Page 1

PHILLIP DENNY WORK pdenny@andrew.cmu.edu www.phillipdenny.com +1 240 529 8089


Campus: Situating the Global University


PHILLIP DENNY

Selected Projects Curriculum VitĂŚ (abbreviated)

01

Campus: Situating the Global University B.Arch Thesis Project (ongoing) Carnegie Mellon University 02

Is This Not a Pipe?

Volume Magazine/C-Lab Columbia Laboratory for Architectural Broadcasting 03

Tenerife

EMBT Arquideas Grant 2013 04

Rome Center for Peace & Religious Studies Cornell University in Rome 05

Scenes and Speculations: Future Cities Commissioned Research on Gulf Urbanism 06

Theater for a New Audience

Carnegie Mellon Drama + Architecture Collaborative Studio 07

Al Wakrah Village Housing

Carnegie Mellon Qatar + Qatar Museums Authority 08

Frick Environmental Center

Landscape + Architecture Studio 09

Saco Lake Bath House + School for Dance Material Tectonics Studio Projects 10

White Cube, Green Maze: New Art Landscapes Heinz Architectural Center, Carnegie Museum of Art

Biography


PHILLIP DENNY pdenny@andrew.cmu.edu www.phillipdenny.com +1 240 529 8089

EDUCATION

Carnegie Mellon University B.Arch | Minor in Architectural History Cumulative GPA 3.89, Design GPA 3.93 Dean’s List Fall 2009 - Fall 2013

Cornell University

Visiting Student of Architecture | Rome Semester GPA 4.00 | Spring 2013

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar Virginia Commonwealth University in Qatar Visiting Student | Doha, Qatar Semester GPA 4.00

HONORS

BECA Arquideas Grant 2013

First Place Winner, International competition juried by EMBT Architects.

Louis F. Valentour Travel Fellowship

School award for design excellence. Architecture study tour in UK + France.

Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society

Nominated and inducted Spring 2012. GPA within top 7.5% of University class.

“Crossing Boundaries” Juhani Pallasmaa Charette

Invited participant in a week-long design charette with Professor Pallasmaa.

Head of School Commendations All semesters, Fall 2009-Fall 2014

College of Fine Arts, Dean’s List All semesters, Fall 2009-Fall 2014

LEADERSHIP

inter·punct

Editor-in-Chief, Student Journal for Architecture Theory, 2013-ongoing

Student Advisory Council Elected Class Representative

Odyssey

Research Honor Society, Faculty-elected, Spring 2010


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Volume Magazine/C-Lab Columbia Laboratory for Architectural Broadcasting

Researcher, Editorial Intern, Volume 37 Is This Not a Pipe?, Columbia University, New York, NY May - August 2013

over,under

Design & Research Collaborator “Scenes and Speculations” Boston, MA May - August 2012

Carnegie Museum of Art Heinz Architectural Center

Intern Curator White Cube, Green Maze & Maya Lin Exhibitions May-July 2011

ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE

Research Collaborator

Pittsburgh Projects & 4D Doha Apps for Architecture

Teaching Assistantships

Architecture Design Studios: Foundation II (Gutschow, Year 1), Environment (Mondor, Year 3) Architecture for Non-Majors (Hutzell, Mixed), Pre-Collegiate (Wolff, High School) History Courses: Survey of Arch. History II: Modern (Gutschow, Year 2)

School of Architecture Lecture Series Graphic Designer, Assistant Coordinator

EXHIBITIONS & PUBLICATIONS

AAP in Rome Exhibition

Exhibition Committee, Architecture

Fourth Year Design Awards

Louis F. Valentour Travel Fellowship Recipient

Sheraton Doha Design Competition

Design charette hosted by Qatar Museums Authority

Meeting of the Minds-URO

Al-Wakrah Village Housing Project exhibited in Doha, Qatar

NAAB Accreditation Review President’s Advisory Council Review

Thesis, and various undergraduate design projects selected for exhibition

SOFTWARE & SKILLS

AUTOCAD, RHINOCEROS, GRASSHOPPER, V-RAY RHINOCAM, SKETCH-UP, ARC-GIS ADOBE CREATIVE SUITE Strengths in research, design, writing, and editing.

References available upon request.


01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

PARADISE

01


01 CAMPUS: Situating the Global University B.Arch Thesis

Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA Advisors Mary-Lou Arscott, Jon Kline, Charles Rosenblum, Rami el Samahy July 2013 - ongoing

Preface Architecture: a medium for the production of Utopias, and the complex process by which they attempt to become material. Much Architecture devotes itself to the reproduction of the material conditions of the status quo. Architecture creates facilities (from Latin, facile, lit. trans: “easily”, that which makes easier), for the processes of the dominant social framework.1 The impossible dreams of Utopia, however, do not negate its conceptual value. The ‘object’ of the project ‘Utopia’ is not so much a Sisyphean chase after a perfected image-world, but rather the production of a critical mirror.2 All Utopias, while literal No-places, are reflections—inverted, mirrored reproductions—of immediately apparent every-wheres.3 The global stock of Universities constitute a vast catalog of unique No-places situated within the context of the late modern everywhere. A landscape of failed Utopias, the history of Universities is colored by a perennial struggle: the essential protection of sacred Ideals from the forces that simultaneously support, and compromise the project of Universitas.4 This irreconcilable Gordian knot is arguably the root of the diversity of processes that the contemporary University now engages. These processes no longer constitute a singular search for Truth, but rather a complex ecology of often competing, even conflictual aims and exchanges at all scales.

02


The scenes outlined in Campus interrogate the place of this ubiquitous institution within the complex milieu of late capitalism, and ask: what might happen when Architecture is no longer the tool for mediating conflict by separation,5 a fortification holding the forces of Capital at bay, but rather is poised as an instrument for the radical accommodation of conflictual Ideologies—a frame for the hyperbolic juxtaposition of simultaneous, competing realities?5 Campus recognizes the absurd realities of the contemporary University as a very real dream, a compromised utopia. It is not merely a critical appraisal of the University; the scenes propose a series of situations that exploit the institution’s late modern reality for the production of new institutional and architectural possibilities.

01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

1 Frampton calls attention to this, one of Architecture's essential dichotomies, in relation to Hannah Arendt's analysis of the vita activa and Heidegger's thought on dwelling. See Kenneth Frampton, "The Status of Man and the Status of His Objects: A Reading of The Human Condition" in K. Michael Hays, ed., Architectural Theory Since 1968 (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1998) pp. 358-376. 2 See Chapter 2 "The Utopian Enclave" in Fredric Jameson Archaeologies of the Future (London: Verso Books, 2005), and Reinhold Martin, "Utopian Realism" Online. 3 The attempt to realize Utopia might be considered a form of Totalitarianism, specifically, the application of a totalizing framework toward a singular future. See Sheldon Rothblatt, "University as Utopia" in European Research University: An Historical Parenthesis. 4 Universitas is here in reference to the concept of the 'ideal' University, a confederation of scholars devoted to the search for "Truth." See, also, the proceedings of the 1972 MoMA conference, "The Universitas Project," convened by Emilio Ambasz, which brought together Jean Baudrillard, Octavio Paz, Umberto Eco, Henri Lefebvre, and Hannah Arendt, among others, to debate the foundations of an ideal University. The Universitas Project (New York: MoMA, 2003). 5 When the political agency of form is taken to lie in its essential finitude—the definition of a 'limit,' the production of distinction. See Pier Vittorio Aureli Possibility of an Absolute Architecture (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2011).

