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60

F

Pe.:qacw3ine OF THE

COLL NOtt\‘ (C

414' 74‘,

NOVEMBER,

1886. Lti k

No. 17.

Vo l.. III.

Independent College, CONTENTS.

Page

School News

113

Speech Day

117

•More Recolleaions of a Sleepy Town ...

125

Cricket

131

Batting Averages

132

Table of Matches

138

Football ...

139

gailUtrin GOODMAN AND SON, PRINTERS, NORTH STREET.

PRICE SIXPENC E


WEIRFIELD SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. TAUNTON. -

Principal: Mrs. LOVEDAY. School is pleasantly situated, near the Independent T HECollege. It has Croquet and Tennis Lawns, a large Gymnasium and gravelled Playground, and a well-fitted Bath Room. The Pupils are regularly prepared for the Cambridge Local and the College of Preceptors Examinations.

PROSPECTUS ON APPLICATION.

,

• ).-? •

cr.


HE j\A_ AGA Z NE S<--OF THE

)fittNitolittoli ‘nlitgt, autiton, SCHOOL NEWS. HE Speech Day at the end of last Term was an unequalled success. The presence of H. J. Wilson, Esq., M.P. (an Old ° Boy), rendered the proceedings even more interesting than usual, which is saying a great deal. Rev. Arthur Hall gave. to the boys, previous to the distribution of the Prizes, a stirring address, which was most attentively listened to. The Entertainment in the evening was well patronised, and amply rewarded those who had come some distance in order to be present, the musical items in tilt programme being supplemented by a highly amusing and successful performance of the trial scene from " Pickwick." We were very pleased to see such a good number of Old Boys present. Individuals of the species " Old Boy " are always most welcome, and we hope that next Speech Day will bring forth even a larger attendance than that which we were rejoiced to see last time. One of the most interesting of the Speech Day features was the presentation of a Testimonial to Mr. J. G. Loveday, by the Masters and Past and Present Pupils of the College, in recognition of his invaluable services in the promotion of athletics during the past eighteen years. Mr. Loveday's efforts in this dire6tion, and the success which has attended them, are too well known and appreciated to need any further reference here ; suffice it to say, that while he has been connected with the College he has been a tower of strength, both in , the Cricket and Football fields, and he has always undertaken the onerous duties of Honorary Secretary, on the occasions of

W

No. 17. November, 1886.


II4

SCHOOL NEWS.

Athletic Sports being held. The Testimonial took the form of a very handsome sofa, and a silver afternoon tea-tray ; on the latter was the following inscription, very elegantly engraved :â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PRESENTED TO JAMES G. LOVEDAY, BY THE MASTERS, AND PAST AND PRESENT PUPILS OF THE INDEPENDENT COLLEGE, TAUNTON, IN RECOGNITION OF HIS SERVICES IN THE PROMOTION OF ATHLETICS, AND AS A TOKEN OF THEIR ESTEEM. JULY 29TH, 1886. Rev. F. W. Aveling made a few appropriate remarks, and was followed by Mr. F. W. Lea, who said a few words as an Old Boy. Mr. Loveday received a magnificent ovation as he rose to thank the donors, which he did in some well chosen words, and we hope he will find the gifts not merely ornamental, but useful. The Hon. Secretary of the Testimonial Fund desires to take this opportunity to thank those Old Boys who sent donations, and to say that he wishes all could have been present to witness the great and cordial success which their assistance enabled the Testimonial Committee to achieve. A detailed account of Speech Day will be found in another part of the Magazine. Although a full record of our Cricket Season is contained elsewhere, still, considering what a splendid record it is, mention of it must be made here. Twelve matches were played, of which 6 were won, and 6 drawn. Defeat was unknown to the team. Seldom indeed is it that we can see such a fine record in School Cricket. Two of the team, R. S. B. Savery (capt.), and W. Bartlett, played during the season for their county, each for the first time, and we are gratified to know that their play for the College was instrumental in their being seledted to places in the County Eleven. Remarks on individual play will be found further on. R. S. B. Savery was on the Speech Day presented with a Somersetshire Wanderers' Blazer, Cap and Sash, as a reward for his numerous brilliant batting achievements, and S. C. Goodman received a bat for the best bowling average.


SCHOOL NEWS.

115

We regret the loss this term of Mr. W. P. Balfern, who has gone to Regent's Park College, with the view of entering upon a career of active work in the Christian Ministry. He has our hearty good wishes. The vacancy in the staff of Masters caused by his departure, has been filled by Mr. A. Baker, B.A. (Oxon.), who has so stepped into the shoes of his predecessor as to have accepted the office of secretary to the Reading Room, a post which is by no means a sinecure. A series of Entertainments has been arranged for this term, and we venture to think that the idea is a most capital one. Two of these Entertainments have already been held, and both have proved highly interesting, and have been thoroughly appreciated. The first consisted of recitations, by W. Miller, Esq., a gentleman whom we have had the pleasure of hearing before, and with whom we should like to be still further acquainted. Mr. Miller's programme was of a varied and interesting character, as may be gathered from the fact that it consisted of the following :â&#x20AC;&#x201D;" The voice of the Wind " (A. Procctor); " The Pied Piper of Hamelin " (Browning); " Love in a Balloon ; " " The Diver " (Schiller, translated by Lytton) ; " Rubinstein's Piano Playing " (Anon.) ; " The Battle of Morgarten " (Hemans) ; " Lady Clare " (Tennyson) ; " The Tuggses at Ramsgate " (Dickens). Of the comic pieces, the most entertaining was certainly " Rubinstein's Piano Playing," Mr. Miller's rendering of it eliciting great laughter and applause. Of the more serious pieces, perhaps the most appreciated was "The Diver;" " The Pied Piper," and " Love in a Balloon," proved also to be great favourites. At the conclusion of the last recitation, Mr. Miller made a short speech, in which he offered to give a recitation prize to the boy who, at the end of the school year, should be judged to have most distinguished himself in reciting at concerts or other entertainments, held in connection with the College. We hope some of the younger boys will bear in mind this generous offer. On Wednesday, November 3rd, the second of the series of Entertainments was held, and proved to be highly interesting and an unqualified success. Mr. Alfred Capper gave us one of his clever demonstrations of so-called " Thought Reading,"â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a part of the programme which was preceded by a few illustrations of sleight


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SCHOOL NEWS.

of hand, such as extricating one's wrists from a cord with which they had been firmly tied together, &c., and a very amusing musical sketch, entitled : " The Silver Wedding." In the Thought Reading Seance, Mr. Capper was eminently successful, and amongst his performances may be mentioned his discovering a person thought of among the audience, discovery of a hidden pin, and three places previously touched by it, removal of an article from one place to another (predetermined by one of the audience), and the enadtment of an imaginary murder. Altogether Mr. Capper quite charmed everyone, by his easy and finished way of doing things, and we are sure that if ever he appears in Taunton again, all who had the pleasure of seeing him on this occasion, will not let the opportunity slip of again witnessing the demonstrations of his skill. In our official capacity, as Editors, we thank Mr. Capper for the most enjoyable evening which we spent in his company. W. H. Cox, B. Campion, Pearson, H. Wilkinson, and W. B. Gregson have been chosen Monitors, and W. B. Gregson has been eledted Football Captain. We are sure that Gregson will do credit to the office which he holds. On the 24th of August last, the Provincial Grand Lodge of Somerset Freemasons held a meeting at the Masonic Hall, Taunton. The Provincial Grand Masterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Earl Carnarvon, Promiweig Grand Master of Englandâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;was present, and appointed our Principal, the Rev. F. W. Aveling, to be Provincial Grand Chaplain of Somerset for the ensuing year. This honour has never before been conferred upon a Nonconformist in Somerset.

