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When the “Stars of David” come out

Family Portrait: Lance Pawling

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Judy Shepard returns to Philadelphia for a University of Pennsylvania youth summit

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Oct. 19-25, 2012

Vol. 36 No. 42

Arrest made in NoLibs shooting

Remembering LGBT ally Arlen Specter By Jen Colletta jen@epgn.com Arlen Specter, Pennsylvania’s longestserving United States senator and a longtime supporter of and advocate for the LGBT community, died last weekend at age 82. Specter, who served in the Senate from 1980-2010, died Oct. 14 of complications from non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. S p e c t e r served most of his FORMER U.S. Senate career as a SEN. ARLEN Republican but, in PAGE 21 SPECTER

By Jen Colletta jen@epgn.com

KEEPING HER LIGHT ALIVE: Malik Moorer (center) passed on a flame at an Oct. 11 vigil to remember his partner Stacey Blahnik, a transgender woman murdered that day two years ago. Candles set a somber tone as about 30 loved ones gathered in the 1800 block of Manton Street, where Blahnik was strangled in her home on National Coming Out Day 2010. Mourners remembered Blahnik’s life and called for a resolution to her unsolved murder. Photo: Scott A. Drake

Police have arrested a man for this month’s shooting that left a transsexual woman wo u n d e d a n d h e r mother dead. Police arrested JIBRELL HUGHES Jibrell Hughes Oct. 12 for the incident that took place on the 300 block of N. 7th Street five days previously. Hughes, 32, is accused of shooting the 41year-old woman, whose name PGN is withholding, in the face and shooting and killing her 65-year-old mother, Stephanie Freeman, in the chest. The woman PAGE 21

Burnett case headed for jury trial By Timothy Cwiek timothy@epgn.com The employment-discrimination case of Bobbie E. Burnett could become the first transgender-related discrimination case to be heard by a federal jury in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Last month, both sides in the dispute filed court papers stating that preparations should be made for a jury trial, because efforts to settle the case have been unsuccessful. Burnett, a city library assistant, claims she suffered ongoing workplace harassment and discrimination due to her transgender status. She’s suing the city and four coworkers for an unspecified amount of damages. Burnett wants $800,000 from the city to settle the case, but the city is offering $7,500, according to court papers.

About three years ago, the city offered Burnett $300,000 to settle. Burnett accepted that offer, but it was subsequently withdrawn by city officials, according to court papers. Shortly thereafter, Burnett filed suit in federal court. According to court papers, a jury trial is expected to last between five and eight days, and would take place sometime next year. Prior to a trial, both sides will have an opportunity to depose up to 10 individuals. U.S. District Judge C. Darnell Jones 2d is expected to preside over the trial. Burnett has worked as a library assistant for the Free Library of Philadelphia for 21 years. About 11 years ago, she transitioned to the opposite gender, allegedly triggering workplace harassment and discrimination that she says continues. PAGE 23

Gay Gay History History Month Month Special Special Coverage Coverage

LIGHTS OUT: Candice Thompson, director of center services at William Way LGBT Community Center, was one of a handful of storytellers at the Oct. 11 Open Air light installation, which that night celebrated National Coming Out Day. To listen to recordings from the event or view footage, visit www. openairphilly.net. Photos: Scott A. Drake

Rivendell: Gay media grandfather of advertising PAGE 14


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Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

LOCAL PGN

PHMC to present research on older LGBT community By Angela Thomas angela@epgn.com Data on local LGBT older adults will be shared with the community at a town-hall meeting this weekend. For the past 18 months, Public Health Management Corporation has spearheaded a study focusing on the health challenges faced by the LGBT aging community. The study included a series of focus groups, more than a dozen individual interviews and a survey completed by more than 250 local LGBTs 55 and older.

PHMC has been conducting LGBT-specific research for eight years and has mostly focused on HIV/AIDS, although senior research scientist Dr. Jennifer Lauby wanted to branch out to include other issues. “We’ve always felt that we wanted to focus on a broader range of health risks in the LGBT community, not just HIV/AIDS,” Lauby said. PHMC received a grant for $17,000 from the Pennsylvania Department of Health to conduct the project. The study launched with a Community Advisory Board comprised of members of the older-adult LGBT population and representa-

tives from service agencies. “They were helpful in suggesting places to find people and give out surveys,” Lauby said. PHMC also held two open houses at the William Way LGBT Community Center and at its own headquarters. Lauby was surprised with some of the findings of the research. “We found out that most people got pretty good health care,” she said. “But there was a concern about loneliness and isolation.” Lauby said that many participants did not have children or a partner at the time.

“A lot of participants lived alone and were concerned about who would take care of them as they got older,” she said. The results of the survey and PHMC’s recommendations for improving access to health services will be reviewed in a public townhall meeting, 2-5 p.m. Oct. 20 at The Church of St. Luke and The Epiphany, 330 S. 13th St. The city’s deputy managing director for aging, Lydia Hérnandez Vélez, will be a guest speaker at the meeting. For more information, contact Lee Carson at lcarson@phmc.org or 267-765-2352. ■

Police outreach workers get LGBT training By Angela Thomas angela@epgn.com With a wave of recent crimes against LGBT people and safety issues consistently a community concern, it’s perhaps more important than ever that the police department’s community-outreach team be wellversed in what it means to be LGBT. To achieve that aim, on Oct. 10 the Philadelphia LGBT Police Liaison Committee hosted an LGBT-awarneess training for nearly 50 community-relations and victims-assistance police officers. “This was the first time for citywide community-relations personnel,” committee secretary Rick Lombardo said.

The committee sought to educate participants on its work to bridge the gap between the LGBT and law-enforcement communities, and the unique issues facing LGBT victims. Committeemembers Franny Price, Fred Bostwick, Jaci Smith and Brian Green all took part in the presentations. “We wanted to give all of our different perspectives,” Lombardo said. The committee provided a wealth of useful information regarding LGBT organizations and the many facets of the community. “We talked to them about LGBT youth and how to be politically correct,” Price said. “We let them know the difference between sexual orientation and gender identity.”

The overall response to the training was positive, Lombardo said, and participants offered intelligent comments and questions. “A lot of them know what is already going on, but this was meant to educate in the process,” Lombardo said. “We wanted to educate them on who we are, our terms, our history.” Price, chair of the committee, agreed that the response was “different” because those present were seasoned, experienced officers. She added that at past meetings, the committee would pack up and leave shortly after its presentation, but this time members stayed to answer a number of questions the officers had. “I think they got a lot of LGBT diversity

awareness and pretty much learned what we’re all about,” Price said. The committee distributed a short survey after its presentation and received good feedback. Lombardo said Deputy Commissioner Stephen Johnson, LGBT liaison, was instrumental in organizing the event. “He really put this together. If there is an issue, he reacts very fast,” Lombardo said. “He really spearheaded this project.” Lombardo added he hopes the trainings helped educate the officers on both the issues and the best way to respond to them. “Overall, there was an excellent mix of people,” he said. “I hope they learned to treat other people like their own family.” ■

locations in Philadelphia PHILADELPHIA — NORTH OF C.C.

1 Shot Coffee, 1040 N. Second St. • 2601 Parkway Condos lobby, 2601 Pennsylvania Ave. • Bebashi, 1217 Spring Garden St. • Beehive Hair Salon, 2319 Fairmount Ave. • Beth Ahavah, 615 N. Broad St. • Bridgeview Place Condo lobby, 315 New St. • Colonnade Condos lobby, 1601 Spring Garden St. • Community College CCP Lambda, 1700 Spring Garden St. • Congresso de Latinos, American St. & Lehigh Ave. • Crooked Frame Café, 2545 Brown St. • Darling’s Diner, 1033 N. Second St. • Filter Coffee House, 331 Race St. • Girard Vet, 28th St. & Girard Ave. • HIV Early Intervention Clinic, St. Joseph’s Hospital, 16th St. & Girard Ave. • Logan View Apts. lobby, 17th & Callowhill sts. • Northern Liberties Iron Works, 821 N. Second St. • One Day At A Time, 2532 N. Broad St. • Philadelphian Condos lobby, 2401 Pennsylvania Ave. • PYT Restaurant, 1050 N. Hancock St., at the Piazza • Sammy’s Place, 1449 N. Fifth St., 1st floor • Shampoo, Seventh & Willow sts. • SILOAM Ministries, 1133 Spring Garden St. • Temple University Student Activity Center, 1755 N. 12th St. • Welker Real Estate, 2311 Fairmount Ave. • Whole Foods Market, 2001 Pennsylvania Ave. •

PHILADELPHIA — SOUTH OF C.C.

Bethel Community Home, 933-935 S. Third St. • Black N Brew, 1523 E. Passyunk Ave. • Carmen’s Country Kitchen, 11th & Wharton sts. • Class Act Auto Repair, 2042 S. Bancroft St. • Equal, 1516 Snyder Ave. • Essene, 719 S. Fourth St. • Expressive Hand, 622 S. Ninth St. • Fuel, 1917 E. Passyunk Ave. • Hideaway, Days Inn, 2015 Penrose Ave. • Jackson Place, 501 Jackson St. • Kris Restaurant, 1100 Federal St. • Rockerhead Salon, 607 S. Third St. • South Philly Bagels, 613 S. Third St. • Ultimo Coffee, 1900 S. 15th St. •

PHILADELPHIA — UNIVERSITY CITY

Annenberg Center, 3680 Walnut St. • Bucks County Coffee, 3430 Sansom St. • Bucks County Coffee, 40th & Locust sts. • Fresh Grocer, 4001 Walnut St. • Goodman Hall, 710 S. 42nd St. • International House, 3701 Chestnut St. • LGBT Center at Penn, 3907 Spruce St. • Old Quaker Condos lobby, 3514 Lancaster Ave. • Oslo Hall, 510 S. 42nd St. • Penn Bookstore, 3610 Walnut St. • Sheraton Hotel, 36th & Chestnut sts. • St. Mary’s Church, 3916 Locust Walk • University of the Sciences England Library, 4200 Woodland Ave. • University Lutheran Church, 3637 Chestnut St. • Wilson Hall, 708 S. 42nd St. • World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St. •

PHILADELPHIA NEIGHBORHOODS — OTHER

Almost Paradise, 742 Frankford Ave. • Coffee Junction, 7210 Cresheim Road • Elfant Wissahickon Realty, 8962 Ridge Ave. • Fantasy Island Books, 7363 State Road • GWHS Beacon Center, 10175 Bustleton Ave. • Harry’s Natural Foods, 1805 Cottman Ave. • Infusion Salon, 7133 Germantown Ave. • Morris House, 5537 Woodland Ave. • One Day At A Time, 2532 N. Broad St. • Philadelphia University KANBAR Center, 4201 Henry Ave. • Prevention Point, 166 W. Lehigh Ave. • Today’s Videos, 9255 Roosevelt Blvd. • Touch of Class Books, 3342 Kensington Ave. • WCAU TV lobby, City Line Ave. & Monument Road • Weaver’s Way, 559 Carpenter Lane • Welker Real Estate, 2311 Fairmount Ave. • WPVI TV lobby, City Line Ave. & Monument Road •


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Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

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FILM INTO FOCUS: ACT UP Philadelphia hosted a panel discussion Oct. 15 at the Church of St. Luke and the Epiphany centered on the new documentary film “How to Survive a Plague.” Waheedah Shabazz-El led the discussion, which focused on the message of the film — which traces the nation’s HIV/AIDS activism — and ways the local community could strength its advocacy efforts. About two-dozen people attended the discussion, which featured panelists and longtime ACT UP members and supporters Julie Davids, David Acosta, Jane Shull, Roy Hayes and Jose DeMarco. Photo: Scott A. Drake

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Crime Watch Gay History Month Gettin’ On Local Media Trail News Briefing

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Phone: 215-625-8501 Fax: 215-925-6437 E-mail: pgn@epgn.com Web: www.epgn.com

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Mark Segal (ext. 204) mark@epgn.com Editor

Jen Colletta (ext. 206) jen@epgn.com Staff Writers Angela Thomas (ext. 215) angela@epgn.com Larry Nichols (ext. 213) larry@epgn.com

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Advertising Manager Greg Dennis greg@epgn.com Advertising Sales Representatives Prab Sandhu prab@epgn.com National Advertising Rivendell Media: 212-242-6863 Office Manager/ Classifieds Don Pignolet (ext. 200) don@epgn.com

Art Director/Photographer Scott A. Drake (ext. 210) scott@epgn.com Graphic Artist Sean Dorn (ext. 211) sean@epgn.com Executive Assistant/ Billing Manager Carol Giunta (ext. 202) carol@epgn.com Philadelphia Gay News is a member of: The Associated Press Pennsylvania Newspaper Association Suburban Newspapers of America Published by Masco Communications Inc. © 2012 Masco Communications Inc. ISSN-0742-5155

The views of PGN are expressed only in the unsigned “Editorial” column. Opinions expressed in bylined columns, stories and letters to the editor are those of the writer, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of PGN. The appearance of names or pictorial representations in PGN does not necessarily indicate the sexual orientation of that named or pictured person or persons.


