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66. THENJIWE NIKI NKOSI


14. DORIS LEE


19 June–3 August 2019 450 Park Avenue, New York Viewing Monday–Saturday 10am–6pm

Curator Dr. Arnold Lehman alehman@phillips.com Executive Assistant to Arnold Lehman Elizabeth Wallace +1 212 940 1303 ewallace@phillips.com   Head of Private Sales Miety Heiden mheiden@phillips.com   Private Sales Associate Jenna Schneider +1 212 940 1393 jschneider@phillips.com   Exhibitions Manager Susanna Graves sgraves@phillips.com


INTRODUCTION BY DR. ARNOLD LEHMAN

Dr. Arnold Lehman Senior Advisor to the CEO

In the Guerrilla Girls’ 1988 broadside text, The Advantages of Being a Woman Artist, of the thirteen caustically sardonic advantages listed, the second is the most relevant to this exhibition: #2 “Not having to be in shows with men.” The “men” reference comes directly afer #1 “Working without the pressure of success,” and before my two favorites, #4 “Knowing your career might pick up afer you’re eighty” and #11 “Being included in revised versions of art history.” Needless to say, it is particularly appropriate that the Guerrilla Girls are participating in this exhibition with a number of their consciousness-raising works. NOMEN: AMERICAN WOMEN ARTISTS FROM 1945 TO TODAY is meant to turn #2 backwards and on its head; to confront #4 with a ramped-up chronology; and to support a radicalized revisionism of #11 into an understanding that the “revised version of art history” is already here! The approximately seventy exceptional women artists (and there certainly could be many, many more) who are recognized in this exhibition— creators of paintings, photographs, and sculpture—are together the makers of a truly remarkable and parallel artistic history. The end of the cataclysmic Second World War and of European dominance of 20th century art brought forward more than seven decades of American visual and intellectual vitality, creativity, contention, art-consumerism, barrier-breaking and a wide embrace of diference in the arts in America. Women, from 1945 to today, have played and will play key roles in that art history. It was only in Europe at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century that there were any public exhibitions devoted exclusively to the work of women artists. However, these exhibitions were not of painting or sculpture, the male-dominated artistic

endeavors, but of drawing. And while, early in the last century, women had gained access to art academies and entrance to exhibitions, in comparison to their male counterparts they were generally ignored by the press, by important collectors, and by museums.1 Afer WWl, American artists traveled to Europe in large numbers to study art in France and Germany and to absorb the excitement of European modernism. However, for the women artists returning to America, there were few opportunities. Instead of enjoying academic appointments in art schools and universities, or independent success as artists, many highly accomplished women were forced to give private art lessons to children or to other women to sustain themselves as artists. While Wyoming gave women the right to vote in 1869, it took a half century until the 19th Amendment to the Constitution expanded that right to all American women. Despite this momentous change in American culture, little changed in recognition and opportunities for women artists until afer WWll. However, a number of women artists began to create an important pathway to recognition with their work in the 1920s and 1930s, such as Georgia O’Keefe and early modernist photographers, such as Berenice Abbott, Imogen Cunningham, Consuelo Kanaga, Dorothea Lange, and Alma Lavenson. Perhaps the question should be asked: “Is it a coincidence that just as women became enfranchised citizens, we see some of the frst eforts by female photographers to enlarge the scope of their public vision.”2 Photography was a critical vehicle for women. The relatively new medium, with its “lingering bastard status as an art,” made its women practitioners


explorers and innovators.3 Along with several other colleagues, these exceptionally observant and relevant artists were among the early standard-bearers of professional women artists working in the 1930s, 1940s, 1950s and later. Indeed, photography, during the years leading up to mid-century, was an important arena for women to demonstrate their talent and commitment to the feld. While they were all deeply infuenced by European and American modernism, they looked carefully at the development of American urban life and, as early photo-journalists, objectively portrayed what they witnessed, including the Depression and World War ll. Somewhat younger photographers, such as Diane Arbus, Lisette Model, Ruth Orkin and Vivian Maier, who had ofen been guided by the teaching or, at least general support of the preceding generation of women, portrayed an even closer view, perhaps, of the changing issues of America, eloquently documenting everyday life for most Americans as well as a more marginalized life for others. Embracing social responsibility as seen through the lens and continuing an inherited modernist perspective, these photographers moved American art through the black and white world of the war years and 1950s and into the more socially and visually complicated years ahead. However, both during the pre-war years and continuing through the 1960s, “most women who excelled in the feld did not expressly foreground their concerns as women. The period’s cult of objectivity hardly fostered a distinctly women’s point of view.”4 As photography by women was rapidly becoming a major force, painting and even sculpture engaged more women, who had returned from professional training in Paris, Düsseldorf, and Munich having had association with leading European fgures such as Picasso, Matisse, Leger, Calder, and Gertrude Stein. Painter Marguerite Zorach and sculptor Mary Callery

were among the frst of this group along with Louise Bourgeois and Louise Nevelson. Georgia O’Keefe was already established and soon to be joined in the late 1950s by Agnes Martin, Lee Bontecou, and members of the singularly male-dominated abstract expressionist group, such as Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Grace Hartigan, Alma Thomas, and Helen Frankenthaler, most born a few years afer WWl and maturing as artists from the late 1940s to the early 1960s. Refecting upon these postwar years, the same question arises “How did these artists—continually discouraged, derided, and attacked—do it? How did they keep working, in the face of so many obstacles, and keep believing in themselves? The simplest answer, beyond talent… is a will of iron, an intense need for that talent to be expressed, no matter the cost….”5 From, perhaps, the moment that Agnes Martin identifed the grid as her métier in 1960, the growth of American art and the increasing rate of women’s participation expanded exponentially. With a variety of abstract movements, as well as minimalism, Pop Art, Conceptualism, Performance Art and many others, space began opening up for women. Afer the excitement of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and 1930s, there was renewed engagement of African American artists, such as Elizabeth Catlett, Betye Saar, Faith Ringgold and, later, Howardena Pindell. Feminism’s visual intervention had already appeared afer enfranchisement in 1920 primarily in the form of continuing gender inequality issues. However, beginning in the 1960s and through the 1970s and 1980s, with civil rights movements having gained signifcant ground, feminist socio-political activism, art and artists became an important force. These women artists took bold and ofen very public positions. Among them were Lynda Benglis, Judy Chicago, Eva Hesse, Mary Beth Edelson, the Guerrilla Girls, Hannah Wilke,


Carolee Schneemann, and somewhat later participants such as neo-conceptualist Mary Kelly, Jenny Holzer, photographer Carrie Mae Weems, and performance artist Janine Antoni, as well as spokeswomen such as Gloria Steinem and Linda Nochlin. In January 1971, in an essay in ArtNews, distinguished feminist art historian, Linda Nochlin asked what has come to be remembered as a critically famous and leading question: “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” It was an eloquent, relentless, and extremely analytical attack on how the socio-political environment created the impossibility “for women to achieve artistic excellence, or success, on the same footing as men, no matter what the potency of their so-called talent, or genius.” Nochlin provided the cornerstone for feminist art history and theory that still ofers an acclaimed and reasoned intellectual basis. Later, artist Deborah Kass rhetorically asked the question: “Who else had undermined the very ground upon which it [the art world] had been built? Who, besides Linda Nochlin, struck the frst and fercest blow against the white male canon?”. Thirty-six years later, Professor Nochlin was an extraordinary partner at the Brooklyn Museum in the organization of the March 2007 inaugural exhibition, Global Feminisms: New Directions in Contemporary Art, at the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, the frst of its kind in the nation. Contemporary American women artists in the 21st century are culturally diverse, globally aware, empowered, and many have gained an esteemed place in the pantheon of American art. Such names as Jenny Holzer, Cindy Sherman, Susan Rothenberg, Howardena Pindell, Laurie Simmons, Kiki Smith, Wangechi Mutu, Vera Lutter, and Diana Al-Hadid exemplify the determination, innovation, and spirit of all those who had led the way forward. And, in this very spirit, a young Latina painter working in the Bronx, Bianca Nemelc,

has raced to fnish an intriguing painting just in time for this exhibition. Although we are approaching our 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote, the Guerrilla Girls’ 2012 headliner “Do women have to be naked to get into the Met. Museum?” still stands as a test of female to male participation in museum permanent collections and temporary exhibitions. “Less than 4% of the artists in the Modern Art sections are women, but 76% of the nudes are female.”6). This exhibition, NOMEN, alters that, at least temporarily, by specifcally excluding the presentation of works of art by men. NOMEN, as the title states, is an attempt to look at this time frame—one of the most innovative periods in art history—only through the extraordinary contributions of women artists. Indeed, it has been this increasingly signifcant engagement of women artists in America from 1945 onward that has spurred the very creativity that we have documented, anticipated, advocated, and embraced. The organization of this exhibition would not have been possible without the exceptional and enthusiastic support and unlimited energy of Elizabeth Wallace, Jenna Schneider, Martin Fox and Susanna Graves. Arnold Lehman Senior Advisor PHILLIPS

1. Uta Grosenick, Women Artists in the 20th and 21st Century, Taschen, 2001. 2. Sally Stein, Modern Women: Women artists at the Museum of Modern Art, MoMA 2010, p. 195. 3. Ibid., p. 193. 4. Ibid. 5. Claudia Roth Pierpont, “How New York’s Postwar Female Painters Battled For Recognition,” New Yorker, October 1, 2018. 6. 2012, Guerrilla Girls


1. CONSUELO KANAGA

1894-1978

Frances with a Flower, 1930-1932 signed in pencil on the lower right mount gelatin silver print 9 3/4 x 7 3/4 in. (24.8 x 19.7 cm.) Provenance Richard Lorenz, Milwaukee Paul Hertzmann, San Francisco Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1995 Exhibited Oakland Museum of Art, Seeing Straight: Revolution in Photography, Group f.64, October 24, 1992 – May 29, 1994, pl. 76, p. 144 Gainesville, Harn Museum of Art, Pure Form: Ansel Adams and the West Coast Precisionist Photographers, March 31 – June 16, 1996 Literature Barbara Millstein, Consuelo Kanaga: An American Photographer, New York, 1992, pl. 30, p. 101 Mary Alinder, Group F.64: Edward Weston, Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham and the Community of Artists Who Revolutionized American Photography, 2014, p. 208

Born 1894, Astoria, Oregon Died 1978, Yorktown Heights, New York Selected museum exhibitions: Montclair Art Museum, New Jersey (1999); Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. (1998); Brooklyn Museum (1976, 1993); Museum of Modern Art (1955); M.H. de Young Memorial Museum, San Francisco (1932) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; Brooklyn Museum; International Center of Photography; The Jewish Museum, New York; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Consuelo Kanaga’s photographic portraits communicate her compassion for her subjects and her dedication to creating compellingly beautiful photographs featuring dramatic sculptural volumes. She explained: “When you make a photograph, it is very much a picture of your own self. . . . Most people try to be striking to catch the eye. I think the thing is not to catch the eye but the spirit.” Beginning in the 1930s, Kanaga became one of the few white photographers in the United States to create artistic portraits of African Americans, as in the striking Frances with a Flower, 1930-32.


2. DOROTHEA LANGE

1895-1965

Daughter of Mexican Field Laborer, near Chandler, Arizona, 1937 Farm Security Administration stamps, typed caption and date on the verso gelatin silver print 7 5/8 x 7 1/2 in. (19.4 x 19.1 cm.) Provenance Private Collection Acquired directly from the above by the present owner in 1990

Born 1895, Hoboken, New Jersey Died 1965, San Francisco 1962 BFA University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 1964 MA University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Selected museum exhibitions: Reynolda House of American Art, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (2018); Oakland Museum of California (2017); J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles (2002); Museum of Modern Art (1940, 1962, 1966, 2020) Selected honors: California Hall of Fame (2008); National Women’s Hall of Fame (2003); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1941) Selected public collections: Bancrof Library, University of California, Berkeley; J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; National Archives, Washington, D.C.; Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia College, Chicago; Museum of Modern Art; Oakland Museum of California; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C. Widely considered to be among the greatest American documentary photographers, Dorothea Lange is best known for the powerful images that she took during the Great Depression for the Farm Security Administration. Bringing determination, compassion, and a unique vision to her work, she captured some of the most iconic photographs of the 20th century. As with her iconic Migrant Mother, Lange’s closely cropped Daughter of Mexican Field Laborer, near Chandler Arizona displays her masterful ability to capture gesture, establish eye contact, and encourage empathy with her subjects.


3. ALMA LAVENSON

1897-1989

Cannery Buildings, Monterey, California, 1939 signed in pencil on the mount; titled and dated on the reverse of the mount; titled in ink and dated in pencil on the “58 Wildwood Gardens, Piedmont, California” label afxed to the reverse of the mount gelatin silver print 7 1/4 x 9 7/8 in. (18.4 x 25.1 cm.) Provenance Estate of Alma Lavenson Butterfeld and Butterfeld, San Francisco, May 23, 1994 Acquired from the above auction by the present owner in 1994

Born 1897, San Francisco Died 1989, Piedmont, California 1919 BA University of California, Berkeley Selected museum exhibitions: University of California, Berkeley (1999); Baltimore Museum of Art (1988); Oakland Museum (1979); California Museum of Photography, University of California, Riverside (1979); Center for Creative Photography, Tucson (1979); San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (1942, 1948, 1960); Brooklyn Museum (1933); M. H. de Young Memorial Museum, San Francisco (1933) Selected public collections: Bancrof Library, University of California, Berkeley; Center for Creative Photography, Tucson; J. Paul Getty Museum; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Metropolitan Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Yale University Art Gallery One of the leading California-based photographers of the mid-twentieth century, Alma Lavenson is best known for images that evoke the region’s history through architecture. Largely self-taught, she took up photography in 1919 and pursued it for the rest of her life. Transitioning from the Pictorialist style of her early work to a modernist approach, her work was included in the frst exhibition of Group f/64 in 1932, alongside Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, and Imogen Cunningham. In Cannery Buildings, Monterey, California, 1939, she documented the industrial canneries of coastal California, capturing the forms of these utilitarian structures with a dramatic, raking light.


4. MARGUERITE ZORACH

1887-1968

Night Still Life signed “M. Zorach” lower lef oil on canvas 26 1/4 x 30 in. (66.7 x 76.2 cm.) Painted circa 1940. Provenance Collection of the Zorach Children (acquired by descent) Kraushaar Galleries, New York Private Collection Collection of Meyer and Vivian Potamkin, Philadelphia (acquired from the above in 1981) Private Collection, New York (acquired from the above in 2003) Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2009 Exhibited Rockland, Maine, William A. Farnsworth Library and Art Museum; Waterville, Colby College Museum of Art, Worcester Art Museum, William and Marguerite Zorach: The Maine Years; July 1980 - August 1981 (titled as Still Life) Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, American Art from the Collection of Vivian and Meyer P. Potamkin, June 10 – October 1, 1989, p. 14 East Hampton, Birnam Wood Galleries, Modern Life: American Paintings Between the Wars, July 5 – August 5, 2007

Born 1887, Santa Rosa, California Died 1968, New York 1908 Stanford University 1908-1911 Académie de La Palette, Paris Selected museum exhibitions: Phillips Museum of Art, Franklin & Marshall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania (2011); Colby College of Art Museum, Waterville, Maine (1968); Forum Exhibition of Modern American Painters, New York (1916); Armory Show, New York (1913); Salon d’Automne, Paris (1911) Société des Artistes Indépendants, Paris (1910) Selected honors: Honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts, Bates College (1964); Logan Medal of the Arts, Art Institute of Chicago (1920); Silver Medal, California Palace of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco (1919) Selected public collections: Brooklyn Museum; de Young Museum, San Francisco; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Modern Art; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C.; Portland Museum of Art, Maine; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.; Whitney Museum of American Art

American painter Marguerite Zorach lived in Paris from 1908 through 1912, absorbing the infuence of Fauvism and associating with fgures like Gertrude Stein, Pablo Picasso, and Henri Matisse, also meeting her future husband, artist William Zorach there. Night Still Life was painted in their home in Maine, where they lived when not in New York. In the colorful still life, Zorach painted a scene from her immediate environment, presenting a windowsill like a stage set that dramatically juxtaposes an abundance of vibrant fowers with the silver pitcher and brilliant yellow curtains.


5. MARY CALLERY

1903-1977

Circus Rider incised with the artist monogram on the underside bronze 21 7/8 x 20 x 12 in. (55.6 x 50.8 x 30.5 cm.) Executed in 1942. Provenance Jonathan Boos Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2012

Born 1903, New York Died 1977, Paris 1921-25 Art Students League, New York Selected museum exhibitions: Zimmerli Art Museum, Rutgers University, New Jersey (1999); Dallas Museum of Art (1958); Salon du Mai, Paris (1949); Arts Club of Chicago (1946) Selected honors: Commission for proscenium arch sculpture, Metropolitan Opera House, New York (1966); Commission for United States Pavilion, Brussels World’s fair (1958) Selected public collections: Addison Gallery of American Art, Massachusetts; Art Institute of Chicago; Cincinnati Art Museum; Detroit Institute of Arts; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Modern Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Wadsworth Athenaeum, Hartford; Whitney Museum of American Art Living in Paris from 1930 through the outbreak of World War II, Callery was active as an art collector and a sculptor. When she returned to New York in 1940, she continued to develop her innovative sculptural practice toward greater abstraction. Related to her Horse, 1942, in the sculpture garden of the Museum of Modern Art, the bronze sculpture Circus Rider, 1942 features a horse with an elongated neck and abstract features that accentuate its vitality. Its dynamic composition features similarly abstracted fgures of a man and a woman who stand astride the equine creature in acrobatic poses.