Universitas and the postmodern Metropole Met·ro·pole, n.: The parent state of a colony. Origin: late 15th c.: from Old French metropole, based on Greek meter, metro- ‘mother’ + polis ‘city’

The University is a productive entity at the heart of centerless Empire.1

More than ten thousand universities now dot the

globe, a flexible meshwork of faculties more or less devoted to the project of Knowledge formation. Today, the University can be found anywhere, all over the world. Whether situated in the metropolis or standing in an idyll, all campuses are enclaves of one sort or another. But before the university took refuge in the Ivory tower it was universitas, a body of faculty and students—an essentially placeless federation.2

Before then, Universitas was a

utopian project—a ‘No-place.’ An entity distinctly removed from the political ordering of its context, universitas constituted a space of difference within a city defined solely by the foreign origin of its students and scholars. Not until the sovereign authority of medieval Bologna gifted a chapel to the scholar’s guild did 03


01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY Research Mill Plan

The Plate (Edu-factory) Edu-factory condenses the Social to flash-point: nodes of contact, lines of discussion, planes of argumentation—Edu-factory collapses Life and Labor. Disciplinarity is abolished; new minds for new problems. The epicenter of production, Edu-factory is a re-producer of the Social. Knowers invest themselves with Knowledge; in the process they soak up value like a sponge.

04

Scale: 1:250


01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

Campus (Genesis) The Building had stood in the center of town for as long as anyone could remember, and before then, too. It was no more than 200 meters on each side. It stood above a patch of ground, campus. Over the years the bounds of campus had slowly eroded. The city dwellers confused one ground for another, and soon nobody could remember which was which.

05


01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

Alma Mater Scholars huddled on muddy ground (Athens all over again. Democratic space realized at last?) The Refugees eagerly dream of new Urbanities. Impromptu symposia commence as the Knowers debate the formation of a masterpiece—a University: autonomous, pristine, ideal.

06


universitas become university, suddenly finding itself on a campus.3 Within the context of late capitalism, the state of the university has reached triple-point. At the beginning of the new millennium the traditional notions of universitas—university as Utopia for the pursuit of Knowledge—have been marginalized by market imperatives: research funds, prestige value, endowment growth dominate the modern University agenda. Universities worldwide continuously produce knowledge, write patents, innovate new technologies.4

University

destroyed Universitas, and is itself at the edge of crisis. If the groundless universitas was literally utopian, then the modern campus is the ideal University’s heterotopic counter-site. Defined by Foucault as a space that accommodates and reproduces a society’s inversion, the heterotopia is at once removed from its context while at once being intimately bound up within its very culture. The global proliferation of universities at once reproduces the hegemonic subjectivities of Globalization’s willto-education, while simultaneously negating the sociopolitical 01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

context of the heteropic campus.5 Considering the modern university as an effectual mechanism of globalization, it ought to be examined through the lens with which we critique globalized capital.6 The replication of the university model across the globe via satellite campuses represents the incursion of foreign logics upon local territories.7

As distinct

from colonialism per se, the university is not just a microcosmic core sample of a society and its accompanying politics to be transplanted elsewhere, a project of authoritarian translation, but rather a finite instance of the metropole’s inversion: the university is a metropolitan antithesis. Campus as anti-city, or enclave—what Castells has termed the transnational enclave.8 In the same way that the intimate frictions of vastly differing ideologies incited violent altercations between town and gown in the earliest colleges of Oxbridge, the postmodern campus is imbued with the latent potential to destabilize the status quo.9 Campus has always been a fascinating stage for the playing-out of binary oppositions. The University: standard-bearer for the pursuit of pure Truth, and the same, an engine for extracting practical utility from new Knowledge; institutional reproducer of subjectivity, while at once a context primed for the disruption and subversion of subjectivities. Yet, still, the university, by way of its pernicious intimacy with the complexes of capitalist production, is essentially a normalizing institution. While the history of the late twentieth century is punctuated by moments in which university’s complicity with the mechanisms of late capitalism incite popular unrest, the story always ends in the same way: a brief period of popular consciousness is followed by an inevitable return to order by means 07


Scale: 1:250

Consumer Paradise

The University had become a mall. A luxe terrazzo unfolds underfoot in every direction. Everything gleams beneath the relentless Glo速 of fluorescent tubes. Exact air-conditioned, it is Eden. Even the atmosphere is indulgent. 08

01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

Consumer Paradise Plan


01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

Debates Within the Tower notions of disciplinarity are to be abolished. Knowers will be socially and cerebrally mobile, able to (and required) jump nimbly between domains of Knowledge according to whim or reason. Curriculum reverts to its Imperial definition: racetrack. The debates drag on for weeks at a time. Stultifying horizontality‌ the madness of their meetings sublime. Point Counter Point in a cyclical discourse of absurd proportions. Consensus is never reached. Discussion plods on, sideways, with no hint of relief. Before long, the Knowers realize their Dreamed-of University has suddenly come into being. 09


of police action.10

The violation of the campus’ political bounds

explicates the crisis of autonomy in the postmodern university. The superposition of disparate political orders is irreconcilable within the totalizing framework of the late capitalist city. Traditions of autonomy, whether upheld de facto or juridically codified, hold the precinct of campus as an extra-political space.11 This irreconcilable conflict is at the heart of globalization’s absorption of the University in the twenty-first century. The global dispersion of the University forms a constellation of extra-political territories whose supranational coordination echoes that of postmodern Empire. Just as late capitalism’s transnational enclaves are linked by the flows of international finance, world Universities are bound by the pervasive exchange of Information. An archipelago, the global network of universities is both a ‘smooth’ extension of the post-Fordist economy and a discontinuous inversion of the global polis.12

Enmeshed within the

is positioned at the helm of vast flows of capital. Ubiquitous, diffuse, the university is bound loosely together by commonly held rules. Since the university’s medieval formation a series of dicta have codified the role of the university in society: ius ubique docendi, Constitutio Habita, Magna Charta Universitatum.13 Academic capitalism forms the modus operandi of the postmodern university, despite its idealized independence from politics and the market. The University in the market economy endlessly chases revenue production. Growth is the dictate of success in the market. More is more. From the creation of non-academic consumable goods found in campus bookstores, to the displacement of student dining halls in lieu of national restaurant brands, campus has become a Consumer Paradise.14

Facing massive governmental de-investment,

public universities, too, must engage in market activities as a matter of course. Students have become commoditized, a stream of revenue to be exploited by the burgeoning academic-capitalist complex. Faculties vie for funding linked to enrollment figures, offering courses taught by legions of underpaid graduate students. The university is yet another industry whose profit margin relies upon the exploitation of a precariously situated labor force.15 The dot com boom of the nineties marked a radical transformation of production in the age of Empire: no longer was the economy tied to the reproduction of material wealth (vis-à-vis the industrial production of goods), but rather, vast wealth would be borne of speculation, the endless manipulation of exchange value. The virtual has unequivocally displaced the material. The disappearance of the factory from urban centers is perhaps the clearest evidence that the city has become the factory.16

The factory is everywhere, and

nowhere—a pervasive, ethereal network.17 10

01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

complex mechanisms of the global economy, the postmodern university


The rush on the University in the early aughts evidenced the position of higher education as an inroads to the post-Fordist labor market. In 2001, amid the excesses of new Globalization’s bull market, university tuition and enrollment surged, soaring past historical rates of growth. Enrollment, formats, tuition have since multiplied, transformed, and bloated. The market calls for the processing of more students, more tuition hours, more—. The University campus seems to wobble on the edge of anachronism as web-based educational models are the order of the day. The State’s endorsement of online education, and investment in MOOC initiatives foreshadows an immediate future: Knowledge will be free, and it will be online. The project of online higher education aims to equitize access to Knowledge. While the World Wide Web University is opening new avenues to Knowledge, the MOOC isn’t itself an equivalent alternative to the brick and mortar institution. The modern University is first and foremost a public space—rarefied air for the ‘Free’ exchange 01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

of ideas. In an era in which technology provides the ability for remote surveillance of the private communications of Billions, the web has quickly become less public than even the most insular private college campus. The threatened disappearance of publics is but one part of the crisis of the modern University.18 Crisis is a moment of opportunity. In which the normalizing parameters of the institution are shaken and dematerialized. Crisis is a duration in which the space of possibilities suddenly becomes vast.19 Witnessing the apocalyptic tail-end of university’s long-arc from religious scholasticism to academic capitalism, the university can be redirected to an alternatively productive model within and against late capitalism. “A building has to hold the forces that might want to transgress its order and should accommodate them through the management of the spaces so that at the same time, the same forces are restrained.”20