OLD BOYS' DOINGS. B. W. L. Ashford, who did so much for us as a three-quarter, whilst a pupil at the College, has been moved by the Bank authorities to Exeter. The papers of that city describe his play as " wonderful." He was seled-ted to play three-quarter for the Western Counties v. London. Though he gained no points, his play was of such a charadler, that he was again played for London and the South v. Oxford and Cambridge. In the Sportsman of yesterday, it was officially stated that he has been given a place in the International matches. Bravo! Ashford, and the same to the Independent College I


117

SPEECH DAY. -0 one could have wished for a more enjoyable Speech Day than that of last term. Weather was propitious, Visitors were plentiful, and Old Boys numerous. The proceedings were highly interesting, and the presence of H. J. Wilson, Esq., M.P. tended to increase the interest. The customary Cricket Match between Past and Present was played in the fore and afternoon of the first day, and resulted in an easy victory for the Present by 94 runs, thanks to Savery's batting, and Goodman's bowling. A detailed account of this is to be found elsewhere. At five o'clock, tea was provided for the visitors, and at six o'clock, there was a service in the school-room, conduccled by the Rev. Arthur Hall. The service commenced with the hymn, " All people that on earth do dwell," sung to the Old Hundredth tune. Sir J. Goss's anthem, " 0 taste and see," was sung. Mr. T. Wood presided at the organ. The Rev. Arthur Hall (of the Congregational Church, Bedminster), preached an eloquent and appropriate sermon, taking as his text, Corinthians ix. 24. In the course of a powerful and pracctical address, he said, when a boy he hated sermons on such occasions as the present. He wished to speak especially to the young people present. The Apostle Paul spoke of a race that was run. The ancients held games chiefly in honour of the gods, and the victors were heroes of valour. They were taken home in triumphal cars, and in order to show them the greatest honour, the walls of their city were pulled down to let them pass through. Those who competed in those ancient games gave themselves previous training. This he wished the young to do. They were starting out in life; many of them were leaving the school ; and as in the race, so in life, they should try and get a good start. The victor in the Olympian game was given a laurel crown of honour, and as they were rewarded and received honours so should they "run patiently the race set before them." To those beginning the race of life much depended upon the start. The young men present who were going out into the world would find competition very hardly pressing them in all diredtions, and in the race of life, to begin in the right way was a grand thing. They

JN


118

SPEECH DAY.

needed the Holy Spirit of God to preserve them throughout life. During the delivery of this address, Mr. Hall so stirred the audience that frequent applause was given, notwithstanding the characcter of the service. The service concluded with the hymn, " Christian, dost thou see them." The distribution of prizes commenced at half-past seven o'clock, the school-room being well filled with the parents and friends of the boys. The room had been tastefully decorated for the occasion with flowers and evergreens by Mrs. Aveling, Mrs. Loveday, Miss Mukle, and several other ladies. Mr. H. J. Wilson, M.P., presided, and he was supported by the Rev. F. W. Aveling, Rev. S. Wilkinson, Rev. A. Hall, Mr. W. Rawlinson, and Mr. J. B. Sully, Mr. Colthurst, Mr. G. Pollard, Mr. J. Latham (Somerset House), Mr. A. Goodman, Mr. J. Kidner (Thurloxton), Mr. Allen (Shepton Mallet), Mr. Haynes, Rev. G. Joyce (Wellington), Mr. J. C. Lambert, Mr. W. E. Wood, Mr. F. W. Lea, Mr. W. P. Balfern, Herr Brinkmann, Mr. J. G. Loveday and Mr. T. Wood. There were also a number of ladies present. The proceedings commenced with an oration in Greek, read by E. Fawckner. An address in Latin was then read by H. Wilkinson ; after which the Principal said they had reason to be exceedingly thankful in looking back over the past year, which, he thought, had been unprecedented in the annals of the College, for success all round ; for while the scholars had passed all their examinations as well as they had ever done—he thought, better than they had ever done before—they had also eclipsed themselves in cricket, not having lost a single match that season (applause). The list of honours gained this year, of which they were exceedingly proud, was as follows :London University—Intermediate Examination in Science, 1st class, F.W. Lea.

Intermediate Examination in Arts, ist class, S. Goodman. Matriculation— Honours, Long, Moss. 1st class—E. Fawckner, Wilkinson, Stephens. Cambridge University-1st in Moral Science Tripos, A. Cornish (an Old Boy). Cambridge Local J uniors—t st class— Honours, Cuff (distinguished in Mathematics and English) ; 2nd class—honours, A. P. Fawckner, Hibbert (distinguished in Latin) ; A. Sully (distinguished in English) ; 3rd class—honours, G. Banbury (distinguished in English) ; F. Hicks ; 4th class—Clements, Jordan, Philp, C. Sully ; 5th class—Shapland ; class over 16 years old, S. Wansbrough. College of Preceptors—Ist class-1st division—J. Gates (distinguished in Scripture); Cass ; znd class, E. Colebrook, G. Lovibond. Owen, Lake ; 3rd class, Carling, Carpenter, Cooke. T, Cule, W. Cox, Edginton, E. Hutchison, Jones, Mortimer, Northcott, S. Pollard, Rowsell, Smith, S. Sullivan, Trollope, Whitmey.


SPEECH DAY.

119

He felt profoundly thankful that they had once more succeeded in passing five boys in matriculation, although they had only sent four up—(laughter). That was a thing which they had accomplished once before, and was a peculiarity at Taunton. They could not do much better than that—(hear, hear). They felt thankful for the help they had had for so many years, and for the earnestness which both masters and pupils have shown in trying to make the school a success. At the same time, they seized that opportunity of thanking very heartily the Committee for the immense amount of time, care, and trouble they had bestowed upon the college, simply from the desire to make it a success--(applause). In their school, while they loved Latin and Greek, they were not ashamed of good old English subjefts, and they actually taught history, geography, and grammar there—(laughter). They wished that college to be for all people who would partake of its advantages--(hear, hear). He congratulated the boys very heartily on what they had done that year, and he also spoke in eulogistic terms of the masters, with whom he had worked most cordially during the last twelve months. He thought he might safely say that since he had been at the college, he had never known a time when either in the domestic or the magisterial arrangements, matters were better than they had been during the past twelve months—(applause). On behalf of the masters and others present, he thanked the Rev. A. Hall for the honest and manly words be had spoken to them, and he also thanked the ladies for their kindness in decorating the room for that evening. Mr. H. J. Wilson, M.P., then distributed the prizes in accordance with the following list :— Distinaions in External Examinations by Pupils who have left :— Cambridge University—ist in Moral Science Tripos, A. Cornish, B.A. Theological Tripos, Rev. J. Bowen, B.A. By Pupils still at the College: Distinctions in Home Examinations—Wills' scholarship, £zo, Wilkinson ; prize of fro for being highest at January matriculation, Moss; Spencer prize, for mathematics and physics, Long; L-5 to highest pupil at Cambridge Local, A. Cuff ; Wills' prize, senior, los., Savery; Wills' prize, junior, los., A. Sully. Good conduct prize (gift of Mr. W. Rawlinson), Savery. Silver medal for Scripture (gift of Principal), A. Sully; prox. acc., G. Banbury. Certificates of Honour on leaving—Cass, Clements, P. Fawckner, Lake, Owen, C. Sully, J. Sully,


120

SPEECH DAY. N.B.—P. denotes prize; c., certificate; h.m., honourable mention.

Class I.—Mathematics—P., Long; P., Pearson ; c., A. Sully; h.m., Bishop h.m., C. Sully; c. for Euclid, P. Fawckner. Latin—P., Wilkinson; c., Moss Hibbert and Savery. Greek—i., Savery, had prize before; P., Wilkinson ; P. for classics, Hibbert. German—(I. Division), P., Moss (had it before); c., Cuff; (II. Division), P., Clements; c., Pearson ; h.m., C. Sully, Goodman, French—i., Moss (had prize before); c., Savery, Long; h.m., Hibbert, P. Fawckner. History and Geography—P., P. Fawckner ; c., Cass; c., J. N. Sully; h.m., Hibbert. Writing—P., Philp ; c., T. Ridley; c., Jordan; h.m., Linton, Wright. Drawing—P., P. Fawckner; c., Hollingworth, A. Banbury and Baker. Painting—P., Sommerville; c., Porter, W. Gregson, A. Sully. English language —P., Cass; c., P. Fawckner ; h.m., Hibbert and Long. Music—P., Hibbert; c., A. Sully; c., Porter; c., C. Sully; c., S. Evans. Chemistry—c., Moss. Natural Philosophy—c., Bishop. Scripture—P., A. Sully; ii. P., G. Banbury; c., J. Sully; c., Sommerville; c., Hibbert ; c., Porter. Golden optimi prizes—Moss, Cuff, Porter. Shorthand—c., P. Fawckner, A. Hutchison; Bishop; S. D. Cox, Jordan. Class II.—Mathematics--P., G. Banbury; c., Hibbert and Porter ; Euclid certificate, Lake. Latin—P., G. Banbury , c., A. Sully; h.m., Clements; C. Sully, Bishop. Greek—c., P. Fawckner. German—(a), P., G. Banbury; P., A. Sully; c., Porter, Philp and W. Gregson; (b), P., Bishop; h.m., Sullivan, Sommerville. French—P., A. Sully; c., Pearson; h.m., Porter and Philp. History and Geography—P., A. Sully ; P., G. Banbury; h.m., Pearson; C. Sully, Duncan. Writing—P., Goodman; c., Duncan, S. Evans; h.m., R. Medway and A. Banbury. Drawing—P., Cass. Painting—P., A. Hutchison. Grammar and Shakespeare—P., G. Banbury; P., A. Sully; c., Philp, Pearson; h.m., T. Ridley, Bishop, Clements, C. Sully, W. Duncan. Scripture—P., Rowsell ; c., W. L. Cox, R. Sullivan, Carling. Natural Philosophy—c., Fawckner, A. Sully, C. Sully, Porter. Scripture (Mondays and Thursdays) —c., G. Lovibond. Class III.—Mathematics —P., W. Duncan ; c., Sommerville and Hollingworth; Euclid certificate, Porter and Philp; h.m., Goodman and A. Cule. Latin—P., A. Banbury; c., Philp. Greek—P., G. Banbury; c., F. Sully. German—P., Owen; c., W. Duncan and S. Chapman. French —P., G. Banbury; c., T. Ridley and B. Colebrook. History and Geography—P., A. Banbury; c., A. Cule. Writing—P., A. Hutchison; c., Eastmond and Lake. Grammar—P., T. Ridley; c., Sommerville and Lake; h.m., Northcott. Scripture—c., A. Cule. Shakespeare—c., A. Banbury, S. Chapman, Sommerville; h.m., B. Colebrook. Class IV.—Mathematics—P., A. Banbury ; c., Bebb, Ball, E. Ridley. Latin—P., E. Evans; c., Owens, Porter, F. Sully. French—P., Lake; c., A. Banbury; h.m., Sommerville. History and Geography—P., Heywood ; P., Eastmond ; c., Marshall; c., Revill; h.m., Edginton, Dougharty, R. Medway, Trollope. Writing—P., C. Goodland ; P., Owen; c., E. Goodland. Grammar— P., Rowsell; c., Mortimer, E. Ridley, F. Vowles, W. Vowles. A. Banbury; c., Smith, Whitmey. Class V.—Mathematics—P., R. Griffiths; c., Eastmond ; h.m., G. Dew, Joyce, Dyer. Latin—P., C. Goodland; c., A. Williams. French—P., Rowsell; c., Pedler, E. Ridley ; h.m., C. Goodland, A. Hare. History and Geography—P., G. Dew; P., W. Williams; c., Dyer, S. Hutchison, Jones, F. Vowles, W. Vowles. Writing—P., Jones; c., Dougharty. Grammar—P., Jones; c., D. Cox, W. Dew, S. Hutchison, W. Williams. Spelling—c., G. Dew; c., F. Vowles; h.m., Chambers. Class VI.—Latin—P., S. Hutchison; c., A. Cule, T. Cule, A. Medway. French—P., Owen; c., A. Evans; h.m., Bebb, T. Griffiths. Spelling, c., R. Griffiths. JUNIOR SCHOOL. Class I.—Scripture-1st prize, F. Hayman ; znd, F. E. Colthurst; c., C. P. Goldsmith, Arithmetic—ist, A. Paul; znd, W. H, Densham ; c., J. A. Godding.