6. VIRGINIA BERRESFORD 1904-1995 Morning Glory and Lily Pads signed and dated “Virginia Berresford 1943” lower right watercolor on paper 22 x 15 in. (55.8 x 38.1 cm.) Executed in 1943. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist’s estate by the present owner Exhibited New York, D. Wigmore Fine Art, Inc., Women Artists in Florida, 1920-1951, November 30, 2017 – February 22, 2018, p. 8 (illustrated)

Born 1902, New Rochelle, New York Died 1995, Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts 1921 Wellesley College, Massachusetts 1923 Columbia University, New York 1925-1930 Academie Moderne, Paris Selected museum exhibitions: Boca Raton Museum of Art (2018); Montclair Art Museum, New Jersey (1994); Princeton Art Museum, New Jersey (1971); University of Maine, Orono (1965); Whitney Museum of American Art (1951); New York World’s Fair (1939) Selected public collections: Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio; Detroit Institute of Art; Farnsworth Art Museum, Maine; Whitney Museum of American Art Spanning American and European modernism, Virginia Berresford studied with Amédée Ozenfant in Paris and New York. She is best known for her innovative still-life and landscape painting, which ofen featured motifs from the ocean and shore. For Morning Glory and Lily Pads, 1943, Berresford blended multiple views of disparate tropical botanical subjects to create a work with an exuberant use of color, organic form, and calligraphic application of watercolor. In 1954, she opened the frst commercial art gallery on Martha’s Vineyard, making signifcant contributions to cultural life on the island.


7. REBECCA LEPKOFF

1916-2014

“Kick the Can,” Ridge St., Lower East Side, 1947 signed on the secondary mount gelatin silver print 12 3/4 x 10 3/8 in. (32.4 x 26.4 cm.) Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

Born 1916, New York Died 2014, Townshend, Vermont 1938 BA City College, New York Selected museum exhibitions: Tenement Museum, New York (2012); Jewish Museum, New York (2012); Vermont Center for Photography, Brattleboro (2010, 2013); New York Public Library, 2006 Selected public collections: Museum of the City of New York; National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.; Vermont Historical Society, Barre Growing up on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, Rebecca Lepkof began photographing her native city upon buying her frst camera in 1938. She was an active member of the famed Photo League, a cooperative of photographers in New York who banded together to promote creative and social causes. Images like “Kick the Can,” Ridge St., Lower East Side, 1947, chronicle the active life of the New York streets. According to the photographer: “People ask me— how did you know what to take? I just went outside, and there were the streets of my mother, of me, and whatnot. Very alive, full activity, with people.”


8. LISETTE MODEL

1901-1983

Woman with Veil, San Francisco, 1947 signed in pencil on the verso. gelatin silver print, printed later 19 1/2 x 15 3/4 in. (49.5 x 40 cm.) Provenance Estate of Harry Lunn, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

Born 1901, Vienna, Austria Died 1983, New York Selected museum exhibitions: deCordova Museum, Lincoln, Massachusetts (2016); Musée du Jeu de Paume, Paris (2010); Fotomuseum Winterthur, Zurich (2001); Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna (2000); Museum Ludwig, Cologne (1992); International Center of Photography, New York (1991); National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa (1990); Museum Folkwang, Essen (1982); New Orleans Museum of Art, Louisiana (1981); Museum of Modern Art (1949); Art Institute of Chicago (1943); Photo League, New York (1941) Selected honors: Medal of the City of Paris (1982); Creative Artists Public Service Program Award (1973); Guggenheim Fellowship (1965) Selected public collections: Albertina, Vienna; George Eastman House, Rochester; Getty Museum of Art, Los Angeles; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Museum of Modern Art; Metropolitan Museum of Art; National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; Centre Pompidou, Paris; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington; Tate, London

Born in Austria, Lisette Model immigrated to the United States in 1938. She quickly gained success for her photographs, publishing in magazines including Harper’s Bazaar and Look, and joining New York’s Photo League cooperative. An important teacher at the New School of Social Research, her best-known student was Diane Arbus. Model revolutionized street photography with her strikingly candid portraits, stating: “The camera is an instrument of detection. We photograph not only what we know, but also what we don’t know.” Representing an older woman who is elaborately and idiosyncratically dressed, other prints of this striking photograph are in the collections of the J. Paul Getty Museum; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; and the Tate, London.


9. IMOGEN CUNNINGHAM 1883-1976 Aloe signed and dated in pencil on the mount; estate stamp on the reverse of the mount; the facsimile signature studio label with the “1331 Green Street� address afxed to the reverse of the mount gelatin silver print 13 1/2 x 10 1/2 in. (34.3 x 26.7 cm.) Provenance Private Collection Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1995

Born 1883, Portland, Oregon Died 1976, San Francisco 1907 BA University of Washington, Seattle 1909 Technische Hochschule, Dresden Selected museum exhibitions: Seattle Art Museum (2009); Fotografe Forum Frankfurt (1992); American Federation of Arts (1983); Art Institute of Chicago (1964); Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle (1965, 1974); George Eastman House, Rochester (1961); Cincinnati Art Museum (1956); Dallas Art Museum (1935); M. H. de Young Memorial Museum, San Francisco (1931, 1970); Portland Art Museum, Oregon (1914) Selected honors: John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1970); Honorary Doctorate, California College of Arts and Crafs, Oakland (1968); American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1967) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; Cantor Center for Visual Arts at Stanford University, California; George Eastman House, Rochester; Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.; Museum of Modern Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Philadelphia Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography Imogen Cunningham is among the most renowned American photographers of the twentieth century for her portraits, nudes, and botanical studies. With Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, and others, she was a key member of Group f/64, championing precisely exposed photographs of the natural world. For Aloe, 1949, she captured the leaves of a succulent with a dramatic sense of abstract form and careful attention to light and framing.


10. LOUISE BOURGEOIS

1911-2010

Untitled signed and dated “Louise Bourgeois 60” lower right ink on cardboard 21 1/2 x 27 3/4 in. (54.6 x 70.5 cm.) Executed circa 1950s. The artist’s studio has confrmed that although the work was signed 1960, the work was executed in the 1950s. Provenance The Artist Peter Blum, New York Barbara and Sorrell Mathes, New York Acquired from the above the present owner Exhibited New York, Peter Blum, Louise Bourgeois: Works on Paper from the ‘40s and ‘50s, September 5 November 11, 2006

Born 1911, Paris Died 2010, New York 1932-1935 Sorbonne, Paris 1936-1938 École des Beaux-Arts, Paris 1938-1939 Art Students League, New York Selected museum exhibitions: Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, North Adams (2017); Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid (2015); Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2003); State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg (2001); Centre Pompidou (1995); Venice Biennale (1993); Serpentine Gallery, London (1985); Museum of Modern Art (1982); Berkeley Art Museum (1979) Selected honors: Austrian Grand Prize for Art (2007); Praemium Imperiale, Japan (1999); National Medal of Arts (1996); Lifetime Achievement Award, International Sculpture Center (1991); Ofcier de l’Ordre des arts et des lettres, France (1984); American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters (1983) Selected public collections: Dia Art Foundation; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Museum of Modern Art; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; National Gallery of Canada, Ottowa; National Gallery of Australia; Centre Pompidou; Philadelphia Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Tate Modern; Whitney Museum of American Art

Louise Bourgeois is among the most celebrated female artists of the twentieth century, and a vital infuence on feminist artists of subsequent generations. Over the course of her long career, she explored a variety of themes including domesticity and the family, sexuality and the body, as well as death and the unconscious. With its undulating forms and variety of hatched textures, the present drawing suggests bodily shapes, the forms of a landscape, and emotional states. According to Bourgeois: “the abstract drawings come from a deep need to achieve peace, rest, and sleep.”


11. RUTH ORKIN

1921-1985

American Girl in Italy, 1951 signed, titled and dated in ink in the margin; signed in pencil on the verso. gelatin silver print, printed 1980 16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm) Provenance Acquired directly from the artist’s estate by the present owner

Born 1921, Boston Died 1985, New York 1940 Los Angeles City College Selected museum exhibitions: Fondazione Stelline, Milan (2014); International Center of Photography, New York (1995); University of Akron, Ohio (1979); Milwaukee Center of Photography (1978); Nikon House, New York (1974) Selected honors: Certifcate of Merit, Municipal Art Society of New York (1984); 1st Annual Manhattan Cultural Award, Photography (1980); One of Top Ten Women Photographers in the U.S., Professional Photographers of America (1959) Selected public collections: Brooklyn Museum; International Center of Photography, New York; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Modern Art; New-York Historical Society Born in Boston, Ruth Orkin grew up in Hollywood because of her mother’s career as a silent flm actress. She moved to New York City in 1943 and would achieve success as a freelance photographer, contributing to Look, Life, Ladies’ Home Journal and other magazines, and establishing herself as a portrait photographer. An American Girl in Italy, 1951, is Orkin’s most celebrated and iconic image and one of a series she took of Ninalee Craig, a fellow American traveler whom she met in Florence. Representing Craig walking down a street as men leer at her, this photograph typifes the concept of the male gaze.


12. BERENICE ABBOTT

1898-1991

American Shops, Lodi, NJ, July 30, 1954 signed in pencil on the verso gelatin silver print 7 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. (19.1 x 24.1 cm.) Provenance The artist Commerce Graphics, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

Born 1898, Springfeld, Ohio Died 1991, Monson, Maine 1917-1918 Ohio State University Selected museum exhibitions: Fundación MAPFRE, Barcelona (2019); Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin (2016); Jeu de Paume, Paris (2012); National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C. (1998); International Center for Photography, New York (1981, 1989, 1995); Dallas Museum of Art (1992); National Museum of American Art, Washington, D.C. (1982); Museum of Modern Art (1970); New School for Social Research (1959); San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (1953); Cooper Union, New York (1940); Museum of the City of New York (1934, 1937) Selected honors: Legion of Arts and Letters, France (1988); International ERICE Prize for Photography (1987); Honorary Doctorate, Bowdoin College (1982); Honorary Doctorate, Smith College (1973); Honorary Doctorate, University of Maine (1971) Selected public collections: Cleveland Museum of Art; Jewish Museum, New York; Minneapolis Institute of Art; Museum of the City of New York; New York Public Library; Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

A central fgure in American photography, Berenice Abbott moved to Paris in 1921, working in Man Ray’s studio and championing the work of Eugène Atget. Returning to the United States in 1929, her incisive portraits and the urban views published in Changing New York, 1939, earned her considerable renown. With its mixture of modernist commercial architecture, signage, and decoration, Abbott’s American Shops, Lodi, New Jersey, 1954, documents the inventiveness of the carcentered culture then emerging in the postwar United States. Public institutions with this photograph in their collections include the Dallas Museum of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, and the Minneapolis Institute of Art.


13. VIVIAN MAIER

1926-2009

New York, NY, 1954 signed, dated, numbered 15/15 in ink by John Maloof within the “Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy of Maloof Collection” copyright stamp on the verso gelatin silver print, printed 2018 12 x 12 in. (30.5 x 30.5 cm.) Provenance John Maloof Collection, Chicago Acquired from the above by the present owner

Born 1926, New York Died 2009, Chicago Selected museum exhibitions: Glenbow Museum, Calgary; Musée de l’Ancien Évêché, Grenoble, France (2019); Somerset House, London (2019); International Photography Hall of Fame, St. Louis (2018); Des Moines Art Center (2016); Arlington Museum of Art (2016); Museo D’Arte della Provincia di Nuoro (2015); Hasselblad Foundation, Gothenburg (2014); Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts (2013); Chicago Cultural Center (2011) Selected public collections: University of Chicago Unknown to the public during her lifetime, Vivian Maier’s powerful photographs have received tremendous international interest since they became known posthumously. The details of Maier’s life are scant: She was born in the Bronx, but spent most of her youth in France before returning to New York in 1951 and moving to Chicago in 1956, where she supported herself for most of life as a nanny. This striking photograph of children enjoying popsicles epitomizes Maier’s ability to capture the unguarded personalities of her subjects.


14. DORIS LEE

1905-1983

Vine Series # 6 signed “Doris Lee” lower center; further signed and titled “Vine Series #6 Doris Lee” on the stretcher oil on canvas 46 x 24 in. (116.8 x 61 cm.) Painted circa 1955. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist’s estate by the present owner

Born 1905, Aledo, Illinois Died 1983, Clearwater, Florida 1927 BA Rockford College, Rockford, Illinois 1929 Kansas City Art Institute 1930 California School of Fine Art, San Francisco Selected museum exhibitions: Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Greensburg, Pennsylvania (2020); National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C. (2014); Woodstock Artists Association, New York (1984); New York World’s Fair (1939) Selected honors: Carnegie Prize (1944); Logan Purchase Prize, Art Institute of Chicago (1935) Selected public collections: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Bufalo; Art Institute of Chicago; Cleveland Museum of Art; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Metropolitan Museum of Art; National Museum of Women in the Arts; Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.; Whitney Museum of American Art Afer her studies in the Midwest, France, and California, painter and illustrator Doris Lee settled in New York City and Woodstock, New York. She achieved fame in the 1930s, claiming the prestigious Logan Purchase Prize and winning commissions for public murals that she painted in a deliberately folksy style. An early collector of American folk art and Pre-Columbian artifacts, Lee simplifed her style in subsequent decades with increased focus on abstract form. Inspired by the growth of an avocado plant, her Vine series of the mid-1950s ofers a charming and sophisticated exploration of repeated forms and unmodulated colors.


15. LOUISE NEVELSON

1899-1988

Sky City I Incised with the signature and date 1957 painted wood 82 x 62 x 16 in. (208.3 x 157.5 x 40.6 cm.) Executed 1957-1959. Provenance Pace Gallery, New York Barbara Krakow Gallery, Boston Private Collection Sotheby’s New York, November 11, 1988, lot 126 Private Collection Sotheby’s New York, November 13, 2003, lot 193 Private Collection Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Pace Wildenstein Gallery, Louise Nevelson Sculpture, 1957-1987, March - April 1997, no. 1, pp. 4-5, illustrated. New York, Pace, Louise Nevelson Black & White, February 1 March 3, 2018, pp. 10, 55 (illustrated, p. 11).

Born 1899, Kiev, Russia Died 1988, New York 1929–1930 Art Students League, New York Selected museum exhibitions: Whitney Museum of American Art (2018); Fondazione Marconi moderna e contemporanea, Milan (2016); Los Angeles County Museum of Art (2015); Museo Arte Contemporanea di Roma, Rome (2007); Galerie Gmurzynska, Cologne (1995); San José Museum of Art, California (1986, 2017); Storm King Art Center, New York (1984); Grey Art Gallery, New York University (1983); Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna, Rome (1976); Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (1973); Jewish Museum, New York (1965); GalateaGalleria d’Arte Contemporanea, Turin (1964); Venice Biennale (1962, 1976) Selected honors: National Medal for the Arts (1985); Gold Metal in Sculpture, American Academy of Arts and Letters (1983); Brandeis University Creative Arts Award for Sculpture (1971); Skowhegan Medal for Sculpture (1971); National Institute of Arts and Letters (1968) Selected public collections: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Bufalo; Art Institute of Chicago; The Brooklyn Museum; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Detroit Institute of Arts, Michigan; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo; High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, Denmark; Museum Ludwig, Cologne; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Museum of Modern Art

Conceived in 1957, Sky City I is an important early example of Louise Nevelson’s ambitious sculptural work. A pioneer of assemblage and installation art, Nevelson established herself as among the most important American sculptors of the twentieth century. Working with wooden objects that she salvaged, she brought them together to create expansive sculptural reliefs. Her found materials retain their form and character while being transformed by her dramatic groupings, which establish complex spaces infected by Cubism. Nevelson then unifed their diverse forms by painting them with a uniformly black paint.


16. EVA HESSE

1936-1970

Untitled signed and dated “eva hesse 1/60” lower right ink and gouache on paper 11 1/2 x 17 1/2 in. (29.2 x 44.5 cm.) Executed in 1960. Provenance Eva Hesse Estate, New York Helen Charash, New York (sister of the artist) Robert Miller Gallery, New York Hauser & Wirth, New York Anthony Meier Fine Arts, San Francisco Acquired from the above by the present owner, New York

Born 1936, Hamburg, Germany Died 1970, New York 1952–1953 Pratt Institute, Brooklyn 1954–1957 Cooper Union, New York 1959 BA Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut Selected museum exhibitions: Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Ohio (2020); Blanton Museum of Art, Austin (2016); Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Madrid (2010); Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2010); Jewish Museum, New York (2006); Tate Modern, London (2002); San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (2002); Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington (1992); Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts (1985); Grey Art Gallery, New York University (1982); Whitechapel Art Gallery, London (1979); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (1972); Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf (1965) Selected honors: Cooper Union Hall of Fame (2009), Augustus Saint-Gaudens Award (1984); Yale-Norfolk Fellowship (1957) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Ohio; Detroit Institute of Arts; Jewish Museum, New York; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Modern Art; Museum Wiesbaden, Germany; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Tate Modern, London; Whitney Museum of American Art

Created the year afer Eva Hesse graduated from Yale University, this untitled work from 1960 anticipated themes and approaches that she would develop over the next decade in her sculpture. An experiment in abstraction with suggestions of the human fgure, this work features her use of dramatic tonal contrasts and gestural marks that form bent lines and rounded forms related to those she would employ over the next few years. In a diary entry from October 1960, Hesse wrote: “I will paint against every rule I or others have invisibly placed…I should like to achieve free, spontaneous painting delineating a powerful, strong structured image. One must be possible with the other. A difcult problem in itself but one which I shall achieve.”