LOCAL PGN

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

Cordova family meets with commissioner By Jen Colletta jen@epgn.com The family of slain transgender woman Kyra Cordova met with the head of the Philadelphia Police Department last week to discuss the progress of the case. Cordova’s mother, other family members and a number of community figures involved with the Justice For Kyra initiative sat down with Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey and other officials Oct. 10 at police headquarters. Cordova, 27, was gunned down Sept. 3 in a wooded area off Adams Avenue in Frankford. A suspect has yet to be identified, and there is a $25,000 reward for information leading to the murderer’s arrest and conviction. In addition to Ramsey, the meeting included the head of the Homicide Department, Capt. James Clark, and LGBT Liaison Deputy Commissioner Stephen Johnson, and afterwards the family met with the detective working on the case. Police provided some new updates on the investigation, but Cordova’s mother Dawn Maher said the meeting also provided an opportunity for the family to voice their concerns. “I felt the meeting went very well,” she said. “They were kind and patient, listening to all questions asked and providing answers. All my questions and concerns were answered and addressed in a positive fashion.” The group discussed the broader topic of how police should appropriately identify transgender victims, an issue that arose early in Cordova’s case. Johnson said that aspect of the meeting was particularly productive. “We answered a lot of their questions and talked a lot about issues regarding proper descriptions of transgender people if and when — and hopefully we won’t have to go through this again — but if something happens in the future, we talked about how it’s best to describe transgender people,” he said. Cordova, a native of Hatfield, had been living in Philadelphia for about five years. She was a former HIV tester at the Gay and Lesbian Latino AIDS Education Initiative and was involved with relaunching a transgender youth initiative at The Attic Youth Center. She most recently had been employed at The Home Depot. Her mother said Cordova had had “problems in the past” but that “it seemed as if her life was taking a turn for the better.” Cordova was last seen alive early morning on Labor Day, when she was captured on surveillance video at a Wawa on Castor Avenue as she purchased two sandwiches and two drinks. She was alone at the time.

KEEPING KYRA’S MEMORY ALIVE: Dawn Maher (center) led several-hundred supporters on a candelight vigil through Center City Sept. 13 in memory of her daughter, Kyra Cordova, who was killed in Frankford on Labor Day. Her killer remains at large. Maher and supporters met with top police officials last week to review the investigation. Photo: Scott A. Drake

The Wawa is about a half-mile from the area where Cordova’s body was found a few hours later. “Whether it was personal or a random act, I don’t know, [but] I find it hard to believe that anybody who truly knew her could have done this to her because she truly was a kind and caring human being, loved by many,” Maher said. Police did not identify the victim for a number of days. Maher said she was out shopping with her mother when she got the call. “I was on my way home when my partner called and said the police were at my house for [Kyra.] I couldn’t figure out why but when I called him back to see if they were still there, he told me they were going to wait for me,” Maher said. “At that point, I knew something was really wrong and when I arrived home to two police cars and saw the looks on their faces, I knew and I felt it in my heart.” In the past month, Maher said, she has been overwhelmed by support from the LGBT community. Days after Cordova was identified, several-hundred mourners gathered for a vigil at William Way LGBT Community Center. An anonymous community member donated $5,000 to start a reward, which was supplemented by $20,000 in city funds. “My family and I have met so many wonderful people over the last month; their kindness and caring is more than we ever could have imagined,” Maher said. “I’m so thankful that my daughter was such a large part of the community and that she has left the community with wonderful thoughts and memories of her. As a mother, this makes me very proud.”

Maher said she has met countless transgender people in the past few weeks who’ve told her stories of being disowned by their families or of not being able to be out to them. While her family is focused on finding Cordova’s killer, Maher said she hopes in the long run work to foster acceptance of the transgender community. “Kyra was very lucky, as her family supported her, even though it wasn’t easy at times, and she had many friends that remained with her during her transition,” Maher said. “People need to understand that this is not a choice. I know for Kyra it was who she had to become, not only mentally but physically. She didn’t become a different person on the inside; she just became who she was truly meant to become on the outside.” As for the case, Maher said that finding the perpetrator would provide “a sense of relief for us and her many friends. To know that she has received justice and, even more, to know that this person is not on the street, able to hurt or kill someone else’s loved one, would provide a great amount of happiness to us all.” Maher urged residents who live in the area where the murder took place, or those who may have information about the case, to “grow a backbone” and come forward. “Regardless of what they thought of my daughter, they still have a killer living in their neighborhood, maybe even on their block,” she said. “I guess it’s that much safer for them not to tell what they know and keep this person safe in their neighborhood, because they’re sure ‘they’ would never do it again or to someone they know and love. Wake up. If this ‘person’ has killed once, they will kill again in your neighborhood because they can, because you let them.” Anonymous tips about the case can be made by calling 215-546-TIPS (5477). ■

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Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

LOCAL PGN

Matthew Shepard’s mom addressing local youth By Angela Thomas angela@epgn.com On Oct. 12, 1998, Judy Shepard’s life changed forever. Shepard is the mother of Matthew Shepard, a 21-year old gay college student who was brutally murdered in a hate crime in Wyoming. His name has become synonymous with antigay hate crime and has been featured in movies, TV shows, and throughout the legal and political world. While Shepard, who will be appearing in Philadelphia later this month for an event with the Anti-Defamation League, said she believes the level of anti-LGBT violence has diminished in the 14 years since her son’s murder, overall animus toward gays hasn’t. “The incidents are not as violent as they were in 1998. However, I believe there are more instances of verbal discrimination,” Shepard said. President Obama signed the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act in October 2009. Shepard was in the audience as this happened “We didn’t get any of that done with President Bush,” Shepard said. “He made it clear on where he stood on LGBT issues.” Shepard will be the keynote speaker for

the ADL’s Youth Leadership Conference Oct. 23 at the University of Pennsylvania. The conference is designed to help students understand and explore the importance of diversity and actions to take against bullying and prejudice. “I’m just going to talk to the kids and give courage to be who they are,” she said. “Don’t let anyone else define who you are, be who you are.” She wants the anti-LGBT rhetoric to stop, noting that when the messages stop, she believes fewer youth will turn to suicide. JUDY SHEPARD AT A 2010 UPENN BOOK SIGNING “Kids see [the hate] and File Photo : Scott A. Drake they feel like they are being Shepard launched the foundation the year rejected,” she said. “Stop talking about separating gay from straight. Matthew was killed to provide education, You can’t choose the color of your eyes or outreach and advocacy around diversity your sexual orientation. It is who you are.” issues. She hired three people originally to manShepard was attracted to working with ADL because its mission is similar to that age the foundation but, with its rapid growth, brought on a number of new staff. Its budof the Matthew Shepard Foundation. “Their goals are in line with ours. They get is less than $1 million but Shepard said make a difference in working with all the agency is in a good position right now to accomplish its aims. areas,” she said.

“We never wanted to be huge. It is just not manageable,” she said. What has resonated with Shepard the most since her son’s death is all of the feedback she has received from people touched by Matthew’s story, although she said it is impossible to pick just one impact that her son’s life and death has had. Some of the public responses were included in Shepard’s book, “The Meaning of Matthew: My Son’s Murder in Laramie, and a World Transformed,” released two years ago. She said she’s happy with the end result of the book, but that the timing of its completion was, in one way, unfortunate. “I wish I could have included the passage of the bill,” she said. The Matthew Shepard Act was signed into law a few months before the book published in mid-2010, but Shepard had already finished the writing by then. “But I don’t think I could have written the book any differently. I told the story that I wanted to.” ■ For more information about the ADL event, visit regions.adl.org/eastern-pa/. For more information on The Matthew Shepard Foundation, visit http://www.matthewshepard.org/.

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LOCAL PGN

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

Antigay donor to narrate youth event By Jen Colletta jen@epgn.com A performance by the Philadelphia Youth Orchestra next month will be narrated by a local man who gave nearly $1 million to fight marriage equality in California. Dr. John M. Templeton Jr., will lend his voice to PYO’s Nov. 25 concert at the Temple Performing Arts Center. Templeton donated $900,000 in 2008 to support Proposition 8, the successful ballot initiative that overturned California’s marriage-equality law. He tied with a California resident as the top individual donor to back the antigay campaign. Templeton, a retired pediatric surgeon, is chair and president of the John Templeton Foundation, which works to establish links between science and religion. He founded conservative public-policy agency Let Freedom Ring, Inc., and is a founding member of conservative political watchdog group Freedom’s Watch. Templeton was invited to narrate next month’s performance by Louis Scaglione, PYO president and music director. PYO, now in its 73rd year, brings together youth 6-21 from throughout the region to participate in five ensembles. Scaglione said he selected Templeton because of the latter’s “support of children in the Greater Philadelphia region through his irrefutable medical accomplishments

in pediatric surgery and trauma at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.” During his medical career, Templeton served as director of CHOP’s trauma program and as professor of pediatric surgery at University of Pennsylvania. He was vice chair of the American Trauma Society and the president of its Pennsylvania chapter. Scaglione asserted that the “political or personal views” of PYO guests and supporters are not a “reflection of the beliefs of the nonprofit organization or its agents.” “PYO celebrates the great diversity that is our community, our city, our nation and our society,” he added. “The musical arts transcend all political, cultural, religious and social constructs. It is through the musical arts that one teaches tolerance and respect. PYO does not align itself with any individual or entity by adoption of their respective viewpoints, philosophies or beliefs. PYO does not condone or condemn the viewpoints, philosophies, religious doctrine or political affiliation of others. PYO supports and encourages open dialogue and healthy debate of artistic, philosophical, political, religious and social issues.” In recent months, Templeton donated $450,000 to the Red, White and Blue Fund — a super Political Action Committee led by antigay politico Rick Santorum — as well as $200,000 to PAC American Crossroads, founded by Karl Rove, and about $24,000 to the Republican National Committee. ■

WATCHING AND WAITING: About 60 people turned out to Tabu Nightclub Oct. 16 to watch the second round of presidential debates, which were held at Hofstra University. The event was hosted by LGBT for Obama and guests enjoyed happy-hour food and drink specials which watching the debate. Although there was no mention of LGBT issues, attendees closely followed the back-and-forth of the debate, which focused on women’s rights, foreign policy and economic issues. Photo: Scott A. Drake

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Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

REGIONAL PGN

News Briefing Court clerk dismisses Paige’s appeal

FALL FASHIONS: Philadelphia Gay Men’s Chorus Ball Boys and Queens were among the more than 175 guests at the sold-out Oct. 13 Fall Ball fundraiser. The ball netted about $45,000 — far greater than the goal of $10,000. “Words cannot describe how amazingly successful it was,” said PGMC marketing director Paul Fontaine. “People had a lot of fun with the ball and the masquerade theme.” Photo: Untamed Photography

Marcia M. Waldron, clerk of the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals, has dismissed the appeal of Officer Michael Paige, who allegedly sexual assaulted another man while on duty five years ago. In June, a federal jury awarded $165,000 to James Harris, who claims that Paige forced him to perform oral sex on him in March 2007 in a secluded area of Fairmount Park. Paige appealed the jury verdict to the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals. But on Oct. 3, Waldron dismissed the appeal due to non-payment of the courttranscript fee — which must be paid for a federal appeal to move forward. Brian M. Puricelli, an attorney for Paige, had no comment for this story. Brian F. Humble, an attorney for Harris, said Paige’s appeal was meritless. Humble recently filed court papers seeking to seize Paige’s assets in order to satisfy the jury award, plus $19,166.48 in accrued interest. Humble also has filed a motion with U.S. District Judge Robert F. Kelly that seeks Paige’s incarceration until he pays $3,753 in attorneys’ fees and costs to Harris. In a brief interview, Humble said those fees and costs were incurred due to a dispute during the discovery phase of the Harris litigation. At press time, a hearing on the request for Paige’s incarceration hadn’t been scheduled. Humble also plans to seek an additional

$600,000 in attorneys’ fees and costs from Paige, which he said were incurred throughout the course of the Harris litigation. But a court hasn’t yet ordered Paige to pay those additional attorneys’ fees and costs. Paige, 46, was dismissed from the Philadelphia police force shortly after the alleged sexual-assault incident. But he was cleared of any criminal wrongdoing in 2008. The following year, he was reinstated to the force, after an independent arbitrator reduced his discipline from dismissal to a 30-day suspension. His annual salary is $62,519, according to personnel records in the city’s Office of Human Resources.

Challenger of Haverford’s LGBT ordinance dies Fred W. Teal, a Havertown resident who filed a legal challenge to the township’s LGBT-inclusive antibias ordinance, died Sept. 21 of natural causes. He was 77. Teal’s death calls into question the future of his 19-month legal challenge to the ordinance. The litigation doesn’t necessary end due to Teal’s death, said Dan Siegel, a Haverford Township commissioner. “Merely because someone dies does not mean that any litigation in which the person is involved ends,” Siegel told PGN. “Instead, the person’s estate must determine how or if to proceed.” At the time of his death, Teal was seeking a permanent injunction, preventing the township from implementing the ordinance. Teal claimed the township exceeded state law when it enacted the ordinance in February 2011. Louis M. DeVecchis 3d, a Haverford resident who advocated for the ordinance, expressed sadness about Teal’s death. “I’m very sad that the gentleman died,” DeVecchis told PGN. “I hope Mr. Teal can

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rest in peace. And I look forward to the prompt implementation of the township’s LGBT ordinance.” The ordinance bans discrimination in employment, housing, commercial property and public accommodations in the township and extends to sexual orientation and gender identity. The ordinance also authorizes the creation of a seven-member human-relations panel to investigate antibias complaints, and allows for penalties of up to $5,000 per discriminatory act. Siegel said efforts are under way to appoint members to the panel.

