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PREPARING FOR

SUCCESS IN YOUR SECOND YEAR

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES


CONTENTS Preparing for success in your second year

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What’s special about this year?

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What does success look like in the second year?

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Academic Expectations and how to meet them

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Our expectations of each other

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Degree programme-level expectations

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Course unit level expectations

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Assessment expectations

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Workload expectations

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Academic practice expectations

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Meeting expectations: Academic Skills

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Where to find support for academic skills

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Library skills

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Reading

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Writing

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Note taking

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Listening

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Numbers and data-handling

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Presenting

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Analytical skills

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Personal Development: An Enhanced Student Experience

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Employability

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Internships

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University College for Interdisciplinary Learning

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Free choice course units

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PREPARING FOR SUCCESS IN YOUR SECOND YEAR Congratulations! You have almost completed your first year of study in the School of Social Sciences. As you prepare to enter your second year there is a variety of information that can help you succeed further. As a School we are committed to providing you with the resources and opportunities you need for success. In this booklet we bring together vital information on how to access those opportunities so that you can achieve your own ambitions as well as those that the University of Manchester sets for you. What’s special about this year? Thirty-three percent (33%) of marks in your second year will count towards your final degree classification. Although it may seem too early, this year is an ideal time to start thinking about developing the employability skills you will need after graduation. This year also provides you with the opportunity to indulge your intellectual curiosity with a free choice course unit or a unit from the University College for Interdisciplinary Learning. Your second year is a stepping stone. By the end of it you should have developed effective strategies for successfully meeting deadlines and expectations in course units which count towards your final degree classification. This will serve you well for your third year when 67% of your final degree classification will come from your final year studies.

What does success look like in year 2? Obviously, success in your studies will include passing the required number of units. However, there is much more to getting the most out of your second year than that. This booklet seeks to show you the range of resources that you can access so that your understanding of success is broader, more fulfilling, more challenging and ultimately of greater value to you. “Success” in this sense means that this year you should consider developing: • your understanding of academic expectations

Personal Development: Your Learning Community

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Societies

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Volunteering

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Student Ambassadors

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Get involved

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• your personal development, including developing your employability and expanding your intellectual curiosity

Have Your Say!

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• your use of the student support that is here for you

Personal Support and Wellbeing

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Your Support Network

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When things get difficult for you: Mitigating Circumstances

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• your academic skills so that you fulfil what is expected of you and improve your marks


SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES: PREPARING FOR SUCCESS IN YOUR SECOND YEAR

ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS AND HOW TO MEET THEM ABOUT ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS The first task of preparing for success is defining and understanding the expectations we have of you this year.

Our expectations of each other We have expectations of you, and you have them of us. You will find these in The University of Manchester’s Student Charter. It was developed jointly by the University and the Student Union and clearly expresses what our expectations and responsibilities are.

Academic practice expectations

All course units have their own forms of assessment. In the School of Social Sciences a variety of assessments is used: exams, projects, essays, presentations, quizzes, multiple choice tests, book reviews, posters, wikis, etc. The marking criteria of each form of assessment are laid out clearly and systematically in course unit guides. You will also find that each subject area has produced guides for you on how to get good grades. They’re incredibly useful!

You are expected to complete assignments and assessments that are the product of your own study, research, analysis and ideas during your undergraduate studies. This includes avoiding all forms of academic malpractice: plagiarism (including submitting the same work more than once), collusion, fabrication or falsification of results, or any other form of malpractice. But more than this, the school aims to produce independent learners and thinkers, and we encourage you to develop your own views, opinions, arguments and approaches.

Workload expectations

Degree programme-level expectations These are in the degree programme handbook for your degree, and are specific to each programme, so it’s advisable to know what they are. The conditions for passing the first year and progressing into the second year are called the “First Year Examination”. What you need to know will include the number of credits to be passed, the pass mark (40%), the regulations determining how to compensate for failed course units, and the rules determining referrals.

Assessment expectations

Course unit level expectations These are in the course guide for each unit. You are likely to see these expressed as ‘intended learning outcomes’ (ILOs). ILOs typically include expectations of the kind of knowledge you should gain about the content of the course unit as well as intellectual skills, such as independent research and analytical skills.

