Page 1

PHILLIP HU

ARCHITECTURE+URBAN DESIGN PORTFOLIO


Table of Contents

Design work from 2014 to 2016

Architecture Edu-cology Produce

4 12

Urban Design Third Condition Shenzhen’s Urban Village Public Realm Study

16 24

Professional Experience GreenHub Continuous Interior

28 29

Fabrication + Visual Art Reveal Space Around Studio Objects

Resume

30 31 32

3


EDU-COLOGY

4.115 Architectural Design II Studio, MIT Professor William O’Brien Jr Spring 2014


TOPOGRAPHICAL SYSTEM The motivation for the project is to create a system that responds to forces of attraction and repulsion between a set of distributed points. As each point has a differing magnitude of attraction or repulsion, a hierarchy develops between points, creating a variety of dexterous spaces. Volume responds in height to forces, resulting in a final topography. On the larger scale, distinct, coded groups of forms emerge from the continuous landscape. The variety of form typology flexibly accommodates a diverse program.

LARGE SCALE ORGANIZATION MODEL AND DRAWING 5


6


ORIENT HEIGHTS MUSIC HIGH SCHOOL The wide variety of spaces needed for the music high school and complex urban fabric demands an equally complex strategy to fluidly resolve design problems. Adapting and aggregating forms from the previous studies create fluid yet distinctive spaces within a landscape. Interpreted as a high school-park hybrid, the project provides a public cultural amenity to the Orient Heights area.

FINAL MODEL AND SITE CONTEXT 7


EXTERIOR Spaces are parametrically determined by the weight and coordinate of program elements, initially mapped out through users’ itinerary diagrams in response to program and urban context. The resulting project integrates landscape with program and circulation; from the outside, the public face is a rolling park landscape, dotted with marsh landscapes and a variety of plant ecologies. On the inside, interior spaces open up into an outdoor auditorium, connected by winding paths carved into the landscape.

8


OUTDOOR AUDITORIUM SPACE AND SURROUNDING WALKWAYS

PROJECT PLAN, ITINERARY DIAGRAMS, AND OUTDOOR AUDITORIUM PERSPECTIVE 9


10


CLOSE-UP SECTION

INTERIOR From the topography, layers of information are peeled away from the plan to inform circulation and landscaping strategy, responding to slope, urban context, and orientation. Topography also informs program, creating slopes for outdoor auditorium seating. The interior responds by using the above topography to inform how overlapping curtain tracks and walls distinguish spaces such as between classroom and hallway. The sloping ceilings end at large skylights or courtyard niches to allow daylight to flood the space.

LONGITUDINAL SECTION 11


PRODUCE

SECTIONAL OF MODEL (VIEWING FROM EAST) 12

4.114 Architectural Design I Studio, MIT Professor Jan Wampler Fall 2013


NORTH END CULINARY COMMUNITY HUB PRODUCE is a proposed coming together space in Boston’s North End responds to a rapidly changing neighborhood and perception of food. Today, gentrification creeps on the neighborhood as older families begin moving out, replaced by transient young residents. Urban agriculture is the solution to a growing anonymity towards our food. It is part of a larger movement of farm-to-table, empowering communities to connect back to their food. The final design acts as an integrated public forum-market and school for agriculture and cooking.

LONGITUDINAL SECTION (VIEWING FROM WEST)

13


PERSPECTIVE OF MODEL, GROUND FLOOR PLAN, SECTION 14


PUBLIC The flexible auditorium acts as either a public forum, lecture hall, or weekend marketplace, where chairs convert to stalls. The ground floor is entirely public space, composing of a cross-street passage way and rainwater retention plaza. EDUCATIONAL Upper level classrooms and laboratory space promote urban agriculture study. Cooking apprenticeships link young, aspiring chefs to local restaurateurs, creating meaningful mentor-mentee community relationships. SUSTAINABLE The large metal screen brings natural daylight into the lower levels, and the roof tops collect water through a solar powered garden terrace system.