Judge dismisses Conshy challenge Montgomery County Common Pleas Judge Bernard A. Moore has dismissed another legal challenge to Conshohocken’s LGBT-inclusive antibias ordinance filed by James D. Schneller. In a one-sentence order dated Oct. 11, Moore dismissed the challenge, without elaborating. In March, Moore dismissed an earlier challenge to the ordinance filed by Schneller, on the basis that it lacked legal standing. But last month, Schneller filed another challenge — adding new claims that borough officials discriminated against him as a Christian when enacting the ordinance. Michael J. Savona, the borough solicitor, said Conshohocken is implementing the ordinance, despite Schneller’s litigation. “We’re hoping Mr. Schneller will move on to more productive activity, and leave the borough and its ordinances for the citizens of Conshohocken to worry about,” Savona told PGN. Schneller, who lives in Radnor, couldn’t be reached for comment. He’s co-founder of Philadelphia Metro Task Force, an anti-LGBT group with about 75 members representing about 20 municipalities in the state. Meanwhile, borough officials await a ruling on their request for the court to bar Schneller from filing additional pro-se challenges to the ordinance. The borough also wants Schneller to pay

$1,000 in attorneys’ fees and costs due to his second challenge to the ordinance. In a separate action, the borough is seeking about $18,000 in attorneys’ fees and costs from Schneller due to his initial challenge to the ordinance. Savona said that request is expected to be heard by an arbitration board. — Timothy Cwiek

Come out for antibullying Temple Emanuel of Cherry Hill and Big Splash Productions present Anti-Bullying Day & Just for You Expo from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 21 at Cherry Hill High School East, 1750 Kresson Road. The free, nondenominational event is open to the community and will include workshops and discussions on antibullying efforts, as well as performance of “Blue Lou and the Bullyfish” and guest speakers such as Cherry Hill Mayor Chuck Cahn, New Jersey Assemblywoman Pam Lampitt and others. For more information, visit www.templeemanuel.org/expo.php.

Capture your city On Oct. 26, Action AIDS will be one of 40 sites citywide participating in the annual Philly Photo Day, hosted by the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center. The event encourages people throughout the city to pick up a camera and take a photo of any subject within Philadelphia. All photos received will be printed and displayed in the Crane Arts Building in Kensington. Local artists will lead free photography workshops at Action AIDS and other community locations, providing cameras and their expertise for interested amateur photogs. For more information, visit www.philaphotoarts.org.

Out & Equal to convene in region A national LGBT advocacy agency later this month will bring together thousands of

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

LGBTs and human-resources professionals, many from the local area, to advance LGBT workplace equality. Out & Equal will host its annual summit Oct. 29-Nov. 1 in Baltimore, Md. The organization works to make sure employers are educated on topics regarding sexual orientation and gender identity. Out & Equal Philadelphia, a local affiliate of the national program, has been pushing for a strong local presence at the event. “We’ve been working on the right messaging and advertising to encourage people to attend the summit,” said Out & Equal Philadelphia co-chair Derek Tarcza. “We feel that there is so much value to this summit. We want to energize the community on various topics.”

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Tarcza hopes that up to 400 people from Philadelphia attend the event. Last year’s summit in Dallas, Texas, drew 2,500 people. “I believe this summit will really open people’s eyes to different issues that they never had exposure to,” Tarcza said. “We have presenters with great tools and knowledge that people could bring back to their companies and organizations.” Among the speakers will be Judy Shepard, LGBT advocate and mother of slain college student Matthew Shepard; Tammy Smith, the military’s first openly LGBT general; and Zach Wahls, LGBT ally and author. Participants can choose from more than 100 workshops, which will focus on topics such as ally leadership PAGE 26

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LGBT Community Legal Clinic A free legal clinic and workshop will be held on Saturday, October 27, 2012. Learn which legal documents you need for legal planning, including medical and financial powers of attorney, living wills, Wills*, and directives as to remains. Attorneys will be available to prepare these documents for you at no charge. The program begins at 11:00 AM on Saturday, October 27 at the William Way Community Center. The LGBT Legal Clinic is free and open to the public. Lunch will be served. In order to have your documents prepared at the clinic, you must register in advance. Contact the LGBT Elder Initiative for complete details. Please email your name and telephone number to info@lgbtei.org or call the LGBT Elder Initiative at 267-546-3448.

* Wills will be provided for those consumers with simple estate needs. Details are available.


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Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

EDITORIAL PGN

Creep of the Week

D’Anne Witkowski

Rick Santorum

Editorial

Fight in the Free State With the Nov. 6 election just a couple weeks away, all eyes are on the race for the White House. LGBTs should undoubtedly have a vested interest in presidential politics — as the top candidate could make a world of difference, good or bad, for LGBT rights in the next four years and beyond — but they also should lend their time and attention to a lesser-known fight that could prove vitally important in the national LGBT-rights movement. Next month, voters in Maryland will head to the polls to cast their votes on whether the state should sanction marriage equality. The legislature in the hopefully aptly named “Free State” earlier this year approved a marriage-equality measure, which the governor signed, but anti-equality activists secured enough signatures to place the issue on the ballot. In the past 14 years, similar ballot initiatives, both regarding marriage laws and constitutional amendments, have been raised 32 times — and 32 times voters have defeated marriage equality. Maryland is one of four states next month, however, that has a chance to come down on the right side of history. Voters in Maine and Washington will also vote on a same-sex marriage law, and Minnesotans will be asked about a constitutional amendment banning marriage equality. If any of these states makes LGBT history, the implications could be far-reaching. No longer could opponents trumpet out the, “We have won in every state where voters have been given a say” card. Not only would it open up full marriage rights for another region of gays and lesbians, it would fuel momentum for other states to follow suit in the coming years, especially if the nation is granted another four years under a president who now favors marriage equality. While Pennsylvanians should be realistic that our state’s adoption of marriage equality will likely not take place any time soon, the greater the number of nearby states who do so, the greater the argument for equality in the Keystone State. So what can locals do to push forward marriage equality in Maryland? Spread the word. While Pennsylvanians can’t actually vote for or against the referendum on Election Day, they can make sure their family, friends and even strangers understand the importance of casting a vote for marriage equality. Many Marylanders may not feel motivated enough to find time to make it to the polls Nov. 6, and that is where a personal connection to the issue can be important. If they hear from LGBT family and friends — or even hear personal stories through phone banking or door-to-door campaigning — that could mean the difference between their conceptual support of marriage equality and their physical presence at their polling place to vote for marriage equality. Study after study has shown that people who know someone who is LGBT are more likely to support LGBT issues. So, even if Pennsylvania’s time is far down the line, locals should lend a hand to our Southern neighbors in the next few weeks to let their stories be heard. Come Election Day, we will hopefully be celebrating a presidential re-election, and a new era in the marriage-equality fight. ■

Look, loyal readers of my column. I know what you’re going to say: “Rick Santorum again? Haven’t you written enough about this douche bag filled with methane gas? He’s not even running for or even in office. At this point paying him any mind, even to call him a creep, is just encouraging him.” And to that I say, you are correct. But what can I say? He’s just so, well, creepy. And so obsessed with gays. So if making Rick Santorum Creep of the Week for the millionth time is wrong, I don’t want to be right. On Oct. 11, National Coming Out Day no less, Santorum spoke before the Family Policy Institute of Washington. As you know, Washington is one of three states that could legalize marriage equality in November. Naturally, Santorum waxed pathetic about how two dudes marrying is the worst thing ever. Worse than killing babies, even. Seriously. “The movement that you are fighting,” said Santorum, “is the most important cultural movement.” He then interrupts himself midsentence to make very clear that he means the most important, saying, “I’m a prolife warrior, I’ll match up my credentials with anybody,” and then continuing, “It is the most important movement to win because if we do not win this issue of marriage not only will the family disintegrate. It is disintegrating.” Santorum then cites some statistics about 19-year-olds not getting married as often as they did in 1972 or some shit “because we are destroying the institution.” But let’s look again at his declaration. Santorum and “prolife warriors” like him believe very strongly that abortion is akin to murder. And now Santorum is saying that keeping two ladies from saying “I do” is more important than protecting the life of the unborn. This shows how very desperate the fight against marriage equality has become and how low Santorum, an antigay poster boy, has sunk. Granted, not everybody thinks of abortion as baby murder, but for folks

who do — ahem, Santorum — it’s hard to imagine anything trumping that issue. Until now. “We want to be on the side of truth,” Santorum said. And, let’s face it, babies don’t understand abstract concepts like truth. Or freedom. Or equality. They can’t make protest signs. They can’t vote. They can’t run for office. Gays and lesbians, on the other hand, are actually formidable opponents. And they know good and damn well what truth, freedom and equality mean. Santorum, however, has a very different definition. Regarding marriage equality, he said, “Are all things equal? Is everything equal to everything else? Or are there differences? Are some things better than other things? Are some things more worthy of support than other things? Equality is a great term just like freedom is a great term but in excess it undermines the virtue that each is. The greatest threat to freedom is unbridled freedom. Everybody going out and doing whatever they wanna do. Red light, green light, I don’t care, I’m free! The greatest threat to equality is equality that shows no discernment, has no basis for value.” Hear that homos? Stop fucking up equality with your valueless lives. The Constitution, Santorum said, “is the operator’s manual of America.” He then holds up a facsimile of his vision for what an amendment banning gay marriage would look like: An IKEA-like diagram of a penis going into a vagina, resulting in a heterosexual American flag baby. “America at its soul,” he said, “is a moral enterprise.” Yes. Just ask the Native Americans. Santorum then rambles on about building a just society. But don’t get any funny ideas, gays. It doesn’t include you. ■

The greatest threat to freedom is unbridled freedom. Everybody going out and doing whatever they wanna do. Red light, green light, I don’t care, I’m free! The greatest threat to equality is equality that shows no discernment, has no basis for value.”

D’Anne Witkowski has been gay for pay since 2003. She’s a freelance writer and poet (believe it!). When she’s not taking on the creeps of the world, she reviews rock ’n’ roll shows in Detroit with her twin sister.

We want to know! If you are celebrating an anniversary, engagement, wedding, adoption or other life event, we would be happy to help you announce it to the community. Send your contact information and a brief description of the event to editor@epgn.com.


OP-ED PGN

The backstory LGBT legacy of Sen. Arlen Specter The Philadelphia Inquirer the following Let me tell you about how I met Arlen day (Oct. 10, 1973) had a large picture of Specter. the event, or zap as we called them in those Back in the early days of the battle for days. The caption read: “District Attorney gay rights, Arlen was district attorney of Arlen Specter shakes hands with Mark Philadelphia. He had not taken a stand on Segal, leader of the Gay Raiders, who the gay-rights bill that was before City parked outside the district attorney’s office Council in 1973. Efforts to set up a meeting went unanswered. So, we had to be a until he emerged and granted them an little creative. interview. The Raiders handed One crisp Monday morning, out free donuts and coffee while a caterer delivered two large waiting for Specter.” coffee makers and dozens of Arlen eventually went to doughnuts to Arlen’s office. the National District Attorneys His staff thought that Arlen Association and asked them had ordered the special treat, to get on board and supand Arlen thought his staff had port nondiscrimination. Now, arranged it. here’s what you never knew. In At the same time in the City Arlen’s Republican years in the Hall courtyard and in the halls U.S. Senate, when it was hard of the building, members of to support LGBT rights, he was the Gay Raiders were handing always behind the curtain ready out flyers that read, “District to vote “yes” on gay rights if it Attorney Arlen Specter invites was needed to assure passage. you to a reception in honor of Only HRC and I were aware Mark Segal of that. That was never more gay-rights legislation in City Council. Please join him at 10 so than with the 1996 vote on a.m. in his office, room 666.” the Employment Nondiscrimination Act, That really was his office number. where he broke ranks with the GOP, and At 10 a.m., we, along with hundreds the bill failed by only one vote. He later of city workers and a huge collection supported the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t of newspeople, arrived at his office. We Tell” and the Defense of Marriage Act. walked in and there was Arlen’s staff tryIn 2009, when the secretary of Housing ing not to look too surprised at a reception and Urban Development was in town and we were in the beginning stages of the LGBT-friendly senior residences project, we needed to meet with HUD secretary Shaun Donovan, but his schedule was tight. Arlen said, “Don’t worry about it. Just meet me at his next to last stop while he’s in Philadelphia and I’ll arrange it.” As Donavan was about to leave, Sen. Specter, with me on one side, grabbed held in their office that their boss was havDonovan and took us to his car in the motorcade, where a Secret Service agent ing, about legislation he had not endorsed. had the door open. Arlen allowed the secArlen remained in his inner office. retary to get in his car and then followed At first, the media took pictures of me and pushed me in at the same time. “We’re handing out coffee and doughnuts to City going to ride with you to the next stop,” he Hall staffers, and we weren’t sure if Arlen said. The secretary was not about to turn would even come out of his private office. down a senator. Finally, the door to his office opened and I had Donovan’s undivided attention there he was, all smiles. He walked over, shook my hand, helped me hand out coffee for 20 minutes. In hindsight, Arlen and I kidnapped the secretary of HUD. And a and we then went into his private office. His first comment to me was, “Mark Segal, week-and-a-half from today, we will hold who else would cater a disruption? Did you the groundbreaking on the nation’s largest capital LGBT-friendly building project. think I’d allow you to have all the media Thank you, Arlen! ■ attention to yourself?” And then that big smile.