17. AGNES MARTIN

1912-2004

Untitled signed “a. martin” on the reverse pencil and ink on etching proof 13 1/8 x 13 in. (33.3 x 33 cm.) Executed circa 1960. Provenance The Elkon Gallery, Inc., New York PaceWildenstein, New York Private Collection, Switzerland Peter Blum, New York Private Collection, New York Barbara Mathes Gallery, New York Private Collection (acquired from the above in 2007) Christie’s, London, February 14, 2013, lot 173 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited New York, The Drawing Center; Dublin, Irish Museum of Modern Art, 3 x Abstraction: New Methods of Drawing by Hilma af Klint, Emma Kunz and Agnes Martin, March 19, 2005 – March 26, 2006 New York, Vivian Horan Fine Art, Minimalism: On and Of Paper, September 28 – November 17, 2006

Born 1912, Macklin, Saskatchewan, Canada Died 2004, Taos, New Mexico 1941 BS Teachers College, Columbia University, New York 1952 MA Teachers College, Columbia University, New York Selected museum exhibitions: Philadelphia Museum of Art (2018); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (2016); Los Angeles County Museum of Art (2016); Tate Modern, London (2015); Aspen Art Museum (2014); Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh (2009); Dia Art Foundation, New York (2004); Whitney Museum of American Art (1993); Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1991); Hayward Gallery, London (1977); Contemporary Art at the University of Philadelphia (1973); Museum of Modern Art (1973) Selected honors: Lifetime Achievement Award from the Women’s Caucus for Art (2005); National Medal of Arts (1998); Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale (1997) Selected public collections: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Bufalo; The Art Institute of Chicago; Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas; Dia Art Foundation, New York; Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Kunstsammlung NordrheinWestfalen, Düsseldorf; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Tate Gallery, London; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Whitney Museum of American Art

Agnes Martin’s serene abstractions have inspired generations of artists. The present untitled work dates from early in Martin’s career, as she was beginning to adopt a restrained geometric vocabulary of inscribed lines and grids. With its repetition of regularly spaced forms and subtle variations of application, this work reveals aspects of the origins of her exploration of meditative space to which she would dedicate her practice.


18. MARISOL

b. 1930

Noël signed, titled and dated “Marisol NOËL 1963” lower right ink on paper image 9 x 7 1/2 in. (22.9 x 19.1 cm.) sheet 13 1/8 x 10 5/8 in. (33.3 x 27 cm.) Executed in 1963. Provenance The Artist Joseph Grippi, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Woodward Galleries, When Art Worlds Collide: The 60’s, May 17 – July 14, 2007

Born 1930, Paris Died 2016, New York 1949 Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris 1950 Art Students League, New York 1950-54 New School for Social Research, New York Selected museum exhibitions: Memphis Brooks Museum of Art (2014); Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, New York (2001); Hakone Open-Air Museum, Kanagawa, Japan (1995); National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C. (1991); Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston (1977); Worchester Art Museum, Massachusetts (1971); Venice Biennale (1968); Bojimans Van Beuningen Museum, Rotterdam (1968); Arts Club of Chicago (1965) Selected honors: Medal of Honor, National Arts Club (1995); Premio Gabriela Mistral, Organization of American States (1997); Premio Nacional de Artes Plásticas, Venezuela (1983); American Academy of Arts and Letters Award (1978); Award of Excellence in Design, Arts Commission of New York City (1958) Selected public collections: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Bufalo; Galería de Arte Nacional, Caracas; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Memphis Brooks Museum of Art; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museo de Arte Contemporáneo, Caracas; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Museum of Modern Art; Toledo Museum of Art, Ohio; Whitney Museum of American Art

First achieving critical and popular acclaim in the 1960s, Marisol Escobar created art that combined abstraction and fguration with observant wit. She was best known for sculpture that combined wooden and multimedia elements and for her ingenious works on paper. Noel, 1963, features repeated forms that radiate from the work’s center, which upon closer inspection are in fact a multitude of fngertips, an example of the formal power and inventive humor characteristic of Marisol’s art.


19. MARY ELLEN MARK

1940-2015

Transvestite, New York City, 1968 gelatin silver print 7 5/8 x 5 3/8 in. (19.4 x 13.7 cm.) Provenance Acquired directly from the artist’s estate by the present owner

Born 1940, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania Died 2015, New York 1962 BFA University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 1964 MA University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Selected museum exhibitions: Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach (2015); Philadelphia Museum of Art (2000, 2012); Cleveland Museum of Art (1996); National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C. (1994); George Eastman House, Rochester (1992); International Center for Photography, New York (1992); California Museum of Photography, Riverside (1982, 1991); Santa Barbara Museum of Art (1977, 1988) Selected honors: Lifetime Achievement in Photography, George Eastman House (2014); Cornell Capa Award, International Center of Photography (2001); Erna and Victor Hasselblad Foundation Grant (1997); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1994); World Press Photo Award (1988); John F. Kennedy Journalism Award (1980, 1981, 1984); Fulbright Scholarship (1965) Selected public collections: Baltimore Museum of Art; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Detroit Institute of Arts; The Hasselblad Foundation, Gothenberg, Sweden; International Center of Photography; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Whitney Museum of American Art

Mary Ellen Mark used her camera to create striking portraits of marginalized people, capturing images of war protestors, the women’s liberation movement, and transvestites, and spotlighting social issues such as homelessness, prostitution, and drug addiction. Mark explained: “I’m just interested in people on the edges. I feel an afnity for people who haven’t had the best breaks in society. What I want to do more than anything is acknowledge their existence.”


20. KATHERINE PORTER

b. 1941

Charles Bridge signed “PORTER” on the reverse acrylic and oil on canvas 78 x 96 in. (198.1 x 243.8 cm.) Executed in 1969. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Exhibited Waltham, Massachusetts, Rose Art Museum, Katherine Porter: Paintings 1969-1984, May 5 – June 16, 1985 Allston, Massachusetts, Shefeld van Buren & Katherine Porter: Paintings, curated by Shefeld van Buren, April 4 – May 31, 2013

Courtesy the artist

Born 1941, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 1963 BA Colorado College Selected museum exhibitions: Greenville Museum of Art, South Carolina (2008); Danforth Museum of Art, Massachusetts (2007); Wigand Gallery, Notre Dame de Namur University, California (1992); Bowdoin College of Art, Maine (1991); University Art Gallery, SUNY, Albany (1987); Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts (1985); Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco (1980); Whitney Biennial (1973, 1981); Worchester Museum of Art, Massachusetts (1973) Selected honors: Honorary Doctorate, Bowdoin College, Maine (1992); Honorary Doctorate, Colby College, Maine (1982) Selected public collections: Bowdoin College Museums of Art, Brunswick, Maine; California Palace of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco; Colby College Museum of Art, Waterville, Maine; Denver Art Museum; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Museum of Modern Art; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Walker Art Museum, Minneapolis

An early work by Katherine Porter, this untitled painting from 1969 features structure and variations, stasis and dynamism. Within its alternating horizontal stripes of blue and pink are chevron shapes that establish a sense of directional movement. Upon closer inspection, we can note variations in Porter’s use of pattern and applications of paint. According to the artist: “My paintings are about chaos, constant changes, opposites, clashes, big movements in nature...I try to put everything into a picture. What you see is what you come up against in the world.”


21. ANNE TRUITT

1921-2004

11 Oct. 70 signed, titled and dated lower right acrylic on paper 23 x 29 in. (58.4 x 73.7 cm.) Painted in 1970. Provenance Osuna Gallery, Washington, D.C. Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1992, Washington, D.C.

Born 1921, Baltimore Died 2004, Washington 1942 BA Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania 1948-49 Institute of Contemporary Art, Washington, D.C. Selected museum exhibitions: National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. (2017); Dia Art Foundation (2017); Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C. (2009); Baltimore Museum of Art (1992); Neuberger Museum, Purchase, New York (1986); Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. (1975); Whitney Museum of American Art (1974); The Jewish Museum, New York (1966) Selected honors: Willa S. Cather Medal, University of Nebraska (2003); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1970) Selected public collections: Baltimore Museum of Art; Dia Art Foundation; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Panza Collection, Verese, Italy; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.; Whitney Museum of American Art

A pioneering American sculptor who made signifcant contributions to the development of Minimalism, Anne Truitt also made abstract paintings like the present work. Bringing tremendous attention to the perception of her work, the artist here applied her concerns regarding pictorial efects, color, space, and support. As Truitt explained: “…latitude and longitude, of my sculptures exactly refect my concern with my position in space, my location. This concern, an obsession since early childhood, must have been the root of my 1961 decision—taken unconsciously in a wave of conviction so total as to have been unchallenged by logic—to place my sculptures on their own feet as I am on mine.”


22. JOAN BROWN

1938–1990

Twenty to Nine signed, titled and dated “Joan Brown “20 to 9” 2/14/72” on the reverse oil and enamel on masonite 89 x 48 in. (226.1 x 121.9 cm.) Executed in 1972. Provenance Acquired directly from the Estate of the Artist by the present owner Exhibited San Jose Museum of Art, This Kind of Bird Flies Backwards: Paintings by Joan Brown, October 14, 2011March 11, 2012 New York, George Adams Gallery, Joan Brown: Major Paintings from the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, April 1 – May 30, 2015 New York, James Cohan Gallery, Intimisims, June 23 – July 29, 2016

Joan Brown in her studio, San Francisco, c. 1981. Photo M. Lee Fatherree

Born 1938, San Francisco, CA Died 1990, Puttaparthi, India 1956 BFA California School of Fine Arts, San Francisco 1960 MFA California School of Fine Arts, San Francisco Selected museum exhibitions: National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C. (2014); San Jose Museum of Art, California (2011); Oakland Museum of California (1998); Whitney Museum of American Art (1996); University of Hartford, Connecticut (1993); Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford (1977); University of California Art Museum, Berkley (1974, 1998); San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (1971) Selected honors: John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1977); NEA Fellowship in Painting (1976); Adaline Kent Award (1973); Louis Comfort Tifany Award (1965); Senator James D. Phelan Award for Painting (1962) Selected public collections: American Federation of the Arts, New York; Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Arkansas; Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Museum of Modern Art; Philadelphia Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Whitney Museum of American Art

An important member of the San Francisco Bay Area Figurative School, Joan Brown distinguished herself by incorporating autobiographical themes into her paintings. Embracing narrative and commemorating specifc personal incidents, she also painted fanciful scenes, including the human-animal hybrids seen in some of her later work. Twenty to Nine is an oil and enamel painting from 1972 for which narrative and emotion are central. Here, Brown contrasted the gridded regularity of the subway tiles in the background and the specifcity of the represented time with the emotion implied in the fgure’s gesture as she sits alone with wine glasses for two.


23. JUDY DATER

b. 1941

Imogen and Twinka, Yosemite, 1974 signed in pencil on the mount; titled, dated in pencil and copyright credit stamp on the reverse on the mount gelatin silver print 10 x 8 in. (25.4 x 20.3 cm.) Provenance The artist David Heath Gallery, Atlanta Private Collection Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1986 Literature Dater, Imogen Cunningham: A Portrait, cover, p. 126 Dater, Twenty Years, p. 47 Facio, Colección Fotografía del Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, p. 95 Fetterman, Woman: A Celebration, pl. 52

Born 1941, Hollywood 1959-1962 University of California, Los Angeles 1963 BA San Francisco State University 1966 MA San Francisco State University Selected museum exhibitions: de Young Museum, San Francisco (2018); St.Mary’s College, Moraga, California (2013); California College of Arts and Crafs, Oakland (1996); International Center of Photography, New York (1994); University of Maryland,Baltimore County (1988); DeSaisset Museum, University of Santa Clara, California (1986); San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (1984); Contemporary Art Center, New Orleans (1979); Oakland Museum, California (1975) Selected honors: Visiting artist, American Academy in Rome (1998, 2006); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1978); Dorothea Lange Award, Oakland Museum (1974) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris; J.Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; International Center for Photography, New York; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Oakland Museum, California; Tate Modern, London; Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography

Imogen and Twinka at Yosemite (1974) pictures the encounter of famed photographer Imogen Cunningham and model Twinka Thiebaud (the daughter of painter Wayne Thiebaud). Taken during a photographic workshop in the national park, Judy Dater was inspired by Thomas Hart Benton’s painting Persephone (1939), with its themes of nudity and voyeurism. Emerging as a photographer with the advent of the feminist movement, Dater has championed an approach to the body that avoids objectifcation.


24. MARY KELLY

b. 1941

Primapara, Bathing Series, 1974 twelve gelatin silver prints each 3 x 4 1/4 in. (7.6 x 11 cm.) number 1 AP from an edition of 3 plus one artist’s proof Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited Vienna, Generali Foundation, Mary Kelly, Post-Partum Document. The Complete Work (1973-79), September 25 – December 20, 1998 Dallas Museum of Art, Fast Forward: Contemporary Collections for the Dallas Museum of Art, November 21, 2006 – May 20, 2007 New York, Hessel Museum of Art, The Greenroom: Reconsidering the Documentary and Contemporary Art, September 27, 2008 – February 1, 2009 Vienna, Generali Foundation, Against Method. The Collection Seen by Gertrud Sandqvist, September 13 – December 22, 2013 Santa Cruz, Sesnon Gallery, Complicated Labours, February 5 – March 15, 2014 Dallas, The Warehouse, Rachofsky House, Doubles, Dobros, Pliegues, Pares, Twins, Mitades, July 10, 2017 – April 14, 2018

Photo by Kelly Barrie

Born 1941, Fort Dodge, Iowa 1963 BA College of Saint Teresa, Winona, Minnesota 1965 MA Pius XII Institute, Florence, Italy 1970 Postgraduate Certifcate, St Martin’s School of Art, London Selected museum exhibitions: Berwick Street Collective, Portadown, Ireland (2014); Tate Britain, London (2013); Moderna Museet, Stockholm (2010); University of California, Irvine (2007); Generali Foundation, Vienna (1998); Herbert Johnson Museum of Art, New York (1992); New Museum of Contemporary Art (1990); University Art Museum, Brisbane (1982); Museum of Modern Art, Oxford (1977); Institute of Contemporary Art, London (1976, 1993) Selected honors: Honorary Doctorate, Lund University, Sweden (2017); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (2015); Anonymous Was a Woman Award (2012); Greater London Arts Association Visual Arts Award (1980); Arts Council of Great Britain Visual Arts Award (1977) Selected public collections: Art Gallery of Ontario; Kunsthaus Zürich; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Tate Britain, London; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Whitney Museum of American Art

Mary Kelly’s artistic practice engages with theoretical and social concerns, feminist consciousness, and documentation of her own life. Her groundbreaking Post-Partum Document, 1973-1979, uses motherhood as an impetus for artmaking. Primapara, a medical term for frst-time mothers, is a related series. According to Kelly: “Primapara is the attempt to document my frst experience of pregnancy, childbirth, and childcare.” In Primapara, Bathing Series, 1974, she presents a grid of small-format, black-and-white photographs that fragment her infant son’s features: eyes, ears, hair, and mouth. These close-cropped images implicitly contrast their artistic presentation with her own experience bathing her baby.


25. MARY BETH EDELSON

b. 1933

Celtic signed and titled on the reverse painted plywood 96 x 48 in. (243.8 x 121.9 cm.) Executed in 1974-1975. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited Washington, D.C., Corcoran Gallery of Art / Henry Gallery, Woman Rising, 1974-1975 New York, David Lewis Gallery, Shape Shifer, March 3 – April 21, 2019

Born 1933, East Chicago, Indiana 1955 BA DePauw University, Indiana 1958 MA New York University Selected museum exhibitions: Kunsthalle Münster (2018); Princeton University, New Jersey (2015); Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefeld, Connecticut (2014); Malmö Konstmuseum, Sweden (2006); Stony Brook Museum, SUNY (2002); University of Tennessee, Knoxville (1989); Washington Project for the Arts, Washington, D.C. (1989); MoMA PS1, New York (1986); Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh (1983); Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Bufalo (1980); Franklin Furnace, New York (1978) Selected honors: International Artists Studio Program, Sweden (2006); Yaddo Residency (2005); Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (2001); Pollock-Krasner Foundation (2000); Honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts, DePauw University, Indiana (1993) Selected public collections: Brooklyn Museum; Detroit Institute of Art; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Malmö Konstmuseum, Sweden; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Museum of Modern Art; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington; Tate Modern, London; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Whitney Museum of American Art

A celebrated American artist, Mary Beth Edelson is an activist, and pioneer of the frst-generation feminist art movement. For the past ffy years she has created iconic works of art—ranging from photography, painting, sculpture, and drawing to performance, print making, books, collages and murals—ofen using her own body as canvas and subject matter. Celtic, 1974-1975, is from her series of Great Goddess Cut-Outs. Standing 8 feet high, this shaped painting asserts itself as an iconic and archetypal emblem of femininity and spirituality across time and cultures.