SPEECH DAY.

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History—P., J. A. Godding; c., F. E. Colthurst; c., F. S. Hayman. Grammar— P., F. E. Colthurst. Reading and Spelling—c., F. S. Hayman. Geography— P., F. E. Colthurst; c., F. S. Hayman. French—xst prize, F. E. Colthurst ; 2nd, F. 0. Hayman. Latin-1st prize, F. E. Colthurst; c., J. A. Godding. Music —P., P. Weston. Drawing and Writing—F. E. Colthurst. Natural History—P., C. P. Goldsmith. Class II.—Scripture—P., L. B. Aveling. Arithmetic—P., A. Wilkinson; c., H. S. Ware. History-1st prize, L. R Aveling; znd, W. Y. Jepson, for History, Grammar and Geography. Reading—P., A. Wilkinson. Spelling—P., W. Y. Jepson (including History, &c). French—P., A. Wilkinson, 1st prize ; c., H. Mullock. Drawing and Writing—Mullock. Class III.—Arithmetic—c., R. W. Cook. English—P., H. Crease. Scripture —P., H. Crease. Good condudt—P., J. G. Turner, given by Mrs. Geo. Sully. Best colleCtion of birds' eggs—xst, Rolls; 2nd, F. Lovibond.

The Chairman then addressed the students, congratulating the prize winners, not only because prizes were tokens of hard work, but as they were an encouragement to them to go on in the future, and try for more—(applause). He strongly urged them to do all they could to retain the knowledge they acquired at that institution, some of which would be useful for its own sake, and some of which might be useful chiefly as a discipline of the mind—(applause). He would like to congratulate Mr. Aveling and his staff of masters on the success the school had attained, and the various distindiions in the universities and other places that had been gained. It was 36 years since he left that Taunton school. He spent two happy years at the school, and left it with regret. He came back again with pleasure—(applause). He was glad to congratulate them on the success of the school, and that it was in a flourishing condition. He was glad to bear his testimony to the good that it did in days that were past, and to the good that it did to himself. The foundation of some of the use he had been able to be in the world he attributed to the conversation he had had with the masters and some of the elder boys in the Taunton playground—(applause). It was in the days of Dr. Bewglass and his staff, and he should always look back with pleasure and interest to those days— (applause). He urged those boys who were remaining at the college to do their utmost to keep up the tone of the school. He must say for the old days, there was a good tone and feeling in the school, and a good public spirit such as he had never heard existing anywhere else (hear, hear). To those who were going out into life—some to college and elsewhere, some into the adtive business of-iife, such as trade, commerce, and agriculture; some, perhaps to


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SPEECH DAY.

emigrate, and some, perhaps, to preach the Gospel in England or elsewhere—he could not predict the future—he wished them well in all their avocations, wherever they went—(applause). He would say to them—Try and do your duty whatever your avocation is—(applause). There was no better epitaph that could be put over a man than " Here lies a man who tried to do his duty "(applause). They could all do that, and they could endeavour to fulfil the duties of Christian citizens. What was a Christian citizen ? He should say it was a Christian politician for one thing ; and a Christian politician was very much the same thing as a political Christian, and he thought there was scarcely anyone of our country at the present time to whom they looked in the future so much as Christian politicians. Some of the boys might at no distant date be members of public bodies, and it was an honourable ambition ; but the honour lay in the work that they did. They should never accept a position unless they could do some good to other people in filling it. In conclusion, he wished the college every success in the future. Mr. W. Rawlinson proposed a vote of thanks to the preacher, the Rev. A. Hall, and to the chairman, for his excellent address— (applause). He believed it was of great importance to the scholars that they should have before them one who was in the same position as they were, and who had through life distinguished himself not only by rising in position and rank, but by doing that which was right—(applause). He was sure the sentiments which the chairman had uttered would remain, and would, as he had hoped they would, be seed cast upon good ground—(applause). The Rev. S. Wilkinson seconded the vote of thanks, which having been unanimously accorded, Mr. Wilson briefly acknowledged, and the proceedings terminated. On Thursday evening, the usual breaking up Concert was given in the school-room, and proved to be of an unusually interesting chara6ter; the musical part of the programme was very good, the chief feature being the rendering of Locke's music to Macbeth by the choir and orchestra, which consisted of organ, strings, flutes and drums ; taken on the whole, a very good rendering was given. Both pianoforte solos were well played, and the recitations were


SPEECH DAY.

123

very effective; that by Aveling being particularly well enunciated. The concluding item, the trial scene from Pickwick, caused much amusement, Buzfuz and Weller being splendidly impersonated by F. Sully and Campion respectively ; the latter indeed kept the audience in perpetual laughter whilst giving his evidence. Head and E. Hutchison performed their parts also in a very praiseworthy manner. The first part of the programme was as follows: ... Composed and spoken by A. Moss GERMAN PROLOGUE ... A. Diabelli PIANO DUET HIBBERT AND DOUGHARTY. M. Browne " Lilliput Land" RECITATION L. AVELING. ... 7. Otto "The Dance" PART SONG ... W. A. Eaton ... The Bridgekeeper's Story" RECITATION A. CARPENTER. Locke "MACBETH" A. BANBURY 1st Witch ... S. EVANS znd Witch Mr. THEO. TAYLOR 3rd Witch Mr. J. G. LOVEDAY 4th Witch CHORUS AND ORCHESTRA. SPEAKERS:— WILKINSON Lady Macbeth .. Moss Macbeth .. HIBBERT ... Messenger Composed and spoken by LONG ... French Epilogue

The Head Master, during the interval, said that they had that evening to recognize the valuable services rendered by Mr. Loveday during his eighteen years' connection with the college, not only to the scholastic work of the institution, but in the equally important matter of sports; they did not want to turn out boys who were mere animals, neither did they wish for boys, all brains, who would go into consumption at r8. He had to ask Mr. Loveday's acceptance of a sofa, which was too unwieldly to bring into the room, and a silver salver, which bore the following inscription.— "Presented to James G. Loveday, by the masters and past and present pupils of the Independent College, Taunton, in recognition of his services in the promotion of athletics, and as a token of their esteem. July 29th, 1886."—(Cheers). He had also to present to


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SPEECH DAY.