NORTH STREET PERSPECTIVE 15


BROWARD

THIRD CONDITION 2 2 MILES MILES 2 MILES

RA1 RA1 RA1

RA1 RA1 RA1

TB TB TB

RA1 RA1 RA1

TA TACB TACB

CB

RA2 RA2 RA2

RA1 RA1 RA1

RA1 RA1 RA1

CA CA CA

RB1 RB1 RB1

RB1 RB1 RB1

RA2 RA2 RA2

RC2 RC2 RC2

RA1 RA1 RA1

RC1 RC1

1 1

2 2 MILES MILES

5

1

2 MILES

ts ts ial n site n lots site oon site ro ies iestoof of er

bodies of

CB CB CB

RB1 RB1 RB1

RC1 RC1 RC1

RA1 RA1 RA1

RA1 RA1 RA1

RB1 RB1 RB1

RB1 RB1 RB1

55AA - 33 LL -

II -- 59 595 5

LL--3377

RB1 RB1 RB1

RA1 RA1 RA1

RB2 RB2 RB2

C 12 C--12

TC TC TC Medium Transport

5A -3

Medium Transport Typtical road where Typtical road where Medium Transport water is water is moved moved Typtical road where quickly quickly externally, and water externally, is moved and open spaces are open spaces are and quickly externally, non-functional or TA non-functional or open spaces are TACB easements CB easements non-functional or easements

0

L

90’ yard 90’ yard

canal canal

yard yard

90’ yard

yard

RA1

RA1

RA1

40’ min 40’ min

canal

40’ min

RA1

TB

TA CB

CB

0.5

curb grate curb grate

C-12

15’ min 15’ min road service service road levee 15’ min levee service road levee

RB1 RB1

RB1 RB1

RB1

RB1

40’ min

2 MILES curb grate

40’ min 40’ min

RB1 RB1

1 curb grate curb grate

curb grate

(RA1, RB1, etc. refer to sectional typologies that decrease in infrastructural investment from A-C. R, C, T refer to residential, commercial, and transport) 5 RA2 RA1 RA1 RA1 RA1 CA TB RA2 RA1 RA1 RA1 RA1 are RA1 CA TB High price/acre values shaded RA1 darker.

16

RB2 RB2 RB2

C ON NSIION ENS EXTE 9 EXT C--9 C-9 EXTENSION

I - 59

25’ street 25’ street

PORT PORT EVRGLDS PORT EVRGLDS EVRGLDS

FLL FLL FLL

RB2 RB2 RB2

C SPUR -10 SPUR C-10 C-10 SPUR

BROWARD COUNTY NETWORK MAPPING: RELATING MOBILITY, WATER, AND CAPITAL FLOW. 25’ street

LL--6688AA

RA1 RA1 RA1

RC2

SPUURR CC--1111SP C-11 SPUR

883344 834

LL--3333 L - 33

5 5

RA1 RA1 RA1

RB1 RB1 RB1

DAN CANAL UT-OFF CANAL CUT-OFF AC DANIIA DANIA CUT-OFF CANAL

RC2 RC2

RC1

RA1 RA1 RA1

RA1 RA1 RA1

RA1 RA1 RA1

RA2 RA2 RA2

RB1 RB1 RB1

RA1 RA1 RA1

TB TB TB

C 11 C--11 C-11

RA1 RA1 RA1

CA CA CA

RB1 RB1 RB1

N NO OR RT TH R ER IV NORTH RIV CA H RIVER C ANAL ER C NAL ANAL

LL--3377 L - 37

LL--6688AA L - 68A

RA1 RA1 RA1 RA1 RA1 RA1

C 12 C--12 C-12

5AA - 335 LL - 35A L

II - 59 - 595 I - 559 5

I - I95 I--95 95 C- CC-10 1100

1 0.5 1 0.5 1 0.5

South Florida Resiliency Studio, MIT Professors Alan Berger, Adele Santos, Fadi Masoud Fall 2015

80’ 4 lane road 80’ 4 lane road

CA CA

RB1 RB1

RA2 RA2

RB1

RA2

80’ 4 lane road

140’ canal 140’ canal

RA1

N RB1 Griffin x Bonaventure Rd, RA2Road NO CA OR Griffin Road Rd, FLL FLL RT THx RBonaventure IV IVE ER Griffin RoadHxRBonaventure Rd, FLL RC CA ANAL

140’ canal

NORT

NAL

H

curb grate

curb grate

CA

RA1

RA


SFWMD Infrastructure + FEMA Flood Zones

DEFINING THE ‘THIRD CONDITION’ Modern development in South Florida was possible by redirecting natural water flows between the Atlantic Ocean to the east and the Everglades to the west. ‘Hard infrastructure’ systems such as canals and levees face increased pressures from rising sea levels and salinization.