Campus does not disavow the forces

of capital and Globalization, but rather seeks to inscribe a space that is simultaneously within and without. While

the

concepts

of

institution

and

utopia

are

seemingly

antithetical (the institution is literally the ‘establishment,’ the utopia ‘No-place.’), elements of the one are always, necessarily, bound up in the workings of the other. The University is an institution that holds a utopian ideal at its core, a fact of its heterotopiafunction.21

Campus exploits the University’s heterotopian logic

by creating an alternative utopia in the contemporary University’s place. The Utopian animus of the University has always been the pursuit of Truth. However, the entry of capital has transformed this simple logic into one of exchange. The modern University is a site for the exchange of knowledge for value, the entry of commoditized knowledge. In order for the University to nourish its 11


Scale: 1:250

Hangar The University finally learned to stop worrying and love Research (dollars). There is no need for Byzantine ethical posturing or skunk-works secrecy in Edu-factory. Veritas is flexible, anyway.

12

01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

Research Mill Plan


01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

City Within the walls of the Tower, the City folds upon itself. A massive cabinet of metropolitan density, it is a frame of collective space, and a museum of the City that once was. Within, an energetic Public lay claim to Streets and Squares. City-Building is Civic-Stage; within the Tower a different quality of life lives on.

13


01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

Frame Climate-controlled and relentlessly empty, the Living Room is 40,000m2 of Almost Nothing. On its surface camps coagulate, then languish, before finally disappearing—absorbed. Conscripts to Knowledge wait to ascend the Tower. Slowly, cohorts percolate through, exploring. No one has ever Known the Tower in all­ —no single map is a record of all its rooms.

14


ideal it must regain autonomy. The University must divorce the pursuit of Truth from the pursuit of capital.22 While the separation of education from the reproduction of value constitutes a difficult decoupling of the University’s contemporary functions of economy, it can reposition the university as a necessary, productive public at the core of society.23

Campus proposes a

space for the exchange, pursuit, and generation of Knowledge that empowers the Knower (the precariously situated Knowledge Worker) by establishing a discernible place for him within urban society.24 The Knower is a unique member of the Knowledge Society. Precariously employed, highly educated, and young; the Knowledge worker’s needs are worlds apart from those of previous generations. Frenetic nodes in a highly charged network, Knowers thrive on proximity, flexibility, and security. Campus imagines a social contract between universitas and context that governs an order of exchange that is inclusive rather than 01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

exclusive, connective rather than disjunctive. By way of a simple agreement, Knowers can become an integrated component in the social ecology of cities. In exchange for the monetary support of the urbs, the Knower agrees to apply his accumulated knowledge to its dissemination: the Knower becomes Teacher. The city guarantees its own future vitality through this multigenerational exchange. Public investment in the young Knower is repaid by his commitment to become a Teacher, to educate future Knowers, and citizens alike. Campus thus short-circuits the late capitalist paradigm of educational attainment: cash for Knowledge, and resituates the university in relationship to a public. Campus can no longer be a colonized territory of late capitalism, the University an outpost of the disembodied market. For the Institution to regain the precious ground of autonomy, it ought to remember that campus, while referring to ground, structure, and locus of the Institution, originally referred to a battlefield. Now, it would seem that the field has been lost to the market. While the University must strive towards autonomy, it cannot become a hermetic enclave. Throughout its history the University has been, for better or for worse, bound to its reality—and all of the frictions and compromise that entails. Campus thus imagines a radical accommodation of the forces that seek to transgress the limits of the institution and its ideals. A project of utopian realism, Campus recognizes the reality of the University in late capitalism as itself a complex fiction constructed by global forces, and asks: what might happen to our battlefield—campus—when we recognize the forces of global capital as manipulatable flows rather than adversarial conditions?

15


01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

Corporate Eden A crown of Hotel Suites® sits precipitously above the void. Heroic elevator bundles pierce the emptiness with Piranesian audacity. The immediate needs of a transient population are automatically provided for in the rooms. Food, liquids, climate, entertainment—all optimized to ensure spontaneous and uninterrupted satisfaction. It is a Taylorist dream. A vast golf course spills out across the roof…an ersatz Arcadia, open Daily.

16


Endnotes:

01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

1 Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri, Empire (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2000). 2 Neave, Blückert, Nybom, eds., The European Research University: An Historical Parenthesis (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006). 3 Hilde de Ridder-Symoens, A History of the University in Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003) pp. 92-96. 4 Jeffrey Williams, "The Pedagogy of Debt" in Edufactory: Towards a Global Autonomous University (New York: Autonomedia, 2009) pp. 89-96. 5 Michel Foucault, "Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias" October (March 1967) 6 Manuel Castells, The Rise of the Network Society (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2000) 7 Andrew Ross, "The Rise of the Global University" in Edufactory, pp. 18-31. 8 Castells, Chapter 2: "The Network and the Self" in The Rise of the Network Society. 9 The student uprisings of 1968, and 1971 in New York, Paris, and Athens, e.g. Radical student-activist demonstrations had lasting effects on the composition, and policy of both Universities and cities. In Paris, after the end of student revolts, the state education system atomized the Université de Paris, creating smaller campuses scattered about the periphery. See Ridder-Symoens. 10 Like the uprisings at the Sorbonne, and three years later in Athens, the Columbia University protest was ended by the intervention of the civic police force. Foucault was greatly affected by a similar experience in Tunisia, March 1968, in which massive student strikes were dissolved by police brutality. See Didier Eribon Michel Foucault (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1989) p. 194. 11 The right to political autonomy, specifically the exclusion of the campus precinct from civic control, was established in the medieval period at many European universities. The University of Prague was famously spared in the Russian supression of the Prague Spring uprisings, 1968. 12 Pier Vittorio Aureli has defined the polis as the socially-produced space of the city; the space of, and produced by politics. The University, understood as an exclusive enclave (per Manuel Castells, "A New Globe in the Making") might thus be considered a disjunctive space within the global network. 13 Sheldon Rothblatt, "University as Utopia" in European Research University, Neave, Blückert, eds. 14 Campus succumbed to Junkspace sometime in the early-2000s. See Rem Koolhaas, "Junkspace" October 100 (Spring 2002): 175-190. 15 Ilkka Kauppinnen has argued that the University is no longer a promoter of national economic competitiveness, but that Universities have impelled the "transnationalization" of academic capitalism. See "Towards transnational academic capitalism" in Higher Education vol. 64, no. 4 (October 2012): 543-556. 16 The University is considered a component of the city-as-productive-mechanism in "All Power to Self-Education," introduction to Edufactory: Towards a Global Autonomous University. 17 The un-rooting of centers of production is a key facet of 'network culture,' and a factor contributing to the productive agent's precarity in the late market economy. See Kazys Varnelis, "The Rise of Network Culture" in Networked Publics (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2012) pp. 145-164. 18 The relative attraction of online education might be considered one symptom of the recent swing towards austerity politics post-2008. See Pier Vittorio Aureli, "Less is Enough" (Moscow: Strelka Institute, 2013) 19 Crisis has been appropriated as a productive force in the postmodern creative economy, see Agenda: can we sustain our ability to crisis? De Smedt, Clouette, Neiheiser, eds., (Barcelona: Actar, 2009) 20 Pier Vittorio Aureli and Martino Tattara "A Simple Heart: Architecture on the Ruins of the Post-Fordist City" Architectural Design vol. 81, no. 1, January 2011. 21 Rothblatt, "University as Utopia." 22 Autonomy is a precondition for the pursuit of Knowledge, as argued by Stanley Aronowitz in The Knowledge Factory: Dismantling the Corporate University and Creating True Higher Learning (Boston: Beacon Press, 2000). 23 Antonio Negri, "From Koolhaas's 'Generic City' to 'Junkspace' in Berlage Survey of the Culture, Education, and Practice of Architecture and Urbanism, Salomon Frausto ed., (Rotterdam: nai010 Publishers, 2011). 24 Loosely analagous to what Richard Florida imagined as the constitutive members of the 'creative class.' Richard Florida The Rise of the Creative Class (2002). 25 Reinhold Martin, "Utopian Realism" Online.