26. CAROLEE SCHNEEMANN 1939-2019 Interior Scroll, 1975 thirteen gelatin silver prints, printed 2008 Suite of 13 silver gelatin prints on fber paper; each mounted on museum board; with colophon page, and transcript of scroll text, on cloth bound clamshell case each 11 x 14 in. (27.9 x 35.6 cm.) each signed, titled, dated and numbered “HC” on the reverse of the mount. Includes colophon and transcript of scroll text, enclosed in clothbound clamshell case. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

Born 1939, Fox Chase, Pennsylvania Died 2019, New Paltz, New York 1959 BA Bard College, New York 1961 MFA University of Illinois, Illinois Selected museum exhibitions: Museum der Moderne Salzburg, Austria (2015); The Merchant House, Amsterdam (2015); Göteborg International Biennial for Contemporary Art, Sweden (2013); Dia Beacon, New York (2012); MOCCA, Toronto (2007); New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (1997); Kunstraum, Vienna (1995); Syracuse University, New York (1994); ColbySawyer College, New Hampshire (1984) Selected honors: Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement, Venice Biennale (2017); Aurora Award (2014); Jimmy Earnst Lifetime Achievement Award (2002); Rockefeller Foundation Award (2001); Pollock-Krasner Artist Grant (1997); Guggenheim Fellowship (1993); National Endowment for the Arts Grant (1983); Cassandra Foundation Grant (1970) Selected public collections: ARCO Museum, Spain; Berkeley Art Museum, California; Bronx Museum of the Arts, New York; J. Paul Getty Center, California; Hamburg Kunste Museum, Germany; Hirschhorn Museum, Washington; Institute of Contemporary Art, London; Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Ludwig Collection, Germany; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Muzeum Wspólczesne, Poland; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Whitney Museum of Art

Carolee Schneemann was a pioneer of feminist art and performance. Her multimedia works and performances confronted taboos around creativity, nudity, sensuality, and sexuality. Among Schneemann’s most groundbreaking work is Interior Scroll, a performance from 1975 that is documented in these 13 photographs. During the performance, she entered the space wearing a white sheet and an apron. Afer undressing, she read from her book Cezanne, She Was a Great Painter and applied paint to her body. She then extracted a scroll from her vagina and read the text on it aloud, a response to a critic who accused her of making messy, female work.


27. JUDY CHICAGO

b. 1939

Mary Wollstonecraf Test Plate #8 china paint on porcelain 14 x 14 x 3 in. (35.6 x 35.6 x 7.6 cm.) Painted in 1975-1978. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited The Brooklyn Museum, Judy Chicago: Roots of “The Dinner Party”: History in the Making, October 20, 2017 March 4, 2018, p. 72 Miami, The Institute of Contemporary Art, Judy Chicago: A Reckoning, December 4, 2018 – April 21, 2019

Born 1939, Chicago, Illinois 1962 BA University of California, Los Angeles 1992 MA Russell Sage College, Troy, New York Selected museum exhibitions: National Museum of Women in The Arts, Washington, D.C. (2019); Azkuna Zentroa, Bilbao, Spain (2016); Brooklyn Museum (2014); Getty Museum, Los Angeles (2011); Le Musée des Maîtres et Artisans du Quebec, Montreal (2010); National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C. (2002); Pasadena Art Museum, California (1969) Selected honors: Visionary Woman Award, Moore College of Art and Design (2004); Woman Achievement of the World, Louisiana World Exposition (1984); Services to the Field Grant, National Endowment for the Arts (1976); Outstanding Woman of the Year, Mademoiselle Magazine (1973) Selected public collections: Albuquerque Museum; British Museum, London; Brooklyn Museum; J. Paul Getty Trust, Los Angeles; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; New Mexico Museum of Art; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C.; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art This work is a test plate created by Judy Chicago for her installation The Dinner Party, 1974-1979, which is widely celebrated as a foundational work of feminist art and is now in the Brooklyn Museum’s collection. One of thirtynine place settings dedicated to women through history, it is dedicated to Mary Wollstonecraf (1759-1797), who authored A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, 1792, a book that is regarded as the earliest and most important treatise advocating equality for women.


28. HANNAH WILKE

1940-1993

S.O.S. Starifcation Object Series (#1) signed and dated “Wilke 1975” lower right chewing gum sculptures on rice paper mounted on rag board, in artist’s Plexiglas box 34 1/2 x 27 x 2 3/8 in. (87.6 x 68.6 x 6 cm.) Executed in 1975. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

Born 1940, New York Died 1993, Houston 1962 BFA Temple University, Philadelphia Selected museum exhibitions: Temple University (2019); Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, New York (2008); Atrium-Centro Museo Vasco de Arte Contemporaneo, Vitoria, Spain (2006); Nikolaj Contemporary Art Center, Copenhagen (1998); University of Missouri, Saint Louis (1989); University of California, Irvine (1976); The Kitchen, New York (1974) Selected honors: Pollock-Krasner Foundation grants (1987, 1992); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (1982); Alaska Council for the Arts grant (1980); National Endowment for the Arts grant (1976) Selected public collections: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Bufalo; British Museum, London; Carnegie Museum, Philadelphia; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Jewish Museum, New York; Moderna Museet, Malmö, Sweden; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sophia, Madrid; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Modern Art; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Tate, London; Wadsworth Atheneum, Connecticut; Whitney Museum of American Art

Among the frst artists to explicitly use imagery of female reproductive organs in her art, Hannah Wilke was an essential fgure in the development of feminist art. Her S.O.S. Starifcation Object Series, which she made from 1974 through 1979, are among her most renowned works. Wilke used the unconventional medium of chewing gum to create shapes that suggest the vulva, then placed them on paper and on her face and body like growths or scars. In this work, the chewing-gum sculptures are arranged in a gridded array, as if a hieroglyphic display or a group of scientifc specimens.


29. HONORÉ DESMOND SHARRER 1920-2009 Still Life with White Pail signed “Sharrer” lower right oil on linen 58 x 50 1/4 in. (147.3 x 127.6 cm.) Painted circa 1978. Provenance The Artist Forum Gallery, New York Private Collection Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Hirschl & Adler, HONORÉ SHARRER: Claws Sheathed in Velvet, April 25 – June 7, 2019

Born 1920, West Point, New York Died 2009, Washington, D.C. 1937-39 Yale University 1940-41 California School of Fine Arts, San Francisco Selected museum exhibitions: Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio (2017); Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. (2007); Memorial Gallery, Rochester, New York (1987); American Federation of Arts, New York (1971); Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (1951); Museum of Modern Art (1946) Selected honors: Award for Outstanding Achievement in Visual Arts, National Women’s Caucus for Art (1987); Childe Hassam Purchase Prize, American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters (1978); Norman Waite Harris Medal and Prize, Art Institute of Chicago (1951); Woman Artist of the Year, Mademoiselle magazine (1949) Selected public collections: Danforth Museum, Massachusetts; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Modern Art; Newark Museum, New Jersey; Smith College Museum of Art, Massachusetts; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington; University of Virginia Art Museum, Charlottesville

Achieving success at an early age, Honoré Sharrer was included in the landmark 1946 exhibition Fourteen Americans at the Museum of Modern Art. She developed a meticulously detailed fgurative style that poet John Ashbery characterized as “a collaboration between Norman Rockwell and the brothers van Eyck.” Exemplifying this intensity of detail, brilliant colors, and uncanny juxtapositions of objects within a distorted space, Still Life with White Pail is a stellar example of Sharrer’s magical realist painting.


30. LYNNE GOLOB GELFMAN b. 1944 Thru Blue 4 signed, titled, inscribed and dated “tri 35 8024 Lynne golob gelfman 1978 blue 4/78 through blue 4 1978 tri 35 8024” on the overlap acrylic on canvas 60 x 60 in. (152.4 x 152.4 cm.) Painted in 1978. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Courtesy of Gelfman Studio

Born 1944, New York 1966 BA Sarah Lawrence College 1968 MFA Columbia University Selected museum exhibitions: Pérez Art Museum Miami (2018); The Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum, Florida International University (2012); National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C. (1995); Metropolitan Museum and Art Center, Coral Gables, Florida (1984); New World Center Gallery, Miami-Dade Community College (1978); Miami Metropolitan Museum and Art Center (1974) Selected public collections: Baltimore Museum of Art; Detroit Institute of Arts; Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami; Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami; Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach; Pérez Art Museum, Miami; Smithsonian American Art Museum Working in Miami since 1972, Lynne Golob Gelfman has been inspired by the diverse subtropical world of Florida and by the culture and landscape of Columbia, where she frst visited as an American Field Service student in 1961. Her Thru Blue 4, 1978, display her unique approach to abstraction. Working with acrylics, Gelfman painted this work from the verso side, allowing the paint to seep through to the painting’s front and incorporating unforeseen efects into her process. With its repetition of systematic patterns and breakdown of those patterns, Gelfman’s abstraction exhibits her inspiration from painters like Agnes Martin, as well as from the woven textiles of Central and South America.


31. ELIZABETH MURRAY

1940-2007

Parting and Together oil on canvas 123 x 63 in. (312.4 x 160 cm.) Painted in 1978. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited New York, Paula Cooper Gallery, Paintings, October 7 – November 4, 1978 New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, 1979 Biennial Exhibition, February - April 1979, p. 61 New York, Pace, Painting in the ‘70s, March 31 – April 30, 2011

Born 1940 Chicago Died 2007 Washington County, New York 1962 BFA The School of the Art Institute of Chicago 1964 MFA Mills College, Oakland Selected museum exhibitions: Anderson Collection at Stanford University (2018); Musée d’art modern et contemporain, Geneva (2016); Arts Club of Chicago (2009); Institut Valencia d’Art Modern (2006); Museum of Modern Art (2005); Newark Museum, New Jersey (1992); San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (1988); Dallas Museum of Art (1987); The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (1984); Smith College, Massachusetts (1982); Galerie Mukai, Tokyo (1980) Selected honors: John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (1999); Skowhegan Medal in Painting (1986); American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York (1984) Selected public collections: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Bufalo; Art Institute of Chicago; Baltimore Museum of Art; Birmingham Museum of Art; Brooklyn Museum; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Detroit Institute of Arts; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Israel Museum, Jerusalem; Pérez Art Museum Miami; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo; Whitney Museum of American Art

Known for her inventive and spirited work, Elizabeth Murray established herself as one of the most important painters of her era. Parting and Together, dated 1978 and shown in the Whitney Biennial the following year, is an important early example of the shaped canvases that Murray would continue to develop throughout her career. Discussing the present painting, Robert Storr noted: “By the late 1970s, the compositional pressures had built up to the extent that the containers she chose for her imagery began to react spasmodically, snapping outward or buckling inward at the edges and so assuming the dimensions of a heaving trapezoid: Parting and Together.”


32. NAN GOLDIN

b. 1953

Cookie and Millie in the Girl’s bathroom at the Mud Club, NYC, 1979 signed, titled, dated and numbered 23/25 in ink on the verso cibachrome 16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm.) Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

Born 1953, Washington, D.C. 1974 Imageworks, Cambridge, Massachusetts 1977 BFA School of the Museum of Fine Arts/ Tufts University, Boston Selected museum exhibitions: Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2017); Museum of Modern Art (2016); Museu de Arte Moderna, Rio de Janeiro (2012); Hasselblad Center, Göteborg, Sweden (2007); Palmer Museum of Art, University Park, Pennsylvania (2005); Centre Pompidou, Paris (2001); Whitney Museum of American Art (1996); Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin (1994); Moderna Museet, Stockholm (1993); Museum Folkwang, Essen (1991); Aperture Foundation, New York (1986); Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (1985) Selected honors: Edward MacDowell Medal (2012); Hasselblad Award for Photography (2007); Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, France (2006); Art Matters, Inc. Award (1990); Wilhelmina Jackson Fellowship (1977) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Museum of Modern Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Tate Gallery, London; Whitney Museum of American Art

Photographing her friends and herself, Nan Goldin’s work constitutes a visual diary based on directness and intimacy. According to the artist: “I photograph directly from my life. These pictures come out of relationships, not observation.” This is clearly the case in the present photograph, which she took at the Mudd Club, a nightclub that was central to the downtown scene in New York from 1978 through 1983. Cookie, to the lef, is Cookie Mueller, an actress, writer, and a close friend of Goldin, who would photograph her throughout her life.


33. CINDY SHERMAN

b. 1954

Untitled Film Still (#61), 1979 Signed, dated and numbered on the verso silver gelatin print 9 1/2 x 6 3/8 in. (24.1 x 16.2 cm.) Executed circa 1979, number 5 from an edition of 10. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

Born 1954, Glen Ridge, New Jersey 1976 BA State University College at Buffalo, New York Selected museum exhibitions: Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo (2018); Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane (2016); Broad Museum, Los Angeles (2016); Musée du Jeu de Paume, Paris (2006); Museum of Modern Art (1997, 2012); Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (1997); Basel Kunsthalle, Switzerland (1991); National Art Gallery, New Zealand (1989); Whitney Museum of American Art (1987); Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1982) Selected honors: American Academy of Arts and Sciences Award (2003); National Arts Award (2002); Governor’s Arts Award, New York (2001); John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation (1995); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1983) Selected public collections: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Bufalo; Art Gallery of Ontario; Australian National Gallery, Canberra; Centro de Arte Reina Sofa, Madrid; Dallas Museum of Fine Arts; Louisiana Museum, Humlebaek, Denmark; Museum Folkwang, Essen; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Museum of Modern Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Tate Gallery, London; Whitney Museum of American Art

For forty years, Cindy Sherman has created selfrefexive photographs with herself as performer and subject. This black-and-white photograph is from her groundbreaking Untitled Film Stills, 1977-1980, in which she adopted the guise of actresses from 50s and 60s Hollywood, Film Noir, and European art-house flms. Altering her pose, costume, surroundings, and framing, Sherman draws upon their roles and presentation of self, creating images with the uncanny ability to appear both specifc and generic. Her photographs interrogate the construction of women’s images in flms and the way mass media refects and perpetuates stereotypes in our culture at large. In Untitled Film Still (#61), Sherman frames herself through a doorway, with a composition that implies a viewer looking at her.


34. KAY WALKINGSTICK

b. 1935

Night Café signed, titled and dated “#66 “Night Café” Kay WalkingStick 7-81” on the reverse acrylic, saponifed wax, modeling paste, and crushed seashells on canvas 56 x 56 x 4 1/4 in. (142.2 x 142.2 x 10.8 cm.) Executed in 1981. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited New York, Pratt Manhattan Center, Dark Thoughts: Black Paintings, November 16 – December 12, 1981 San Francisco, Modernism Gallery, 40 New York Artists, 1985 Englewood, New Jersey, Recent Works: Kay WalkingStick and Patriciu Mateescu, Galleria Maray, September 1986 Washington, DC, National Museum of the American Indian; Phoenix, The Heard Museum; Dayton Art Institute; Kalamazoo Institute of Arts; Tulsa, Gilcrease Art Museum; Montclair Art Museum, Kay WalkingStick: An American Artist, November 6, 2015 - June 17, 2018, p. 78 New York, June Kelly Gallery, KAY WALKINGSTICK: Paintings from the 1970s-1980s, November 29, 2018 – January 15, 2019

Julia Maloof Verderosa

Born 1935, Syracuse, New York 1959 BFA Beaver College, Glenside, Pennsylvania 1975 MFA Pratt Institute, New York Selected museum exhibitions: Dayton Art Institute, Ohio (2017); Heard Museum, Phoenix (2016); The National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C. (2015); Montclair Art Museum, New Jersey (2008, 2018); Eiteljorg Museum of American Indian and Western Art, Indianapolis (2003, 2010); Hillwood Art Museum of Long Island University, New York (1991); Carl N. Gorman Museum, University of California, Davis (1985); New Jersey State Museum, Trenton (1975) Selected honors: National Academy of Design, New York (2019); Murray Reich Distinguished Artist Award, New York Foundation for the Arts (2018); Lee Krasner Award, PollockKrasner Foundation (2011); National Honor Award for Achievement in the Arts, Women’s Caucus for Art (1996); Selected public collections: Albright-Knox Museum, Bufalo, New York; Cherokee Heritage Foundation, Oklahoma; Denver Art Museum; Eiteljorg Museum of American Indian and Western Art, Indianapolis; Israel Museum, Jerusalem; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Whitney Museum of American Art

Kay WalkingStick, a painter and member of the Cherokee nation, focuses on the American landscape and its metaphorical signifcance. The varied rendering of landscape in her art is the thread that weaves together the many painterly directions she has taken over the last ffy years. For the abstract Night Café, 1981, she worked with lines and arcs that resemble petroglyphic signs, exploring geometric forms as means of exploring deeper meanings about her identity. She developed this painting with acrylic and cold wax emulsion, mixing shells into its varied surface and thereby materially incorporating the natural world.