Savery a Blazer, Cap, and Sash, for the best scores in cricket this season, and a Bat to S. Goodman as the best bowler. Mr. Lea, as an Old Boy, adding a few words with respe& to Mr. Loveday, remarked that he had been foremost in every form of athletic sport, and had done more than any man there to promote the success of the college in the field. Mr. Loveday briefly acknowledged the gifts, observing that his connection with the college began eighteen years ago on that date ; he found that cricket and football were at a very low ebb, and the playground and field were very poor ; however, all those things had been remedied. In 1870, they gained their first cricket victory, by beating the Wesleyan college, and they had continued their career very successfully, with ups and downs, until the present season, which had been an especially victorious one. He thanked them very heartily for the presents they had given him. The second part of the programme was then rendered as follows : ... "Sleep, gentle lady" (With Orchestral accompaniment). ... ... "The last Watch" SONG Mr. THEO. TAYLOR. RECITATION ... ... "The M.P. Candidate" ... F. HAYMAN. "O Fatherland" ... PART SONG "My sweet Dorabella"... TRIO Messrs. TAYLOR, W. E. WOOD AND J. G. LOVEDAY. PIANO DUET ... . . "La Chasse" W. COOKE AND WESTON (Juniors). PART SONG

...

H. Bishop C. Pinsuti Oudentia F. Abt. Mozart S. 7arvis

Dickens "TRIAL. SCENE FROM PICKWICK " A., SULLY, F., SULLY, C., CARPENTER, H. WILKINSON, H. PEARSON, GREGSON, T., WANSBROUGH, HOLLINGSWORTH, HANNAFORD, JORDAN, TROLLOPE, HUTCHISON, E., HUTCHISON, A., HEAD, DAVIES, T., LAKE, HIBBERT, JONES, MORTIMER.

LONG, CAMPION, SULLY,

â&#x20AC;˘


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MORE RECOLLECTIONS OF A SLEEPY TOWN. (Continued).

0

r

T may appear strange that the former M.P's. for the County had not elected to stand for Bridgetown Division. But they were men who felt acutely their unworthiness for such a high position. Both of them also were desirous that the other should have the unique honour of standing for Bridgetown, and as neither would yield in generosity, they both retired to lowlier and safer seats. It may also have struck the reader that no mention has been made of the remainder of the Division, and of its right to have a voice in the selection of Candidates. But on re-consideration, he will easily and properly perceive that the paramount position of Bridgetown could not brook interference or advice. The benefit it was conferring on humanity in general, by taking an active part in its affairs, was so plain to the world that it was not to be expected it could be in any way restricted or harassed in the exercise of its discrimination. The rest of the Division, after a feeble and futile atttempt to assert equality at the outset, subsided into a mute and thankful submission to the decrees of its autocrat. Sir Camelot Constable included in his programme the following propositions, by desire of his Bridgetown Committee:â&#x20AC;&#x201D; I. That Absolute Monarchy, assisted, advised, and interpreted by Bridgetown Tories, and their heirs and successors, was the ordained and only practical Constitution of the United Kingdom. II. That Hereditary Aristocracy was inseparably connected with land. III. That consequently, all land should belong to hereditary Aristocrats; and as a natural sequence, no one could possibly be an Aristocrat, unlesss he was the hereditary owner of land. IV. That the good of the Aristocrats was the supreme end to be desired and achieved. V. Consequently, a return to protection, and the entire prohibition of all imports tending to depreciation in value of British husbandry. And VI. That England was by its geographical position, and the character of its hereditary inhabitants, clearly intended to be


126 MORE RECOLLECTIONS OF A SLEEPY TOWN. the ruler of the world, and that for the maintenance and assertion of our Divine prerogative, all other nations should be compelled, under peril of war and ultimate annihilation, to acknowledge and bow to our supremacy. Mr. Ridd commenced his address to the Eledtors with the statement, that up to the present time England had been governed on an entirely false system. That its claims to supremacy were unfounded and unjust. That the dwellers in Great Britain (excepting Bridgetown) had deteriorated, both in morals and physique. That the people of America, France and India, were immeasurably our superiors in civilization. That the only chance we had of improvement was to retrace our steps, and to slowly and painfully rebuild the fabric of our Constitution upon their model and example. That the hereditary system was pernicious, and land-owning a curse. That all land should be vested in a sort of State Council, composed of Bridgetown Liberal politicians, and that the only hereditary system permitted in the Country should be the well deserved privileges and honors of Bridgetown Radicals. And finally, that the best cure for present evils would be a Republican form of Government, under the tutelage and inspiration of the Bridgetown Liberal and Radical Association. It will easily he understood that the Ele6tion did not in any sense turn upon any of the so-called great political questions of the day. Neither did the Candidates strive to attra5t voters to their respective standards by declaring themselves to be followers of any of the great party leaders of the day. The Bridgetown theories were the battle-ground of the opposing parties. The Bridgetonians themselves were the only leaders Bridgetonians could possibly allow themselves to recognize. Sir Camelot Constable opened the campaign by a large meeting of his supporters (intermingled with opponents) at the Town Hall. He was introduced to Bridgetown by Mr. Clement Dencourt, the President of the Bridgetown Conservative Association. Mr. Dencourt impressively assured his hearers that the hour of destiny had struck, and that the man of the time had, in obedience to the mandate of Providence, revealed


MORE RECOLLECTIONS OF A SLEEPY TOWN. 127 himself. He was happy to say, that however grieved they might all be at the appalling revolution in society, and in the government of this unhappy country, however horror-stricken and indignant they might feel at the dastardly futile conduft of the late Liberal Government—yet in Sir Camelot Constable they had an imperial soul, a master mind, who would weld all these inconsistencies into one perfe6t whole—who could recall the lost chord of national harmony ; and who still lived and a6ted in the past with those grand old ancestors of his, whose proudest boast was that England was the only free, the only happy, and the only glorious Country in the world. That one very strong reason—in addition to the faec that it was a most fitting decree of Providence why England was free, why England was glorious, and why England was happy, was that it held such a bright jewel in its crown as the ancient and faithful Borough of Bridgetown, and with a comprehensive wave of his hand from Sir Camelot Constable to the audience, Mr. Dencourt made way for the Conservative Candidate. Then, amidst the deafening cheers of the true Blues, the stamping of sticks, and hoarse growls and murmurs on behalf of the warriors on retired pay who crowded the platform, and the shrill cat-calls, whistling and howling of the Radical remnant, the Hon. Baronet rose to open the attack. It would be wearisome to people not imbued with Bridgetown tradition, nor, perchance, capable of appreciating or even understanding the Bridgetown theory of politics, to quote the great speech at any length. How he opened with a disclaimer of any ambition or self interest on behalf of himself, but declared his zeal to perpetuate the undying name of Bridgetown with its glorious principles and theories on the heart of the nation. How he deplored the short-sightedness of the Country in not having before recognized the sterling worth and inestimable qualities of Bridgetown. How he pulverised the home measures, and the foreign diplomacy of, the late Liberal Government ; together with the arguments and proposals of his Liberal opponent for the Division into irreconcilable atoms, and logically explained with irresistible eloquence and lucidity the scheme which had been


â&#x20AC;˘ 128 MORE RECOLLECTIONS OF A SLEEPY TOWN. formulated by the Conservative party in Bridgetown for the better government of the Country. How he vent wed to consider this scheme the most statesmanlike attempt to restore order, and the right condition of things the world had ever seen or. heard of, refledling everlasting glory upon England, and the gratitude of a thankful people upon Bridgetown. Is it not all written in the Archives of the Conservative Association, and enshrined in the memories of all true Tories ? The meeting was then addressed by two or three of the local leaders, who had plenty to say, but did not know the way td say it, as public speaking was an art little known, indeed hitherto discouraged in Bridgetown. A resolution was proposed and seconded that Bridgetown deemed Sir Camelot Constable worthy of representing the town in the ensuing Parliament, and carried by an enormous majority. Two days after this great event, Mr. John Ridd met a public meeting of his supporters at the Public Assemblyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a room half as large again as the Town Hall. The place was crammed with lower class people of all sorts and conditions. That is to say, the Aristocrats, with one or two noteworthy exceptions, were conspicuous by their absence. The chair was taken by Alexander Connington, Esq., a man bred up in the fold of Toryism, and fed from his youth upwards upon the doctrines of class privilege ; but who had concluded that the only hope of his country surviving the shock of anarchy was in going forth .= to meet the foe, instead of barricading the gates against them. He hoped to lead Liberalism into the right path by persistent inculcation of the theories of Bridgetown Radicals, and had a firm conviction that the adoption of a Constitution on the model of a foreign republic, would soon conduce to the elevation of England amongst the nations of Europe, inspired and regulated as it would be by the unequalled talent and sagacity of Bridgetown Progressists. He was a verbose orator, and held his audience in thrall for an hour, whilst he expatiate4 upon the woes and miseries, the mistakes and misfortunes of England, the aggravated mischief and meddling importunity of the present Tory Government, and the need for a strong hand and a willing and