Mark My Words

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

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Street Talk

What recent LGBT event will go down in history? “Hillary Clinton addressing the United Nations and saying that human rights should be extended to the LGBT Osvaldo Moran community. student I think that Camden, N.J. was great. But it will be difficult for some countries to comply. At least she’s helping them move in the right direction.”

“Obama supporting same-sex marriage. It challenges the status quo in a way that no other president has done. It’s Justin Nepenthe student a symbolic North Philadelphia gesture. But it will change the conversation in Washington. In the LGBT community, people will remember this event as a sign that their president stood by them.”

“New York passing gay marriage. I was very happy for gay people when that happened. My first reaction was, ‘Finally!’ Desta Sharp It’s very photographer significant West Philadelphia because New York is the largest state. They’re setting an example for the rest of the country.”

“The repeal of ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.’ It was brave of Obama to push for that. No other president did something Grant Smith like that. student It was long Center City overdue. The people who benefited [from the repeal] will never forget it.”

Letters and Feedback Editor: I recently came across the PGN Street Talk question, “Should inmates be entitled to gender-reassignment surgery?” (Oct. 5-11), and I was dismayed by the answers. I agree that having taxpayers pay for the surgery at this point in history would turn even more people against the trans community. However, I think those asked (and possibly the majority of the non-trans population) don’t quite understand the severity of this condition. Being trans may not be life threatening in the way a horror like cancer is, but people do die from it. Forty-one percent* of trans people attempt suicide. Compare that to 1.6 percent for all Americans. This doesn’t address the quieter ways to commit suicide. More than a quarter of trans people have misused drugs or alcohol (compared with 1.7 percent and 7.3 nationally), while more than 30-percent smoke (10-percent higher than average). All of these numbers are so high for a reason: Trans people are dealing with a condition that causes severe and relentless mental

anguish. Being trans doesn’t kill in a way that cancer or something else as insidious does; it kills by ravaging a person’s thoughts, emotions and psyche. And the biggest crime here is that the overwhelming number of insurance companies cover no part of dealing with this congenital condition. People are suffering, yet nothing is being done. Whether or not an inmate should be entitled to gender-reassignment surgery should be a moot point. All trans people should be entitled to gender-reassignment surgery. If this was already incorporated into everyday health care, there would be much less of an outrage about an inmate receiving this type of care because, agree or not, prisoners should be entitled to health care for any condition that’s causing them to unduly suffer. S. Pisarek Philadelphia *National Transgender Discrimination Survey Report on Health and Health Care


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PGN LOCAL

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

Gayborhood Crime Watch The following incidents in the Midtown Village and Washington Square West areas were reported to the 6th Police District between Oct. 1-7. Information is courtesy of 6th District Capt. Brian Korn; Stacy Irving, senior director, Crime Prevention Service; Center City District; the Police Liaison Committee and Midtown Village Merchants Association. To report crime tips, visit www.phillypolice.com or call 215-686-TIPS (8477). INCIDENTS — At 1 a.m. Oct. 1, a man was at 11th and Sansom streets when a male with a handgun struck him on the head and took his wallet. The suspect was a black male in his late 20s. — At 8:30 a.m. Oct. 1, a woman was in the 800 block of Walnut Street when two males snatched her handbag. The suspects were described as black males, the first wearing a red hat, white shirt and jeans, and the second in a black hoodie, black pants and black sneakers. — Between midnight and 5 p.m. Oct. 2,

someone stole a secured bicycle from outside 225 S. 12th St. — At 3:45 p.m. Oct. 4, a woman was in the 900 block of Walnut Street when a man on a dark gray bicycle rode by and snatched a chain from her neck, then fled south on Ninth Street. The suspect was described as a black male in his 20s, wearing a gray hoodie and jeans. — At 6:15 p.m. Oct. 5, a man was in the stairwell of a parking garage at 1001 Market St. when a man with a knife took his iPhone. The suspect was described as a 6-foot black male, bald with a dark complexion, and wearing a white T-shirt and dark pants. — At 8:30 p.m. Oct. 5, someone stole a secured bicycle from outside 1100 Walnut St. — Between Aug. 6 and Oct. 6, complainants left their residence in the 300 block of South Quince Street in the care of a house sitter. Contractors were working inside during this time, and numerous items went missing. — At 12:15 p.m. Oct. 6, a man handed a

teller at TD Bank, 121 S. Broad St., a note demanding money. The man was given cash, and a dye pack exploded outside when he was getting on a bicycle to get away. The man was described as Hispanic, 35-45, 5-foot-9, with a light brown complexion, medium build and a light beard, wearing glasses and a red Phillies cap. — Between 2-4:50 p.m. Oct. 6, someone stole a secured bicycle from outside 1200 Walnut St. — Between 4 p.m. Oct. 6 and 7 a.m. Oct. 7, someone stole a secured bicycle from outside 1100 Walnut St. — At 9 a.m. Oct. 7, a man entered the 7-11 at 1201 Chestnut St. with his shirt pulled up over his face and carrying an American flag with a sharpened tip and demanded money. The employee refused and the man fled. Nothing was taken. The suspect was described as a black male, 20-25, and 5foot-8, with a medium build and dark complexion, wearing a brown shirt. — Between midnight and 12:50 p.m. Oct. 7, someone smashed a window of a 2001

Mercedes that was parked in the 1100 block of Chestnut Street. A backpack was taken. NON-SUMMARY ARRESTS — At 1:30 p.m. Oct. 1, Center City District Officers Moore and Pagan observed an illegal narcotic transaction outside 10th and Market streets. They apprehended and charged a 39-year-old suspect with illegal narcotic sales. Recovered were 11 prescription narcotic pills. — On Oct. 3, Center City District Officers Moore and Bates observed an illegal narcotic transaction on the 900 block of Market Street. They apprehended and charged a 44-year-old and a 27-year-old, both with Northeast Philadelphia addresses, with illegal narcotic sales. Recovered were 45 prescription narcotic pills. — On Oct. 5, Center City District Officers Pagan and Jones observed an illegal narcotic transaction on the 900 block of Market Street. They apprehended and charged a 26-year-old with a Frankford address with illegal narcotic sales. Recovered were 10 prescription narcotic pills and marijuana. ■

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AGING PGN

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

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Who cares about this election? For LGBT people, especially elders, there are many pressing issues to be determined in this election. The Affordable Care Act — ObamaCare — has made health care more accessible to seniors. Free prevention screenings for cancers, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and many other diseases related to aging can be diagnosed early and treated under the law. Who cares if you have access to quality, affordable health care? The cost of prescription drugs for seniors is being reduced through changes to Medicare Part D. For many, this will save thousands of dollars annually. Who cares if you can afford life-saving medications? The Older Americans Act is Ed the main source of funding for the social services available for seniors. This includes senior centers, job training and placement, nutrition and meals and dozens of other services. Legislation has been introduced that specifically names LGBT seniors as a “vulnerable population.” This change would start the process of ensuring that LGBT seniors have equal access to all of the services and resources other Americans have. Who cares if you have access to services and resources that will help you

age successfully? For millions of women, health-care services such as breast and cervical cancer screenings are funded by the federal government. These screenings are provided through community health services. Who cares if you receive health care and screenings in competent, safe, welcoming and affordable settings in your community? The money you pay into the Social Security Trust Fund is insured by the federal government. Adjustments of some kind are going to be necessary to maintain the fund. One answer is to allow private companies to manage your money. Who cares if your life savings aren’t guaranteed by the government and can be Bomba lost in the next market crash? Medicare needs to be adjusted so that it will remain financially stable after 2024. One proposal is to let insurance companies take over Medicare. Under this plan, you would get a voucher to cover part of the cost of the premiums. There is no guarantee that the insurance would cover your pre-existing conditions or keep you covered if you get sick. Who cares if you pay more for, or lose, your coverage? The cost of providing long-term care services is twice as much in a nursing

Gettin’ On

facility as it is if you are receiving similar services in your own home. Medicaid is the primary payer of LTC services. The number of Medicaid beds in nursing facilities is limited and is unlikely to meet the demand for Boomers needing LTC. The existing facility and payment structure must be expanded to allow for more in-home care and choice. Who cares who will care for you, where you will receive that care and how you will pay for it? There is no federal law banning discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity in employment, housing or health care. Who cares if you lose your home or your job or are refused care because you aren’t straight? Repealing the Defense of Marriage Act could result in same-sex married couples receiving more than 1,100 federal rights and benefits. This would include Social Security and veterans benefits. It would eliminate the income tax that same-sex partners have to pay when they receive domestic-partner benefits from their employers. In some states, it would end inheritance taxes on assets inherited from a deceased partner. Who cares if you have the same rights and benefits as other Americans? In 32 states, legislation or rules have been introduced that would make it more difficult for seniors to vote. This includes reduced voting hours and locations and

new forms of identification. Who cares if your voting rights are taken away? It is likely that the next president will nominate one or more justices to the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court banned segregated schools in 1954. The Supreme Court made it legal for people of different races to marry in 1967. In 1973, the court decided that women could choose to have an abortion. The Supreme Court helped determine the outcome of the presidential election in 2000. In 2003, the Supreme Court made it legal for gay people to have sex. Who cares who selects the jurists who can determine your rights and freedoms? Don’t care about this election? Then don’t vote. But when you realize what you’ve lost because you chose not to exercise your right, your responsibility and the privilege to vote that you do have as an LGBT American, don’t blame anyone but yourself. ■ Ed Bomba is communications chair of the LGBT Elder Initiative. The LGBTEI fosters and advocates for services and resources that are competent, culturally sensitive, inclusive and responsive to the needs of LGBT older adults. To comment on this article, suggest topics for future articles or for more information, visit www.lgbtei.org or call 267-546-3448 and watch for “Gettin’ On” each month in PGN.

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For directory advertising, see page 4


14

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

NATIONAL PGN

Gay History Month

Rivendell paves the way for LGBT publications By Chuck Colbert Special to PGN For more than 30 years, Rivendell Media, the nation’s leading LGBT publicationsplacement firm, has left its mark on advertising — the business of LGBT newspapers. Founded in the summer of 1979 by entrepreneur Joe DiSabato, Rivendell now represents more than 150 local and regional LGBT publications to national advertising agencies. But three decades ago, bringing the reach of gay media to Madison Avenue was a pioneering endeavor. “Rivendell was the first to ‘professionalize’ the idea of media going after the ad market for numerous publications,” said Mark Segal, publisher and founder of Philadelphia Gay News. “No one ever thought of that before.” DiSabato’s trailblazing nudged the organization, growth and professional develop-

ment of the LGBT press. He was, for instance, a driving force behind the formation of the Gay Press Association during the 1970s. In 1984, Rivendell also organized the National Gay Newspaper Guild, a group of the nation’s most widely read publications. Until its demise in 2008, the Guild included San Francisco-based Bay Area Reporter, Boston’s Bay Windows, Michigan’s Between the Lines, Dallas Voice, South Florida Blade, Frontiers in Los Angeles, Gay & Lesbian Times in San Diego, New York Blade, PGN, Atlanta-based Southern Voice, Washington Blade and Chicago’s Windy City Times. More recently, Rivendell has been the driving force behind the establishment of the National Gay Media Association, which

initially included a group of publishers from eight regional LGBT media outlets. The newly formed group aims to be the “premier vehicle for national advertisers to reach the gay and lesbian marketplace,” said Todd Evans, who now heads Rivendell. Founder DiSabato died unexpectedly from an asthma attack in the early 1990s. For a short time, his life and business partner Michael Gravois ran Rivendell until Evans took over in 1994. Meanwhile, NGMA will “bring together common marketing procedures and standards, and encourage and promote national advertising,” Evans said. The list of NGMA newspapers includes some of those that were part of the Guild. The founders are Bay Area Reporter, Bay

Windows, Between the Lines, Dallas Voice, Gay City News, Georgia Voice, Washington Blade and Windy City Times. What’s so important about organizing LGBT media? Doing so gave them economic clout, enabling placement of national advertising in regional publications. “There was no way publications like ours could have ever gotten the attention” of the New York City-based national advertising center, explained Jan Stevenson, publisher of Between the Lines. Only Rivendell could do that, collectively representing significant numbers of LGBT publications, she said. “If you want depth of numbers, more depth in the market across the country,” said Windy City Times publisher Tracy Baim, “then you have to get it from the regional gay media, including their companion websites.” As PGN publisher Segal explained, local advertising is the “bread and butter” of LGBT niche publications. National ads

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PGN NATIONAL

are the “cream.” And they are “sure nice to have,” as most publishers readily acknowledge. The number of LGBT media outlets in the United States has varied over time from as few as a handful to more than 200, according to estimates. By 2009, however, the number dropped below 200. Still, LGBT niche media reaches an estimated three million readers. That long and deep reach into the gay market is no small measure when compared with the much smaller readership of national LGBT publications, which is estimated, at most, to be several hundred thousand. Early on, there were only a handful of gay publications, including the New York Native, San Francisco’s Sentinel and Boston’s Gay Community News, among others. With the advent of the gay-rights movement and increased visibility, more and more papers sprang up across the country. Then along came Anita Bryant’s antigay campaign in 1977. “Anita Bryant woke up larger portions of the gay community, helping to increase press runs,” explained Don Michaels, former publisher of the Washington Blade.

