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Contents HISTORY THE ARTIFACTS FEATURED OBJECT DIAGRAMS SITE PLANS SECTIONS STRUCTURE ELEVATIONS PRECEDENTS

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History

The south has a very unique economic history. Over time the southern economy shifted from being primarily cotton based to a multiple of service based industries ranging from auto manufacturing and food processing to telecommunications and Financial Services. With this I wanted to look further into what caused the shift. There was only one city that fully explained how the south fully regenerated its economy. That city was Memphis Tennessee. Memphis was established in 1819 as a rail hub to transport cotton from the Deep South to Chicago and the Northeast and like many other cities in the Deep South depended on cotton to thrive Ànancially. The city thrives until the late 1800s when the city was devastated by both the Civil War and a Yellow Fever outbreak that lasted two years. Memphis lost 75% of its population Yellow fever and suɛered an economic collapse. The city suɛered until the early 1900s when a businessman by the name of A. Arthur formed a committee with other businessmen to compose a plan to regenerate the cotton economy in the region, and bring the city and region together for a greater good. Thus the Memphis Cotton Carnival was born. The Cotton Carnival was a yearly event that mixed a business expo type environment with a “Mardi Gras” type festival. The Carnival displayed the importance of cotton by demonstrating its many uses. The carnival was a huge success and the demand for cotton increased thus regenerating the economy. A few years later The Carnival begin to attract people from all over the Deep South and other industries like lumber and steel manufacturing in the South begin to show their interest in the event. Due to this the Memphis Cotton Carnival was renamed Carnival Memphis since the sole purpose for the Carnival was no longer for cotton but was for other industries in the south to be celebrated in the same fashion.

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SoExFo!-SoExFo!SoExFo!-SoExFo!SoExFo!-SoExFo!SoExFo!-SoExFo!SoExFo!-SoExFo!Mammy’s Upper Torso

Dogtrot House

The Artifacts L’xW’xH’

General Lee

40x20x20

20x9x5

Pedro’s Billboard

Rev. Dennis Church Bus

40x20x20

45x2x20

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8x8x15


-SoExFo!-SoExFo! -SoExFo!-SoExFo! -SoExFo!-SoExFo! -SoExFo!-SoExFo! -SoExFo!-SoExFo! To Kill A Mockingbird

Mardi Gras Float

10x55x13.5

2x2x6

Can Opener (2 Cabnets)

Forrest Gump’s Leg Braces

12x2x10

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2x2x7


Featured Object: The Can Opener

Peter Durand

Ezra J Warner Prototype

The origins of the Àrst can openers are traced back to the Dutch Navy around 1772 the same time the tin can was developed. Tin cans were used to preserve freshly caught salmon, that was boiled in brine. The tin can was patened by Peter Durand in 1810 and tin can preservation became an industry both in and outside of the Netherlands. In 1812 English Industrialist and Engineer, Bryan Donkin, aquired the patent and developed the world’s Àrst canning factory in London. The tin can at this time was produced with a heavy amount tin and required heavy work with a chisel and hammer to open. Around 1850 can openers begin to emerge. The Àrst can opener, known as the lever-type was invented by Robert Yates in 1855. A second, more complex lever-type can opener, was patented by Ezra J. Warner in 1858. Today the can opener is a very common household item, and can be found in any part of the world. The modern day canopener features a condensed bottle opener, and a “Churchkey Style” Opener, giving it a total of three functions in one. In this particular design the cutting wheel is replaced with a single blade (inspired by the Àrst design) that pierces the can when squeezed down and slices the edge when moved around the can.

First Can Opener

Modern Day Can Opener

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More Complex Prototype


To See It In Motion

Scan with QR

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code reader


Context

Diagrams

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Section

Drainage

Festivals/Events


Site: Memphis, TN

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SITE

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Plans

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1-Ampitheater 2-Entry 3-Event Space 4-Gift Shop 5-Business Incubator

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LEVEL 1

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3 UP

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UP


4-Old South Gallery 5-Civil War Gallery 6-New South Galleries Mammies Torso Pedro’s Bilboard Can Opener Exhibit

DN UP

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LEVEL 2

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4 DN UP

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7-Classrooms 8-Lecture Hall 9-Media Lab 10-New South Galleries Mardi Gras Float

10 DN UP UP

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LEVEL 3

8 UP

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11-Administrative Oɜces 12-New South Galleries General Lee To Kill a Mockingbird Forest Gump’s Braces

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DN

LEVEL 4

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13-Rooftop Garden 14-Lounge

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LEVEL 5

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Sections

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Structure 1

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Level 1

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Level 4

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ROOF 80' - 0"

ROOF 80' - 0"

Level 5 64' - 0"

Level 5 64' - 0"

Level 4 48' - 0"

Level 4 48' - 0"

Level 3 32' - 0"

Level 3 32' - 0"

Level 2 16' - 0"

Level 2 16' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0" Level 1 Mezzanine -7' - 0"

Level 1 Mezzanine -7' - 0" Level B -14' - 0"

Level B -14' - 0"

Level B2 -28' - 0"

Level B2 -28' - 0"

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Wall Section

Level 5

C


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Ceramic Rods

Elevations

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Louvered Glass

Solar Panels

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SoExFo!-SoExFo! Southern Poverty SoExFo!-SoExFo! Law Center FORM SoExFo!-SoExFo! SoExFo!-SoExFo! SoExFo!-SoExFo!

Precedents

Montgomery, Alabama

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-SoExFo!-SoExFo! -SoExFo!-SoExFo! BUILDING FACADE: -SoExFo!-SoExFo! New York Ceramic Rods Times Building -SoExFo!-SoExFo! -SoExFo!-SoExFo! New York, New York

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SoExFo!-SoExFo!SoExFo!-SoExFo!Torre Agbar BUILDING SoExFo!-SoExFo!FACADE: Louvered Glass SoExFo!-SoExFo!SoExFo!-SoExFo!Barcelona, Spain

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Gary Cormer -SoExFo!-SoExFo! Youth Center -SoExFo!-SoExFo! -SoExFo!-SoExFo! GARDEN -SoExFo!-SoExFo! -SoExFo!-SoExFo! Chicago, Illinois

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Southern exchange forum