O O

A E

W

B

LL

Y

N IA

H O

D A 58 81

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de

10

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sp

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RE RE O O ST ST

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G G IN CSIN CS RK TIRK TI PA GISPA GIS LO LO

SE

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SE SE U U ED ED

IX

flux productive

e.g. floodable warehouses, aqua culture, seasonal agriculture

high ground Zoning

U

D

24%

24% 200 ha 200 ha

flood-receptive low-medium dense structures + uses (10-16 DU/acre); 40% open space; 20% open water (can be transferred to convert open space)

51%

410 ha

mixed use medium density retail, office, residential (50 DU/acre max) 15% open space; 15% open water (can be transferred)

TOD density corridor overlay

mixed use exceptional density retail, office, residential ; 15% open space, 15% open water (can be transferred)

flood-receptive low-medium dense structures + uses DU/acre); 40% open space; 20% open water (can be (10-16 DU/acre); 40% open space; open water (can be transferred to convert open 20% space) transferred to convert open space)

flux productive flux productive e.g. floodable warehouses, aqua culture,

RE

P L AR STOOGIS KING RE TICS

200 ha

ED G IN CS RK TI PA GIS

E

H ZO IGH G NIN RO UN G

24%

IX flux residential/commercial flux residential/commercial flood-receptive low-medium dense structures + uses (10-16 O ST

RM

e.g. recreation, retention, ecology

96 ha

e.g. recreation, retention, ecology

flux residential/commercial

M

XZ ON

AY

RL

VE

O

BE

open green space open greenretention, spaceecology e.g. recreation,

FLU

D

ON

12% 12% 96 ha

LO

EC RE OL TEN OG RE I TIO C AL Q. N OP BU EN FFE SPA R CE

TO

RO AD

TOD overlay

WA TER

open green space

TOD overlay TOD overlay M

AY AY RL RL VE VE O D TO

O

RO AD RO ON AD B ON ERM BE RM

E

D

IX

D

TO

WA TE EC OL WA R RET O T E RE ECO GICA ER RE NTIO Q. LO L TE N RE OPEN GICA BUFF NTIO Q. N OP SPA L BU ER CE FF EN E SPA R CE FLU X FLU ZON H XZ E ON ZO IGH G E HNIGIN RO U G Z H ND ON G PA R IN R L G OUN STOOGPIS KING D RE ARTKICS LO STO GIS ING RE TICS

P L AR STOOGIS KING RE TICS

M

op opsity sity en en d d sp sp ev ev ac ac . r . r e e ig ig tra tra h h ns ns ts ts fe fe r r

96 ha

RM

RE

12%

BE

H ZO IGH G NIN RO UN G

O ST

Base Topography with Street Network

ON

G IN CS RK TI PA GIS LO

VE O

FLU

SE

RE

D TO

RO AD

U

WA TER EC RE OL TEN OG IC TIO AL Q. N OP BU EN FFE SPA R CE

ED

Municipal Jurisdiction Boundaries + Flexibility Zones

IX

n op sity en d sp ev ac . r i e tra gh ns ts fe r

98

OL

MIN SE RIBE T

M

Today’s planning emphasizes use segregation and moving water away from built environments as quickly as possible. In the face of future environmentalTOD overlay uncertainty, the ‘third condition’ refers to an alternative to reductive zoning methods and hard infrastructure used in planning today. This new system of ‘flux’ zoning becomes flexible and responsive to seasonal environmental shifts and extreme weather events rather than purely preventative.

D

C H

Broward County Land Use Zoning

e.g. floodable warehouses, aqua culture, seasonal agriculture seasonal agriculture

high ground Zoning

high ground Zoning TOP - EXISTING LAYERS OF ZONING AND PLANNING, BOTTOM - PROPOSED THIRD CONDITION FLUX ZONING CATEGORIES 51%

51% 410 ha 410 ha

mixed use medium density retail, office, residential (50 DU/acre mixed max) use medium density retail, office, residential (50 DU/acre max) 15% open space; 15% open water (can be transferred) 15% open space; 15% open water (can be transferred)

TOD density corridor overlay TOD density corridor overlay mixed use exceptional density retail, office, residential ; 15% mixed use exceptional retail, residential ; 15% open space, 15% open density water (can be office, transferred)

17


East - Logistics, Canal based Production [marine/aquaculture]