35. BETYE SAAR

b. 1926

Other Houses, Other Lives signed and dated “Betye Saar 82” lower side panel assemblage and mixed media 18 1/4 x 11 1/4 x 2 1/2 in. (46.4 x 28.6 x 6.4 cm.) Executed 1982 Provenance Private Collection, New York Exhibited New York, New Museum; New York, The Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art; New York, The Studio Museum, The Decade Show: Frameworks of Identity in the 1980s, May 12 – August 19, 1990 p. 83 (illustrated, plate LXVI)

Born 1926, Los Angeles verso

1949 BA University of California, Los Angeles 1958-62 Graduate Studies at California State University, Long Beach; University of Southern California; and California State University, Northridge Selected museum exhibitions: Craf Contemporary, Los Angeles (2017); Fondazione Prada (2016); Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (2016); California African American Museum, Los Angeles (2011); Crocker Museum of Art, California (2006); Detroit Institute of Arts (1998); Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (1990); The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (1980); San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (1977); Whitney Museum of American Art (1975); California State University, Los Angeles (1973) Selected honors: MacDowell Medal for Lifetime Achievement in the Arts (2014); Distinguished Women in the Arts Award, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2013); Anonymous Was A Woman Award (2012); Lifetime Achievement Award, Visual Art, California African American Museum (2011); Alain Locke Award, Detroit Institute of Arts (2005); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1991) Selected public collections: Berkeley Art Museum, University of California; Detroit Institute of the Arts; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Modern Art; National Gallery of American Art, Washington; Philadelphia Museum of Art; The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art

Betye Saar emerged a key fgure in the Black Arts and feminist movements of the 1960s and 1970s. Saar’s distinct vision harmonizes the personal, political, and magical in her assemblages. She was inspired by artists including Joseph Cornell and Noah Purifoy, founding director of the Watts Tower Cultural Center. According to Saar: “I think of my process as a personal ritual: the frst part would be fnding the materials, the hunting and gathering. I go to thrif and antique stores or estate sales, looking for things and picking objects that have a sense of history or a story to tell. Then I move into the second part of the ritual, which is combining the pieces and manipulating their surfaces so they can tell another story– and let the piece create itself.”


36. ALEXIS SMITH

b. 1949

Bad Day....(Christmas Eve, 1943) signed and dated on the reverse mixed media 21 1/2 x 17 1/4 in. (54.6 x 43.8 cm.) Executed in 1982. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited New York, Garth Greenan Gallery, Alexis Smith: Hello Hollywood, May 24 – June 30, 2018 New York, Petzel, Strategic Vandalism: The Legacy of Asger Jorn’s Modifcation Paintings, March 5 – April 13, 2019

Pauline Stella Sanchez

Born 1949, Los Angeles, California 1970 BA University of California, Irvine Selected museum exhibitions: Pepperdine University, Malibu (2018); Los Angeles County Museum of Art (2016); Miami Art Museum (2000); J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles (1997); University of California, San Diego (1991); Brooklyn Museum (1987); P.S. 1, Institute for Art and Urban Resources, New York (1982); Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art (1979); Whitney Museum of American Art (1975, 1991) Selected honors: Barnsdall Art Center (2008); Otis College of Art and Design (2001); National Endowment for the Arts (1987, 1976); Los Angeles County Museum of Art (1974) Selected public collections: J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; Museum of Modern Art; Norton Family Foundation, Santa Monica; Ohio State University, Columbus; University of California, Los Angeles; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

Alexis Smith is known for her meticulously crafed mixedmedia works that combine images, texts, and objects. Drawing from Hollywood, advertising, and pulp fction, she creates works that explore American culture. For Bad Day… (Christmas Eve, 1943), 1982, Smith combined a representation of a rugged cowboy, a prototypical fgure of Western masculinity, with a wooden nickel within a refned frame. On this frame is inscribed “He dunked a donut in his cofee and took a bite out of half of it. ‘Men have died for less than that, Ancient One.’” Smith’s juxtapositions here are humorous and open-ended, throwing into question our myths of American identity.


37. JENNY HOLZER AND LADY PINK b. 1950 and b. 1964 Some men think women are expendable they fuck them kill them and throw them away like candy wrappers spray paint on canvas 107 1/2 x 112 1/8 in. (273.1 x 284.8 cm.) Executed in 1983 - 1984. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited Munich, Sprüth Magers; Cologne, Sprüth Magers, Hot Pink, November 11, 2004 – July 16, 2005

Jenny Holzer. Photo © Nanda LanFranco.

Lady Pink. Photo by Lauren Thomas.

JENNY HOLZER Born 1950, Gallipolis, Ohio 1968–70 Duke University, Durham 1972 BFA Ohio University, Athens 1977 MFA Rhode Island School of Design Selected museum exhibitions: Tate Modern, London (2018); Museo Correr, Venice (2015); Fondation Beyeler, Basel (2009); MAK, Vienna (2006); Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey, Mexico (2001); Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (1997); Dallas Museum of Art (1993); Venice Biennale (1990); Dia Art Foundation (1989); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (1989); Brooklyn Museum (1988); Institute of Contemporary Art, London (1983) Selected honors: American Academy of Arts and Letters (2018); Distinguished Women in the Arts Award, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2010); Urban Visionaries Award, The Cooper Union, New York (2006), Public Art Network Award, Americans for the Arts (2004), Berlin Prize Fellowship, The American Academy in Berlin (2000); Golden Lion, Venice Biennale (1990); Blair Award, Art Institute of Chicago (1982) Selected public collections: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Museum of Modern Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Tate Modern, London; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Whitney Museum of American Art

LADY PINK (A.K.A. SANDRA FABARA) Born 1964 Ambato, Ecuador Selected museum exhibitions: Bronx Museum of Art (1999); Herning Museum of Contemporary Art, Denmark (1998); Queens Museum, New York (1990); The Galleries at Moore College of Art and Design, Philadelphia (1984) Selected public collections: The Metropolitan Museum of Art; The Whitney Museum of American Art; The Museum of the City of New York; Groninger Museum, Netherlands; Brooklyn Museum; Museum of Modern Art Language has long been Jenny Holzer’s medium of engaging the public whether through electronic signs, posters, billboards, projections, carved inscriptions, or other means. Around the time Some men… was created in the early 1980s, Holzer was pasting up evocative posters and stickers on the streets of New York, her messages with their edgy and aphoristic tone intended to command attention and inspire thought. Lady Pink, one of the few women grafti writers and founder of the all-women grafti crew “Ladies of the Arts”, was stealthily and defantly spraying large scale public murals on subway train cars and building exteriors. Their collaboration in the present work juxtaposes a powerful feminist statement from Holzer’s Survival series with Lady Pink’s characteristic depiction of a strong, feminine, confdent woman surrounded by lush tropical fowers.


38. GUERRILLA GIRLS

b. 1985

The Guerrilla Girls; Dear Art Collector Suite The suite of three ofset lithographs and six digital prints in colors, on wove papers, the full sheets. largest S. 16 x 28 in. (40.6 x 71.1 cm.) smallest S. 9 x 26 in. (22.9 x 66 cm.) Signed and numbered on the accompanying colophon, from the edition of 20, published by the artists, all unframed. Including: How Many Women Had Solo Shows At NYC Museums Last Year?, 1985; The Advantages of Being a Woman Artist, 1988; When Racism and Sexism Are No Longer Fashionable, How Much Will Your Art Collection Be Worth?, 1989; Do Women Have to Be Naked to Get Into the Met. Museum? Update, 2012; Dear Billionaire Art Collector, 2015; These Galleries Show No More Than 10% Women Artists Or None At All Recount, 2015; The Advantages of Owning Your Own Art Museum, 2016; Wealth and Power, 2016; 3 Ways to Write A Museum Wall Label When the Artist is a Sexual Predator, 2018

Jonathan Herman

Provenance Acquired directly from the artist

Anonymous collective Began 1985, New York Selected museum exhibitions: Museu de Arte São Paulo (2017); Whitechapel Gallery, London (2016); Abrons Art Center, New York (2015); Alhondiga, Bilbao, Spain, 2013; Columbia College, Chicago (2012); Tate Modern, London (2004-present); Printed Matter, New York (1995); The Clocktower, Institute for Art and Urban Resources, New York (1987); The Palladium Dance Club, New York (1985) Selected honors: Skowhegan Award (2013); Yoko Ono Lennon Courage Award for the Arts (2010); Distinguished Feminist Art Award, College Art Association (2009); Brooklyn Museum (2007); Center for Policy Studies, London (1993); Susan B. Anthony Award, New York State Chapter of the National Organization for Women (1987) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; Brooklyn Museum; Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles; Harvard University Art Museum, Cambridge; Museo de Arte de São Paulo; Museum of Modern Art; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Rhode Island School of Design Museum, Providence; Tate Modern, London

The following statement is from www.guerrillagirls.com: GUERRILLA GIRLS REINVENTING THE ‘F’ WORD: FEMINISM The Guerrilla Girls are feminist activist artists. Over 55 people have been members over the years, some for weeks, some for decades. Our anonymity keeps the focus on the issues, and away from who we might be. We wear gorilla masks in public and use facts, humor and outrageous visuals to expose gender and ethnic bias as well as corruption in politics, art, flm, and pop culture. We undermine the idea of a mainstream narrative by revealing the understory, the subtext, the overlooked, and the downright unfair. We believe in an intersectional feminism that fghts discrimination and supports human rights for all people and all genders. We have done over 100 street projects, posters and stickers all over the world, including New York, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Mexico City, Istanbul, London, Bilbao, Rotterdam, and Shanghai, to name just a few. We also do projects and exhibitions at museums, attacking them for their bad behavior and discriminatory practices right on their own walls, including our 2015 stealth projection about income inequality and the super rich hijacking art on the façade of the Whitney Museum in New York. Our retrospectives in Bilbao and Madrid, Guerrilla Girls 1985-2015, and our US traveling exhibition, Guerrilla Girls: Not Ready To Make Nice, have attracted thousands. We could be anyone. We are everywhere. What’s next? More creative complaining!! New projects in London, Paris, Cologne, and more!


39. ROSALYN DREXLER

b. 1926

Masked Reader signed and dated on a label afxed to the reverse acrylic and paper collage on canvas 40 x 30 in. (101.6 x 76.2 cm.) Executed in 1988. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited Waltham, Rose Art Museum; Bufalo, Albright Knox Art Museum; St. Louis, Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, Rosalyn Drexler: Who Does She Think She Is?, February 11, 2016 – April 17, 2017 New York, Garth Greenan Gallery, Rosalyn Drexler: Occupational Hazard, September 7 – October 21, 2017

© Justin Bettman, 2017

Literature “Art: Rosalyn Drexler.” Time Out, no. 1107 (2017) p. 49 Rosalyn Drexler, “Infuences: Rosalyn Drexler.” Frieze, no. 190 (2017) pp. 13, 15

Born 1926, Bronx Selected museum exhibitions: Rose Art Museum, Waltham, Massachusetts (2016); Radclife College, Cambridge, Massachusetts (1998); New York University (1986); PS1 Contemporary Art Center, New York (1978); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (1965); Whitney Museum of American Art (1965); American Federation of Arts, New York (1964); Oakland Art Museum, California (1963) Selected honors: Honorary Doctorate, University of the Arts, Philadelphia (2007); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1977); NEA Fellowship in Painting (1976); Adaline Kent Award (1973); Emmy Award for Best Writing for Comedy-Variety (1973); Louis Comfort Tifany Award (1965); Obie Award (1964, 1973, 1985); James D. Phelan Award for Painting (1962) Selected public collections: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, New York; Hirschhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Museum of Modern Art; New York University; Rose Art Museum, Waltham, Massachusetts; St. Louis Art Museum; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Whitney Museum of American Art

An accomplished novelist, playwright, and once even a professional wrestler, Rosalyn Drexler is best known as an artist. First emerging as a sculptor during the Abstract Expressionist era, she shifed her practice as Pop emerged, creating paintings by working from photographs, then applying paint over them in blocks of color. In Masked Reader, 1988, a suited man reads while holding a teacup and cigarette. She makes his conventional appearance bizarre by including his prominent mask, a motif that the artist returned to throughout her career. This mask suggests mystery and a hidden appearance—and perhaps a hidden agenda. “Power, desolation, destruction, blather, broken promises…” said Drexler about these works “It seems like things repeat themselves.”


40. HOWARDENA PINDELL

b. 1943

Autobiography: The Search (Chrysalis/Meditation, Positive/Negative) signed and dated “Howardena Pindell 1988-89” and titled “Autobiography The Search Meditation: Positive/ Negative” on the reverse acrylic, tempera, oil stick, cattle markers, paper, vinyl tape, and polymer photo transfer on canvas 73 1/8 x 110 1/2 in. (185.7 x 280.7 cm.) Executed in 1988-89 Provenance G.R. N’Namdi Gallery, Detroit William and Gloria Johnson, The Woodlands, Texas (acquired from the above prior to 1993) Bankruptcy auction, Columbus, Ohio, July 2009 Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Kenkeleba Gallery; New York, Alternative Museum; Atlanta, Art Gallery, Georgia State University; Waltham, Massachusetts, Rose Art Museum, Howardena Pindell: A Retrospective 1972–1992, June 19 – December 16, 1993, no. 50, p. 26, 94 (illustrated, pp. 72-73) MCA Chicago; Richmond, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; Waltham, Massachusetts, Rose Art Museum, Howardena Pindell: What Remains to be Seen, February 24, 2018 May 19, 2019, no. 12, p. 219 (illustrated, pp. 102-103, 256)

Born 1943, Philadelphia 1965 BFA Boston University 1967 MFA Yale University Selected museum exhibitions: Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2018); Louisiana Art and Science Museum, Baton Rouge (2007); Heckscher Museum of Art, New York (1999, 2004); Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Massachusetts (1993); Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford(1989); The Studio Museum in Harlem (1986); Birmingham Museum of Art (1985); State University of New York at Stony Brook (1979); Henie-Onstad Kunstsenter, Høvikodden, Norway (1976); Douglass College Art Gallery, Rutgers University (1973); Spelman College, Atlanta (1971, 2015) Selected honors: Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement, College Art Association (2019); IAM Pioneer Award (2000); Artist Award, The Studio Museum of Harlem (1996); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1987) Selected public collections: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Bufalo; Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College; Brooklyn Museum; McNay Art Museum, San Antonio; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Smithsonian Museum of American Art; Spelman College Museum of Fine Art, Atlanta; Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut

Multidisciplinary artist Howardena Pindell creates works with diverse methods using both conventional media like paint as well as materials like postcards, glitter, fabric, and paper dots made with a hole punch. Pindell’s formal innovations and writing, which are ofen autobiographical, also express social and political criticism, addressing issues of racism, sexism, apartheid, and war. In The New York Times, William Zimmer declared Autobiography: The Search (Chrysalis/Meditation, Positive/Negative) “a triumphant painting because it embodies the notion of potential for change.” This expansive autobiographical work on unstretched canvas mixes painting, photo transfer, words, and other media to present a bold and multifaceted vision of her outer and inner spiritual journey through life. Included in the artist’s defnitive retrospective organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, in 2018, curator Naomi Beckwith called this piece “one of Howardena’s most amazing works.”


41. LEE BONTECOU

b. 1931

Untitled signed and dated “Bontecou 1990” lower right graphite on paper 17 x 14 in. (43.2 x 35.7 cm.) Executed in 1990. Provenance The Artist Knoedler & Company, New York Barbara and Sorrell Mathes, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2004 Exhibited New York, Knoedler & Company, Lee Bontecou: Drawings 1958-1999, May 6 – July 30, 2004, no. 29, p. 37 (illustrated) New York, Barbara Mathes Gallery, Paper: Bontecou, Flavin, Kusama, Long, Mangold, Sandback, Serra, Smith, Taafe, September 11 – October 27, 2007

Born 1931, Providence, Rhode Island 1950-52 Bradford College, Haverhill, Massachusetts 1952-55 Art Students League, New York Selected museum exhibitions: Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, Netherlands (2017); Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2004); Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (1993); Halthorn Gallery, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, New York (1977); Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (1972); Kunstverein Giannozzo, Berlin (1968); Documenta III, Kassel, Germany (1964); The Museum of Modern Art (1961) Selected honors: American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2006); Skowhegan Medal for Sculpture (2004); Fulbright Scholarship (1956) Selected public collections: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Bufalo; Dallas Museum of Art; Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum of Art; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Kunstmuseum Basel; Menil Collection, Houston; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Museum of Modern Art; National Gallery of Art, Washington; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Whitney Museum of American Art

Among the few women to gain prominence in the art world of the 1960s, Lee Bontecou garnered attention for her abstract sculptures and drawings that combine mechanical imagery with organic shapes. Untitled, 1990, depicts a surrealist landscape complete with a darkened celestial object and biomorphic clouds. Bontecou has described her drawings as “worldscapes” that evoke aspects of the imaginary and everyday world, evoking themes of mystery and the infnite.


42. MARILYN MINTER

b. 1948

100 FOOD PORN #69 (CHICKEN) signed, titled and dated ““100 FOOD PORN #69 (CHICKEN)” ENAMEL ON METAL SIGN 24” x 30” M. MINTER ‘90” on the reverseenamel on metal 24 x 30 in. (61 x 76.2 cm.) Executed in 1990. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Exhibited New York, Simon Watson Gallery, Marilyn Minter: 100 Food Porn, 1990 Contemporary Arts Museum Houston; Museum of Contemporary Art Denver; Orange County Museum of Art, CA; Brooklyn Museum, Marilyn Minter. Pretty/Dirty, April 18, 2015 - April 2, 2017, no. 22, pp. 76-77 (illustrated).