“Then came AIDS in 1981 — a huge boost to the gay press as people turned to it to follow AIDS coverage because the mainstream [media] was kind of slow to get off the ground.” Michaels went on to say that many initially feared advertisers would run the other way. The reverse happened. Pharmaceutical ads — and million-dollar revenues — flooded LGBT media. During the early years, alcohol and beer, HIV/ AIDS pharmaceutical advertising and phone-sex revenues accounted for the bulk of Rivendell’s business. As late as 1994, phone-sex ads were a milliondollar account for Rivendell, according to Evans, current CEO and president. From the mid-1990s to the present, national advertising increasingly diversified — for example, automotive, entertainment, financial services, travel and tourism — as Fortune 500 companies eyed the potentially

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

lucrative gay market. This new dimension necessitated a more professional sales and editorial endeavor. Robert Moore, publisher of the Dallas Voice, recalled his experience from 25 years ago as ad director. “I was very green, a good student, but I needed a good teacher,” he said. “The value with Rivendell is they taught me what was valuable information, what I needed to give to people and how to take a product and turn it into something that would get noticed.” Rivendell’s methodology also applied to the local market. “Many of the issues are the same as national,” Moore said. “You still have to know how to talk to people in an intelligent manner.” On the editorial side, “Rivendell made the gay press a more professional business because they raised the bar,” said Cathy Renna, managing partner of Renna

What’s so important about organizing LGBT media? Doing so gave them economic clout, enabling placement of national advertising in regional publications.

Communications, a public-interest communications firm. The dynamic changed, she went on to explain, from, “I’m at a gay paper because I am not really a journalist” doing “advocacy” and “can’t get a job in the mainstream,” to, “I’m now a real journalist,” able to work in the mainstream or gay media or both. Rivendell’s success also boosted workplace equality. “You can only run a paper on love, passion and politics for so long,” said Bob Witeck of Witeck Communications, a strategic public-relations and marketing firm. “You have to have a grounding and support of an advertising base,” insofar as “commerce has been a big driver for LGBT civil rights. As business gets to know us, employees and their partners have driven the movement toward equality. When you are treated equally in the workplace, it’s harder to discriminate anywhere else.” ■ Portions of this essay first appeared in Press Pass Q, a trade journal for gay media professionals and a soon-to-be released new book, Gay Press, Gay Power: The Growth of LGBT Community Newspapers in America, edited by Tracy Baim.

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16

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

PGN

“Most doctors choose ATRIPLA. That’s important to me.” Simon — Current ATRIPLA Patient With over 6 years of prescribing experience, ATRIPLA (efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF) is the #1 prescribed single-tablet HIV regimen.*

Alone or with other HIV meds. Real ATRIPLA patients. INDICATION ATRIPLA (efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) is a prescription medication used alone as a complete regimen, or with other anti-HIV-1 medicines, to treat HIV-1 infection in adults and children at least 12 years old who weigh at least 40 kg (88 lbs). ATRIPLA does not cure HIV-1 infection or AIDS and you may continue to experience illnesses associated with HIV-1 infection, including opportunistic infections. See your healthcare provider regularly while taking ATRIPLA. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION What is the most important information I should know about ATRIPLA? ATRIPLA can cause serious side effects: • Some people who have taken medicine like ATRIPLA (which contains nucleoside analogs) have developed lactic acidosis (build up of an acid in the blood). Lactic acidosis can be a serious medical emergency that can lead to death. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get the following signs or symptoms of lactic acidosis: — feel very weak or tired — feel cold, especially in your arms and legs — have unusual (not normal) muscle pain — feel dizzy or lightheaded — have trouble breathing — have a fast or irregular heartbeat — have stomach pain with nausea and vomiting • Some people who have taken medicines like ATRIPLA have developed serious liver problems (hepatotoxicity), with liver enlargement (hepatomegaly) and fat in the liver (steatosis). In some cases, these liver problems can lead to death.

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Call your healthcare provider right away if you get the following signs or symptoms of liver problems: — skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow (jaundice) — urine turns dark — bowel movements (stools) turn light in color — don’t feel like eating food for several days or longer — feel sick to your stomach (nausea) — have lower stomach area (abdominal) pain • You may be more likely to get lactic acidosis or liver problems if you are female, very overweight (obese), or have been taking nucleoside analogcontaining medicines, like ATRIPLA (efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate), for a long time. • If you also have hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and you stop taking ATRIPLA, you may get a “flare-up” of your hepatitis. A “flare-up” is when the disease suddenly returns in a worse way than before. Patients with HBV who stop taking ATRIPLA need close medical follow-up for several months to check for hepatitis that could be getting worse. ATRIPLA is not approved for the treatment of HBV, so you need to discuss your HBV therapy with your healthcare provider. Who should not take ATRIPLA? You and your healthcare provider should decide if ATRIPLA is right for you. Do not take ATRIPLA if you are allergic to ATRIPLA or any of its ingredients. What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking ATRIPLA? Tell your healthcare provider if you: • Are pregnant or planning to become pregnant: Women should not become pregnant while taking ATRIPLA and for 12 weeks after stopping ATRIPLA. Serious birth defects have been seen in children of women treated during pregnancy with one of the medicines in ATRIPLA.

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Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

17

ATRIPLA works to lower viral load and may increase CD4+ (T-cell) count, which may help improve your immune system. ATRIPLA does not cure HIV-1 infection or AIDS and you may continue to experience illnesses associated with HIV-1 infection, including opportunistic infections.

Selected Important Safety Information: • Some people who have taken medicine like ATRIPLA have developed build up of lactic acid in the blood, which can be a serious medical emergency that can lead to death. • Some people who have taken medicines like ATRIPLA have developed serious liver problems, with liver enlargement and fat in the liver, which can lead to death. • If you also have hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and you stop taking ATRIPLA, your hepatitis may suddenly get worse. ATRIPLA is not approved for the treatment of HBV. Please see below for more information about these warnings, including signs and symptoms, and other Important Safety Information.

Ask your doctor about ATRIPLA— the single-tablet HIV regimen with over 5 million prescriptions written.* *Source Healthcare Analytics, Source® PHAST Prescription Monthly, January 2006 – April 2012.

To learn more, visit www.ATRIPLA.com Women must use a reliable form of barrier contraception, such as a condom or diaphragm, even if they also use other methods of birth control, while on ATRIPLA (efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) and for 12 weeks after stopping ATRIPLA. Women should not rely only on hormone-based birth control, such as pills, injections, or implants, because ATRIPLA may make these contraceptives ineffective. • Are breastfeeding: Women with HIV should not breastfeed because they can pass HIV or may pass ATRIPLA through their milk to the baby. We do not know if ATRIPLA can be passed to your baby in your breast milk and whether it could harm your baby. • Have kidney problems or are undergoing kidney dialysis treatment • Have bone problems • Have liver problems, including hepatitis B or C virus infection. Your healthcare provider may want to do tests to check your liver while you take ATRIPLA or may switch you to another medicine. • Have ever had mental illness or are using drugs or alcohol • Have ever had seizures or are taking medicine for seizures. Seizures have occurred in patients taking efavirenz, a component of ATRIPLA, generally in those with a history of seizures. If you have ever had seizures, or take medicine for seizures, your healthcare provider may want to switch you to another medicine or monitor you. What important information should I know about taking other medicines with ATRIPLA? ATRIPLA may change the effect of other medicines, including the ones for HIV-1, and may cause serious side effects. Your healthcare provider may change your other medicines or change their doses. MEDICINES YOU SHOULD NOT TAKE WITH ATRIPLA • Do not take ATRIPLA if you are taking the following medicines because serious and life-threatening side effects may occur when taken together: Vascor® (bepridil), Propulsid® (cisapride), Versed® (midazolam), Orap® (pimozide), Halcion® (triazolam), or ergot medications (for example, Wigraine® and Cafergot®).

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• ATRIPLA (efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) should not be taken with: Combivir® (lamivudine/zidovudine), COMPLERA® (emtricitabine/rilpivirine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate), EMTRIVA® (emtricitabine), Epivir® or Epivir-HBV® (lamivudine), Epzicom® (abacavir sulfate/lamivudine), Trizivir® (abacavir sulfate/lamivudine/ zidovudine), TRUVADA® (emtricitabine/tenofovir DF), or VIREAD® (tenofovir DF), because they contain the same or similar active ingredients as ATRIPLA. ATRIPLA should not be used with SUSTIVA® (efavirenz) unless recommended by your healthcare provider. • Vfend® (voriconazole) should not be taken with ATRIPLA since it may lose its effect or may increase the chance of having side effects from ATRIPLA. • Do not take St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum), or products containing St. John’s wort with ATRIPLA. Taking St. John’s wort may decrease ATRIPLA levels and lead to increased viral load, and possible resistance to ATRIPLA or crossresistance to other anti-HIV-1 drugs. • ATRIPLA should not be used with HEPSERA® (adefovir dipivoxil). These are not all the medicines that may cause problems if you take ATRIPLA. Tell your healthcare provider about all prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements you are taking or plan to take. Important Safety Information is continued on the following page. Please see Patient Information on the following pages.

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Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

ATRIPLA (efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) Important Safety Information (continued) What are the possible side effects of ATRIPLA? ATRIPLA may cause the following additional serious side effects: • Serious psychiatric problems. Severe depression, strange thoughts, or angry behavior have been reported by a small number of patients. Some patients have had thoughts of suicide, and a few have actually committed suicide. These problems may occur more often in patients who have had mental illness. • Kidney problems (including decline or failure of kidney function). If you have had kidney problems, or take other medicines that may cause kidney problems, your healthcare provider should do regular blood tests. Symptoms that may be related to kidney problems include a high volume of urine, thirst, muscle pain, and muscle weakness. • Other serious liver problems. Some patients have experienced serious liver problems, including liver failure resulting in transplantation or death. Most of these serious side effects occurred in patients with a chronic liver disease such as hepatitis infection, but there have also been a few reports in patients without any existing liver disease. • Changes in bone mineral density (thinning bones). Lab tests show changes in the bones of patients treated with tenofovir DF, a component of ATRIPLA. Some HIV patients treated with tenofovir DF developed thinning of the bones (osteopenia), which could lead to fractures. Also, bone pain and softening of the bone (which may lead to fractures) may occur as a consequence of kidney problems. If you have had bone problems in the past, your healthcare provider may want to do tests to check your bones or may prescribe medicines to help your bones. Also, bone pain and bone softening may occur because of kidney problems. Common side effects: • Patients may have dizziness, headache, trouble sleeping, drowsiness, trouble concentrating, and/or unusual dreams during treatment with ATRIPLA. These side effects may be reduced if you take ATRIPLA at bedtime on an empty stomach; they tend to go away after taking ATRIPLA for a few weeks. Tell your healthcare provider right away if any of these side effects continue or if they bother you. These symptoms may be more severe if ATRIPLA is used with alcohol and/or mood-altering (street) drugs. • If you are dizzy, have trouble concentrating, and/or are drowsy, avoid activities that may be dangerous, such as driving or operating machinery. • Rash is a common side effect with ATRIPLA that usually goes away without any change in treatment. Rash may be serious in a small number of patients. Rash occurs more commonly in children and may be a serious problem. If a rash develops, call your healthcare provider right away. • Other common side effects include: tiredness, upset stomach, vomiting, gas, and diarrhea. Other possible side effects: • Changes in body fat have been seen in some people taking anti-HIV-1 medicines. Increase of fat in the upper back and neck, breasts, and around the trunk may happen. Loss of fat from the legs, arms, and face may also happen. The cause and long-term health effects of these changes in body fat are not known. • Skin discoloration (small spots or freckles) may also happen. • In some patients with advanced HIV infection (AIDS), signs and symptoms of inflammation from previous infections may occur soon after anti-HIV treatment is started. If you notice any symptoms of infection, contact your healthcare provider right away. • Additional side effects are inflammation of the pancreas, allergic reaction (including swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat), shortness of breath, pain, stomach pain, weakness, and indigestion. This is not a complete list of side effects. Tell your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you notice any side effects while taking ATRIPLA. You should take ATRIPLA once daily on an empty stomach. Taking ATRIPLA at bedtime may make some side effects less bothersome. Please see Patient Information on adjacent and following pages. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088. © 2012 Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. All rights reserved. ATRIPLA is a registered trademark of Bristol-Myers Squibb & Gilead Sciences, LLC. SUSTIVA is a registered trademark of Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. 697US12AB02908