Interstate 95 Tri-Rail

Florida 7

West - Transit, Neighborhood Center

TRANSIT/LOGISTICS RIDGE PLAN 18

Florida Turnpike 1 mile


e rnpik

a’s Tu

Florid

I-95

PROTECT couple infrastructure with protective berms and soft absorptive edges

ABSORB interior lined ponds collect fresh rainwater runoff, surrounded by wetlands and urban flux zone

GROW+CONNECT transit+ goods flow through the site to connect the districts north-south and beyond regionally

OPEN WATER SPACE REQUIREMENT FOR INDIVIDUAL LOTS

OPEN SPACE SPORADIC AND BY INDIVIDUAL LOTS

OPEN WATER SPACE REQUIREMENT FOR INDIVIDUAL LOTS

Part of a group Broward County Resiliency Master Plan, my focus was the design of a transit/logistics oriented spine, a reference to the existing geological Atlantic Coastal Ridge. The new neighborhood inwardly faces natural preserves, protected by infrastructure berms. The three main strategies are to protect new dense development with enhanced existing infrastructure, absorb excess rainwater through green-blue space, and to connect the county with transit and logistics networks.

EXISTING WESTERN TOC CONDITIONS

rse development, typified by large swaths of impermeable aces

OPEN SPACE SPORADIC AND BY INDIVIDUAL LOTS

ONS

LARGE PARKING REQUIREMENTS

mpermeable

LARGE PARKING REQUIREMENTS

FIN

IN

IFF

GR

WATER MOVES BETWEEN ECOLOGICAL SECTORS

WATER MOVES BETWEEN ECOLOGICAL SECTORS

AD RO

IF GR

AD RO

LOGISTICS TOC SPINE

LOGISTICS TOC SPINE

TRANSIT/LOGISTICS ORIENTED SPINE

$

OPMENT

2070 FLUX+TOC OVERLAY DEVELOPMENT

ew retail/lohborhood ponents are ater

OPEN SPACE AND WATER SPATIALLY FOCUSED

spine protective infrastructure, new retail/loIKE NP cs/mixed use UR building typology, walkable neighborhood AT D I ic, and central parks to locally process rainwater OR FL

SOME FLEX BECOME FLUX URBAN FABRIC

SOME FLEX BECOME PARK SYSTEM

W

E ,N

7 IDA T OR SI FL RAN T

R

IDA

R LO

ID F AP

OPEN SPACE AND WATER SPATIALLY FOCUSED

IKE

P RN

TU

HIGH DENSITY

TOC SPINEBECOME SOME FLEX FLUX URBAN FABRIC

SOME FLEX BECOME PARK SYSTEM

7, IDA T OR NSI L F RA T

W

NE

PID

RA

HIGH DENSITY TOC SPINE

2070 TOC SCENARIO NEIGHBORHOOD, TRANSIT ORIENTED CORRIDOR 19


parcel owner

FAR 1 .4

developer

FAR LOT COVER / 1 3 70% 90%

WHO

ER

$

th

FAR 2 7

open space WA TER EC fund RE OL TEN OG ICA TIO LB N UF upgrade/moving costs F ow gr

developer

$

gro wth ON

XZ ON

BE

H ZO IGH G NIN RO UN G

D

TO OV D E ER XCE LA PT Y IO

N

WHERE

DIAGRAM OF TRANSFER RIGHTS AND FLOW OF SUBSIDIES / COSTS BETWEEN DEVELOPERS AND PARCEL OWNERS 20

E (t

RM

PUBLIC FUNDING (CONSTRUCTION/FEDERAL)

PE

FLU

th

TRANSFER RIGHTS

RO AD

Q. O

ow gr

maintain infrastructure

RE

hro

ug

ho

ut

NS

PA CE

Bro wa rd

)


RECONFIGURING AND TRANSFERRING DEVELOPMENTAL RIGHTS Transferring developmental rights is a key component to efficiently organizing development and open space. Parcel owners in low zones are effectively paid for their original developmental rights by high-ground medium density development, keeping the low zone as absorptive, open space to qualify as the high ground development’s off site open space requirement. Other homeowners or businesses in the flux zone are similarly helped by developers with floodable structure upgrades.