Advisors: Mary-Lou Arscott, Jon Kline, Charles Rosenblum, Rami el Samahy. Support: Kai Gutschow, Kelly Hutzell, Michael Kubo, Francesca Torello, Talia Perry, Zachary Weimer.

17


01 CAMPUS: SITUATING THE GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

Stoa A library, a University, an office, a museum—Edu-factory merges genres of Knowledge Space without compromise. The Public Realm is a Productive Realm. Edu-factory condenses the Social to flash-point: nodes of contact, lines of

18

discussion, planes of argumentation— Edu-factory collapses Life and Labor.


02: IS THIS NOT A PIPE? VOLUME 37 IS THIS NOT A PIPE? COVER DESIGN, IRMA BOOM

19


02 IS THIS NOT A PIPE? Volume Magazine/C-Lab Columbia Laboratory for Architectural Broadcasting Editorial Intern, Columbia University, New York, NY with Benedict Clouette, Jeffrey Inaba, C-Lab May-August 2013, Published November 2013

Original research, text, graphics, and layout design for “Mechanization of the Office” and “Increasing efficiency, increasing usage?” Interview with Mahadev Raman, Arup, "Its the physics" in Volume 37.

Before electric illumination the workday was bound to daylight hours. The optimization of the architectural plan to admit maximum natural light caused U, H, L and other such letterform typologies to proliferate (the earliest generation of mechanized buildings retained

these

pre-Industrial

forms).

The

electrification

of

the workplace at the turn of the century introduced a range of technologies whose effects would diminish the contingencies of environment that impeded the efficient performance of work. Electric light flooded the pre-War office, allowing work to proceed around the clock. Otis’ electric-powered elevators lifted droves of workers as tall office buildings sprang up across metropolitan centers. The plan of the office building, now artificially lit and conditioned, swelled to brutal depths. The development of technology would continuously transform how and where work took place in the twentieth century.

20


21


22


23


24


25


26


27


28


29


30


Drawings, text and layout by Phillip Denny with contributions by Maria Broytman.

31


32


Drawings, and text by Phillip Denny. Document design Irma Boom.

33


34


03: TENERIFE SITE PERSPECTIVE

35


03 TENERIFE BECA Arquideas Grant 2013 First Place Winner, International Competition Juried by EMBT Architects, Barcelona, ES December 2013

The thalassotherapy center is an immersive landscape: it is a place within which the user submits the body to spa treatments and transformation. In order to treat the body and mind, the user must first be removed from the usual. Arriving at the center, the user enters the pavilion at the high end of the site. Here the patron is oriented and directed down through the atrium to the changing rooms. From the changing rooms the bathers move along a corridor, passing through a series of water gardens which frame and orient the user to the sea beyond. As the bather moves along the path the space begins to open. Suddenly the bather finds himself on the slope among the many basins. Set within the basin are planters for flowering shrubs and trees, whose branches provide shade and whose rustling leaves create a soothing soundscape. After bathing the user may choose to have a massage in the hammam, or relax in the steam sauna, beneath a skylight that refracts the seawater above. In the evening, the user returns to the pavilion by the way he arrived. Moving back up through the atrium, he reenters the everyday, replenished and rejuvenated.

36


03: TENERIFE Saltwater Basin

Sauna

cc

Water Garden

Entry Tunnel

Changing

Sections

The site’s slope is manipulated to create a series of terraces cc that simultaneously hide unsightly development downhill, and open a dialogue with the sea. 37


+260

+240

+220

03: TENERIFE

+200

Desalination

Saltwater Basin

Extant Structures (Basins)

Sauna

Freshwater Basin

Entry Tunnel

Architectonic Elements (Frame)

Restaurant & Arrival/Check-in Mechanical

Program (Fill)

Site Plan / Diagrams

The project’s particular geometries are an artifact of an incomplete resort development project. The poured-in-place concrete foundations are repurposed to become thalassotherapy basins and spa facilities. 38


03: TENERIFE

Vignettes: Atrium + Arrival

The main building functions as a point of departure and arrival, where patrons transition from their everyday world to one of relaxation and introspection. 39


cc

Meditation

03: TENERIFE

cc

Restaurant Arrival

Entry Parking

Mechanical

Transverse Section / Plan +268

40

â–˛

The basins are scattered over the landscape, opening up vistas onto the sea beyond.


04: ROME CENTER FOR PEACE AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES

GROUND PLAN

41


04 ROME CENTER FOR PEACE AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES Cornell University in Rome Pax Romana Studio

Cornell University, Rome, IT Professors George Hascup, Davide Marchetti Spring 2013

The Rome Center for Peace and Religious Studies project reconciles the need for the construction of a massive institution on an actively utilized public landscape. The project explores the potentials of the mat-form building to activate context and expand the urban field. The architecture connects a series of interrelated programs to a wide range of urban situations. The project’s intricately scaled network of outdoor spaces extends the public realm over, under, and through the built environment. The ground plane is considered as an intensive architectural landscape, a plinth of public programs that create a public campo above. At the heart of the building, a central void connects all of the project’s functions, a nonprogrammed green space sheltered by the building-as-canopy above. The building’s raison d’etre, the religious study centers, occupy the highest points of the building. Raised above the public plinth, the centers pair enclosed study spaces with exterior courtyards. The study centers and libraries form a continuous, porous canopy that unites the building’s form, and defines the public realm.

42


04: ROME CENTER FOR PEACE AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Section / Courtyard

The site's ground is intensively manipulated, an architectural landscape that aims to instigate moments of public enticement and interaction. 43


04: ROME CENTER FOR PEACE AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Site Plan

The architecture soaks up its context like a sponge. It carries the surrounding urban texture over the site and throughout the building. 44


04: ROME CENTER FOR PEACE AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Concept Drawing

The project generates spatial complexity by layering formal traces of historical site features, contextual axes, and programmatic factors. The interplay of layers becomes a dialogue played out within and outside of the Center. 45


Figures

Canopy Development: Diagram / Section

The Center preserves the site's current open space by framing a public courtyard. The library and learning centers spill out onto the main courtyard, ensuring access to light and air. 46

Extrusions

04: ROME CENTER FOR PEACE AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Excavations


04: ROME CENTER FOR PEACE AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Ground Plan

The ground plan elaborates a complex dialogue between contextual site features, historical absences, and local use-functions.

47


Contextual Relationships

Block Porosity

Green Spaces

04: ROME CENTER FOR PEACE AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Contextual Situation

Site Envelope

Formal Relationship / Public Interface

The building cedes space to public use at key points on the site. At the corner closest to the Colosseum, the Center anchors a piazza.

48


5 2

10

10

1

2

3

1 2

04: ROME CENTER FOR PEACE AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Level +2

Level 0

2

10 4 1 1

6

2 1

8

1

9

7 2

2 1

Program Library Learning Center Circulation Desk Auditorium Meeting Courtyard Archive Gallery Cafe Dormitory

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Level -1

Level +1

Plans

The building is a complex assembly of distinct volumes and excavations pulled together by the institution. Green spaces permeate the structure, dissolving thick poche. 49


Dispersed

PROGRAM Consolidated

Porous

FORM

04: ROME CENTER FOR PEACE AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Lithic

Formal Development / Learning Center

50

â–˛

The Peace Center's porous form carefully balances dark spaces for the preservation of rare artifacts, and light-filled spaces for their study.