Nadya Wasylko

Born 1948, Shreveport, Louisiana 1970 BFA University of Florida, Gainesville 1972 MFA Syracuse University, New York Selected museum exhibitions: Brooklyn Museum (2016); Contemporary Art Museum, Houston (2015); Deichtorhallen, Hamburg (2011); Museum of Modern Art (2010); San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (2005); Everson Museum, New York (1975) Selected honors: Louis Comfort Tifany Award (2006); Guggenheim Fellowship (1998); National Endowment for the Arts Grant (1989); New York Foundation for the Arts Grant (1988) Selected public collections: Baltimore Museum of Art, Maryland; Chase Manhattan Bank, New York; Denver Museum of Art, Colorado; Kunsthaus Museum, Zurich; Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Whitney Museum of American Art

Marilyn Minter appropriates the visual language of fashion, advertisements, and pornography, transforming them into hyper-realistic paintings that subvert their methods. She has explained: “I’m always looking for the paradox. The idea of glamour is so shallow, so debased, and yet it gives people so much pleasure and is a huge industry. I have a love/hate relationship with it.” Minter began her career as a photographer, then moved to painting. The present enamel on metal work is from an early series of paintings that she titled Food Porn. These visually stunning works have a visceral, even erotic appeal and a lushly fuid, gelatinous surface, bringing to the fore considerations of how images manipulate desire.


43. AMINAH BRENDA LYNN ROBINSON 1940-2015 Edmonia Lewis/Sculptor - A Clutch of Blossom Series signed and dated “©1990 Aminah Brenda L Robinson” right edge mixed media on Pellon 59 3/4 x 21 1/2 in. (151.8 x 54.6 cm.) Executed in 1990. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited New York, Forum Gallery, The Feminist Figure, April 5 May 5, 2007 Albany, Opalka Galleries, Stories and Journeys: The Art of Faith Ringgold and Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson, January 17 – April 24, 2013 New York, ACA Galleries, Crosscurrents: A Treasury Through Time, July 9 – August 16, 2013

Courtesy ACA Galleries, New York

Born 1940, Columbus, Ohio Died 2015, Columbus, Ohio 1960 BA Columbus College of Art and Design, Ohio 1960 Ohio State University, Columbus Selected museum exhibitions: Tacoma Art Museum (2006); Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Chile (2004); Brooklyn Museum (2003); Columbus Museum of Art (1990; 2004, 2007, 2011, 2012); Museum of Craf and Folk Art, San Francisco (1989); Akron Museum of Art (1987); Franklin University, Columbus, Ohio (1982); Otterbein College, Westerville, Ohio (1982) Selected honors: John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2004); Governor’s Award for the Visual Arts, Ohio Arts Council (1989); KUUMBA Black Liberation Award in the Visual Arts from Malcolm X College, Chicago (1978) Selected public collections: Brooklyn Museum of Art; Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio; National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Cincinnati; Newark Museum, New Jersey; Ohio University, Dayton; Toledo Museum of Art, Ohio

A vital fgure in the arts and culture of her native Columbus, Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson created paintings, books, sculptures, and multimedia works that communicate memory and history with power and determination. In 1990, she created her Clutch of Blossoms series, describing it as “is a body of work about women I have known and women whom I have admired through the years. It’s mothers and daughters—it’s a celebration of womanhood.” This piece represents Edmonia Lewis, who was the frst professional African American sculptor and spent most of her career in Rome.


44. GRACE HARTIGAN

1922-2008

Mae West’s Bed signed and dated “Hartigan ’90-91” lower center oil on linen 72 x 78 in. (182.9 x 198.1 cm.) Painted 1990-1991. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist’s estate by the present owner Exhibited Baltimore, Loyola College Art Gallery, Rosemont, Lawrence Gallery, Grace Hartigan: AB-EX Pointillism, 1988 – 1993, October 26 – February 27, 1988

Courtesy the Estate of Grace Hartigan

Born 1922, Newark, New Jersey Died 2008, Timonium, Maryland 1942 Newark College of Engineering, New Jersey Selected museum exhibitions: Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, New York (2001); Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, New York (1993); Baltimore Museum of Art (1980); Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore (1967); University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (1963); Documenta, Kassel (1959); Vassar College Art Gallery (1954) Selected honors: Governor’s Award, Maryland (2006); Life Time Achievement Award, Neuberger Museum (2002); Childe Hassam Purchase Award, American Academy of Arts and Letters (1974); Honorary Life Trustee, Baltimore Museum of Art (1957) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Brooklyn Museum; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Israel Museum, Jerusalem; Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minneapolis; Smithsonian Museum of American Art; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Modern Art; Walker Art Center; Whitney Museum of American Art

An artist with a protean approach to her work, Grace Hartigan began her mature work as an Abstract Expressionist, introduced fgurative elements into her work in the mid-1950s, and moved between abstraction and fguration throughout the remainder of her long career. Women remained an important theme for her throughout her oeuvre, from Grand Street Brides (1954, Whitney Museum of American Art) and Marilyn (1962) to Theodora (1983, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1983). Mae West’s Bed (1990-91), with its palette of pink, yellow, orange, and black, marks her return to an Abstract Expressionist style, though one with references to the real world. Hartigan’s title suggests the humor and sexual liberation of the actress who once called her bedroom “the most famous in the world.”


45. LAURIE SIMMONS

b. 1949

Walking Hot Dog, 1991 pigment print 84 x 48 in. (213.4 x 121.9 cm.) This is number 1 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited New York, Mary Boone Gallery, Laurie Simmons: Clothes Make the Man: Works from 1990-1994, April 27 - July 27, 2018

Caroline Tompkins

Born 1949, Far Rockaway, New York 1971 BFA Tyler School of Art, Philadelphia Selected museum exhibitions: Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth (2018); Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, Massachusetts (2016); Jewish Museum, New York (2015); Gothenburg Museum, Sweden (2012); New York Public Library (2010); The Nassau County Museum of Art, New York (2007); Baltimore Museum of Art (1997); San José Museum of Art (1990); Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (1987); PS1 Contemporary Arts Center, New York (1979); University of Rhode Island, Kingston (1979) Selected honors: Spotlight Award, International Center of Photography (2016); Aurora Award (2012); Roy Lichtenstein Residency, American Academy in Rome (2005); John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship (1997); National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship (1984) Selected public collections: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Hara Museum, Tokyo; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Modern Art; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Whitney Museum of American Art

Since the mid-1970s, Simmons has staged scenes for her camera with dolls, mannequins, objects, and sometimes people. Playing with scale and juxtaposing human features with inanimate things, Simmons creates disarmingly humorous images with social, political and psychological subtexts. Walking Hot Dog, 1991, is from her Walking and Lying Objects, a series she produced from 1987 through 1991, in which she attached domestic objects to human legs, rendering them both anthropomorphic and absurd. In this large-scale photograph, a phallic hot dog appears to be walking or dancing with feminine highheeled shoes, playfully invoking signs of gender while also suggesting our desire for food.


46. JACKIE FERRARA

b. 1929

Jak Tower 297 cedar 112 1/2 x 32 x 32 in. (285.8 x 81.3 x 81.3 cm.) Executed in 1995. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist

Photo by Andrea Blum

Born 1929, Detroit 1950 Michigan State University, East Lansing Selected museum exhibitions: Drawing Center, New York (2017); Tufs University, Medford, Massachusetts (2007); Atrium Gallery, University of Connecticut, Stamford (2000); Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (1998); Freedman Gallery, Albright College, Pennsylvania (1993); Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota (1992); Moore College of Art, Philadelphia (1987); Lowe Art Museum, Coral Gables (1982); Laumier Sculpture Park, St. Louis (1981); Ohio State University (1977) Selected honors: National Academy of Design (2016); Institute Honor, American Institute of Architects (1990); Design Excellence Award, Art Commission of the City of New York (1988); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1976) Selected public collections: Columbus Museum of Art; Denver Art Museum; High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Israel Museum, Jerusalem; Laumeier Sculpture Park St. Louis; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts; St. Louis Art Museum; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis

The soaring, modular forms of Jak Tower 297 epitomize Jackie Ferrara’s innovative sculptural practice. Since the 1970s, she has created precisely stacked structures, carefully developing their shapes and paying careful attention to the material qualities of wood, such as color and grain. With their afnities to pyramids or ziggurats, Ferrara’s sculptures suggest the architecture and monuments of the ancient world while imparting her distinctly contemporary vision.


47. BARBARA BLOOM

b. 1951

Broken (Cup) broken celadon objects, repaired with gold, box wrapped in computer-generated paper, framed X-ray of the object (with back lighting) frame 16 ¾ x 12 ¾ x 1 ½ in. (42.4 x 32.4 x 3.8 cm.) ceramic 2 1/4 x 4 1/8 x 4 1/8 in. (5.7 x 10.5 x 10.5 cm.) gif box 6 ½ x 13 ¾ x 13 ¾ in. (16.5 x 34.9 x 34.9 cm.) Executed in 2001. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

Born 1951, Los Angeles 1972 BFA California Institute of the Arts Selected museum exhibitions: International Center of Photography, New York (2008); Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, New York (2000); Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio (1998); Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh (1992); Serpentine Gallery, London (1990); Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1985) Selected honors: Visiting Scholar, Getty Research Institute (2007); Duemila Prize for Best Young Artist, Venice Biennale (1988); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1988) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; International Center of Photography, New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Modern Art; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam In Broken (Cup), 2001, Barbara Bloom presents a collection of objects that includes a Japanese ceramic bowl that she has reconstructed and repaired with a gold and lacquer technique called Kintsugi. As Bloom explains, “When the Japanese mend broken objects, they aggrandize the damage by flling the cracks with gold. They believe that when something’s sufered damage and has a history it becomes more beautiful.” Created a few years afer an accidental fall required her to undergo surgery and rehabilitation, her Broken series invokes themes of fragility, reconstruction, and healing.


48. YAYOI KUSAMA

b. 1929

BUTTERFLY signed, titled and dated “Butterfy 2001 Yayoi Kusama” on the reverse stufed sewn synthetic fabric, feathers, iron, mirror and wood 28 3/8 x 24 x 14 1/8 in. (72.1 x 61 x 35.9 cm.) Executed in 2001, this work is accompanied by a registration card issued by the Yayoi Kusama Studio, under registration number 2810. Provenance Galerie Piece Unique, Paris Private Collection Christie’s, Paris, June 10, 2016, lot 237A Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Born 1929, Matsumoto, Japan 1948–1949 Kyoto City Specialist School of Arts, Kyoto, Japan Selected museum exhibitions: Yayoi Kusama Museum, Tokyo (2017); National Art Center, Tokyo (2017); Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C. (2015); Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, Denmark (2015); Whitney Museum of American Art (2012); Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid (2011); National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo (2004); Le Consortium, Dijon (2000); Museum of Modern Art (1998); Los Angeles County Museum of Art (1998); Venice Biennale (1992); Museum of Modern Art, Oxford (1989); American Center, Tokyo (1980) Selected honors: 18th Praemium Imperiale Award for painting (2006); Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts, Woman’s Caucus for Art (2006); Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, France (2003); Asahi Prize (2001) Selected public collections: Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Museum of Modern Art; National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Tate Gallery, London; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Whitney Museum of American Art

At age 90, Yayoi Kusama continues to be active and prolifc as an artist, creating paintings, sculptures, and installations that inspire audiences worldwide. Butterfy, 2001, displays many of the themes that have animated her oeuvre since the 1960s. Kusama took a shaped vanity mirror, surrounded it with red, pod-like protuberances that she constructed with fabric and painted butterfies on its surface. Her use of a mirror creates a frame for the viewer that changes each time it is viewed. Suggesting vanitas and self-realization, the artist connects this work to the cycles of life, death, and metamorphosis.


49. KIKI SMITH

b. 1954

Moon on Crutches Figure 2 cast aluminum and bronze 74 1/2 x 68 x 83 1/2 in. (189.2 x 172.7 x 212.1 cm.) Executed in 2002. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

Born 1954, Nuremberg, Germany Selected museum exhibitions: Haus der Kunst, Munich (2018); Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, New York (2012); High Museum of Art, Atlanta (2011); Kunstmuseen Krefeld, Germany (2008); Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2005); Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C. (1998); Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh (1998); Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (1997); Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, Massachusetts (1992); Museum of Modern Art (1990) Selected honors: Lifetime Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award, International Sculpture Center (2016); United States Department of State Medal of Arts (2013); Nelson A. Rockefeller Award, Purchase College School of the Arts (2010); Women in the Arts Award, Brooklyn Museum (2009); Skowhegan Medal for Sculpture (2000) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; Brooklyn Museum of Art; Detroit Institute of Arts, Michigan; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum Folkwang, Essen; Museum of Modern Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Tate, London; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Whitney Museum of American Art

Creating in a wide variety of media, Kiki Smith has developed a signifcant body of work that explores the human condition, spirituality, and the natural world. Smith represents the human body in unconventional ways to invoke themes of beliefs and storytelling. As in many of her works, Moon on Crutches Figure 2, 2002, features a female fgure. Created in cast aluminum, she appears to foat impassively, suspended from the ground over a thicket of metal, which may be said to operate like metaphorical crutches.


50. JANINE ANTONI

b. 1964

Caryatid chromogenic print and broken vessel (cracked green glaze over red oxide on an ovoid-bodied base with truncated neck) print 29 3/4 x 91 1/4 in. (75.6 x 231.76 cm.) vessel 11 x 12 x 18 in. (27.9 x 30.5 x 45.7 cm.) Executed in 2003, this work is from a series of 14 unique variants. This work is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity. Provenance The artist Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Luhring Augustine, Sculpture, March 23 – April 14, 2018

Born 1964, Freeport, Bahamas 1986 BA Sarah Lawrence College, New York 1989 MFA Rhode Island School of Design Selected museum exhibitions: The Contemporary Austin, Texas (2019); Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia (2016); Magasin III Museum, Stockholm (2004); Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefeld, Connecticut (2001); Whitney Museum of American Art (1998); Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow (1995) Selected honors: Anonymous Was A Woman Grant (2014); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (2011); John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship (1998) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; Israel Museum, Jerusalem; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Modern Art; Whitney Museum of American Art The title of Janine Antoni’s Caryatid refers to a component of classical Greek architecture in which a female fgure replaces a typical column. Antoni has inverted the fgure, turning it on its head: at frst glance the photograph appears to capture the artist’s back as she balances upside-down on the clay pot, relieving the female body of the labor it traditionally performed. On second look, it is apparent that the photograph is inverted, exchanging the roles of support between vessel and body. Coupled with the photograph is the same clay vase, now broken into fragments that are held within its own remains.


51. ELEANOR ANTIN

b. 1935

The Lovers, 2004 chromogenic print 48 1/2 x 61 1/8 in. (123.2 x 155.3 cm.) This work is number 4 from an edition of 4. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited New York, Ronald Feldman Gallery, Roman Allegories, February 12 – March 12, 2005 Milan, Marella Arte Contemporanea, Roman Allegories, 2005 and 100 Boots, 1971-73, April 20 – May 28, 2005 San Diego Art Museum, Historical Takes, July 19 – November 2, 2008

Born 1935, Bronx 1958 BA City College, New York Selected museum exhibitions: Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (2014); Los Angeles County Museum of Art (1999, 2009, 2019); San Diego Museum of Contemporary Art, La Jolla (1991); Minneapolis College of Art and Design (1982); Whitney Museum of American Art (1978, 1997); Wadsworth Atheneum, Connecticut (1977); The Clocktower, Institute for Art and Urban Resources, New York (1976); Museum of Modern Art (1973); Long Island University, Brooklyn (1968) Selected honors: Anonymous Was a Woman Foundation (2011); Lifetime Achievement Award, College Art Association (2006); Honor Awards for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts, Women’s Caucus for Art (2006); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1997) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; Des Moines Art Center; Fonds National d’Art Contemporain, Paris; Jewish Museum, New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego; Centre Pompidou, Paris; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Whitney Museum of American Art

A performance artist, flmmaker, photographer, and installation artist, Eleanor Antin knowingly invokes historical themes in her work. According to critic Kim Levin, “Impersonating the past, Antin personalizes the issues and dilemmas of the present. Her work is probably, more than we yet realize, a portrait of our time.” The Lovers is a color photograph from her Roman Allegories series, a tableau of the classical past that nods toward nineteenth-century salon painting. Taken in southern California, her models break character as if on a break during a flm shot, having a snack or smoking, as two fgures in togas walk arm-in-arm in the background.