transfer rights + reconfigure

flux TOC building typology

inward facing,transit oriented

PA R

KIN

G

STO

ED IX

M

RE

LO G TB

AC K

SE

XZ ON

E

RM BE

flux residential/commercial

flood-receptive low dense structures + uses

G IN ICS RK ST PA GI E LO OR ST

N

O

e.g. recreation, retention, ecology

DU

D

open green space

FLU

A RO

RO AD

ICS

XE

RE O ST

SE

SE U

IST

MI

G IN CS RK TI PA GIS LO

WA TER EC RE OL TEN OG RE I TIO C AL Q. N OP BU EN FFE SPA R CE

In the new Transit Oriented Corridor (TOC) overlay building typology, the highway level will be the new logistics level for big box store goods. Flexible retail and services exist in the level below, adapted to the idea that they can be flooded in the event of a critical emergency. Goods and displays can be safely stored above in that event. Residential, offices, and other retail/ services that cannot exist in a flexible zone will be built up, set back from the major road.

flux productive

e.g. floodable warehouses, aqua culture, seasonal agriculture

TOC density corridor

mixed use exceptional density retail, office, residential

CURRENT PATTERNS OF COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT AND PROPOSED USE REDISTRIBUTION 21


EASTERN LOGISTICS CORRIDOR

FLUX ZONE, SOFT CANAL, STORAGE BERMS SUPPORTS MARINE AND LOGISTICS INDUSTRIES The current landscape consists of warehouses, large swaths of parking, and retail along roads. The tri-rail expands its freight operations and both the rail line and I-95 are raised on protective berms. Goods from the neighboring productive landscape are processed and channeled through the site along new channels of water, rail, and road to the northern metabolic transportation hub. Berms also serve as potential storage points for goods or for dark industrial processes, similar to a brewery, connecting the protected zone to the productive landscape underground. A semi-soft canal extends from the current canal system through the middle of the site, phased in portions of traded developmental rights. Conventional mixed use fabric develops on high ground while marine-based or aquaculture processing facilities coexist with cyclical water levels in the productive flux zone. Because of fluctuating water levels, the canal’s edges are softened with ecological buffers at critical runoff points to locally process rainwater from roads and industrial sites, to be moved to lined ponds at the north-south ends of the site. CREATE PERMEABLE CREATE PERMEABLE SPACES IN FLUX SPACES IN FLUX

AIL AIL BUILD UP PROTECTIVE BUILD UP PROTECTIVE DR DR DE DE INFRASTRUCTURE PAN XPAN INFRASTRUCTURE X E E

GROWTH GROWTH FROM FROM TRANSIT TRANSIT NODE NODE

RECREATION, FLUX BOARDWALK RECREATION, FLUX BOARDWALK IN URBAN FABRIC IN URBAN FABRIC

CANAL FLEXFLEX BECOMES CANAL BECOMES PARK SYSTEM PARK SYSTEM

WITH ITH ERM M W 95 B 5 BER TATSETAKTSE 9 S S R TAELRLOC LOCK INTEIN CANCANAL

5% % : 6 65 0 BLE LE: : .1: .1E0A EAB R R M FA FA R M PE ER IM IMP

Current Conditions

22

5 .25 1.2 ]: 1 R]: ER TE EN C OD HO NT

E DC

5 2.7 2.75 FRESH TO SALINE FRESH TO SALINE E]: E]: PRODUCTIVE FLUX FLUX PRODUCTIVE PIN PIN S S C C TO [TO [ R FA FAR

Phasing: Initial Development 2040

Storage/Processing Storage/Processing connects under under berm berm connects

OO RH R BO BO IGH GH I E E -N N L L A RI RIA ST ST DU DU IN IN R[ R[ FA FA

Phasing: 2070 Development


WESTERN NEIGHBORHOOD-CENTER

FLUX ZONE PARK WINDS THROUGH URBAN CORE Initial conditions are occupied mostly by sparse warehouses, retail, offices, and occasional mobile home parks. Development begins with heavy public investments in a raised berm Florida 7. A transit system would encourage development along the node on large parcels of rented warehouse, office, or retail spaces. A TOC overlay encourages high density development such as the TOC-building typology along Florida 7 and the turnpike. Asphalt is converted to open space in low zones. Two low lying residential subdivisions are allowed to change slowly in the flux zone, homes being replaced by preserved open space or upgraded floodable structures. The final build out includes a networked flux zone park system with soft boundaries to internal flux zones of floodable structures. The green network processes water in steps, before flowing to local, lined freshwater retention ponds or allowed to flow into natural preserve areas. E E PIK PIK RN RN TU TU IDA IDA R R O O FL FL GROWTH FROM GROWTH FROM TRANSIT NODE TRANSIT NODE