05: SCENES AND SPECULATIONS: FUTURE CITIES

PETRO-FIT, “RIG TOWER”

51


05 SCENES AND SPECULATIONS: FUTURE CITIES Three Scenes and Speculations from a Future City over,under / Carnegie Mellon University Researcher, Design Intern, Boston, MA with Rami el Samahy and Adam Himes May-August 2012

If all design can be seen as ways to predict—and shape—the future, no field ought to look further forward than urban design and planning. However, as a profession, planners tend to be fairly cautious, relying on historical precedents rather than future trends in shaping cities. There are perfectly rational reasons for this tendency; the past is a more knowable territory than the future. And yet, do we limit our vision if we fail to occasionally untether ourselves from the past, and seek where design opportunities may lie in the future? Our research team—architects and urban designers, curious about alternative approaches todesigning the urban future, especially as it relates to the Middle East—began by creating a digital compendium of all the predictions we could find (past and present) related to the future of urban environments. We tagged and sorted these in various ways to see what we might uncover. Among the most interesting (and obvious) discoveries: projections into the future are more telling of the present in which they are created.

52


05: SCENES AND SPECULATIONS: FUTURE CITIES

2012

2025

SITE 2040

2050

Rising Sea Levels

Conservative projections of sea-level rise expect a +1m change in the next hundred years. Doha, Qatar would see profound consequences after even a marginal rise in sea-level. 53


Village +1.5m rise

Existing Existing Existing Existing

high high high tide high tide tide tide lowlow tide low low tide tide tide

Solar Solar Solar Solar Desalination Desalination Desalination Desalination Brine lift

high high high tide high tide tide tide lowlow tide low low tide tide tide

05: SCENE 1: SABKHA CITY

Brine Brine Brine lift Brine liftliftlift Brine lift

New Infrastructure

01

02

Brine Brine Brine Brine isiscarried isiscarried carried carried through through through through existing existing existing existing village village village village plumbing plumbing plumbing plumbing and and and and fed fed fed fed through through through through heads. heads. heads. heads. scaffolding scaffolding scaffolding scaffolding toto to spray tospray spray spray

03

Brine Brine Brine Brine reservoir reservoir reservoir reservoir

Brine Brine Brine Brine distribution distribution distribution distribution

01

AApublic AApublic public public saltwater saltwater saltwater saltwater pool pool pool pool serves serves serves serves asas as as reservoir reservoir reservoir reservoir before before before before brine brine brine brine isisdistributed isisdistributed distributed distributed toto to the tothe the the spray spray spray spray grid. grid. grid. grid.

The The The gate gate gate gate permits permits permits permits a asmall aasmall small small AAthin AAthin thin thin sheet sheet sheet sheet ofof of seawater ofseawater seawater seawater travels travels travels travels through through through through a aaa The amount amount amount ofof of seawater ofseawater seawater seawater toto to enter toenter enter enter series series series series ofof of solar ofsolar solar solar stills, stills, stills, stills, causing causing causing causing freshwater freshwater freshwater freshwater toto to to amount desalination. desalination. desalination. desalination. collect collect collect collect onon on glass onglass glass glass planes. planes. planes. planes.

02

03

Brine Distribution

Brine Reservoir

Brine is carried through existing village plumbing, and distributed through scaffolds to the spray heads.

A public saltwater pool serves as a holding tank for brine, which will be distributed into the spray grid later.

Brine reservoir

A public saltwater pool serves as reservoir before brine is distributed Brine reservoir to the spray grid. A public saltwater pool serves as reservoir before brine is distributed to the spray grid.

existing through ds. existing through ds.

04 Desalination Desalination Desalination Desalination gate gate gate gate

Solar Solar Solar Solar desalination desalination desalination desalination

Solar Desalination

05 Dock Dock Dock Dock

AAfA loating Afloating floating floating pier pier pier pier rises rises rises rises and and and and falls falls falls falls with with with with the the the the tides. tides. tides. tides.

04

Gate

A thin sheet of A tidal-powered water is evaporated gate permits a by solar exposure. limited amount of Freshwater collects seawater to enter in the stills. The the system daily. resultant high-saline Solar desalination brine is collected.

A thin sheet of seawater travels through a series of solar stills, causing freshwater to Solar desalination collect on glass planes. A thin sheet of seawater travels through a series of solar stills, causing freshwater to collect on glass planes.

Solar Desalination Infrastructure

How can one of the most energy-intensive and ecologically destructive infrastructural processes (and a necessary evil for life in the Gulf) become productive and positive? 54

05

Kinetic Dock As the tides rise and fall, a cablepulley system opens valves and locks throughout the village, initiating Desalination desalination.

gate

The gate permits a small amount of seawater to enter Desalination gate desalination. The gate permits a small amount of seawater to enter desalination.


Current-Pump

Scaffold Plumbing

05: SCENES AND SPECULATIONS: FUTURE CITIES

Scale Scale = 1:500 = 1:500

250

Solar Desalination Arm

500

500 250 1000

2000

Brine Sprayer & Matrix

2000

1000

Scale Scale = 1:250 = 1:250

Preservation Bubble

Elements / Below Sabkha City

Desalination's waste, high-salinity brine, is repurposed for the creation of an artificial salt-landscape above the Gulf's inundated coastal towns. A simple system of tidal-, and solar-powered mechanisms allows desalination to occur without external power. 55


05: SCENE 1: SABKHA CITY

Urban Core Sample

A new kind of urbanism grows above the Gulf's inundated coastal towns. A freshwater reservoir anchors each urban courtyard, a new type of street furniture that serves as a meeting point for village life. 56


05: SCENES AND SPECULATIONS: FUTURE CITIES

Urban Courtyard

An urban courtyard is accommodated above the remains of each one of Al Wakrah's historical villas. Urban life is centered around spaces for the production and storage of freshwater. 57


05: SCENE 1: SABKHA CITY

Sabkha City Courtyard: Desalination Arms Sun/Mode Diagram

Tidally-activated Pedestrian Bridge

ht hig

t ow

ide

Tidally-activated Dock

ide

l Urban Mechanisms

Sabkha City is animated by the many tidal-, and solar-powered mechanisms that adapt Al Wakrah to life with rising seas.

58


MODULES

Scaffolding Module 3.4 x 3.6 x 3.6

05: SCENES AND SPECULATIONS: FUTURE CITIES

Aggregation

Units (Module Aggregations)

Unit Aggregation

Unit Aggregation

Module System

Much of Sabkha City's infrastructure is composed of repurposed construction scaffolding, which provides a fine-grain, flexible construction module. 59


Year 2012

Villa courtyards areilled f with a site-cast concrete liner in anticipation of their inundation and destruction.

Year 2012

Villa courtyards areilled f with a site-cast concrete liner in anticipation of their inundation and destruction.

Year 2012

Villa courtyards areilled f with a site-cast concrete liner in anticipation of their inundation and destruction.

Year 2014

Villa courtyards are filled with a site-cast concrete liner in anticipation of their inundation and destruction.

Year 2012

Villa courtyards areilled f with a site-cast concrete liner in anticipation of their inundation and destruction.

Year 0

Interior spaces are cast in concrete to provide foundations for the salt landscape.

Scaffolding is deployed throughout al Wakra as a framework for the growth of a new landscape. Construction mesh is stretched between the scaffolding to form spans between each tower.

Year 2014

Villa courtyards are filled with a site-cast concrete liner in anticipation of their inundation and destruction.

Interior spaces are cast in concrete to provide foundations for the salt landscape.

Year 2012

Villa courtyards areilled f with a site-cast concrete liner in anticipation of their inundation and destruction. Villa courtyards are filled with a site-cast concrete liner in anticipation of their inundation and destruction.

Scaffolding is deployed throughout al Wakra as a framework for the growth of a new landscape. Construction mesh is stretched between the scaffolding to form spans between each tower.

Interior spaces are cast in concrete to provide foundations for the salt landscape.

Scaffolding is deployed throughout al Wakra as a framework for the growth of a new landscape. Construction mesh is stretched between the scaffolding to form spans between each tower.