52. FAITH RINGGOLD

b. 1930

Jazz Stories: Mama Can Sing, Papa Can Blow #6: I’m Leavin in the Mornin signed and dated “F. Ringgold 10/28/04” on lower right; further signed, titled and dated “JAZZ STORIES 2004 Mama Can Sing Papa Can Blow #6 I’m Leavin in the Mornin by Faith Ringgold” on a label afxed to the reverse. acrylic on canvas with pieced fabric border 82 x 65 in. (208.3 x 165.1 cm.) Executed in 2004 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited New York, ACA Galleries, Jazz Stories 2004: Mama Can Sing, Papa Can Blow, December 18, 2004 – February 12, 2005 Fairfeld, Connecticut, J. Walsh Art Gallery, Fairfeld University, Faith Ringgold, January 28 – March 4, 2006 Spokane, Gonzaga University, Jundt Art Museum, Faith Ringgold, January 19 – April 4, 2007 Boise Art Museum, Faith Ringgold: Mama Can Sing, Papa Can Blow, December 15, 2007 – March 23, 2008 Savannah College of Art and Design Museum of Art, The Art of Faith Ringgold: Story Quilts and Freedom Quests, January 23 – May 23, 2011 Mesa, Arizona, Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum, Jazz Stories: Faith Ringgold, September 14 – November 25, 2018

Photo by Grace Matthews, Courtesy ACA Galleries, New York

Literature Ringgold, Faith, Jazz Stories 2004, Mama Can Sing Papa Can Blow, Experimental Printmaking Institute, Lafayette College, Easton, PA

Born 1930, New York 1955 BA City College of New York 1959 MA City College of New York Selected museum exhibitions: Serpentine Gallery, London (2019); National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington (2013); Neuberger Museum, Purchase, New York (2010); Museum of Modern Art (2000); New Museum of Contemporary Art (1998); Fine Arts Museum of Long Island, New York (1991); Baltimore Museum of Art (1987); The Studio Museum in Harlem (1984); Vorhees Gallery, Rutgers University, New Jersey (1973) Selected honors: Medal of Honor for Fine Arts, National Arts Club (2017); Annual Cultural Arts Award, City College of New York (2011); Visual Arts Award, Harlem Arts Alliance (2006); Artist of the Year, The Studio Museum in Harlem (1991); Caldecott Honor Book (1991); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship (1987); Creative Artists Public Service Award for Painting (1971) Selected public collections: Baltimore Museum of Art; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The Museum of Modern Art; High Museum, Atlanta; Newark Museum, New Jersey; Saint Louis Art Museum; Smithsonian American Art Museum; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Whitney Museum of American Art

A celebrated artist, accomplished storyteller, and dedicated activist, Faith Ringgold works in a variety of media, including painting, quilts, sculpture, and performance. From a series celebrating the legacy of this uniquely American music, Jazz Stories: Mama Can Sing, Papa Can Blow #6: I’m Leavin in the Mornin depicts musicians and singers. Growing up in Harlem listening to jazz, the artist has portrayed an elegantly dressed group in a sophisticated style that is infuenced by folk art and the rhythmic energies of the music they play. Painted in acrylic, the work includes Ringgold’s signature use of textiles in the work’s border.


53. VERA LUTTER

b. 1960

San Marco, Venice XVIII: November 29-30, 2005 signed, titled and dated on the verso. gelatin silver print in two parts overall 93 1/2 x 113 in. (237.5 x 287 cm.) Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

Born 1960, Kaiserslautern, Germany 1991 BFA Academy of Fine Arts, Munich, Germany 1995 MFA School of Visual Arts, New York, NY Selected museum exhibitions: Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (2015); Carré d’Art Musée d’art contemporain, Lyon, France (2012); Foundation Beyeler, Switzerland (2008); Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas (2005); Dia Beacon, New York (2005); Kunsthaus Graz, Austria (2004); Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago (2002); Kunsthalle Basel, Switzerland (2001) Selected honors: Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant (2002); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (2001); International Artists Studio Program, Artist in Residence (2001); Kulturstifung der ZF Friedrichshafen Grant (1999); International Center for Advanced Studies Grant, NYU (1997); Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst Grant (1993) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Israel Museum, Jerusalem; Kunsthaus, Zurich; Lenbach House, Munich; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Centre Pompidou, Paris; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Whitney Museum of American Art

Among the most innovative photographers working today, Vera Lutter produces one-of-a-kind photographs that incorporate fundamental principles of her medium. To make her work, she creates a room-size camera obscura with a simple pinhole, exposing large sheets of photographic paper on the opposite wall. The result is a unique large-scale black-and-white image that she retains as a unique negative. In this image, Lutter pictures the Piazza San Marco in Venice, capturing its famous architecture and their refections at a fttingly monumental scale.


54. JENNIFER BARTLETT

b. 1941

Knots signed and dated “J. Bartlett 2005 – 2006” on the reverse oil on canvas 108 x 108 in. (274.3 x 274.3 cm.) Painted in 2005-2006. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist and Locks Gallery, Philadelphia Exhibited Philadelphia, Locks Gallery, Painting the Language of Nature and Paintings, October 6 – November 11, 2006

Photo by Nancy Brooks Brody

Born 1941, Long Beach, California 1963 BA Mills College, Oakland, California 1965 MFA Yale School of Art Selected museum exhibitions: The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. (2020); The Drawing Center, New York (2016); Cleveland Museum of Art (2014); Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, Massachusetts (2006); Orlando Museum of Art (1993); Brooklyn Museum (1985); Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (1984); Whitney Biennial (1981); Dartmouth College (1975); Mills College (1963) Selected honors: Francis J. Greenburgher Award, Art Omi, New York (2019); Cultural Laureate, Historic Landmarks Preservation Center (1999); American Institute of Architects Award (1987); Harris Prize, Art Institute of Chicago (1976) Selected public collections: Brooklyn Museum; Cleveland Museum of Art; Dallas Museum of Art; Israel Museum, Jerusalem; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Museum of Modern Art; Philadelphia Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Tate Modern, London; Whitney Museum of American Art

From a series of paintings featuring boats and water, Knots, 2006, showcases Jennifer Bartlett’s unique approach to painting, which balances representation with abstraction, and painterly mark-making with a conceptual sophistication. Here, a feld of hatched marks represent waves, while a boat makes its way across the picture plane, its acceleration noted in the painted sequence of knots in the painting’s upper register. According to Donald Kuspit, Bartlett’s use of language “draws you further— ‘conceptually further,’ as it were—into the picture, making it more mysterious—and subtly incomprehensible—than it might otherwise seem.”


55. CARRIE MAE WEEMS

b. 1953

Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2006 - Present chromogenic print sheet 72 x 60 in. (182.9 x 152.4 cm.) framed 73 1/2 x 61 1/2 in. (186.7 x 156.2 cm.) This work is number L2 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist proofs. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited SCAD Museum of Art, Carrie Mae Weems: Considered, February 16 – June 12, 2016 Saratoga Springs, Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery, Classless Society, September 7, 2013–March 9, 2014, p. 123 (illustrated)

Photo by Jerry Klineberg

Literature Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video, exh. cat, 2013, p. 169 (illustrated) Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw, Represent 200 Years of African American Art in the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, 2014. p. 3 (illustrated)

Born in 1953, Portland, Oregon 1981 BFA California Institute of the Arts, Valencia 1984 MFA University of California, San Diego 1984–1987 Graduate Program in Folklore, University of California, Berkeley Selected museum exhibitions: McMullen Museum of Art, Boston (2018); Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, Harvard University (2016); The Studio Museum in Harlem (2014); Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville (2013); Art Institute of Chicago (2011); Newcomb Art Gallery, Tulane University (2003); Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, Massachusetts (2000); Sarah Moody Gallery of Art, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (1994); Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (1991) Selected honors: Distinguished Feminist Award, College Art Association (2016); International Center of Photography Spotlights Award (2015); W.E.B. Du Bois Medal, Harvard University (2015); John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2013); Medal of Arts, U.S. Department of State (2012); Anonymous Was a Woman Award (2007); Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize Fellowship, American Academy (2005); The Alpert Award for Visual Arts (1996) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; Brooklyn Museum; George Eastman House, Rochester, New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; MIT List Visual Arts Center; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Tate Modern, London; Virginia Museum of Art, Richmond; Whitney Museum of American Art

Begun in 2006, Carrie Mae Weems’ Museum series are photographs of the artist’s back as she stands outside museums worldwide. In this work, we see the Philadelphia Museum’s iconic staircase and the vast plaza, which is empty save for Weems and a pile of litter. As a black woman artist, Weems’ use of her own image in these works bring to the fore the racial and gender barriers to institutional success—a theme made more complex by the scafolding and large banners announcing a Frida Kahlo exhibition on the museum’s façade.


56. ALEX PRAGER

b. 1979

Ellen from Polyester, 2007 chromogenic print 47 x 43 in. (119.4 x 109.2 cm.) signed, titled, dated and numbered 3/7 in ink on the reverse of the fush-mount. Provenance Robert Berman Gallery, Santa Monica Acquired from the above by the present owner, California Literature Prager, Silver Lake Drive, p. 19

Born 1979 Los Angeles Selected museum exhibitions: Foam Fotografemuseum, Amsterdam (2019); Des Moines Art Center, Iowa (2017); St. Louis Art Museum (2015); National Gallery of Art, Melbourne, Australia (2014); Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. (2013); SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah (2013) Selected honors: Emmy Award (2012); Foam Paul Huf Award (2012); International Photography Award (2009); Lucie Award (2009); London Photographic Award (2006) Selected public collections: The Whitney Museum of American Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Museum of Modern Art; North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh; High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Kunsthaus (The Museum for Modern Art), Zurich; Cincinnati Art Museum; Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, Australia; Fondation Carmignac Gestion, Paris Alex Prager, a self-taught photographer, flmmaker, and Los Angeles native engages and reveals the carefully constructed reality of her hometown, and its inhabitants, in her early Polyester series. Unwrinkled women in candy colored vintage wardrobes, glamorously coifed with lush false lashes and blank stares are set against vibrant blue skies, swirling seas, and dramatically lit rooms. Prager’s scenes are compellingly familiar, as if the artist has caught our star in between takes in a classic 1960s flm; her camera cracks the illusion, and hints at the unease and emotion percolating below the gloss.


57. WANGECHI MUTU

b. 1972

Cact Us watercolor, ink, collage on paper Diptych, 12 1/4 x 9 in. (31.1 x 22.9 cm.) each (framed) 10 x 7 in. (25.4 x 17.8 cm.) each (paper) Executed in 2008. Provenance Susanne Vielmetter Gallery, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner

Born 1972, Nairobi, Kenya 1996 BFA Cooper Union for the Advancement of the Arts and Sciences, New York 2000 MFA Yale University, School of Art, New Haven Selected museum exhibitions: The Contemporary Austin, Texas (2017); SITE Santa Fe (2016); Il Capricorno, Venice, Italy (2015); Brooklyn Museum (2013); Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2012); Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego (2009); San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, New York (2005); Johannesburg Biennale (1997) Selected honors: Asher B. Durand Artist of the Year Award, Brooklyn Museum (2013); Deutsche Bank Artist of the Year Award (2010); The Louis Comfort Tifany Award (2008); The Joan Mitchell Foundation (2007); Studio Museum in Harlem Artist in Residence (2003); Richard Leakey Merit Award, Nairobi (1994) Selected public collections Art Gallery of Ontario; American Federation of the Arts, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Modern Art; New Museum, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, California; Studio Museum in Harlem, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art.

In her collages, flms, sculptures, installations, and performance Wangechi Mutu channels her concerns with femininity, sexuality, ethnicity, ecology, and politics. Her polymorphic forms address cultural perceptions of the female body and the oppression of women. As Mutu stated: “I was always interested in the power of the body, both as an image and as an actual mechanism through which we exist and fnd out who we are. I was interested in what goes on inside, but also what people see you as. I was also looking at the history of the body, questioning issues of representation and perception.” In Cact Us, 2008, botanical forms are mixed with elements of human anatomy to create hybrid forms that reconfgure the female body in an uncanny fashion.


58. LYNDA BENGLIS

b. 1941

Figure 5 cast aluminum 89 x 61 x 27 in. (226.1 x 154.9 x 68.6 cm.) Executed in 2009, this work is number 1 of an edition of 3. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited New York, Dedalus Foundation, Come Together: Surviving Sandy, Year One: Curated by Phong Bui, October 17 - December 15, 2013, pp. 130–131 (another example exhibited)

Born 1941, Lake Charles, Louisiana 1964 BFA Newcomb College, New Orleans Selected museum exhibitions: Aspen Art Museum (2016); Storm King Art Center, New York (2015); Rhode Island School of Design (2011); Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven (2009); Bass Museum of Art, Miami (2003); Harwood Museum of Art, Taos (1995, 2019); High Museum of Art, Atlanta (1991); Jacksonville Art Museum (1981); The Clocktower, Institute for Art and Urban Resources, New York (1973); Hayden Gallery, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1971); Fine Arts Center, University of Rhode Island, Kingston (1969) Selected honors: Lifetime Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award, The International Sculpture Center (2017); American Academy of Arts and Letters (2012); Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement, College Art Association (2011); John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (1975) Selected public collections: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Bufalo; Anderson Collection at Stanford University; Art Institute of Chicago; Brooklyn Museum; Dallas Museum of Art; Detroit Institute of Arts; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin; Jewish Museum, New York; Metropolitan Museum of Art; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Seattle Art Museum; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Whitney Museum of American Art

Since the 1960s, Lynda Benglis has created unique sculptural forms in a diverse array of materials through corporeal gestures of pouring, throwing, and molding in three-dimensional space. Benglis’s artistic practice is simultaneously playful and visceral, organic, and abstract, creating work grounded in her continuous investigation of sensory experience. An abstract work with fgurative connotations in its title and form, Figure 5 is mounted on the wall, in contrast to those sited on the foor. Its rough, roiling surface of cast aluminum contrasts in material and texture with the smooth, sof surfaces of her earlier latex and foam sculptures.


59. ELIZABETH CATLETT

1915-2012

Bather signed with the artist’s initials “EC” on the fgure’s lef heel mahogany 40 x 11 3/8 x 11 3/8 in. (101.6 x 28.9 x 28.9 cm) Executed in 2009. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited New York, June Kelly Gallery, Elizabeth Catlett: Recent Sculpture, April 3, 2009 – May 2, 2009 Bronx Museum of the Arts, Stargazers: Elizabeth Catlett in Conversation with 21 Contemporary Artists with guest curator: Isolde Brielmaier, February 6 - May 29, 2010, pp. 21, 74,81 (illustrated, p. 54) New York, June Kelly Gallery, Remembering Elizabeth Catlett: Sculpture , Paintings, and Prints, January 24 – February 25, 2014 New York, June Kelly Gallery, Elizabeth Catlett: An Ardent Feminist, March 8 – April 16, 2019

Photo by Gloria Baker

Born 1915, Washington, D.C. Died 2012, Cuernavaca, Mexico 1935 BS Howard University School of Art, Washington 1940 MFA University of Iowa, Iowa City 1947-48 Esculea de Pintura y Escultura, Mexico Selected museum exhibitions: Bronx Museum of the Arts (2011); Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh (2008); Cleveland Museum of Art (2002); Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, New York (1998); Hampton University Museum, Virginia (1993); Arizona State University Museum, Tempe (1987) Selected honors: NAACP Image Award (2009); Honorary Doctorate, Carnegie Mellon University (2008); Legends and Legacy Award, Art Institute of Chicago (2005); Lifetime Achievement Award, International Sculpture Center (2003); Distinguished Alumni Award, University of Iowa (1996); Rosenwald Fund Fellowship (1946) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; Baltimore Museum of Art; Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Virginia; Cincinnati Art Museum; DuSable Museum of African American History, Chicago; High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museo de Arte Moderno, Mexico City; Museum of Modern Art; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C.; Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York; The Studio Museum in Harlem; Whitney Museum of American Art

A fgurative artist who employed abstraction in her celebrated sculptures and graphic arts, Elizabeth Catlett is one of the most celebrated African American artists of the 20th century. Throughout her long career, Catlett was committed to a visual vocabulary rooted in the strength, beauty, and dignity of African American women. Bather, 2009, is a carved wooden sculpture from late in her career. Its powerful forms reveal the inspiration she took from modernism and from the sculptural traditions of West Africa and Pre-Columbian Mexico.


60. DEBORAH KASS

b. 1952

Afer Louise Bourgeois neon and transformers on powder-coated aluminum monolith 66 x 68 x 6 3/4 in. (167.6 x 172.7 x 17.1 cm.) Executed in 2010, this work is from an edition of 6 plus three artist proofs. Another work of this edition is housed in the permanent collection of the Brooklyn Museum. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Photo by Grace Roselli

Exhibited New York, Paul Kasmin Gallery, MORE feel good paintings for feel bad times, September 23 - October 30, 2010 (another example exhibited) Pittsburgh, Andy Warhol Museum, Deborah Kass: Before and Happily Ever Afer, October 27, 2012–January 6, 2014 (another example exhibited) New Orleans, Arthur Roger Gallery, Deborah Kass: feel good paintings for feel bad times, October 4 – October 25, 2014 (another example exhibited) Nassau County Museum of Art, True Colors, July 21 November 4, 2018 (another example exhibited)

Born 1952, San Antonio, Texas 1968-70 Art Students League, New York 1972 Independent Studies Program, Whitney Museum of American Art 1974 BFA, Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh Selected museum exhibitions: Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, New York (2016); Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh (2012); Newcombe Art Gallery, New Orleans (1999); Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art and Design, Kansas City (1996) Selected honors: Art Matters Inc. Grant (1992, 1996); Fellowship in Painting, New York State Foundation for the Arts (1991); Award from the National Endowment for the Arts in Painting (1987) Selected public collections: Brooklyn Museum of Art; Cincinnati Art Museum; Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Indiana; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Jewish Museum, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; New Museum, New York; New Orleans Museum of Art; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Museum of Modern Art; Pérez Art Museum Miami; Whitney Museum of American Art

Mining the history of art and pop culture, Deborah Kass creates works that parody and critique standard narratives of postwar art. Afer Louise Bourgeois, 2010, plays of the spiraling neon light sculptures of Bruce Nauman. Catching our attention with a spectrum of colors, we must work to decipher its message, an altered quotation by Louise Bourgeois with a decidedly feminist message: “A woman has no place in the art world unless she proves over and over again that she won’t be eliminated.”