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If you are a full-time student you are expected to spend about 40 hours per week studying, the same as a full-time employee at work. One of the things you will need to develop, then, is effective time-management strategies and habits. This is especially the case if you combine your degree with a part-time job. The University of Manchester’s Manual of Academic Procedures specifies that a 20 credit unit entails 200 hours work by students including lectures and other class times. A 10 credit unit entails 100 hours work. So, depending on the contact time in the course unit, you will normally be required to spend a considerable amount of time outside formal teaching sessions studying independently and/or in groups. If you’re struggling with your workload the Humanities Study Skills website should be your first stop. It has great time-management resources for you under ‘Organising Yourself’.

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Important: the School of Social Sciences uses originality checking software called Turnitin. If you plagiarise, including your own work or that of another student, Turnitin will find it easily. Do not even think about plagiarising! The penalties are very serious and can lead to loss of credit and even expulsion from the University.


SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES: PREPARING FOR SUCCESS IN YOUR SECOND YEAR

MEETING EXPECTATIONS: ACADEMIC SKILLS In order to give yourself the best chance of success, it’s worth thinking about how your academic skills will change and develop over your time at university. The relevant skills you’ll need this year include those detailed opposite. Try to take advantage of the various sources of advice to improve these skills.

Where to find support for academic skills: 1. MyLearningEssentials for courses: www.library.manchester.ac.uk/ academicsupport/mylearningessentials 2. School of Social Sciences Student Support Officer: Dr Paul Smith email: Paul.V.Smith@manchester.ac.uk 3. ‘Guide to study skills website’: www.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/studyskills 4. Speak to your Academic Advisor. 5. You’ll find discipline specific guidance in a range of formats on the SoSS UG intranet site: www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/studentintranet/undergraduate/useful-documents

Library skills: university libraries are not just about books anymore! You’ll need to learn how to find and use books, journals, and electronic sources of all kinds. There’s more information available than ever before and you’ll need to know how to benefit from it.

Reading: there are many types of reading and it is good to be aware of the style of reading you are using: speed, active, indepth, critical, and so on. You’ll also need to learn what types of information you need to read.

Writing: you’ll learn to write in different genres, and develop general skills such as referencing, writing concisely and grammatically, writing for different purposes, and avoiding plagiarism.

Note taking: taking notes from written material is different from taking lecture notes. You’ll have to learn to make your note-taking useful and effective, as it serves many purposes.

Listening: a big component of any degree! Listening to others, finding the message, contextualising and acting on it are all important aspects of your listening skills.

Numbers and data-handling: the ability to handle and analyse numbers, statistics, and graphical representations of data is vital for any social scientist.

Presenting: communicating a message to others orally in SoSS’s international setting is an ability that you will need to develop, both for university and beyond.

Analytical skills: what does it all mean? Being able to find and communicate the significance of ideas is (roughly) what we mean by ‘analysis’.

6. Economics PASS sessions – find out when your course is running one of these weekly study groups: ECON10061 Introductory Mathematics ECON10071 Advanced Mathematics ECON20110 Econometrics

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SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES: PREPARING FOR SUCCESS IN YOUR SECOND YEAR

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT: AN ENHANCED STUDENT EXPERIENCE You’ve chosen to invest in your future by studying with us. We work very hard to provide you with a vast array of opportunities to enhance your learning and also to enhance your desirability to future employers.

Employability This year the School of Social Sciences will be hosting its second ‘Reading Week Extra’ event, in which a series of employability activities is provided in week six of the first semester. This is a great opportunity to start to think about your employability. It will also showcase what is provided throughout the year by the School, its alumni, and the University’s central services. These are some of the things that took place during Reading Week Extra last year: • “Team Work Challenge” Getting work experience is a competitive business. It’s a vicious circle; you can’t get work experience without a job, and you can’t get a job without work experience. So how can you start to build your CV? This two-day workshop challenged groups of students to develop a proposal and ‘pitch’ their ideas to a panel of seasoned professionals. • “Succeed at Psychometric Tests” An opportunity for students to learn why companies use psychometric tests in the recruitment and selection process and how to improve their results.

Internships

Free choice course units

Internships and placements are short periods of professional experience. During an internship or placement, you will be doing similar work to a normal employee of the organisation. Many employers use internships and placements as a fast track onto their graduate programmes. Perform well, and you might be offered a full-time job.

Learning a language or taking a University College course is an excellent way of giving your studies some breadth. Check your Programme regulations to see what courses are available to you.

University College for Interdisciplinary Learning Your second year typically provides you with the opportunity to indulge your intellectual curiosity and take a course beyond your degree programme should you wish. The University College presents you with the chance to broaden your educational horizons. It offers course units that showcase the breadth and depth of research and knowledge found at the University.