Villa courtyards areilled f with a site-cast concrete liner in anticipation of their inundation and destruction. Villa courtyards are filled with a site-cast concrete liner As sea levels continue to rise, al Wakra’s historical buildings in anticipation of their inundation and destruction. are washed away by the tides and the freed courtyard casts float out to sea.

Interior spaces are cast in concrete to provide foundations The negative form courtyard casts are pulled by the tide for the salt landscape. into the Gulf. The village’s inundated ruins become a marine habitat.

Scaffolding is deployed throughout al Wakra as a framework for the growth of a new landscape. Construction mesh is stretched between the scaffolding to form spans between each tower.

Villa courtyards are filled with a site-cast concrete liner in anticipation of their inundation and destruction. As sea levels continue to rise, al Wakra’s historical buildings are washed away by the tides and the freed courtyard casts float out to sea.

Interior spaces are cast in concrete to provide foundations for the salt landscape. The negative form courtyard casts are pulled by the tide into the Gulf. The village’s inundated ruins become a marine habitat.

Scaffolding is deployed throughout al Wakra as a framework for the growth of a new landscape. Construction mesh is stretched between the scaffolding to form spans between each tower.

As sea levels continue to rise, withalaWakra’s site-casthistorical concretebuildings liner Villa courtyards are filled are washed away theinundation tides and the courtyard casts in anticipation ofby their andfreed destruction. float out to sea.

The negative form casts are pulled by the tide Interior spaces are courtyard cast in concrete to provide foundations intothe thesalt Gulf. The village’s inundated ruins become a for landscape. marine habitat.

Scaffolding is deployed throughout al Wakra as a framework for the growth of a new landscape. Construction mesh is stretched between the scaffolding to form spans between each tower.

Year 2075

As sea levels continue to rise, al Wakra’s historical buildings are washed away by the tides and the freed courtyard casts float out to sea.

The negative form courtyard casts are pulled by the tide into the Gulf. The village’s inundated ruins become a marine habitat.

Year 2075

As sea levels continue to rise, al Wakra’s historical buildings are washed away by the tides and the freed courtyard casts float out to sea.

The negative form courtyard casts are pulled by the tide into the Gulf. The village’s inundated ruins become a marine habitat.

As sea levels continue to rise, al Wakra’s historical buildings are washed away by the tides and the freed courtyard casts float out to sea.

The negative form courtyard casts are pulled by the tide into the Gulf. The village’s inundated ruins become a marine habitat.

The salt landscape continues to grow.

The village expands into the Gulf.

The salt landscape continues to grow.

The village expands into the Gulf.

The salt landscape continues to grow.

The village expands into the Gulf.

The salt landscape continues to grow.

The village expands into the Gulf.

The salt landscape continues to grow.

The village expands into the Gulf.

The salt landscape continues to grow.

The village expands into the Gulf.

Year 2014

Year 2012 Year 2014 Year 2075

Year 2014 Year 2075

Year 2014 2075 Year

Courtyards are filled with a concrete liner.

Year 2

Landscape growth infrastructure is inserted.

Year 5

Year 2075 Year 2075

Courtyards become buoyant as tides rise.

Year 2077 Year 2075

Year 2075 Year 2077

Year 2077 Year 2075

Year 10

Year 2077 Year 2125 21?? Year

Salt landscape continues to develop.

Year 2077

Year 2125 21?? Year

Year 2077 Year 2125 21?? Year

Year 2125 21?? Year

Year 15 Year 2125 21?? Year

Courtyards sink, seed new landscape growth.

Year 2125 21?? Year

Year 25 Sabkha City grows above the inundated old Town.

60

05: SCENE 1: SABKHA CITY

Year 2075


Linear Oasis

Desertification

Al Ruwais

one-third

threatens

of

the

over

Earth’s

population and affects over 40% of its land area. Over twelve million hectares of arable land is 03

lost

every

Al Dhakira

year

to

desert

encroachment.

01

Dukhan

The

02

Linear

hybrid Projected Area of Urban Growth

Lusail

infrastructure integrated

Doha

Proposed Doha Metro

05: SCENES AND SPECULATIONS: FUTURE CITIES

sprawl It

Umm Sa’id

is

that

a

provides

solutions

problems

of

resource Al Wakra

Proposed GCC Railway

Oasis

botanical-mechanical

scarcity, at

to

the

desertification,

a

and

regional

serves

as

sandstorms,

a

a

urban scale.

barrier

to

self-sustaining

source of water and food, and a limit to urban growth. After the construction of its most basic infrastructure, the Linear Oasis can passively collect water from the

atmosphere,

supporting Al Dhakira

A

Dukhan

Al Dhakira

B

agriculture,

live-work settlement, and transit Al Dhakira infrastructure.

Dukhan

Dukhan Lusail

Lusail

Doha

Lusail

C

Doha

Doha

Proposed Doha Met

01

local

subsequently

Proposed Doha Met

Proposed Doha Met

02

03

Transit Hub

Market

Bridge

Transit hubs are located at the intersections of Linear Oasis and existing transit infrastructure, and the proposed GCC railway.

Linear Oasis is paired with an open air market in locations where the wall is an urban growth barrier. Fresh produce from the Oasis is transported here for sale.

Where Linear Oasis crosses water and other difficult terrain, it serves as a springboard onto which new transit or power infrastructure can be attached.

61


Construction +1 year

Agriculture +5 years

+5 Years Agriculture

Transit & Infrastructure +15 years

+10 Years Transit

Settlement +25 years

+15 Years Settlement

05: SCENE 2: LINEAR OASIS

+0 Years Construction

Linear Oasis Phasing

Construction of the wall seeds the development of a new, liveable territory Northwest of Doha, Qatar. Irrigation and transit infrastructure ensure liveability while the wall itself defines an urban growth boundary. 62


= ale Sc

1:1 x10 -9

500mm

750mm

250mm

875mm

Water-collecting Hydrophobic Panel

Panel-Frame Connection

Panel Aggregation Floral Irrigation

05: SCENES AND SPECULATIONS: FUTURE CITIES

Systems

Linear Oasis employs a system of water-collecting surfaces to harvest ambient moisture in the air, and directs the collected water towards irrigation for agriculture and flora. 63


Tubular-steel Frame

Drought-resistant Planting

Water-collecting Panelized Surface

Panel Aggregation Corner Detail

05: SCENE 2: LINEAR OASIS

Water-collecting Hydrophobic Panel

Corner Detail Surface Panel Aggregation

Details

The panels aggregate to form a water collection surface that feeds an agricultural irrigation system.

64


05: SCENES AND SPECULATIONS: FUTURE CITIES

Rig-Tower: Doha, Qatar

The Rig-Tower becomes a new addition to the Doha skyline, constructed at blazing speed—even by Gulf standards—and at a lower cost than any structure of its size. 65


Infrastructure

Rig

Storage

Refinery

Pipeline

Program

Agriculture

Amusement

05: SCENE 3: PETRO-FIT

Commute Reversal

Construction

Education

Mall

Skyscraper

Petro-fit Matrix

Infrastructural possibilities are paired with programmatic opportunities as a first step toward imagining architectural futures for a Post-Oil Gulf. 66


1500 m

1000 m

500 m

05: SCENES AND SPECULATIONS: FUTURE CITIES

0m Empire State Building

Sears Tower

Burj Khalifa

Rig Tower

There are 120 offshore rigs in the Gulf. Together they measure 307,006

m2 (3,304,582 ft ) in area. 2

Rig Tower: Module + Assemblage

Platforms in the Gulf are designed to drill in relatively shallow waters, and to be self-propelled. Each of the rigs three pylons is retractable, allowing for the platform to move itself to a new drilling location as needed. 67


05: SCENE 3: PETRO-FIT

“Rig Tower” Detail

68

The “High-Rise of Homes” becomes reality in the Gulf as oil derricks are repurposed for a novel residential development project.