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Patient Information ATRIPLA® (uh TRIP luh) Tablets ALERT: Find out about medicines that should NOT be taken with ATRIPLA. Please also read the section “MEDICINES YOU SHOULD NOT TAKE WITH ATRIPLA.” Generic name: efavirenz, emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (eh FAH vih renz, em tri SIT uh bean and te NOE’ fo veer dye soe PROX il FYOU mar ate) Read the Patient Information that comes with ATRIPLA before you start taking it and each time you get a refill since there may be new information. This information does not take the place of talking to your healthcare provider about your medical condition or treatment. You should stay under a healthcare provider’s care when taking ATRIPLA. Do not change or stop your medicine without first talking with your healthcare provider. Talk to your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you have any questions about ATRIPLA. What is the most important information I should know about ATRIPLA? • Some people who have taken medicine like ATRIPLA (which contains nucleoside analogs) have developed a serious condition called lactic acidosis (build up of an acid in the blood). Lactic acidosis can be a medical emergency and may need to be treated in the hospital. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get the following signs or symptoms of lactic acidosis: • You feel very weak or tired. • You have unusual (not normal) muscle pain. • You have trouble breathing. • You have stomach pain with nausea and vomiting. • You feel cold, especially in your arms and legs. • You feel dizzy or lightheaded. • You have a fast or irregular heartbeat. • Some people who have taken medicines like ATRIPLA have developed serious liver problems called hepatotoxicity, with liver enlargement (hepatomegaly) and fat in the liver (steatosis). Call your healthcare provider right away if you get the following signs or symptoms of liver problems: • Your skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow (jaundice). • Your urine turns dark. • Your bowel movements (stools) turn light in color. • You don’t feel like eating food for several days or longer. • You feel sick to your stomach (nausea). • You have lower stomach area (abdominal) pain. • You may be more likely to get lactic acidosis or liver problems if you are female, very overweight (obese), or have been taking nucleoside analogcontaining medicines, like ATRIPLA, for a long time. • If you also have hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and you stop taking ATRIPLA, you may get a “flare-up” of your hepatitis. A “flare-up” is when the disease suddenly returns in a worse way than before. Patients with HBV who stop taking ATRIPLA need close medical follow-up for several months, including medical exams and blood tests to check for hepatitis that could be getting worse. ATRIPLA is not approved for the treatment of HBV, so you must discuss your HBV therapy with your healthcare provider. What is ATRIPLA? ATRIPLA contains 3 medicines, SUSTIVA® (efavirenz), EMTRIVA® (emtricitabine) and VIREAD® (tenofovir disoproxil fumarate also called tenofovir DF) combined in one pill. EMTRIVA and VIREAD are HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus) nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and SUSTIVA is an HIV-1 non-nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI). VIREAD and EMTRIVA are the components of TRUVADA®. ATRIPLA can be used alone as a complete regimen, or in combination with other anti-HIV-1 medicines to treat people with HIV-1 infection. ATRIPLA is for adults and children 12 years of age and older who weigh at least 40 kg (at least 88 lbs). ATRIPLA is not recommended for children younger than 12 years of age. ATRIPLA has not been studied in adults over 65 years of age. HIV infection destroys CD4+ T cells, which are important to the immune system. The immune system helps fight infection. After a large number of T cells are destroyed, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) develops. ATRIPLA helps block HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, a viral chemical in your body (enzyme) that is needed for HIV-1 to multiply. ATRIPLA lowers the amount of HIV-1 in the blood (viral load). ATRIPLA may also help to increase the number of T cells (CD4+ cells), allowing your immune system to improve. Lowering the

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PGN

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

ATRIPLA® (efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) amount of HIV-1 in the blood lowers the chance of death or infections that happen when your immune system is weak (opportunistic infections). Does ATRIPLA cure HIV-1 or AIDS? ATRIPLA does not cure HIV-1 infection or AIDS and you may continue to experience illnesses associated with HIV-1 infection, including opportunistic infections. You should remain under the care of a doctor when using ATRIPLA. Who should not take ATRIPLA? Together with your healthcare provider, you need to decide whether ATRIPLA is right for you. Do not take ATRIPLA if you are allergic to ATRIPLA or any of its ingredients. The active ingredients of ATRIPLA are efavirenz, emtricitabine, and tenofovir DF. See the end of this leaflet for a complete list of ingredients. What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking ATRIPLA? Tell your healthcare provider if you: • Are pregnant or planning to become pregnant (see “What should I avoid while taking ATRIPLA?”). • Are breastfeeding (see “What should I avoid while taking ATRIPLA?”). • Have kidney problems or are undergoing kidney dialysis treatment. • Have bone problems. • Have liver problems, including hepatitis B virus infection. Your healthcare provider may want to do tests to check your liver while you take ATRIPLA or may switch you to another medicine. • Have ever had mental illness or are using drugs or alcohol. • Have ever had seizures or are taking medicine for seizures. What important information should I know about taking other medicines with ATRIPLA? ATRIPLA may change the effect of other medicines, including the ones for HIV-1, and may cause serious side effects. Your healthcare provider may change your other medicines or change their doses. Other medicines, including herbal products, may affect ATRIPLA. For this reason, it is very important to let all your healthcare providers and pharmacists know what medications, herbal supplements, or vitamins you are taking. MEDICINES YOU SHOULD NOT TAKE WITH ATRIPLA • The following medicines may cause serious and life-threatening side effects when taken with ATRIPLA. You should not take any of these medicines while taking ATRIPLA: Vascor (bepridil), Propulsid (cisapride), Versed (midazolam), Orap (pimozide), Halcion (triazolam), ergot medications (for example, Wigraine and Cafergot). • ATRIPLA also should not be used with Combivir (lamivudine/zidovudine), COMPLERA, EMTRIVA, Epivir, Epivir-HBV (lamivudine), Epzicom (abacavir sulfate/lamivudine), Trizivir (abacavir sulfate/lamivudine/zidovudine), TRUVADA, or VIREAD. ATRIPLA also should not be used with SUSTIVA unless recommended by your healthcare provider. • Vfend (voriconazole) should not be taken with ATRIPLA since it may lose its effect or may increase the chance of having side effects from ATRIPLA. • Do not take St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum), or products containing St. John’s wort with ATRIPLA. St. John’s wort is an herbal product sold as a dietary supplement. Talk with your healthcare provider if you are taking or are planning to take St. John’s wort. Taking St. John’s wort may decrease ATRIPLA levels and lead to increased viral load and possible resistance to ATRIPLA or cross-resistance to other anti-HIV-1 drugs. • ATRIPLA should not be used with HEPSERA® (adefovir dipivoxil). It is also important to tell your healthcare provider if you are taking any of the following: • Fortovase, Invirase (saquinavir), Biaxin (clarithromycin), Noxafil (posaconazole), or Sporanox (itraconazole); these medicines may need to be replaced with another medicine when taken with ATRIPLA. • Calcium channel blockers such as Cardizem or Tiazac (diltiazem), Covera HS or Isoptin (verapamil) and others; Crixivan (indinavir), Selzentry (maraviroc); the immunosuppressant medicines cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune, and others), Prograf (tacrolimus), or Rapamune (sirolimus); Methadone; Mycobutin (rifabutin); Rifampin; cholesterol-lowering medicines such as Lipitor (atorvastatin), Pravachol (pravastatin sodium), and Zocor (simvastatin); or the anti-depressant medications bupropion (Wellbutrin, Wellbutrin SR, Wellbutrin XL, and Zyban) or Zoloft (sertraline); dose changes may be needed when these drugs are taken with ATRIPLA.

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19

ATRIPLA® (efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) •

Videx, Videx EC (didanosine); tenofovir DF (a component of ATRIPLA) may increase the amount of didanosine in your blood, which could result in more side effects. You may need to be monitored more carefully if you are taking ATRIPLA and didanosine together. Also, the dose of didanosine may need to be changed. • Reyataz (atazanavir sulfate) or Kaletra (lopinavir/ritonavir); these medicines may increase the amount of tenofovir DF (a component of ATRIPLA) in your blood, which could result in more side effects. Reyataz is not recommended with ATRIPLA. You may need to be monitored more carefully if you are taking ATRIPLA and Kaletra together. Also, the dose of Kaletra may need to be changed. • Medicine for seizures [for example, Dilantin (phenytoin), Tegretol (carbamazepine), or phenobarbital]; your healthcare provider may want to switch you to another medicine or check drug levels in your blood from time to time. These are not all the medicines that may cause problems if you take ATRIPLA. Be sure to tell your healthcare provider about all medicines that you take. Keep a complete list of all the prescription and nonprescription medicines as well as any herbal remedies that you are taking, how much you take, and how often you take them. Make a new list when medicines or herbal remedies are added or stopped, or if the dose changes. Give copies of this list to all of your healthcare providers and pharmacists every time you visit your healthcare provider or fill a prescription. This will give your healthcare provider a complete picture of the medicines you use. Then he or she can decide the best approach for your situation. How should I take ATRIPLA? • Take the exact amount of ATRIPLA your healthcare provider prescribes. Never change the dose on your own. Do not stop this medicine unless your healthcare provider tells you to stop. • You should take ATRIPLA on an empty stomach. • Swallow ATRIPLA with water. • Taking ATRIPLA at bedtime may make some side effects less bothersome. • Do not miss a dose of ATRIPLA. If you forget to take ATRIPLA, take the missed dose right away, unless it is almost time for your next dose. Do not double the next dose. Carry on with your regular dosing schedule. If you need help in planning the best times to take your medicine, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist. • If you believe you took more than the prescribed amount of ATRIPLA, contact your local poison control center or emergency room right away. • Tell your healthcare provider if you start any new medicine or change how you take old ones. Your doses may need adjustment. • When your ATRIPLA supply starts to run low, get more from your healthcare provider or pharmacy. This is very important because the amount of virus in your blood may increase if the medicine is stopped for even a short time. The virus may develop resistance to ATRIPLA and become harder to treat. • Your healthcare provider may want to do blood tests to check for certain side effects while you take ATRIPLA. What should I avoid while taking ATRIPLA? • Women should not become pregnant while taking ATRIPLA and for 12 weeks after stopping it. Serious birth defects have been seen in the babies of animals and women treated with efavirenz (a component of ATRIPLA) during pregnancy. It is not known whether efavirenz caused these defects. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you are pregnant. Also talk with your healthcare provider if you want to become pregnant. • Women should not rely only on hormone-based birth control, such as pills, injections, or implants, because ATRIPLA may make these contraceptives ineffective. Women must use a reliable form of barrier contraception, such as a condom or diaphragm, even if they also use other methods of birth control. Efavirenz, a component of ATRIPLA, may remain in your blood for a time after therapy is stopped. Therefore, you should continue to use contraceptive measures for 12 weeks after you stop taking ATRIPLA. • Do not breastfeed if you are taking ATRIPLA. We do not know if ATRIPLA can be passed to your baby in your breast milk and whether it could harm your baby. Also, mothers with HIV-1 should not breastfeed because HIV-1 can be passed to the baby in the breast milk. Talk with your healthcare provider if you are breastfeeding. You should stop breastfeeding or may need to use a different medicine.

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Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

PGN

ATRIPLA® (efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate)

ATRIPLA® (efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate)

Taking ATRIPLA with alcohol or other medicines causing similar side effects as ATRIPLA, such as drowsiness, may increase those side effects. • Do not take any other medicines, including prescription and nonprescription medicines and herbal products, without checking with your healthcare provider. • Avoid doing things that can spread HIV-1 to others. • Do not share needles or other injection equipment. • Do not share personal items that can have blood or body fluids on them, like toothbrushes and razor blades. • Do not have any kind of sex without protection. Always practice safe sex by using a latex or polyurethane condom to lower the chance of sexual contact with semen, vaginal secretions, or blood. What are the possible side effects of ATRIPLA? ATRIPLA may cause the following serious side effects: • Lactic acidosis (buildup of an acid in the blood). Lactic acidosis can be a medical emergency and may need to be treated in the hospital. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get signs of lactic acidosis. (See “What is the most important information I should know about ATRIPLA?”) • Serious liver problems (hepatotoxicity), with liver enlargement (hepatomegaly) and fat in the liver (steatosis). Call your healthcare provider right away if you get any signs of liver problems. (See “What is the most important information I should know about ATRIPLA?”) • “Flare-ups” of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, in which the disease suddenly returns in a worse way than before, can occur if you have HBV and you stop taking ATRIPLA. Your healthcare provider will monitor your condition for several months after stopping ATRIPLA if you have both HIV-1 and HBV infection and may recommend treatment for your HBV. ATRIPLA is not approved for the treatment of hepatitis B virus infection. If you have advanced liver disease and stop treatment with ATRIPLA, the “flare-up” of hepatitis B may cause your liver function to decline. • Serious psychiatric problems. A small number of patients may experience severe depression, strange thoughts, or angry behavior while taking ATRIPLA. Some patients have thoughts of suicide and a few have actually committed suicide. These problems may occur more often in patients who have had mental illness. Contact your healthcare provider right away if you think you are having these psychiatric symptoms, so your healthcare provider can decide if you should continue to take ATRIPLA. • Kidney problems (including decline or failure of kidney function). If you have had kidney problems in the past or take other medicines that can cause kidney problems, your healthcare provider should do regular blood tests to check your kidneys. Symptoms that may be related to kidney problems include a high volume of urine, thirst, muscle pain, and muscle weakness. • Other serious liver problems. Some patients have experienced serious liver problems including liver failure resulting in transplantation or death. Most of these serious side effects occurred in patients with a chronic liver disease such as hepatitis infection, but there have also been a few reports in patients without any existing liver disease. • Changes in bone mineral density (thinning bones). Laboratory tests show changes in the bones of patients treated with tenofovir DF, a component of ATRIPLA. Some HIV patients treated with tenofovir DF developed thinning of the bones (osteopenia) which could lead to fractures. If you have had bone problems in the past, your healthcare provider may need to do tests to check your bone mineral density or may prescribe medicines to help your bone mineral density. Additionally, bone pain and softening of the bone (which may contribute to fractures) may occur as a consequence of kidney problems. Common side effects: Patients may have dizziness, headache, trouble sleeping, drowsiness, trouble concentrating, and/or unusual dreams during treatment with ATRIPLA. These side effects may be reduced if you take ATRIPLA at bedtime on an empty stomach. They also tend to go away after you have taken the medicine for a few weeks. If you have these common side effects, such as dizziness, it does not mean that you will also have serious psychiatric problems, such as severe depression, strange thoughts, or angry behavior. Tell your healthcare provider right away if any of these side effects continue or if they bother you. It is possible that these symptoms may be more severe if ATRIPLA is used with alcohol or mood altering (street) drugs. If you are dizzy, have trouble concentrating, or are drowsy, avoid activities that may be dangerous, such as driving or operating machinery.