61. SUSAN ROTHENBERG

b. 1945

Pink Raven signed, titled and dated “PINK RAVEN 2012 S. Rothenberg” on the reverse oil on canvas 62 3/4 x 48 in. (159.4 x 121.9 cm.) Painted in 2012. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited New York, Sperone Westwater, Susan Rothenberg, November 4 – December 20, 2016 (illustrated, pp. 4-5) Amsterdam, Grimm Gallery, Susan Rothenberg: The Height The Width The Weight, September 7 – October 17, 2017 London, Almine Rech Gallery, A New Spirit Then, A New Spirit Now, curated by Norman Rosenthal, October 2 – November 17, 2018

Photograph by Koos Breukel © 2019 Susan Rothenberg/Artists Rights Society (ARS),

Born 1945, Buffalo, New York 1967 BA Cornell University, Ithaca Selected museum exhibitions: Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth (2009); Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (1998); Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca (1998); Museo de Arte Contemporáneo, Monterrey, Mexico (1996); Albright Knox Art Gallery, Bufalo (1992); Rooseum Center for Contemporary Art, Malmö, Sweden (1990); Los Angeles County Museum of Art (1983); Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1982); Kunsthalle Basel (1981); Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (1978) Selected honors: Artist Honoree, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (2017); Rolf Schock Prize, Stockholm (2003); Skowhegan Medal for Painting (1998) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; Baltimore Museum of Art; Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas; Dallas Museum of Art; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Museum of Modern Art; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Tate, London; Whitney Museum of American Art

Ofen painting animals such as birds or horses with vivid colors and expressive brushwork, Susan Rothenberg develops works that synthesize abstraction and fguration. Pink Raven, 2012, represents the bird in striking shades of pink on a green wire, one claw hooked around that wire and the other one about to grasp it in a movement of landing. Rothenberg composed the raven’s body and the painting’s ground through her characteristically frenetic brushstrokes, and articulated branches that fade into the background. She doesn’t use photographs to study the forms of her animals, stating “I just see what I can see when I see them up close.”


62. GHADA AMER

b. 1963

Sindy In Pink - RFGA signed, titled and dated on the reverse acrylic, embroidery and gel medium on canvas 36 x 46 1/8 in. (91.4 x 117.2 cm.) Executed in 2015. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist and Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York and Aspen Exhibited Berlin, Kewenig, Ghada Amer, April 29 – July 29, 2016 Brian Buckley

Born 1963, Cairo 1986 BA École Nationale Supérieure d’Arts à la Villa Arson, Nice 1989 MFA École Nationale Supérieure d’Arts à la Villa Arson, Nice Selected museum exhibitions: Dallas Contemporary (2018); Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal (2012); Brooklyn Museum (2008); Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Roma (2007); Stedelijk Museum s’Hertogenbosch (2006); Davis Museum and Cultural Center, Wellesley College (2005); Whitney Biennial (2000); Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo, Seville (1999); Hôpital Ephémère, Paris (1992) Selected honors: Award for African Art, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution (2017); Smithsonian Institution Artist Research Fellowship (2007); UNESCO Prize, Venice Biennial (1999) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; Brooklyn Museum; Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Arkansas; Detroit Institute of Art; Fonds National d’Art Contemporain, Paris; Guggenheim Museum, Abu Dhabi; Israel Museum, Jerusalem; Centre Pompidou; Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul; Tel Aviv Museum of Art

Manifesting feminist themes through the imagery and materials of her work, Ghada Amer incorporates embroidery into her paintings. According to Amer: “When I was growing up, women would gather and sew together. So I thought this was a good way to talk about women and language ... That’s why I wanted to paint with sewing it, but out of necessity, not out of loving the craf.” To create Sindy in Pink, she combined paint with embroidery, incorporating both abstract and fgurative elements that include the forms of leaves. Against this colorful background is the repeated phrase “WE ARE THE GRANDDAUGHTERS OF THE WITCHES YOU COULD NOT BURN.”


63 & 64.

CRISTINA LEI RODRIGUEZ Two works: (i) Stool (Pink Quartz I); (ii) Stool (Pink Quartz II) plastic, epoxy, grout, plaster, pigment and dye (i) 20 x 17 1/2 x 17 in. (50.8 x 44.5 x 43.2 cm.) (ii) 20 x 16 3/8 x 17 in. (50.8 x 41.6 x 43.2 cm.) Executed in 2016. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist

Cristina Lei Rodriguez

Born 1974, Miami 1996 BA Middlebury College, Vermont 2002 MFA California College of Art, San Francisco Selected museum exhibitions: Brooklyn Academy of Music Peter Jay Sharp Building (2014); de la Cruz Collection, Miami (2013); Vizcaya Museum and Gardens, Miami (2007); Oakland Museum of California (2002) Selected honors: Artist-in-Residence, Vizcaya Museum and Gardens, Miami (2007); International Studio and Curatorial Program, New York (2006) Selected public collections: The Bass, Miami; de la Cruz Collection, Miami; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Pérez Art Museum Miami; Rubell Family Collection The objects that Cristina Lei Rodriguez creates take many forms, but all are made from common materials that are given a new intangible life. Her work is both organic and abstract, yet pristinely fnished, echoing a tension between the natural and the artifcial. An important fgure in Miami’s art scene, Rodriguez creates sculptures that channel the character of the city as she experiences it, stating: “Nature here can be so aggressive and so strong, the natural environment here is really alive, but it’s also really about the city being constructed and so much of it is an illusion.”


65. DIANA AL-HADID

b. 1981

The Candle Clock of the Scribe modifed polymer gypsum, fberglass, brass, copper, steel, concrete, polyurethane foam, bronze, lead, metal leaf, and pigment 89 x 53 x 30 in. (226.1 x 134.6 x 76.2 cm.) Executed in 2017. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist and Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York and Aspen Exhibited New York, Marianne Boesky Gallery, Falcon’s Fortress, September 16 – October 21, 2017

Born 1981, Aleppo, Syria 2003 BA & BFA Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 2005 MFA Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia Selected museum exhibitions: Frist Art Museum and Cheekwood Estate and Gardens, Nashville (2019); Bronx Museum of the Arts (2018); San José Museum of Art (2017); Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire (2016); Newcomb Art Museum, New Orleans (2016); Secession, Vienna (2014); NYU Abu Dhabi Art Gallery (2014, 2016); Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2010); Arlington Arts Center, Washington, D.C. (2006) Selected honors: Keynote Speaker, International Sculpture Center Conference (2016); Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant (2011); Fellow in Sculpture, New York Foundation for the Arts (2009) Selected public collections: deCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, Lincoln, Massachusetts; San José Museum of Art; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, Nebraska; Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, Virginia; Whitney Museum of American Art

Born in Syria and living in Brooklyn, Diana Al-Hadid creates works in a variety of media, drawing inspiration across cultures from the history of science and invention, myths, and the old masters. Al-Hadid creates structures that simultaneously soar and dissolve in space, due in part to her interest in the object’s relationship to the ground and her fascination with engineering. The Candle Clock of the Scribe, 2017, was inspired by the ingenious candle clocks devised by Ismail al-Jazari in the 13th century. With controlled dripping and pooling of her materials and suspension of a brass falcon, Al-Hadid alludes to the passage of time and honors the legacy of Islamic scholars.


66. THENJIWE NIKI NKOSI

b. 1980

Emergent Phenomena II (Afer Standard Bank Head Ofce) signed and dated “Thenjiwe Niki Nkosi 2017” on the overlap oil on canvas 59 1/8 x 78 3/4 in. (150.2 x 200 cm.) Executed in 2017. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

© Akona Kenqu

Born 1980, New York 2006 BA Harvard University 2008 MFA School of Visual Arts, New York Selected museum exhibitions: Goethe-Institut, Johannesburg (2018); Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris (2017); Seed Space, Nashville (2017); National Gallery of Zimbabwe (2016); Somerset House, London (2015); Joberg Pavilion, Venice (2015); Standard Bank Gallery, Johannesburg (2013); Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon (2011) Selected honors: Pro-Helvetia Grant (2015); Residency, FRAC des Pays de la Loire, France (2013); Ithuba Art Fund Grant (2011); National Arts Council of South Africa Grant (2009, 2015) Selected public collections: The Dean Collection, New York; Nando Collection, Cape Town Born in New York, Thenjiwe Niki Nkosi lives and works in Johannesburg. Her paintings, flms, and videos investigate power and its structures—political, social, and architectural. Her painting Emergent Phenomena II, from 2017, is a prime example of her Architectures series. In its background is the massive headquarters of Johannesburg’s Standard Bank, Africa’s biggest lender by assets. Nkosi interrupts the building’s massive rectilinear shapes with brightly hued tropical fowers in the foreground, their organic forms implicitly suggesting an alternative to the bank’s institutional power.


67. PATRICIA CRONIN

b. 1963

Aphrodite Reimagined cold cast marble and resin 28 7/8 x 11 x 10 in. (73.3 x 27.9 x 25.4 cm.) Executed in 2018, this work is number 1 from an edition of 6 and is for exhibition only. Please note that number 3 from the edition of 6 is available. This work is the maquette of Aphrodite Reimagined housed at the Tampa Museum. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Photo by Grace Roselli

Exhibited Tampa Museum of Art, Patricia Cronin, Aphrodite, and the Lure of Antiquity: Conversations with the Collection, August 16 – January 6, 2019 (another example exhibited)

Born 1963, Beverly, Massachusetts 1986 BFA Rhode Island College 1988 MFA Brooklyn College CUNY, Brooklyn 1991 Skowhegan School of Art, Maine Selected museum exhibitions: Tampa Museum of Art (2018); The FLAG Art Foundation, New York (2016); Chiesa di San Gallo, Venice (2015); Musei Capitolini, Rome (2013); Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow (2012); Newcomb Art Museum, New Orleans (2012); Brooklyn Museum (2009); American Academy in Rome (2007); University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (1999); South Florida Art Center, Miami (1995) Selected honors: National Academy of Design (2018); Anonymous Was A Woman Award (2009); Rome Prize in Visual Art, American Academy (2006); Distinguished Alumni Award, Rhode Island College (2004) Selected public collections: Avery Library, Columbia University, New York; Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow; Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow; LeslieLohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, New York; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Pérez Art Museum Miami; National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.; Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx

Brooklyn-based sculptor Patricia Cronin uses a classical style to explore contemporary feminist themes. Aphrodite Reimagined is a maquette of a monumental sculpture of the same title in the collection of the Tampa Museum of Art. Inspired by a fragment of marble Roman fgure from the museum’s collection from the 1st century AD, Cronin re-created the fgure in cold cast marble and reconstituted the fgure’s missing features in a pale aquamarine resin. The result is a sculpture that appears simultaneously ancient and contemporary, fragmented and whole.


68. SHEREE HOVSEPIAN

b. 1974

Swell signed, titled and dated on the reverse gelatin silver prints collage and nylon, in artist’s frame 25 x 21 1/8 x 4 in. (63.5 x 53.7 x 10.2 cm.) Executed in 2018 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

Born 1974, Isfahan, Iran 1999 BFA/BA University of Toledo, Ohio 2002 School of the Institute of Chicago Selected exhibitions: Stony Island Arts Bank, Chicago (2018); The Drawing Center, New York (2017); Brooklyn Academy of Music (2016); Gallery 44, Centre for Contemporary Photography, Toronto (2013); Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago (2011, 2015, 2018) Selected honors: Residency, Drawing Center, New York (2016); Artist in Residence, The Banf Centre, Canada (2015); Centre for Contemporary Photography, Toronto (2014) Selected public collections: Art Institute of Chicago; The Bronx Museum; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Spertus Museum, Chicago; The Studio Museum in Harlem Made with silver gelatin photographs and nylon, Swell is a multimedia work by Sheree Hovsepian. Combining photographs of anatomical fragments with stretched nylon fabric, she creates textured felds that suggest arching landscape-like forms with a literal and fgurative feminist overlay. Discussing her process, Hovsepian explains: “I feel an urge to work with my hands in an additive process as opposed to the way I see straight photography. I approach materials from a kind of naïve perspective that I experience as very freeing and in contrast to photography, which is more about precision and control.”


69. JAUNE QUICK-TO-SEE SMITH b. 1940 Unhinged (Map) signed, titled and dated “Jaune Smith 2018 map unhinged” on the overlap oil, acrylic and oil stick 60 x 40 in. (152.4 x 101.6 cm.) Executed in 2018. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

c. 1998, by Thomas King

Born 1940, St. Ignatius Indiana Mission, Flathead Reservation, Montana 1960 AD Olympic College, Bremerton, Washington 1976 BA Framingham State College, Massachusetts 1980 MA University of New Mexico, Albuquerque Selected museum exhibitions: Yellowstone Art Museum, Billings, Montana (2017); Holter Museum of Art, Helena, Montana (2016); Georgia O’Keefe Museum, Sante Fe (2012); Newcomb Art Gallery, New Orleans (2009); Tucson Museum of Art, Arizona (2004); National Museum of the American Indian, New York (2004); Penn State University, State College (2002); Art Museum of Missoula, Montana (2000); California State University, Long Beach (1989); Yellowstone Art Center, Billings, Montana (1986) Selected honors: Woodson Foundation Award (2014); National Academy of Art (2011); College Art Association Committee on Women in the Arts Award (2002); National Women’s Caucus for Art Award in Visual Arts (1997); Joan Mitchell Foundation Award (1996); Wallace Stegner Award for Art of the American West (1995) Selected public collections: Albuquerque Museum, New Mexico; Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco; Georgia O’Keefe Museum, Santa Fe; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Miami Dade College Museum of Art and Design; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Museum of Modern Art; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington; Rhode Island School of Art and Design; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Whitney Museum of Art

An enrolled member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith creates multifaceted art that communicates her insistent socio-political commentary. In Unhinged (Map), 2018, she presents her world view by painting a map of North American countries upside down and separated by blocks of color and abstract lines of centrifugal force. Highlighting the artifciality of political borders and reminding us of these nations’ histories with native peoples, Quick-to-See Smith’s provocative painting combines the personal and political.


70. BIANCA NEMELC

b. 1991

Warm Refections signed and dated “Bianca Nemelc 2019” on the reverse acrylic on canvas 30 x 24 in. (76.2 x 61 cm.) Painted in 2019. Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

Rog Walker

Born 1991, New York 2009 AA Borough of Manhattan Community College Selected exhibitions: Galeria del Barrio, New York (2019); SPRING/BREAK, New York (2019) An emerging artist who is based in the Bronx, Bianca Nemelc’s work, literally just completed for the exhibition, takes us to the edge of the future for women artists. A fgurative painter concerned with female identity, she pays homage to her heritage through the many hues of browns that make up the bodies of her subjects. Warm Refections presents the torsos and breasts of two female fgures in a natural, tropical setting. According to Nemelc, “The women usually refect some experience that I had, they are also a great way to refect on the things that are going on in my life. Mostly, they refect bodily agency. Agency being a woman, growing into a woman, taking control and experiencing diferent things in life.”


INDEX Abbott, B. 12

Maier, V. 13

Al-Hadid, D. 65

Mark, M. 19

Amer, G. 62

Martin, A. 17

Antin, E. 51

Minter, M. 42

Antoni, J. 50

Model, L. 8 Murray, E. 31

Bartlett, J. 54

Mutu, W. 57

Benglis, L. 58 Berresford, V. 6

Nemelc, B. 70

Bloom, B. 47

Nevelson, L. 15

Bontecou, L. 41

Nkosi, T. 66

Bourgeois, L. 10 Brown, J. 22

Orkin, R. 11

Callery, M. 5

Pindell, H. 40

Catlett, E. 59

Porter, K. 20

Chicago, J. 27

Prager, A. 56

Cronin, p. 67 Cunningham, I. 9

Ringgold, F. 52 Robinson, A. 43

Dater, J. 23

Rodriguez, C. 63, 64

Drexler, R. 39

Rothenberg, S. 61

Edelson, M. B. 25

Saar, B. 35

Escobar, M. 18

Schneemann, C. 26 Sharrer, H. 29

Ferrara, J. 46

Sherman, C. 33 Simmons, L. 45

Gelfman, L. 30

Smith, A. 36

Goldin, N. 32

Smith, J. 69

Guerrilla Girls 38

Smith, K. 49

Hartigan, G. 44

Truitt, A. 21

Hesse, E. 16 Holzer, J. and Lady Pink 37

WalkingStick, K. 34

Hovsepian, S. 68

Weems, C. 55 Wilke, H. 28

Kanaga, C. 1 Kass, D. 60

Zorach, M. 4

Kelly, M. 24 Kusama, Y. 48 Lange, D. 2 Lavenson, A. 3 Lee, D. 14 Lepkof, R. 7 Lutter, V. 53

Front cover Laurie Simmons, Walking Hot Dog, 1991, lot 45 (detail) Inside front cover Thenjiwe Niki Nkosi, Emergent Phenomena II (Afer Standard Bank Head Ofce), 2017, lot 66 (detail) Doris Lee, Vine Series # 6, 1955, lot 14 (detail) Opposite Louise Bourgeois, Untitled, circa 1950s, lot 10 (detail) Back cover Patricia Cronin, Aphrodite Reimagined, 2018, lot 67 (detail)


10. LOUISE BOURGEOIS


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NOMEN: American Women Artists from 1945 to Today [Catalogue]  

Phillips presents a unique selling exhibition, composed exclusively of works by women artists, this summer in New York.

NOMEN: American Women Artists from 1945 to Today [Catalogue]  

Phillips presents a unique selling exhibition, composed exclusively of works by women artists, this summer in New York.