06: THEATRE FOR A NEW AUDIENCE

SECTION (THEATRE-MACHINE)

69


06 THEATRE FOR A NEW AUDIENCE Architecture + Drama Collaborative Studio in cooperation with Theatre for a New Audience, New York Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA. TFANA, New York, NY Professors Hal Hayes, Dick Block, and Peter Cooke, OAM Fall 2012

“I can take any empty space and call it a bare stage. A man walks across an empty space whilst someone else is watching him, and this is all that is needed for an act of theatre to be engaged.”

Peter Brook The organizational diagram of the archetypal theatre building reserves the performance chamber as the sole intersection of public & private, theatre & patron, reality & illusion. The Theatre for a New Audience proposes an alternative diagram that instigates moments of synchronistic programmatic cross-pollination by rearranging the theatre’s constituent programmatic components according to hyperrationalized adjacencies and functional efficiencies.

70


06: THEATRE FOR A NEW AUDIENCE

Lobby & Roof Performance Garden

Interspatial relationships are established through curated visual and surface continuities. Spaces unfold one into the next.

71


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Cafe Lobby Patron’s Lounge Production Technical Terrace / Garden Forecourt & Performance Space Auditorium (Thrust)

4

4

3 5

1

7

2

6

Orchestra Level Plan

The raised lobby volume consolidates the theatre’s social functions onto a single horizontal plane.

72

06: THEATRE FOR A NEW AUDIENCE

8


Performance Garden

Tension Grid / Production Space

Transverse Section

Performance Chamber

The performance chamber is flanked on one side by a corridor that enables free circulation while carefully preserving public-private relationships. Space required above the chamber for technical needs sympathetically accommodates the depth of the planted roof terrace.

N/S Corridor

Back of House

06: THEATRE FOR A NEW AUDIENCE

Performance Chamber

The performance chamber gathers an audience of 299 into an intimately scaled space. No seat is more than 30’ from the center of the stage.

73


Performers

Public

Composite

Program Scheme

Programmatic juxtapositions drive the architecture’s formal-spatial manifestation. Functions often religiously separated are brought into contact, creating charged and dynamic zones of activity. 74

06: THEATRE FOR A NEW AUDIENCE

Production


06: THEATRE FOR A NEW AUDIENCE

In Context

The Theatre for a New Audience will be flanked by new, massive residential towers in coming years, meanwhile it is a dynamic presence on Flatbush Avenue. 75


Plan +096 (Roof)

Performance Garden

Plan +056

Atrium Conference Room

Offices

Plan +034

06: THEATRE FOR A NEW AUDIENCE

Upper Balcony Seating

Terrace / Garden

Technical Lobby

Outdoor Performance Technical Gallery

Plan +015 Lobby Tickets Cafe Production

76

â–˛

Outdoor Performance


07: AL WAKRAH VILLAGE HOUSING

SITE PLAN

77


07 AL WAKRAH VILLAGE HOUSING Gulf Urbanism + Architecture Design Studio in collaboration with Qatar Museum Authority Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar, Doha, QR Professors Rami el Samahy, Kelly Hutzell. Spring 2012

A proposal for the integration of new housing above the Emir’s reconstructed historical village in Al Wakrah, Qatar. The existing architectural condition on site speaks to the village’s historical social dynamics. The urban fabric is defined by the organic aggregation of inwardly focused courtyard units. As a result, the village is an archipelago of introverted courtyard houses within an intricate network of circulation and social spaces, the sikka. The proposal seeks to subvert this urban paradigm by introducing a second layer urbanism to the site. The integration of new housing above the village’s historic fabric allows for gradations of public and private space to occur vertically, liberating the ground plane as a continuous network of public spaces.

78


AH VILLAGE HOUSING COURTYARDS Parti

Housing Units and Corridors Housing

AL WAKRAH VILLAGE HOUSING CIRCULATI

Circulation Circulation

Community Courtyard Public Space

Communal Space Spaces Communal

Existing Buildings Existing Structures

VILLAGE HOUSING SECTION

Ground Plan Ground Plan

07: AL WAKRAH VILLAGE HOUSING Community Courtyard

Public CorridorÂ

Garden

Apartment

Semi-Private Terrace

Site

The existing architectural condition is considered a material landscape that the project may augment and exploit. The new intervention generates a mat-urbanism that opens the possibility for new modes of interaction between users and their environment.

2m 0m Scale 1:100

4m

6m

8m

79

10m


Efficiency

Studio

AL WAKRAH VILLAGE HOUSING BIRD’S EYE 2-Bedroom

07: AL WAKRAH VILLAGE HOUSING

1-Bedroom

Housing

Al Wakrah's existing condition is the result of a decades-long accretion of units following ad hoc logics. The new housing proposal contributes to this complex system by adding yet another layer. 80


07: AL WAKRAH VILLAGE HOUSING Student Housing

Staff Housing

Hotel

Family Housing

Communities

The housing project is itself comprised of four smaller communities, each set in relation to a public space, and each stitched together by the historical village below. 81


KRAH VILLAGE HOUSING CIRCULATION Roof Terrace Roof Terraces

Roof Terraces Main Level

Housing Units

Interstitial Space Private Gardens

Ground Level

Public Private

Terraces: Diagram + Model / Perspective

Public spaces of nested scales and varying degrees of privacy are integrated throughout. At the terrace level, above the housing units, a continuous roof-scape allows for neighborly interaction. 82

07: AL WAKRAH VILLAGE HOUSING

Public Ground


07: AL WAKRAH VILLAGE HOUSING

Tectonic Scheme

A system of pre-cast structural elements pairs with a modular shading system to ensure rapid expansion and a multitude of shading possibilities. 83


AL WAKRAH VILLAGE HOUSING STRUCTURE Shading Shading Components

Prefabricated Structure Frame

Existing buildings Extant Structures

Extant Plan

Ground Plan

07: AL WAKRAH VILLAGE HOUSING

Prefabricated Housing Unitsunits

Project Assembly

84

The scheme’s structural module allows for a delicate integration of new architectural features with the historical context, while maximizing architectural variety.


08: FRICK ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER

ENTRY

85


08 FRICK ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER Landscape + Architecture Studio

Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA Professors Christine Mondor, Jennifer Gallagher Fall 2011

At present, the south end of Frick Park is a tract of wetland under-utilized by the city of Pittsburgh and its inhabitants. Disconnected from the rest of the park by an expressway overpass, the area has become a polluted landscape. The project creates a series of programmed surfaces that provide a linkage between the more well-trafficked areas of Frick Park and the forgotten portion to the south. The architecture augments the user’s access to, and understanding of, place by synthesizing spatial relationships between the architecture and its environs. The environmental center is organized as a landscape transect. The architecture both responds to, and acts upon, the landscape along its length. The user is thus immersed in a dialogue that instills an appreciation of the ecological diversity inherent to the area. Educational spaces are dispersed along the building’s length, each focused on a specific ecological condition, and landscape space.

86


08: FRICK ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER

Plans

Building as transect: the environmental center extends itself across the site, instigating moments of dialogue with a range of landscape ecologies. 87


08: FRICK ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER

Perspective, Section

Architecture’s relationship to nature is interrogated in a number of spaces. Classrooms function as lenses onto specific landscape ecologies, while courtyards envelop extant site features. 88


Nine Mile Run Classroom

Forest Classroom

Wetlands Classroom

Meadow Classroom

08: FRICK ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER

Skin Diagram / Perspective Section

The site is brought under, over, and through the center. The building's perforated copper screen functions as a trellis to encourage flora growth. 89


Green Roof Native groundcover + perennials

Green Roof Board-form concrete hardscape Ipe wood deck

Concrete slab

Glazing

Performative skin Perforated copper

Tectonic Scheme

The Environmental Center's lithic tectonics are a blank surface to be colored and manipulated by the environmental context. The enclosure system mediates the 'hard' structure's relationship to environment. 90

08: FRICK ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER

Structural Frame


acer saccharum sugar maple

Acer saccharum Sugar maple acer saccharum sugar maple

populus grandidentata

gymnocladus dioicus

platanus acerifolia

fraxinus nigra

Populus grandidentata Bigtooth aspen

Gymnocladus dioicus Kentucky coffeetree

Platanus acerifolia London plane

Fraxinus nigra Black ash

populus grandidentata

gymnocladus dioicus

platanus acerifolia

fraxinus nigra

bigtooth aspen

bigtooth aspen

kentucky coffeetree

kentucky coffeetree

london plane

london plane

black ash

black ash

pennisetum

fountain grass

Pennisetum Fountain grass pennisetum

fountain grass

08: FRICK ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER

Planting / Greenhouse

A demonstration greenhouse is situated at the south end of the site. Workshops and public programs are conducted here.