Fre-77–

/•

-

MORE RECOLLECTIONS OF A SLEEPY TOWN. 129 capable intellect to redeem us from the enervating and degrading bondage of the past. He felt convinced that Mr. John Ridd would satisfy all requirements, except the fancies of bigoted and drivelling Tories, and that the time would come when even they would acknowledge that Bridgetown deserved well of mankind for having inaugurated a British Republic with peace, plenty, and prosperity) under the auspices of its premier President, their honourable Candidate, Mr. John Ridd. . Mr. Ridd spoke in striking contrast to his Chairman—of hesitating manner, and slow in speech, yet his language was plain and direct, and he contrived to fully enunciate his views in an address of about half an hour's duration. A vote, pledging the meeting to support him was also carried by an enormous majority, and thus the campaign commenced. In the art of canvassing, the Radicals decidedly showed the way to their Tory Townsmen. The latter, by the very nature of their sympathies and antipathies, abhorred argument. Of course, all Bridgetonians, in the normal state of things, disliked anything approaching discussion or heated language. Calm alternative propositions, and ensuing meditation thereon, before committal to a theory—the result arrived at by each controversialist being invariably locked in his bosom for fear of contradiction—was the practice usually adopted. But upon occasions like the present, when their abnormal faculties were aroused, Bridgetonians expected to whet their intellects by dispute, to cross swords in debate one with the other, and woe betide the unlucky canvasser who is not perfectly " posted " in all the intricacies of diplomacy and commerce, home and foreign affairs. The Tories declared in despair that the voters were hopelessly ignorant. They could not, or would not understand the beauties or advantages of Fair Trade, or of Protection, whether those economical dodlines were viewed in a practical or in a theoretical light. The whole realm of voters outside the half-pay circle, and the villas of swelldom strenuously refused to recognize the claims to superiority put forth on behalf of the Aristocracy and Landowners. They wound not believe in Absolutism, and liked cheap bread. The Conservative Cause in Bridgetown did


13o MORE RECOLLECTIONS OF A SLEEPY TOWN.

not seem likely to gain adherents outside the " hupper suckles,' unless the fishing vote could be brought over. Now what was the fishing vote ? The fishermen of Bridgetown comprised the remnant of the original native population before the introdudlion of trade, and the establishment of a standing army, with half-pay pensioners and hangers on as its natural consequence. They were stolidly indifferent to eledlions. It did not appear that any advantage was to accrue to them therefrom, and at a great council held. at the " Great Seal," the ancient hostelry consecrated to the memories of past and gone seagoing folk, it was almost decided to have nothing to do with eledlions one way or • another. " Well, mates," said one of the debaters " afore we hoist a nootral flag to these 'ere combatants let's have a jaw wi' old grandfer Tom." "Ay, ay, Jack," cried the rest, "you be right there, mate."—' Ask the old man to come out, Mary." Grandfather Tom was an ancient, over 96 years of age, he had only just retired from active business, and had transferred his nets, along with his lounging, lazy habits, to the youngest of his ten sons, a stripling of the age of 6o or thereabouts. " Oh! ay ! boys, so you be ledtioneering, be 'ee ! So you be 'leetioneering ! "—He chuckled, when the reason of his being brought into consultation had been carefully and lengthily explained. After that burst, the old worthy subsided in the arm chair that had been brought for him by his grand-daughter, and the hostess. The thought seemed to take him back to merry days. He several times broke into chuckling and gleeful murmurs, as if he was rolling some splendid joke on the tip of his tongue which would lose flavour by utterance. All the bystanders remained in reverent silence. After a pause, the old man began in feeble tones—" I mind well ledtioneering when I was a lad. Ah! they was times, to be sure. Old Squire Cary put up 'gainst Sir Bampfield Courtenay. Barrels o' beer everywhere. No 'casion to go home for victual. Cause why! weren't there a plenty at all the 'houses,' and a golden sovereign for every man as done his duty to the Squire? We was all Squire Cary's men, we‘was." (To be Continued).

1


â&#x20AC;˘

131

CRICKET.

*

/ T was thought at the beginning of last Cricket Season that we had a very good team, and one which would render a very good account of itself. No one was, however, prepared for the exceptionally brilliant performances of the 1st Eleven, and certainly the Cricket Season of 1886 will long be remembered as one of the most successful ever experienced by the College, and as one in which we were unbeaten. Mention is made elsewhere of individual achievements, but a good thing will bear repetition, and we, therefore, repeat that the success of the team has been chiefly due to the magnificent batting of our captain, R. S. B. Savery, who is perhaps the best bat the College has ever produced, and to the fine bowling of S. C. Goodman, whose average is superb. Of the 12 matches played, 6 were won and 6 drawn, while of the drawn matches, only one was against us ; 4 were ridiculously in our favour, the remaining 1 being in an even condition. The matches won were :-2 v. Wesleyan College ; 1 v. Blundell's School ; 1 v. Kingston ; 1 v. Bridgwater ; and the Old Boys' Match. The drawn matches were :â&#x20AC;&#x201D; z v. Bathpool ; 1 v. Wellington ; 1 v. Taunton ; 1 v. Kingston ; and x v. Bridgwater. Many brilliant innings were played, chiefly by Savery, and two " centuries " were obtained, one by Savery (143) against Taunton, and one by Bartlett (117) against Kingston. Remarks on individual play follow :Captain : R. S. B. Savery ; Hon. Sec.: F. W. Lea, Esq. Matches played 12 ; won 6 ; drawn 6 ; lost o. THE ELEVEN IN 1886. R. S. B. SAVERY. A magnificent bat, as his average will prove, hitting hard, and with sound defence ; has played such consistently sterling cricket, as to cause his being chosen to play for his county ; bats in a very fine style, is a very good bowler, with break from off, and is a brilliant field anywhere. W. BARTLETT. A very hard-hitting bat ; has been very successful in this department of the game, as his good average shows ; very good mecum-paced bowler, and sure catch ; has also played for his county tlis season. T. WOOD, Esq. Bats in pretty style ; his placing to leg is very neat ; has been a very consistent scorer ; a first-rate wicket keeper, and a fair change bowler.


CRICKET.

132

W. E. WOOD, Esq. Has developed into a steady bat, and has played some useful innings ; a dangerous, rather fast bowler, in which capacity he has been of great use. T. GREGSON. Should make a fine bat, if he went in a little less for hitting, and a little more for defensive play ; a very good field. S. C. CLEMENTS. A very steady bat, though a bit uncertain ; rather slow in the field, but good catch. A. A. LINTON. Bats remarkably well for his size, and will become a first-class batsman ; fair change bowler ; somewhat slow in the field. F. W. LEA, Esq. A careful bat, though not so successful as in former seasons ; good field, and can bowl when required. S. C. GOODMAN. The most successful bowler in the team ; has a splendid average, and has done many good performances with the ball ; bats steadily, though rather uncertain ; fine field at slip. J. G. LOVEDAY, Esq. Invaluable in keeping a team together, and though he has not met with the same success that has hitherto attended him, his absence would create a gap difficult to be filled. A. E. Moss. Disappointing bat, owing to defative sight, but good field and catch. BATTING AVERAGES.

R. S. B. Savery W. Bartlett T. Wood W. E. Wood T. Gregson S. Clements

A. A. Linton F. W. Lea S. C. Goodman J. G. Loveday A. E. Moss G. R. Long

No. of Innings

Times Not Out

Total Runs

Highest Score

Average

12

I

492

143

8

o

258

117

44'7 32.2

12

0

12

2

246 130

6 II ir

3 4

45 69 59

25 35

12

I

89

20*

II ro II 6

r 0 o 0

2

20'5

41 27*

13â&#x20AC;˘ IIâ&#x20AC;˘2

8-6 8.4 8. r 7.6 5'3 2.6

21

76 43 14 53 8 29 5 14 A. Wansbrough played in two innings making o* and Whitmey played in one innings making o. * Signifies not out.

2'3 2.


CRICKET.

133

BOWLING ANALYSIS. Overs Runs Maidens Wickets 126.2 23 284 41 116.i 26 20 232 125.3 277 17 34 58. 13 • 133 7 BOWLED IN TWO INNINGS. I0'2 19 T. Wood, Esq. 3 4 6'2 I A. Linton 22 BOWLED IN ONE INNINGS. I F. W. Lea, Esq. 12 I 4 0 19 G. R. Long 0 4 Goodman, Bartlett, and Savery, each bowled I no ball. S. C. Goodman W. Bartlett R. S. B. Savery W. E. Wood, Esq.