Rash may be common. Rashes usually go away without any change in treatment. In a small number of patients, rash may be serious. If you develop a rash, call your healthcare provider right away. Rash may be a serious problem in some children. Tell your child’s healthcare provider right away if you notice rash or any other side effects while your child is taking ATRIPLA. Other common side effects include tiredness, upset stomach, vomiting, gas, and diarrhea. Other possible side effects with ATRIPLA: • Changes in body fat. Changes in body fat develop in some patients taking antiHIV-1 medicine. These changes may include an increased amount of fat in the upper back and neck (“buffalo hump”), in the breasts, and around the trunk. Loss of fat from the legs, arms, and face may also happen. The cause and long-term health effects of these fat changes are not known. • Skin discoloration (small spots or freckles) may also happen with ATRIPLA. • In some patients with advanced HIV infection (AIDS), signs and symptoms of inflammation from previous infections may occur soon after anti-HIV treatment is started. It is believed that these symptoms are due to an improvement in the body’s immune response, enabling the body to fight infections that may have been present with no obvious symptoms. If you notice any symptoms of infection, please inform your doctor immediately. • Additional side effects are inflammation of the pancreas, allergic reaction (including swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat), shortness of breath, pain, stomach pain, weakness and indigestion. Tell your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you notice any side effects while taking ATRIPLA. Contact your healthcare provider before stopping ATRIPLA because of side effects or for any other reason. This is not a complete list of side effects possible with ATRIPLA. Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for a more complete list of side effects of ATRIPLA and all the medicines you will take. How do I store ATRIPLA? • Keep ATRIPLA and all other medicines out of reach of children. • Store ATRIPLA at room temperature 77 °F (25 °C). • Keep ATRIPLA in its original container and keep the container tightly closed. • Do not keep medicine that is out of date or that you no longer need. If you throw any medicines away make sure that children will not find them. General information about ATRIPLA: Medicines are sometimes prescribed for conditions that are not mentioned in patient information leaflets. Do not use ATRIPLA for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give ATRIPLA to other people, even if they have the same symptoms you have. It may harm them. This leaflet summarizes the most important information about ATRIPLA. If you would like more information, talk with your healthcare provider. You can ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for information about ATRIPLA that is written for health professionals. Do not use ATRIPLA if the seal over bottle opening is broken or missing. What are the ingredients of ATRIPLA? Active Ingredients: efavirenz, emtricitabine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate Inactive Ingredients: croscarmellose sodium, hydroxypropyl cellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, magnesium stearate, sodium lauryl sulfate. The film coating contains black iron oxide, polyethylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol, red iron oxide, talc, and titanium dioxide. June 2012 ATRIPLA is a trademark of Bristol-Myers Squibb & Gilead Sciences, LLC. COMPLERA, EMTRIVA, HEPSERA, TRUVADA, and VIREAD are trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc. SUSTIVA is a trademark of Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharma Company. Reyataz and Videx are trademarks of Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. Pravachol is a trademark of ER Squibb & Sons, LLC. Other brands listed are the trademarks of their respective owners.

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21-937-GS-010 TR13541

Revised June 2012

697US12CBS01404

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PGN SPECTER from page 1

2009, announced he was switching parties to become a Democrat, a decision that drew skepticism from some Democrats and welcome from many others. In a statement this week, President Obama called Specter the consummate “fighter.” “From his days stamping out corruption as a prosecutor in Philadelphia to his three decades of service in the Senate, Arlen was fiercely independent, never putting party or ideology ahead of the people he was chosen to serve,” the president said. Mayor Michael Nutter said the former senator “cared about people, gave voice to the voiceless and stood up for everyday Philadelphians, Pennsylvanians and Americans at every opportunity.” Throughout his Senate career, Specter often broke ranks with more conservative Republicans, including on a number of LGBT-rights issues. He cosponsored t h e L G B T- i n c l u sive hate-crimes law each session since its inception in 1997. He voted for its eventual passage in 2009 and was acknowledged by President Obama when he signed the bill, named in part for slain gay college student Matthew Shepard, into law. In one of his last Senate votes, Specter supported the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” the military’s ban on openly gay servicemembers, which he voted against in 1993. He was a consistent cosponsor of the Employment Nondiscrimination Act, and cosponsored a bill that sought to provide

equal benefits to same-sex domestic partners of federal employees as well as one that looked to treat same-sex binational couples equal to heterosexual couples. Specter turned heads in 2009 when he announced he was in favor of repealing the federal Defense of Marriage Act, which prevents the government from recognizing same-sex marriage, and for which he voted in 1996. He told PGN at that time that he had been in a “more traditional” mindset when DOMA arose and that there was “a very different mood in the country when that bill was passed, a very different mood.” Abbe Fletman, a member of the local LGBT coalition that supported Specter’s 2009 re-election campaign, noted that, when he left office in 2010, he had a 96percent rating from the Human Rights Campaign. “He started out pretty good and just evolved to be even better on our issues,” Fletman said. Micah Mahjoubian also worked on the coalition and said he was proud to have the opportunity to work on Specter’s behalf because he was “the kind of public servant I truly admire.” “As a strong advocate of civil rights, w o m e n ’s r i g h t s , LGBT equality and critical health-care funding, he always did the right thing, even if it hurt him politically,” Mahjoubian said. “Washington would be a better place if there were more like him there today.” Specter, a former Air Force lieutenant, initially was a Democrat but switched to Republican in the mid-1960s before taking on the city’s district attorney position,

“As a strong advocate of civil rights, women’s rights, LGBT equality and critical health-care funding, he always did the right thing, even if it hurt him politically. Washington would be a better place if there were more like him there today.”

SHOOTING from page 1

underwent surgery last week and was released this week. Hughes, who also goes by the last names Lewis and Jones, faces a litany of charges, including murder, criminal attempted murder, aggravated assault, theft, robbery, receiving stolen property and numerous firearms charges. Hughes, who lives in the 100 block of Linton Avenue in Olney, was arrested five times previously, between 1996-98. Charges include several robbery counts, contempt of court and harassment with a gun. “Four out of his six arrests are gun-related so he’s a pretty violent guy,” said police spokesperson Lt. Ray Evers. Evers said police believe this latest incident was robbery-related. He declined to elaborate on the relationship between the victims and the suspect other than to say they knew each other. “There was some knowledge between the group,” he said. “They knew each other in

some way for a short period of time. This wasn’t a completely random street robbery.” Deputy Commissioner Stephen Johnson, LGBT liaison, said the victim met Hughes “socially.” “While in her premises, a confrontation ensued and the assailant shot and wounded the complainant,” he said. “When her mother attempted to intercede, she was also shot by Jibrell and died from her wound.” Several witnesses were present in the house at the time of the shooting, although Evers said he did not know how they were connected to the victims. There has not been a history of police calls to the house, Evers said. The woman was found outside on the street, although Evers said both victims were shot inside the house. Hughes is being held at Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility and is scheduled for a hearing at 9 a.m. Oct. 31 in room 306 of the Criminal Justice Center, 1301 Filbert St. ■

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

21

SPECTER WITH LGBT SUPPORTERS AT 2010 CAMPAIGN EVENT AT WILLIAM WAY LGBT COMMUNITY CENTER File Photo: Scott A. Drake

which he held until 1974. The evolution that brought him back to the Democratic Party included several key votes that earned him the Republican In Name Only moniker, such as his crucial 2008 vote in favor of President Obama’s stimulus package. “As his party continued moving toward the right, he remained a voice of moderation,” she said. “He was part of a strain of the Republican Party that is almost an endangered species today.” His more-recent party switch ultimately didn’t enable him to win re-election in 2009, when he lost to challenger Joe Sestak, who eventually lost to Republican Sen. Pat Toomey. Specter was diagnosed with nonHodgkin’s lymphoma in 2005 but remained in office during his treatments. The cancer returned in 2008 but that did not stop his political aspirations. He told PGN in 2009 that he would con-

sider retirement “when I felt I was no longer able to make a significant contribution to the Senate.” At that time, he said he frequently played squash and lifted weights every day. He bristled at the idea of being forced out of political office for his age. “When the age question comes up, I always quote the baseball player Satchel Paige: ‘If you didn’t know your age, how old would you think you were?’ I think I’d say 37, and I’d only pick 37 because I don’t think people would believe 17.” After leaving the Senate, Specter took on a teaching position at University of Pennsylvania’s law school. He announced this past summer that his cancer had returned. A funeral was held Tuesday in Penn Valley. Obama issued a presidential proclamation ordering all government flags to be flown at half-staff the day of the funeral. ■

Philadelphia Gay News


22

NATIONAL PGN

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

The police news release said the men were accused of misdemeanors such as public lewdness at Saxon Woods Park in White Plains. The police department didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Media Trail Lawsuit filed against Westchester police The Wall Street Journal reports a lawsuit alleges the Westchester County, N.Y., police sought to humiliate gay men and ignored the fact that many of the cases were sealed when they released the names of 16 men in a crackdown on sexual activity in a local park. The suit says the men in at least a dozen cases pleaded guilty to violations, the equivalent of speeding tickets. They didn’t face any sex charges. It was filed by the Lambda Legal organization on behalf of a man who said he was horrified to find his name and photo in newspapers and local websites last year.

Gallaudet criticized for placing official on leave

that would allow him to become an Eagle Scout. The Boy Scouts of America has a policy prohibiting gay members or troop leaders.

Gay ex-Boy Scout gets $20K check

Maine gay marriage campaign gets $225K donation

The Sacramento Bee reports a Northern California Boy Scout who was denied the opportunity to become an Eagle Scout and kicked out of his troop after he came out as gay has secured a considerable consolation prize: a $20,000 check for college and a national television audience. Ellen DeGeneres booked 18-year-old Ryan Andresen of Moraga as a guest on her talk show Oct. 11, which was National Coming Out Day. After talking with Andresen about his experience, DeGeneres surprised him with the check provided by online photo publisher Shutterfly. Andresen’s mother, Karen, launched an online petition last week to get the master of her son’s to sign off on a project

The Boston Globe reports the Human Rights Campaign is donating $225,000 to Mainers United for Marriage as part of its national campaign in support of gay marriage. The donation is part of $1 million in contributions to marriage-equality campaigns in Maine, Maryland, Minnesota and Washington. Mainers United for Marriage said the Human Rights Campaign has contributed $7.3 million to legislative and electoral marriage issues in 2011-12. HRC President Chad Griffin said voters in the four states have a chance to make history in supporting marriage equality at the polls. Maine residents are voting on a ballot Nov. 6 that legalizes same-sex marriage.

The Washington Post reports groups on both sides of the gay-marriage debate are speaking out against Gallaudet University in Washington. The statements come after an administrator was placed on leave because she signed a petition opposing gay marriage. Marylanders for Marriage Equality campaign manager Josh Levin says Angela McCaskill “should be reinstated immediately” as chief diversity officer at Gallaudet, the nation’s leading university for the deaf and hard of hearing. Although the group supports gay marriage, Levin says “everyone is entitled to free speech.” McCaskill, a Maryland resident, signed a petition circulated by marriage-equality opponents to put the issue on the ballot in November. Maryland legalized gay marriage this year, but the law hasn’t taken effect. The conservative Family Research Council issued a statement calling Gallaudet’s action discriminatory. ■

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PGN BURNETT from page 1

Her personnel records in the city’s Office of Human Resources still refer to her as a male, even though she had gender-reassignment surgery 11 years ago. According to Burnett’s lawsuit, she’s been transferred to eight different library branches, denied access to unisex restroom facilities, passed over for advancement and unfairly restricted in her interactions with patrons. Slurs hurled at Burnett by some staffers include “freak,” “man in woman’s clothing” and “nigger,” according to the lawsuit. On one occasion, when Burnett expressed wishes for a nice weekend to a coworker, the employee responded with, “Burn in hell,” according to the lawsuit. Additionally, some staffers have gone out of their way to avoid contact with Burnett, and they’ve avoided touching objects she might have touched, the suit alleges. Library officials failed to take corrective measures to alleviate the hostile work environment, the suit alleges. Her lawsuit alleges constitutional violations of right to due process, equal protection under the law, freedom of expression and other rights.

She’s also suing under Title 7 of the Civil Rights of 1964 for alleged discrimination due to her sex. Additionally, she alleges that four of her coworkers intentionally inflicted emotional distress upon her, which is prohibited under state law. John W. Beavers, an attorney for Burnett, said Burnett has a strong case. “Employees who transition on the job don’t lose their constitutional rights to equal treatment by their employer,” Beavers said. Beavers said $800,000 is appropriate compensation for the ordeal that Burnett has endured. “Ten years is a long time to go through what Bobbie Burnett has gone through,” he said. “She wasn’t treated like she was human. If your employer doesn’t treat you as a human for 10 years, it causes a lot of pain, suffering and emotional distress. Any one incident she endured would be bad. But the totality of the events

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

was devastating.” Suzanne Reilly, chief deputy city solicitor for labor and employment, declined to comment on the case. “It is law-department policy that we just don’t comment on ongoing litigation,” Reilly told PGN. Burnett, 56, earns about $30,299 annually. In a brief interview, Burnett said that a “substantial portion” of any money she might receive due to the lawsuit would be used to establish a foundation to aid members of the transgender community. “I would take a substantial portion of any compensation I might receive, and start a foundation where people like me can get help,” she said. “The foundation would have a legalclinic component, so that people in need of legal assistance can get help with those things.” Beavers said he’s optimistic that a jury will rule in favor of his client.