91


Site Conditions Forward Ave

Nine Mile Run I376 Overpass

Ecology Forest

Wetlands Meadow

Use

Pedestrian

Movement

Vehicular

Parti

Site Diagrams

The site is read as a series of forces and contingencies that define a diagram for the architectural

92

08: FRICK ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER

Park Boundaries


Meadow Classroom

Greenhouse

Library

Cafe

08: FRICK ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER

Forward Avenue

Nine Mile Run Stream

Section / Model

The building unfolds along a series of linear paths that cut through, over, and beneath the building.

93


Lobby

Meeting Room

Art Park

08: FRICK ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER

Nine Mile Run Creek

Classroom

94

â–˛

Each of the four classrooms functions as a lens focused onto a specific landscape zone and its attendant issues.


09: SACO LAKE BATHS + SCHOOL FOR DANCE

CALDARIUM

95


09 SACO LAKE BATHS + SCHOOL FOR DANCE Material Tectonics Studio Projects Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA Professors Jeremy Ficca and Tom Price Spring 2011

PROJECT 1: SACO LAKE BATHS The Bath project investigates the role of the building envelope as mediator between environment and spatial experience. The user encounters a series of spaces in which the relationships between self, architecture, and exterior condition are transformed. The hiker’s first impression of the spa is of an excavated monolith, an outcropping of rock in the forested hillside. A long bridge provides a singular pathway between natural and constructed environment, reinforcing the architecture’s role as experiential mediator. Upon entering, the user moves downward through the building, confronting a series of spatial episodes within a concrete structure loosely-bound by a gabion envelope. The user finds the lowest level inundated with water, a grotto space in which one is alternately isolated from, and exposed to the environment. A pair of light wells illuminate the baths while simultaneously inviting the climate into the lowest depths of the building.

96


+055 09: SACO LAKE BATHS

+074

+035 Plans

A visit to the Baths involves a sequence of mediated experiences of the environment. Moving down the building towards the baths, the user's experience of their environment becomes increasingly unmediated, visceral. 97


Frigidarium

Changing/Lockers

Caldarium

09: SACO LAKE BATHS

Entry

Section / Corridor

Throughout, the gabion wall functions as a mediator between interior and exterior. A stone wall suddenly luminous, the gabions filter sunlight into the complex. 98


09: SACO LAKE BATHS

Entry / Tepidarium

Upon entry an enormous aperture frames the user's view of the landscape beyond. In the tepid-bath, filtered sunlight reflects onto cast-concrete walls hanging just above the surface of the water. 99


Gabion wall, steel-framed Structural steel bridge

09: SACO LAKE BATHS

Site-cast concrete

Axonometric / Model

100

â–˛

The building's tectonic scheme carefully separates two systems: the superstructure, and enclosure. All of the surfaces kinaesthetically engaged by the user are in cast concrete, while the gabion wall, generator of visual affect, is always just out of reach


09: SCHOOL FOR DANCE

URBAN SITUATION

101


The circulation element unites the school’s three main functions (performance, education, and administration) by eliciting a different attitude toward each. The path circles around the performance space, allowing a range of perspectives. The circulation cuts diagonally through the school, creating a series of smaller spaces centered around a generous stair. At the highest level, the pathway brushes against the administrative area before letting onto a public roof terrace. Throughout the building, the integrity of the horizontal floor plate is interrogated as cuts and folds are introduced to generate inter-spatial continuity and an architecture that prompts the engagement of the body.

102

09: SCHOOL FOR DANCE

PROJECT 2: SCHOOL FOR DANCE The project assembles a set of programs (too large for the site) in a vertical composition. A stable form contains a range of disparate programs, united by a zig-zagging circulation path that maximizes interaction between each. The architecture is rendered legible to the urban condition as the facade hides or reveals public and private spaces.


Screen

Glazing

09: SCHOOL FOR DANCE

Structure

Concrete

Models / Tectonic Strategy

The building’s composition is conceptualized as an interplay of four autonomous systems whose collision and cooperation yields the architecture’s final form. 103


administration

+76

GALLERY

09: SCHOOL FOR DANCE

FLY

+17

+05

Plans

A serpentine circulation trajectory twists and unfolds through the building. Programs and vistas form a cinematic series of images presented to the user. 104


Administration

Mixing Chamber

Studios

09: SCHOOL FOR DANCE

Gallery

Lobby

Auditorium

Flyloft

Perspective Section

The generic slab is cut and torqued at each level, opening unexpected vistas between distinct levels and programs.

105


structure

administration

circulation

Administration

School

school

Theater

performance

Circulation

Program

09: SCHOOL FOR DANCE

Structure

Diagrams / Mixing Chamber

106

â–˛

The collision of structure, circulation, and program create dynamic spaces between areas of activity.


10: WHITE CUBE, GREEN MAZE

INSTALLATION VIEWS

107


10 WHITE CUBE, GREEN MAZE: NEW ART LANDSCAPES Heinz Architectural Center Carnegie Museum of Art Curatorial Intern, Pittsburgh, PA May-July 2011

White Cube, Green Maze: New Art Landscapes presents, in six case studies, the emergence of a new museum typology characterized by the synthesis of architecture, landscape design, and art in situ. The show presented the Olympic Sculpture Park by Weiss+Manfredi, USA; Raketenstation by Raimund Abraham at Stiftung Insel-Hombroich, Germany; Jardin Botanico de Culiacan, by Taller de Operaciones Ambientales and Tatiana Bilbao, Brazil; the Grand Traiano Art Complex by Topotek 1, HHF Architects, and Johnston Marklee, Italy; and the Benesse Art Site Naoshima, with work by Tadao Ando and SANAA, Japan. In addition to models and original drawings, the exhibition showcased original photographs created by architectural photographer Iwan Baan.

108

â–˛

Curatorial Internship, with Raymund Ryan, Curator of Architecture, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Provided design consultation and digital modeling expertise. The show travelled to Yale School of Architecture after opening at Carnegie Museum.


BIOGRAPHY

Phillip Denny (b. 1991) is a designer working in architecture, graphics, research, writing, editing, and curating. He expects to graduate in May 2014 with a B.Arch degree from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA. Since 2013 he has been the Chief Editor of inter·punct, a student-led journal for architecture theory and discourse. Phillip has worked at over,under in Boston, MA, where he developed the Future Cities project on urbanism in the Gulf. He has also worked at Carnegie Museum of Art, where he assisted in curating the White Cube, Green Maze: New Art Landscapes, and Maya Lin exhibitions. Most recently, Phillip was a researcher at the Columbia Laboratory for Architectural Broadcasting where he researched, wrote, and designed “Mechanization of the Office,” for Volume a quarterly magazine on architecture founded by Ole Bouman, Rem Koolhaas, and Mark Wigley. Phillip is currently developing an architecture thesis, Campus, which interrogates the contemporary university’s architectural, urban, and institutional form. Phillip lives in Pittsburgh and New York City.


Phillip Denny: Work 2009-2014  

Ten projects completed during B.Arch studies at Carnegie Mellon University, 2009-2014.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you