Average 6.8 11.6 16.2 19. 4'7 22' 12'

NOTABLE PERFORMANCES. Name R. S. B. Savery R. S. B. Savery W. Bartlett S. Goodman

For whom Against whom Date Score Independent College Taunton June 3oth 143 Wellington (Somerset) Ishmaelites August 2 & 3 139 Independent College Kingston July 14th 117 Independent College Bridgwater June 12th 5'3 overs, 3 maidens, 4 wickets for 3 runs, average—o.7

WESLEYAN COLLEGE ?J. I. C., T. (Return). This match was played on our ground, July 7th, and resulted in another decisive victory for us. We went in first, on a hard, dry wicket, and made 129. Savery again headed the list, and hit up 35 in dashing style ; Mr. T. Wood contributed 25 in nice form, and towards the close Mr. W. E. Wood played a useful not-out innings of 27. Mr. Lea was unlucky enough to play on, when well-set. When they went in, Goodman bowled so splendidly, that with the exception of Veevers and Yorath, no stand was made, and they were all dismissed for 65, thus leaving us viaors on the first innings by 64 runs. Yorath bowled well for them. The full score and bowling analysis are as follows :INDEPENDENT COLLEGE. Mr. J. G. Loveday c Denny b Yorath Mr. F. W. Lea b Veevers ••• ••• Mr. T. Wood c & b Yoiath ••• .•• R. Savery c Denny b Yorath ••• ••• Mr. W. E. Wood not out ... ••• •.• S. Clements c Sloper b Yorath ••• ••• S. Goodman b Yorath A. Linton c Veevers b Yorath A. E. Moss b Yorath ..• G. R. Long b Sloper S. Whitmey run out ... Extras ... Total

9 13 25 35 27 0 0

2 2 0 II

129


134

CRICKET. WESLEYAN COLLEGE. SECOND INNINGS.

FIRST INNINGS.

Morum b Goodman ... Beeton c Clements b Goodman ... Veevers b Goodman ... ... Yorath c Linton b Goodman ... Sloper b Goodman... ... Gane (2) b Goodman ... ... Ballard b Goodman ... ... Lewis c Linton b Savery Denny c Clements b Goodman ... Gane (2) c Savery b Goodman ... Hadley not out ... Extras ... ... Total

...

5 o 22 22

not out not out

... ...

9 6

o 3 ...

13

Total for one wicket

33

b W. E. Wood

...

3 o 4 2

Extras ...

3 65

BOWLING ANALYSIS. FIRST INNINGS.

C. Goodman R. S. B. Savery Mr. W. E. Wood S.

Overs

Maidens

Runs

Wickets

18

3 4 3

33

9

II

7

18 II

o

Wickets

SECOND INNINGS.

G. R. Long Mr. W. E. Wood

Overs

Maidens

Runs

4 3

0 0

19 59

BLUNDELL'S SCHOOL V. I. C., T. This, the most exciting match of the season, was played on our ground, on July loth, and resulted in a vidlory for us, by the narrow majority of 4 runs. They, having won the toss, went in and made 85, to which Toiler contributed 38 (not out) in very good style, Drage assisting him to put on 36 runs for the eighth wicket. We made a good start, having 39 for 2 wickets, and 57 for 4, but then a series of misfortunes befel us in rapid succession. Savery was bowled by a ball which struck his elbow, and went thence into the wicket ; Mr. T. Wood, who had been playing sterling cricket, succumbed to a shooter; Clements, Mr. W. E. Wood, Moss and Gregson, followed in quick succession, and Goodman, after some plucky hitting, also was dismissed. Nine for 78 ! Then Linton and Long made an unexpeCted stand, and, putting on II runs, won the match amidst the greatest excitement. In their second innings Gooch and Prendergast batted well. Score :â&#x20AC;&#x201D;


CRICKET.

135

BLUNDELL'S SCHOOL. FIRST INNINGS.

SECOND INNINGS.

J.A.Prendergast c Goodman b Savery 4 C. W. Gooch c Gregson b Goodman 7 M. H. Toiler not out ... 38 G. H. Arundell b Savery J. C. Milton b Savery 2 C. W. Brabant b Savery 4 3 N. S. Ashby c Lea b Goodman 9 W. A. Hook b 'Goodman 13 G. W. Dradge run out ... W. J. Harper b Goodman ... o S. Dorling c Goodman b Savery 3 Extras 2

c Loveday b Goodman .. c Savery b Goodman ... not out

Total ... 85 INDEPENDENT COLLEGE. 2 Mr. J. G. Loveday b Toiler . Mr. F. W. Lea 1 b w, b Milton ... Mr. T. Wood b Dorling... 27 R. Savery b Milton ... ••• ••• 4 Mr. W. E. Wood c Gooch b Dorling 9 S. Clements b Dorling S. C. Goodman b Tolley... A. A. Linton not out ... . . ... 5 A. E. Moss b Toiler T. Gregson c Arundell b Dorling... 2 G. R. Long c & b Toiler 5 II Extras

32 ... 28 5

Total ... 65

89

Total BOWLING ANALYSIS. FIRST INNINGS.

Overs S. C. Goodman

R. S. B. Savery Mr. W. E. Wood

Maidens

Runs

Wickets

15 10'3

3 0

33 38

4 5

4

2

12

0

Runs

Wickets

SECOND INNINGS.

Overs S. C. Goodman

6

R. S. B. Savery A. A. Linton

9 5

Maidens

o I 0

27

2

I

o

21

KINGSTON v. I. C. T. (Return). This match, played at Kingston, July 14th, resulted in a draw greatly in our favour, as, had there been a few minutes more, we should have won by a large majority. We went in, but fared badly at first, and but for the stand made by Bartlett and Mr. T. Wood, who put on 156 runs for the fourth wicket, our total would have been meagre indeed. Bartlett's innings of 117 is the highest he has made for us this season. It was worthy of his reputation as a big hitter, including as it did no less than seven 6's (right out of the


„,,.....÷-001111••"”

CRICKET.

136

ground), one 5, one 4, seven 3's, and eleven 2's. Mr. T. Wood batted patiently, and without a chance for 39. At call of time, our opponents had lost 8 wickets for 56, out of which Page was credited with 24. Score :— INDEPENDENT COLLEGE. Mr. F. W. Lea b Graves ... o Mr. W. E. Wood b Page ... 39 Mr. T. Wood c and b Page ... R. Savery b Page ... o W. Bartlett c Page b Graves ... 117 S. C. Goodman c and b Page ... S. Clements not out... ... A. A. Linton b Graves ... A. E. Moss c Burch b Graves ... 2 r T. B. Gregson st Biffin b Page ... x G. R. Long c England b Page ... Extras 3 Total

... 575

KINGSTON. A. Hewett c Goodman b Bartlett W. Summerhayes b Goodman F. Biffin st T. Wood b Bartlett W. England b Goodman ... E. W. Page not out... ... P. Graves run out .. T. Burch c Long b Bartlett ... .. W. Cooper c & b Bartlett H. Middleton run out ... W. Gadd I did not bat H. Wescombe Extras ...

12

Total for eight wickets

56

BOWLING ANALYSIS. Runs Overs Maidens /•/ 19 W. Bartlett 4 17 S. C. Goodman 8 1 8 R. Savery 4

4 4 24 0

6 4 I

Wickets 4 2 0

BATHPOOL P. I. C., T. (Return). On July 23rd, we played our return match with Bathpool on their ground, when a draw was again the result. Thanks chiefly to the vigorous hitting of R. Ford, who had the ill-luck to be last man out, when he seemed certain to carry his bat, their total amounted to 154. He received assistance from Moritz and Hurrel, both of whom, however, were rather lucky. When we started our innings, there was but one hour left for play, and in that time we lost 4 wickets for 6o runs, of which Bartlett made 3o (including one splendid drive, right out of the ground for 6), and Mr. T. Wood 15. The match ended, therefore, in an even draw. Score :— BATHPOOL. T. Ford c T. Wood b Bartlett ... o R. Ford 1 b w, b Goodman ... 84 W. England b Goodman ... 2 T. Biffin c Bartlett b Goodman ... 5 A. Moritz c Long b W. E. Wood 21 A. Martin b Goodman ... H. Harrell 1 b w, b Goodman ... 22 R. Coalsworth run out ... E. Howard st T. Wood b Goodman 4 W. B. Paulin run out ... H. Howard not out ... Extras 13

INDEPENDENT COLLEGE. Mr. J. G. Loveday c R. Ford b Moritz 4 Mr. F.W. Lea c H. Howard b R. Ford 5 Mr. T. Wood c and b R. Ford 15 W. Bartlett c (sub) b Moritz 3o R. S. B. Savery not out ... Mr. W. E. Wood not out ...

Total ... 154

Total (for 4 wkts.) 60

Extras

5


CRICKET.