• Subject area events Subject area (economics, politics, social anthropology, sociology and philosophy) events.

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SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES: PREPARING FOR SUCCESS IN YOUR SECOND YEAR

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT: YOUR LEARNING COMMUNITY You’re part of a vibrant and exciting community so don’t miss out on the opportunities that are open to you. This is your chance to share your passion for your course, debate the issues of the day, learn a new skill, give something back to the community, or just make some new friends.

Societies University isn’t all work, work, work. Joining a society is a great way to meet people from across the University. These are just some of the Societies that our students are involved in. • Anthropology Society • BA Econ Society • BEconSc Society • BA in Social Science (BASS) Society • Criminology Society • The Post-Crash Economics Society • Finance, Accounting and Business (SOFAB) • Manchester Debating Union • Philosophy Society • Politics Society • Politics, Philosophy and Economics Society • Think Soc: The Manchester Philosophy and Politics Society

Volunteering Volunteering is a fantastic way to feel part of a community, meet and spend time with interesting people you might not otherwise have met, gain in confidence, and skills, and make a good impression on your CV. The Careers Service The Careers Service has lots of useful information about why you might want to volunteer, how to find an activity that matches your experience and aspirations as well as case studies from students who have already volunteered in the greater Manchester area. Volunteering and Community Engagement Team

Student Ambassadors

The University has a dedicated Volunteering and Community Engagement Team, situated within the Careers Service to support with volunteering. It has a brokerage service available which advertises hundreds of volunteer opportunities.

If you are looking for a part time job that is rewarding and fits around your studies then applying to be a student ambassador is the perfect solution! You’ll meet lots of other students on different courses, and work with a wide range of people from primary school children, to sixth formers and teachers great to put on your CV! You’ll also get a chance to share your experiences of your course to prospective students, show off your university and raise the aspirations of the younger generation.

Students Union – Student Action Manchester You can also volunteer through the Students’ Union. Student Action is a volunteering group that has a wide range of projects, from working with children to the elderly and caring for people with disabilities to helping the homeless. www.manchesterstudentsunion.com/studentaction

To find out more see The Crucial Guide (Volunteering)

Student Representatives Would you like to influence School policy or make a difference to how your programme is run? Fancy enhancing your CV? If so, why not consider becoming a student rep?

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If you think you could be a voice for your fellow students you’ll find more information at www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/ intranet/ug/reps.

Have Your Say! We’re constantly working to improve the student experience and we can’t do this without your help. At key points in the year surveys will be sent out to you asking what you think about teaching and learning, support services and other aspects of University life.

Get involved

For contact details for societies across the University: Explore the Students’ Union website www.manchesterstudentsunion.com/groups

Student reps serve as the main channel of communication between the School and the student body and have regular opportunities to meet academics and discuss School issues at programme and School committee meetings.

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Don’t miss out on the opportunity to have your say and help us to improve your experience.


SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES: PREPARING FOR SUCCESS IN YOUR SECOND YEAR

PERSONAL SUPPORT AND WELLBEING There is a wealth of support for you and it comes in a variety of guises. Whatever query or difficulty you have this year you don’t need to face it alone.

Your Support Network There are lots of different people on hand to offer you practical advice and support throughout your time at University. They want to help so don’t be afraid to get in touch. • UG Programme Administrators • Disability Co-ordinator • Student Support Officer • Student Welfare Officer • Programme Directors • Academic Advisors • BA (Econ) Programme Tutors • Course Unit Tutors • University Support Services

When things get difficult for you: Mitigating Circumstances We understand that illnesses and difficult or distressing personal circumstances can occur as part of everyone’s life and that these issues may have a profound effect on your studies. This is a normal part of life and you mustn’t be afraid to contact us if you find yourself in a difficult situation. We have a ‘mitigating circumstances’ procedure in place that means we can make sure you get the support you need to get you back on track. Don’t sit in your room and worry about things. If something is upsetting you, then it’s not trivial! Come and see us.

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SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES: PREPARING FOR SUCCESS IN YOUR SECOND YEAR

Notes

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School of Social Sciences Undergraduate Support Office Arthur Lewis Building The University of Manchester Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL tel: +44 (0) 161 306 1340 email: socialsciences@manchester.ac.uk www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug

DW991.04.14 | The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL | Royal Charter Number RC000797


Preparing for Success 2014 - Year 2