HIGH DENSITY HIGH DENSITY LOGISTICS SPINE LOGISTICS SPINE

CREATE PERMEABLE CREATE PERMEABLE SPACES INSPACES FLUX IN FLUX

5% 5% :6 :6 LE 0 BLE 0 : .1 EA R: .1 EAB R FA ERM FA ERM P P IM IM

E]:

PIN

ID

P RA

Current Conditions

R FA

EW EW ,N ,N A7 A7 RID SIT RID IT O FL RAN FLO ANS T TR

CS [TO ID

P RA

.75

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PIN

CS [TO

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AR FHIGH DENSITY HIGH DENSITY TOC SPINE TOC SPINE

Phasing: Initial Development 2040

SOME FLEX BECOMES SOME FLEX BECOMES PARK SYSTEM PARK SYSTEM

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Phasing: 2070 Development

23


URBAN VILLAGE PUBLIC REALM STUDY

Setback: None - 2’

MCP Thesis, MIT Advisor: Professor Eran Ben-Joseph Spring 2016

CODE LEGEND

1

Setback: None - 2’

Setback: 5’ - 6’ Setback: Greater than 6’

3a 3b

4a

4c

5a 5b

Building: Overhead building

6

Building: Non-standard sign

A

Building: Ground Level Extension

B

Setback: Greater than 6’

Setback: None - 2’

Building: Step

Setback: 3’ - 4’

Building: Overhead building

Setback: 5’ - 6’

Building: Non-standard sign

Setback: Greater than 6’

Building: Ground Level Extension

Building: Step

Temporary: Ground object within street edge

Building: Non-standard sign

Temporary: Ground object past street edge

Building: Ground Level Extension

Temporary: Overhead installation

A

Temporary: Ground object within street edge

Building: Step

4b

Setback: 5’ - 6’

Building: Overhead building

Setback: 3’ - 4’

2a2b

Setback: 3’ - 4’

A

Open space (see Table 1)

Temporary: Ground object past street edge

7a installation Temporary: Overhead Open space (see Table 1)

7b

8

Temporary: Ground object within street edge

C

Temporary: Ground object past street edge Temporary: Overhead installation

A

9

10a

10b

10c

Open space (see Table 1)

11

12 13a

D

PUBLIC REALM MAPPING EXAMPLE OF ELEMENTS AND ADAPTATIONS IN XIN NAN VILLAGE 24

13b

13c


ABSTRACT Shenzhen’s villages in the city or urban villages are forms of informal settlement that emerged in the midst of rapid Chinese urbanization. For a period of time, both the city and villages mutually benefited from the arrangement where rural-designated urban villages used their unrestricted developmental rights to create an alternative affordable housing option for low cost workers. Recently, as land prices have increased, city leaders and developers have begun redeveloping urban villages as a new source of land supply. Even when the original village cooperative, now corporation, is well compensated, migrant workers must continuously move further away from the city to find affordable housing. The cost of erasing urban village cannot only be measured by figures of

relocation costs, rental prices, and potential profits. This thesis acknowledges the value of urban villages as a community and place through its dynamic public realm. The unplanned activities and street life in the village’s alleys and niches include many social and recreational uses alongside necessary economic and domestic uses. The urban village becomes a potential model for a responsive, never-obsolete, flexible structure that allows for a pluralistic approach to understanding cities. The thesis looks at the how both informal and formal spaces in the public realm are used and asks: How are informal and formal spaces used differently? How does public life in a flexible, adaptable public realm preserve affordability and community in urban villages? How does informal public life challenge conventional understandings of the role of public space? Through

design, how can the lessons from these spaces be translated in contemporary developments to foster community and public life? The thesis begins with an overview of existing public realm design recommendations with regards to unplanned activities. A field study in January 2016 provides the primary research data, including observations, time-lapse photography, and informal conversations with public realm users and planningrelated professionals. The thesis follows with a mapping and analysis process of building elements, adaptations, and activities that reveals how physical typological elements affect usage pattern. The thesis concludes with design recommendations and possible design interventions that reflect the continuing relevance of urban villages.

se tb

10b

10c

11

12

13a 13b 13c

temporary overhead installation building element ground floor addition

overhead building

semiprivate (soft edge) semipublic (soft edge)

1 2a 2b 3a3b 4a 4b 4c 5a 5b 6

7a

7b

8

se tb ac k

building element steps

10a

ac k

9

overhead sign

convex corner

Qian Hai Road

urban village belt

Xuefu Road

concave corner

temporary overhead installation

se tb ac k

se tb

outside temporary ground (semipublic or public)

ac k

within temporary (semiprivate)