137

BOWLING ANALYSIS. W. Bartlett S. C. Goodman Mr. W. E. Wood

Overs

Maidens

Runs

Wickets

26

6

56 62 23

6

22

I

5

0

PAST V. PRESENT. In spite of the goodly number of Old Boys present on the Speech Day, they were unable to get together a fully representative team, and this perhaps accounted for the very easy vi6tory of the Present, —a vi6tory which formed a fitting climax to a brilliantly successful season. The Old Boys batted first, but with the exception of the brothers Allen, made no stand against the excellent bowling of Goodman and Savery. Upon the school team batting, the boys all went in first and succeeded in winning the match before any of the masters went in. Savery played a magnificent innings of 71, and one which is worthy to rank with his other brilliant performances. Later in the innings Messrs. F. W. Lea, T. Wood, and W. E. Wood materially added to the score which ultimately reached 157— leaving a vidtory by 94 runs. Score and bowling analysis :— OLD BOYS. ... 23 R, Allen b S. Goodman ... 4 A. Porter b S. Goodman... ... 3 R. Ford b R. Savery 13 P. B. Allen b R. Savery 3 W. G. Norman c Lea b S. Goodman ... 6 H. Trood b R. Savery F.0 Goodm an c T.Wood b S Goodman o 2 Hayward c and b S. Goodman Cass b R. Savery 2 W. H. Cox not out ... A. Hare b S. Goodman ... Extras ... Total

THE COLLEGE XI. R. Savery b Porter ... 71 S. Clements c Hare b R. Ford ... 2 A. Linton c R. Ford b Porter 3 S. Goodman c Porter b R. Ford 3 T. Gregson c & b R. Ford ... I A. Moss run nut 7 Mr. S. Wood c Ford b Porter ... 15 Mr. F. W. Lea not out ... 20 Mr. J. G. Loveday run out ... 4 Mr. W. Wood c Goodman b Porter 14 G. Long c Ford b Porter ... 4 Byes, 10 ; leg byes, 3... ... 13

... 63

Total

BOWLING ANALYSIS. S. C. Goodman R. Savery Mr. W. E. Wood

Overs

Maidens

14'2

I

Runs 26

6

18

7

4

5

2

23 8

Wickets

157


MATCHES PLAYED

DATE.

AGAINST WHOM.

WHERE PLAYED.

June 2nd Bathpool June 9th Kingston

I. C. I. C.

June 12th Bridgwater

Bridgwater

COLLEGE SCO RE. t

12.

WON

6. DRAWN 6. LOST 0.

OPPONENTS' SCORE.

ist Ynnings.

131 for 7 wks. 75

30

97

39

RESULT.

2nd Innings.

REMARKS.

For College : R. Savery 55, Mr. T. Wood 31 Drawn Mr. W. E. Wood 14. College : W. Bartlett 28, S. Goodmax 46 for 9 wks. Won by 45 runs For 5 wickets for 12 runs. For Kingston : B. Ford 11 and 24.

June 19th Wesleyan College

Wes. Coll.

June 24th Bridgwater (ret.)

I. C.

: R. Savery 36, Mr. W. E. Woo( 36 for o wkt. Won by 58 runs For25,College Mr. T. Wood 12, S. Goodman 4 wicket

166

Ioo

Won by 66 runs

3o for 9 wks.

225

Drawn

Wellington

248

76 for 5 wks.

Drawn

June 3oth Taunton

Taunton

334

27 for r xvkt.

Drawn

July 7th Wesleyan Coll. (ret.)

I. C.

129

65

33 for 1 wkt. Won by 64 runs

July zoth Blundell's School

I. C.

89

85

70 for 2 wks. Won by 4 runs

June 26th

Wellington

July 14th

Kingston (ret.)

Kingston

175

56 for 8 wks.

Drawn

July 23rd

Bathpool (ret.)

Bathpool

6o for 4 wks.

1 54

Drawn

157

63

Won by 94 runs

July 28th Old Boys

I. C.

f It is a remarkable fadt that throughout the Season our Team had no Second Innings.

for 3 runs, W. Bartlett 5 wickets for 18 runs For Bridgwater : Rev. G. Peake 13, Dr Campbell 24*. For College : R. Savery 97, Mr. T. Wood 20 Mr. J 0. Loveday 10. For Wesleyan College : Veevers 64. For College : Mr. T. Wood 17, also 3 wicket: for 14 runs. For Bridgwater : Spencer 45 Newman (pro.) 43. Hallett 38, Dr. Parson: 23*, Kelway 21, Hallett 8 wickets for 12 rum For College : W. Bartlett 63, R. Savory 48, 8 Clements 35, T. Gregson 25, Mr. W. E. Woo( 17, A. Linton 1•, Mr. J. G. Loveday 14 For Wellington : F. Johnson 25, E. Page 14 For College : R. Savery 143, S. Goodman 43, Mr. T. Wood 41, A. Linton 21, Mr. W. E Wood 18, T. Gregson 1•, W. Bartlett 10. For College : R. Savery 35, Mr. W. E. Woo( 27•, Mr. T. Wood 25, Mr. F. W. Lea 19, S Goodman 9 wickets for 33 runs. Foi Wesleyan College : Yorath 22, Veevers 22 For College : Mr. T. Wood 27, 8. Goodman 13 Mr. F. W. Lea 10. For Blundell's: H. Tolle: 38*, J. Prendergast 32, C. W. Gooch 28, E Drage 13 For College : W. Bartlett 117, Mr. T. Wood 39, W. Bartlett 4 wickets for 19 runs. Fo Kingston : E. W. Page 2•. For College : W. Bartlett 30, Mr. T. Wood 15 For Bathpool : R. Ford 84, Hurrell 22 A. Moritz 21. For College : It. Savery 71, Mr. F. W. Lea 20* Mr. T. Wood 15, Mr. W. E. Wood 14, 8 Goodman 6 wickets for 26 runs, R. Savers 4 wickets for 23 runs. For Old Boys : It Allen 23, P. B. Allen 13.

* Signifies not out.


1 39

THE FOOTBALL SEASON, 1886-7, E can scarcely say that our Football prospeCts this year have looked as bright as we have seen them in late years. The majority of our XV. are new to the team. W. B. Gregson was unanimously elected captain, while Mr. F. W. Lea consented to fill the post of Secretary. The following is the team compiled : Mr. T. Wood (back); Mr. Lea, Savery, Carpenter, F. (threequarters); Wansbrough, Wright (halves); Mr. Baker, Mr. Loveday, Gregson, W. B., Gregson, T., Goodland, C., Philp, Medway, R., Bebb and Sommerville. Of these, Messrs. Lea and Loveday, Savery and Gregson, W., are the only members of last year's team left to do battle for the College. All the others with the exception of Mr. T. Wood have been promoted from last year's second XV. Our old enemy Accident' has already been at work ; Mr. W. E. Wood, who, at the beginning of the season was in rare form, will be unable to play for us again, owing to a severe strain, sustained by him, whilst playing in a side. We are glad to be able to state that he is getting better. So far matters have not gone with us as could have been wished, but we hope that they will show improvement as time goes on. We shall be able, however, to remark on individual play, and to enter more into detail when the season is over. INDEPENDENT COLLEGE V. TRINITY F. C. This, our first match, was played on the Trinity ground, on Saturday, OCtober gth, in very unfavourable weather. We won the toss, and ele6ted to defend the lower goal. May kicked off for Trinity, and the home forwards, backing up well, the first scrum was formed in our 25, Savery soon returning the ball by a good kick to the centre ; Randell by a short run, again transferred the ball to our quarters, but was pushed into touch. Carpenter here secured the ball, and dashed to the centre, but was collared before having scored. The Trinity backs now put in a series of short runs, and the ball again becoming loose, the home forwards rushed it over our line, and Harris secured the first try. May failed to convert the point. Mr. Lea, Carpenter and Savery now tried hard to get away, but May getting the leather, attempted to drop a goal, the kick failed, and we touched down in self-defence. Our forwards headed


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FOOTBALL.

by Gregson, W., now played up well, and invaded the home territory. Fouracre relieved his side by a useful run, to which Savery replied by some fine kicking. From a pass by Westcott, Randell was enabled to score the second try. The kick, an easy one, failed. Half-time was now called, and the teams having crossed over, the College played up in fine style, and Trinity had to save. The ball was still in the home 25, when Mr. Wood made a good catch, which Savery only just failed to improve upon, the ball falling in front of the posts. Rain now came on very heavily, and play being no longer possible, the game was abandoned as a draw. Besides those already mentioned, Messrs. Wood, Wansbrough, and Davies, played especially well. Teams :Independent College, Mr. T. Wood (back); Mr. F. W. Lea, Savery, Carpenter, Wansbrough (three-quarters); Gregson, T., Sommerville (halves); Mr.W.Wood, Mr. Baker, Gregson,W., Philp, Medway, R., Matthias, Davies, T., and Goodland, C. Trinity :â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Pole (back) ; Fouracre, May, Dawe, Cross (three-quarters); Westcott, Roost (halves); Wilkins, Randell, Harris, Rogers, Bags, Allen, Pote, and Sullivan. INDEPENDENT v. WESLEYAN COLLEGE. This annual match was played on the Wesleyan grounds, in splendid weather, on Wednesday, 06tober loth. This game was originally fixed for 061ober 16th, but the inclemency of the weather rendered the ground absolutely unfit for play. Ballard, the Wesleyan captain, won the toss, and decided to defend the lower goal, so Savery kicked off for us. Their back returned into touch. The forwards on both sides worked very hard, and monopolized the ball for a long time, until from a pass out, Savery made a fine punt to our opponents 25 ; Lewis repeatedly tried to get away, but failed on each occasion to pass Carpenter, whose collaring was magnificent. Messrs. Baker, Loveday and Medway, put in some useful work for us in the scrums. Yorath secured the ball from a pass, and ran dangerously near our goal, but was well collared by Mr. Lea. Half-time was now called. Up to this point the play had been very fast and even, neither side having been able to secure any material advantage. Certainly our form was superior to what has been shown againt the Wesleyans for some years past. Ballard


