid Department by fax at +1 212 924 1749 or scan and email to bidsnewyork@phillips. com at least 24 hours before the sale. You will receive confirmation by email within one business day. To reach the Bid Department by phone please call +1 212 940 1228. • Absent prior payment arrangements, please provide a bank reference. Payment can be made by cash (up to $10,000), credit card (up to $100,000), money order, wire transfer, bank check or personal check with identification. Please note that credit cards are subject to a surcharge. • Lots cannot be collected until payment has cleared and all charges have been paid.

* Excluding Buyer’s Premium and sales or use taxes

Financial Information For your bid to be accepted, we require the following information for our reference only. Please note that you may be contacted to provide a bank reference: Credit Card Type

Expiration Date

Credit Card Number

Signature

Date

• By signing this Bid Form, you consent to our use of your personal data, including sensitive personal data, in accordance with Phillips’s Privacy Policy published on our website at www. phillips.com or available on request by emailing dataprotection@phillips.com. We may send you materials about us and our services or other information which we think you may fnd interesting. If you would prefer not to receive such information, please email us at dataprotection@phillips.com. • Phillips’s premises may be subject to video surveillance and recording. Telephone calls (e.g., telephone bidding) may also be recorded. We may process that information in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

By signing this form, you accept the Conditions of Sale of Phillips as stated in our catalogues and on our website.

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125. John Armleder

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phillips.com

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Profile for PHILLIPS

NEW NOW EVENING & DAY SALES [Catalogue]  

Phillips presents the New Now Evening & Day Sales on 29 February in New York.

NEW NOW EVENING & DAY SALES [Catalogue]  

Phillips presents the New Now Evening & Day Sales on 29 February in New York.