CONTEXTUAL LOCATION OF NANSHAN ON URBAN VILLAGE BELT; ELEMENT DEFINITION 25


Basic Unit

Long rhythm, no variation

Short rhythm, lots of variation

Minimal semiprivate space

Semiprivate space 1

Varied levels of semiprivate and semipublic (light) space

Enclosed

Half-Enclosed, Small step

ne e/public Zo ional Semiprivat and Recreat al ci So ry Tempora om d D estic onomic an mporary Ec Te ble) (dark) No relationship n Space Ta e (see Ope Open spac

Balanced relationship with alley

with alley

A

EXAMPLE DIAGRAM OF RECOMMENDATIONS OF SETBACK DESIGN 3a 3b

2a2b

4a

4b

4c

5a 5b

6

7a

7b

C

B

A

8

CODE LEGEND Claimed Semiprivate/public Zone Temporary Social and Recreational Temporary Economic and Domestic

A

9

10a

10b

10c

11

Open space (see Open Space Table)

12 13a

PUBLIC REALM MAPPING OF IMPLIED PUBLIC, SEMIPUBLIC, SEMIPRIVATE SPACE 26

D

13b

13c


METHODOLOGY

07b

13’

21’

2.5’

Through mapping, photography, annotation, and diagramming, the thesis began to explain how Chinese users organically subdivided the public realm for different adaptations. The thesis argues that flexibility in use and in time enables these public realms to be densely programmed while avoiding conflict. Observation and interviews uncovered how varied setbacks, abandoned spaces, and temporary logistics spaces allowed the public realm to be subdivided into different public, semipublic, and semiprivate spaces. Users also adapted spaces with objects and temporary shelter to claim spaces, so their intervention can be more stable. Space stewards dynamically change and so do their uses. This allows urban villages to constantly adapt to its shifting economic and demographic context.

13a

14’

DOCUMENTATION METHODS INCLUDE SECTIONS AND ANNOTATED PHOTOGRAPHY OF INFORMAL ADAPTATIONS 27


GREENHUB

Pilot Projects + Lower East Side BID Scott Francisco + Team Collaboration Summer Internship 2013

Greenhub is a proposal to refurbish an under-utilized public parking garage and transform the ground level and roof into a green multi-modal transportation hub with bicycle parking facilities, cafe, and a rooftop community garden. Solar Car Charging

Greenhouse Solar panel sun shades

Garden storage

acilities

Bike lane

en

tes decades ocus is on able planter rden will host usinesses and ecreation. ns and ons, staffing and

ure that t will serve assroom r.

NYPD traffic office

The GreenHub roof is an ideal location for solar panels: unobstructed southern exposure, easy vehicle access, and simple structural anchor points. A large solar array will supply a significant portion of the Green Hub electricity needs, including the charging of electric vehicles. These panels will also offer shade and protection for nine parking spaces.

As an intern, I actively participated in the design process and produced presentation materials including renderings, drawings, and diagrams. Finally, a booklet of proposed projects was completed, detailing potential partnerships, a business model, and identifying Coffee Shop stakeholders. Streetscape activation is a key goal of the GreenHub. The storefront cafe will serve coffee, snacks and water in a minimalist setting - a local hotspot for bicycling culture. “The Hub� will also be a portal for the other bike services. Baristas will offer information to cyclists while maps, guides and NYC cycling programs are prominently featured.

Compost collection Rainwater collection

Bike Repair Shop New architectural facade

anic waste can y Center will help ndfill waste and rden community. ue.

ed by Green Hub, es and bike racks bike parking will mmuters can drop irs during the day.

MULTIMODAL HUB

A welcoming bike repair shop makes a perfect partner with the cafe and bike parking. This community-oriented service can make repairs and tune-up while bikes are parked. A self-serve repair station will allow for quick adjustments. Local organizations will offer classes, and the facility will be shared with Recycle A Bicycle and Bike Rescue programs.