FOOTBALL. re-started the game, and Carpenter returned well. Our opponents' forwards headed by Belcher and Lowry then invaded our territory, but the rush was stopped by Mr. Wood who returned the ball. The ball was again gradually forced to our 25, where Ballard intercepted a faulty pass, and dodging the back, secured the first try, the point being improved upon ; Mr. Lea kicked off, and the ball being badly returned, we took advantage of the mistake, and from a fast dribble Savery obtained a try. The kick, almost from touch, failed. Some good backing-up on the part of the Wesleyan forwards enabled Lewis to obtain the second try, which Ballard converted. The game having been re-started, Carpenter and Gregson put in some useful runs, but Yorath securing a punt of Mr. Wood's, dropped a grand goal. By means of some quick passing on the part of our opponents' backs, Ballard succeeded in obtaining two tries in close succession, but in each case the kick failed. Savery contributed a pretty run just before the game ended. Thus, the Wesleyans won a good game by 3 goals 2 tries to i try. As all played their very best, it will be unnecessary to mention any names in particular. The teams were as follows :â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Independents : (back), Mr. T. Wood ; (three-quarters), Mr. Lea, Savery, Wansbrough, Carpenter ; (halves), Sommerville, Gregson, T.; (forwards), Messrs. Baker and Loveday, Medway, Matthias, Davis, Goodland, C., Philp and Gregson, W. (capt.). Wesleyans : (back), Denny ; (three-quarters), Lewis, Yorath, Ballard (capt.); (halves), Goudge, Sloper ; (forwards), Robinson, Lowry, Hawkes, Trevanion, Belcher, Learoyd, Hoare, Hadley and Raddock. INDEPENDENT COLLEGE V. WELLINGTON. On a ground saturated with water, and therefore, in a miry condition, this match was played at Wellington, on Saturday, Odlober 23rd, and resulted in a victory for the home fifteen, by 3 goals and 3 tries to nothing. Early reverses seemed to dishearten our fellows, and this, added to the immense superiority of our opponents in weight, caused our defeat. The game was so onesided as to call for no comment, save that the work on their side was almost entirely confined to the forwards, whose rushes, Savery, W. Gregson and Wansbrough, tried hard to stop.


142

FOOTBALL. INDEPENDENT COLLEGE V. WEST WARD F. C.

This match was played on our grounds on Thursday, Odlober 28th, in splendid weather. At 3.3o Revill kicked off for W. Ward, to which Savery well replied. After a short time Quartley made a good run, but was neatly collared by Savery ; some quick passing, however, between F. and E. Hammet enabled the latter to secure a try, but Revill failed to convert the point. Some fine tackling by Mr. T. Wood and Medway at this point, prevented the W. Ward from again scoring. The College now a6ted on the aggressive, and a fine rush headed by Mr. Loveday, Gregson, W., and Savery, took the leather into the W. Ward 25, and we looked dangerously like getting in, when half-time was called. Mr. Loveday re-started the game, and a capital run by Mr. Lea, and some punting by Carpenter, took the ball into the W. Ward's 25, and Savery was intercepted only in the nick of time. After a series of scrums in neutral ground, the opposing forwards sent the ball over our goal line, which F. Hammet secured and well converted into a goal. In a very similar manner Oxley scored a third try, but the kick failed. The College now on their mettle, played up finely, and Carpenter succeeded in running in, but the try was disallowed. After a thoroughly enjoyable game, time was called, the ball being in our opponents 25. Thus the game ended in favour of the W. Ward, by i goal, 2 tries to nil. For the W. Ward: F. and E. Hammet, Quartley and Moore, showed up finely, while for us, Mr. Lea, Gregson, W., Savery, Wansbrough and Bebb, were the most conspicuous. Teams : W. Ward :â&#x20AC;&#x201D;(back), Saiway; (three-quarters), Hammet, E. and F., Quartley and Harwood ; (halves), Norman and Oxley ; (forwards), Moore, A. and R., Revill, Goodman, Mitchell (2), Bonfield and Jarman. I. C.:â&#x20AC;&#x201D; (back), Mr. T. Wood ; (three-quarters), Mr. Lea, Carpenter, and Savery; (halves), Wansbrough and Wright ; (forwards), Messrs. Loveday and Baker, Gregson, W. and T., Philp, Medway, Bebb, Goodland, C., and Sommerville. INDEPENDENT COLLEGE V. WELLINGTON (Return). Played on our grounds on Saturday, Odlober 3oth, in fine weather. We, unluckily, had to play without the services of Mr. W. Wood and Savery. Wellington won the toss, and chose to


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FOOTBALL.

defend the pavilion goal, accordingly we kicked off. The ball was well returned, but Carpenter secured it and passed to Mr. Lea, who, however, was collared. Shortly afterwards, Sanders ran well into our 25, and the Wellington forwards dribbled the ball over the line, which Manley secured, thereby scoring the first try. No goal resulted. For a long time scrums were formed in neutral ground, the game being left almost entirely to the forwards. The play of Mr. Baker, Gregson, W., and Bebb, at this point was fine. Some splendid passing was now exhibited by Wright and Carpenter, and by their means play was transferred to our opponents 25. Macey relieved his side by a good run, but was grassed by our back, just before half-time was called. The game having been re-started, Macey and Mr. Lea made some plucky runs for their respedtive sides, but the Wellington forwards again got hold of the leather and invaded our territory. Wansbrough and Wright by some long punts returned the ball, which however, Macey seized, and he almost scored, but was again superbly collared. Our forwards now played up, and with the help of Carpenter transferred the ball to our opponents 25. Macey again relieved his side, and from a loose scrum, Selwood secured a try which was well converted. Shortly before the call of time, Harvey obtained the third try, which was not improved upon. Thus the game ended in favour of Wellington by goal, 2 tries to nil. Sanders, Macey, and Tan, showed the best form for Wellington; while for us, Messrs. Baker and Lea, Carpenter, Gregson, W., and Wansbrough did their best to avert defeat. Wellington Team :â&#x20AC;&#x201D;(back), Tarr ; (three-quarters), Page, Phillips, Macey, Sanders ; (halves), Coram, Merry ; (forwards), Manley, Stone, Selwood, Chidgey, Johnstone, Harvey, Woolcott, and Baker. INDEPENDENT COLLEGE V.

Mr.

HAKE'S TEAM.

Played on the College grounds on Tuesday, November gth, in favourable weather. Hake won the toss, and chose to defend the lower goal. Savery kicked off, and the ball was returned into touch. Messrs. Bishop and Lea by combined efforts soon caused the Town to save. The game having been re-started, Hammet ran with the ball to the centre, where it remained for some time Mr. Wood now caught the ball and dropped a fine kick, which fell


144

FOOTBALL.

S

just in front of the goal. Our forwards now took possession of the leather, and from a tight scrum Gregson, W., took the ball over the line, but the try was disallowed. This caused the Town to save a second time. Mr. Lea and Sommerville, A., by some pretty running now almost scored, but the latter player was pushed into touch by his brother just in time. After a short run by Chiverton, half-time was called, neither side as yet having secured any material advantage. Teams having crossed'over, Wright secured the leather, and by a fast run, transferred play to our opponents' 25, where a series of scrums was formed, until Wansbrough carried the ball over ; but as the result of a maul he was dragged back again. However, we were not to be denied, and some good work on the part of the forwards enabled Gregson, W. to secure the first try ; Savery scored a goal by a splendid kick from close to the touch line. Our three-quarters by a lot of runs continually endangered the Town lines, but were prevented from scoring, by the safe tackling of its backs. At last Mr. Lea by a magnificent run broke through its defence, and secured the second try. The kick, also a difficult one, failed. Nothing else of importance occurred, and a thoroughly interesting match ended in our favour, by a goal and a try to nil. This is the first match we have won this season, and doubtless our half-backs materially helped to bring about the result. For Hake's team, Sommerville, H. and R., Bostock and Hammet did their utmost to avert defeat, while each of our team did his very best. Teams : Independent College : Mr. T. Wood (back); Messrs. Lea, Bishop, Wright, Carpenter (three-quarters) ; Savery, Wan sbrough (halves) ; Medway, Philp, Sommerville, Bebb, Matthias, Davies, T. R., Goodland, C., and Gregson, W. B. Mr. Hake's team : Ireland (back); Chiverton, Hammet, Hake, Sommerville, H. (three-quarters); Hammet, Sommerville, R. (halves); Bostock, Andrews, Williams, Coles, etc. " ELvAo."

The continuation of the article on " Notnuat " is unavoidably held over till the next Number.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;ED.


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ICT-November 1886