Bike office Secure bike storage

Public restrooms

Coffee shop

ng is freshening up ay-per-use showers ore feasible - a e transportation

Secure shower + restroom Personal lockers Bike shop entrance

ILLUSTRATIVE AXONOMETRIC AND STREET LEVEL PERSPECTIVE 28

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CONTINUOUS

Diller Scofidio + Renfro Private Project Team Collaboration January 2015

NYC PENTHOUSE INTERIOR Overlooking Central Park, the interior penthouse project uses continuous wooden surfaces to shape space, from the floor, to functional walls, and to the ceilings. As an intern, I actively participated in the design process of millwork details and produced presentation materials, particularly interior renderings. I also built and used physical prototypes along with rendered form studies to test dimensions or aesthetics specific to project conditions.

INTERIOR RENDERING FROM ENTRY, COLUMN COVERING DETAIL, CHAIR PROTOTYPE 29


REVEAL

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Kennedy & Violich Architecture Front Gate Professor Sheila Kennedy Summer Internship 2014

PLYWOOD FABRICATION STUDY Reveal is a study in digital plywood fabrication, where the “door pull” could be “extracted “ out of the surface, expanding the actual depth of the material. Using a 3 axis CNC mill, the design exposes the inherent natural wood qualities, normally hidden under cross lamination layers, showcasing the construction of the plywood itself and building a relationship between the parts (layers) to the whole (plywood sheets). Here, the use of purely analogue handheld tools could not achieve the level of preciseness in the z-dimension required to shave off layers of lamination, further emphasizing the capabilities of automated production to achieve a unique set of material effects, playing off of the natural wood grain of the marine plywood.


SPACE AROUND STUDIO OBJECTS

Advanced Painting Studio Professor Bunny Harvey Wellesley Spring 2015

FRAMING SPACE WITH LIGHT AND SHADOW This series of paintings from direct observation explores the interaction between objects and the space they occupy. Space is shaped by walls, floors, and ceilings. The plain, white studio space reflects varied light sources such as daylighting and fluorescent lighting. Secondary bounces of light create unexpected reflections from objects beyond the frame of the canvas. The foreground objects become mute and cool yet bold in its rigid geometry. In the shapes between metal rods and coiled wires, shadows, reflections, and highlights are captured and abstracted in heavy brush strokes. The paintings seeks to reveal the quality of the whole space through the limits of a painting’s frame. Left to Right: #7 Wire around Easel, #5 Tripods, #2 Chair, #4 Stools

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Phillip Hu

hu.phillip@gmail.com 832.878.2897

Education • • • •

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) | June 2016 Masters in City Planning, Bachelor of Science in Architecture and Urban Studies and Planning Thesis: Public Realm Usage Patterns - Shenzhen’s Disappearing Urban Villages GPA: 4.9 Undergraduate; 4.7 Graduate 2015 William Emerson Prize to an Architecture Senior for Academic Excellence

Experience •

Boston Redevelopment Authority | Fall 2015 - Spring 2016 Community Planning Intern –– Prepared graphics for and assisted at community meetings –– Analyzed meeting outcomes to inform planning process

Skills Software • Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign • ArcGIS • Rhinoceros 5.0 • AutoCad • V-Ray for Rhino (Rendering) Relevant Coursework • GIS Spatial Urban Lab • Comparative Land Use and Transportation • Digital City Design: Senseable Cities • Design Studio: Coding Resilient Urbanism • Engaging Communities: Models and Methods

Activities and Leadership •

Rune | 2011-2015 Arts Editor, Publication Editor Managed art submissions, lead discussion, and prepared final book layout

Random Hall | 2012-2015 Dormitory Judicial Committee Chair Provided mediation services for residents and resolves conflicts

Kennedy & Violich Architects | Spring 2014 - Summer 2014 Design Intern - Undergraduate Research Assistant for Sheila Kennedy –– Researched digital plywood fabrication techniques using 3-axis CNC mill –– Collaborated with design team on schematic designs through physical models –– Prepared drawings and presentation materials for CD sets and proposals Urban Planning and Design Institute of Shenzhen (UPDIS) | Summer 2015 Urban Design Cultural Exchange Intern –– Prepared Central Activity Zone (CAZ) case studies as precedents –– Applied recommended urban design practices on a CAZ in Qingdao •

MIT Architecture and Planning Department | Spring 2013, Spring 2015 Research and Teaching Assistant for Anne Spirn –– Analyzed and researched maps of Cambridge to discover urban trends –– Provided research, teaching support for ‘The Once and Future City’ course

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Phillip Hu | Design Portfolio 2016  

This is a portfolio of my professional and academic work while I was studying at MIT.

Phillip Hu | Design Portfolio 2016  

This is a portfolio of my professional and academic work while I was studying at MIT.

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