Her lawsuit alleges constitutional violations of right to due process, equal protection under the law, freedom of expression and other rights.

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“Bobbie was treated differently than other employees for illegal reasons,” he said. “She had to take a lot of time off from work because of emotional distress caused by the unlawful discrimination. Bobbie did everything she could do to have the discrimination stop. But supervisors permitted fellow employees to direct discriminatory harassment against Bobbie. So I believe a jury could easily award $800,000, once it hears all the facts.” He also said a monetary award for Burnett could help strengthen employment rights for other transgender individuals in the region. “A big monetary award would put employers on strong notice not to discriminate against their transgender employees,” he said. “Even a small award would put them on notice not to discriminate. But I don’t expect Bobbie will get a small award.” Beavers said he’s eager to present the case to a jury. “I like trailblazing,” he said. “I’m enthusiastic about having the opportunity to do what you go to law school for, which is to support justice. And I think this case has a great potential for that.” ■

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MON 9/8c OCT 22

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Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

PGN REGIONAL NEWS BRIEFING from page 9

������������������������������ AMY F. STEERMAN Attorney at Law

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Concentrating in Planning for Lesbian and Gay Couples • Probate • Wills • Living Wills • Powers of Attorney

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development, transgender inclusion and LGBT diversity leadership. Tarcza said local co-chair Ray DiFrancesco has been integral in rallying local support for the summit. “We share the same passion in workplace issues,” he said. “We want people to feel comfortable coming out in the workplace and being fully themselves.” The local chapter has hosted a regional Out & Equal conference and an all-day summit at the Comcast Center. For more information about the Out & Equal summit, visit www. outandequal.org/summit-2012.

Dos and don’ts of LGBT weddings Looking to say “I do” this year? The Say I Do LGBT Wedding expo will be held from 1-4 p.m. Oct. 28 at the Radisson Plaza-Warwick Hotel, 220 S. 17th St. The expo will feature a variety of local vendors willing and ready to help with all wedding details. The event is open to couples and singles. Tickets are $7 for singles and $10 for couples. For more information, visit sayidophilly2012.eventbrite.com.

Free legal advice for elders The LGBT Elder Initiative will host a legal clinic at 11 a.m. Oct. 27 at the William Way LGBT Community Center, 1315 Spruce St. The clinic is free and will include information on the documents needed for legal planning, such as living wills, directives and medical and financial powers of attorney. The documents will be prepared by attorneys for free following the workshop. In order to have attorneys prepare the documents, those interested must register for the event. To RSVP, email name and telephone number to info@lgbtei.org or call 267-546-3448. ■ — Angela Thomas

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A C ul t ure ������������������ rts

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

PAGE 43

Family Portrait Get Out and Play Out & About Outward Bound Scene in Philly Q Puzzle Worth Watching

Page Page Page Page Page Page Page

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“STARS OF DAVID” CAST MEMBERS (FROM L TO R): JOANNA GLUSHAK, ALEX BRIGHTMAN, NANCY BALBIRER, BRAD OSCAR AND DONNA VIVINO Photo: Mark Garvin

Stage and drag star adapts Jewish stories for new musical By Larry Nichols larry@epgn.com

Philadelphia Theatre Company opens its new season with the world premiere of the new musical “Stars of David,” through Nov. 18 at Suzanne Roberts Theatre. The play is a musical stage adaptation of Abigail Pogrebin’s highly acclaimed book “Stars of David: Prominent Jews Talk about Being Jewish,” explores the issue of Jewish identity through interviews with some of America’s most recognizable public figures, including Gloria Steinem, Aaron Sorkin, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Joan Rivers, Norman Lear, Tony Kushner and Wendy Wasserstein. Out actor, screenwriter, playwright and acclaimed drag performer Charles Busch (“The Divine Sister,” “The Lady in Question,” “Red Scare on Sunset” and “Vampire Lesbians of Sodom”) worked on the story for the play, which takes the

interviews and transforms them into songs more outrageous and campy productions. “It’s somewhat closer in tone to ‘The by some of Broadway’s most acclaimed composers and lyricists, including William Tale of the Allergist’s Wife’ than ‘Vampire Finn (“The 25th Annual Putnam County Lesbians of Sodom,’” he said. “It’s really Spelling Bee”), Duncan Sheik (“Spring a musical, which is something I don’t do Awakening”), Sheldon Harnick (“Fiddler very often. I’m not sure it’s ever been done on the Roof”) and Susan Birkenhead before like this. On one hand it’s a musical (“Jelly’s Last Jam”), among others. It also review. These songs are all based on interviews with famous peofeatures one of the last ple. There’s a song that’s songs written by the based on this interview late Marvin Hamlisch with Joan Rivers. There’s (“A Chorus Line”). a song based on an interThe production has an view with Kenneth Cole. ensemble cast featuring Nancy Balbirer, Another song is based Alex Brightman, Joanna on an interview with Glushak, Brad Oscar Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Donna Vivino. etc. Most shows would Busch said the work be content with that: could be seen as someJust do a review of these what of a departure, different profiles. We’re especially for fans who attempting to weave are used to some of his PLAYWRIGHT CHARLES BUSCH throughout the songs an

actual play, which is based on the idea of a journalist who is interviewing all these people and how these interviews reflect her own life and what she’s going through and her own exploration of her relationship to her faith.” Busch said he read the original book t after he was tapped to work on the musical incarnation. “It feels so long since we started this thing, although it’s only been about a year,” he said. “I think the producers had sought me out and I wasn’t sure I wanted to do it. I ran into Gordon Greenberg, the director, and his enthusiasm was infectious, so I decided to throw myself into it. Then I read the book or maybe I read before I ran into Gordon. It’s a fascinating book. I kind of devoured it, reading about a vast group of prominent people from all different fields and their relationships to something as complex as their Judaism, whether it’s related to their culture or their religious aspects or not at


Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

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all. A lot of the men had married outside their religion. It’s a fascinating book. It’s certainly interesting for all these composers who had the task of musicalizing [sic] the individual interviews. We got this incredible group of musical-theater writers, and each one has an individual interview to compose to. It’s fascinating to see how each one did it, because we gave them total freedom and it was a scary leap of faith to see what they would come up with. They really evolved the piece.” Not that the stories need help to be compelling. Busch said the accounts were gripping before the musical enhancements. “They are compelling for different reasons. The Kenneth Cole piece is very moving, about how he married a very Catholic Maria Cuomo. It didn’t seem to bother him originally to have his children raised Catholic and now, years later, it has become a more complex issue for him. It was a very touching interview and a moving song. Another one I really loved is Abbey Pogrebin, who wrote the book. She is actually a very talented lyricist herself. She actually wrote a couple of songs, including a song based on Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s interview from when she was a 16-year-old girl. Her mother, whom she was so close to, died and she wanted to read the Kaddish at the funeral to be part of the Jewish ritual. Women are not allowed to participate in that way and it was a really traumatic experience for her.

(FROM L TO R): BRAD OSCAR, DONNA VIVINO, JOANNA GLUSHAK AND ALEX BRIGHTMAN Photo: Mark Garvin. “Then there’s some funny stuff, too. Joan Rivers, her interview is a wild rant about all the things that the Jews have given the world and how no one seems to appreciate it. It’s rather remarkable how Bill Finn was able to absolutely capture the rhythms of Joan’s speech in a song. The actress singing doesn’t have to put much effort into imitating Joan Rivers because the phrasing of the song itself has that staccato rhythm. It’s good stuff.” Busch added that, even though the show’s focus is on being Jewish, there are some stories that will be of interest to the LGBT community. “There are a number of gay participants,” he said. “Tony Kushner participated ,and there is a wonderful song about him that is very much about being a gay person in a Jewish family. Marc Shaiman wrote a song about Andy Cohen from Bravo. Those are the two that spring to mind immediately.” Busch said he relishes the opportunity to work on plays like “Stars of David,” which

are a departure from those he normally writes and performs in. “It’s like switching to different channels,” he said. “I enjoy my genre parodies where I’m the star of the show, I have to admit. But then I can turn into the dowdy author and take on an interesting creative challenge. And certainly this project is very challenging, trying to wed these songs to another story. So I use that side of my brain. “As far as style goes, I very much at home with the outrageous and the naturalistic portrayal of the people around me. I can’t say I have favorites. I’d say the outrageous Hollywood-inspired plays of mine are easier to do. I just have it in my bones — movies and acting style. I can whip up one of those plays very quickly.” ■ Philadelphia Theatre Company presents “Stars of David” through Nov. 18 at Suzanne Roberts Theatre, 480 S. Broad St. For more information or tickets, call 215-985-0420 or visit PhiladelphiaTheatreCompany.org.

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UNDETECTABLE for many HIV patients REYATAZ can help lower your viral load

INDICATION REYATAZ® (atazanavir sulfate) is a prescription medicine used in combination with other medicines to treat people 6 years of age and older who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). REYATAZ has been studied in a 48-week trial in patients who have taken anti-HIV medicines and a 96-week trial in patients who have never taken anti-HIV medicines. REYATAZ does not cure HIV or AIDS and you may continue to experience illnesses associated with HIV-1 infection, including opportunistic infections.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Do not take REYATAZ if you are allergic to REYATAZ or to any of its ingredients. Do not take REYATAZ if you are taking the following medicines due to potential for serious, life-threatening side effects or death: Versed® (midazolam) when taken by mouth, Halcion® (triazolam), ergot medicines (dihydroergotamine, ergonovine, ergotamine, and methylergonovine such as Cafergot®, Migranal®, D.H.E. 45®, ergotrate maleate, Methergine®, and others), Propulsid® (cisapride), or Orap® (pimozide). Do not take REYATAZ with the following medicines due to potential for serious side effects: Camptosar® (irinotecan), Crixivan® (indinavir), Mevacor® (lovastatin), Zocor® (simvastatin), Uroxatral® (alfuzosin), or Revatio® (sildenafil).

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Do not take REYATAZ with the following medicines as they may lower the amount of REYATAZ in your blood, which may lead to increased HIV viral load and resistance to REYATAZ or other anti-HIV medicines: rifampin (also known as Rimactane®, Rifadin®, Rifater®, or Rifamate®), St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum)-containing products, or Viramune® (nevirapine). Serevent Diskus® (salmeterol) and Advair® (salmeterol with fluticasone) are not recommended with REYATAZ. Do not take Vfend® (voriconazole) if you are taking REYATAZ and Norvir® (ritonavir). The above lists of medicines are not complete. Taking REYATAZ with some other medicines may require your therapy to be monitored more closely or may require a change in dose or dose schedule of REYATAZ or the other medicine. Discuss with your healthcare provider all prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamin and herbal supplements, or other health preparations you are taking or plan to take. Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. REYATAZ use during pregnancy has not been associated with an increase in birth defects. Pregnant women have experienced serious side effects when taking REYATAZ with other HIV medicines called nucleoside analogues. After your baby is born, tell your healthcare provider if your baby’s skin or the white part of his/her eyes turns yellow. Do not breastfeed if you are HIV-positive. Also tell your healthcare provider if you have end-stage kidney disease managed with hemodialysis or severe liver dysfunction. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any side effects, symptoms, or conditions, including the following:

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ONCE-DAILY ����������������������������������� � ��������������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������� �������������������� � ��������������������������������������������������������� � � ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������� � ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ���������������������������������� � ����������������������������������������������������������� Do not take REYATAZ if you are allergic to REYATAZ or to any of its ingredients. REYATAZ does not cure HIV or AIDS and you may continue to experience illnesses associated with HIV-1 infection, including opportunistic infections. Individual results may vary.

Ask your doctor about REYATAZ, the #1 prescribed protease inhibitor since 2007.†‡ *Source Healthcare Analytics, Source® PHAST Prescription Monthly, January 2004–April 2012. † Wolters Kluwer Pharma Solutions, Source® PHAST Prescription Monthly, October 2011. ‡ Excluding ritonavir when used as a boosting agent.

� Mild rash (redness and itching) without other symptoms sometimes occurs in patients taking REYATAZ, most often in the first few weeks after the medicine is started, and usually goes away within 2 weeks with no change in treatment. � Severe rash may develop with other symptoms that could be serious and potentially cause death. If you develop a rash with any of the following symptoms, stop using REYATAZ and call your healthcare provider right away: —Shortness of breath —Conjunctivitis (red or inflamed –General ill-feeling or “flu-like” eyes, like “pink-eye”) symptoms –Blisters —Mouth sores —Fever –Swelling of your face –Muscle or joint aches � Yellowing of the skin and/or eyes may occur due to increases in bilirubin levels in the blood (bilirubin is made by the liver). � A change in the way your heart beats may occur. You may feel dizzy or lightheaded. These could be symptoms of a heart problem. � Diabetes and high blood sugar may occur in patients taking protease inhibitor medicines like REYATAZ. Some patients may need changes in their diabetes medicine. � If you have liver disease, including hepatitis B or C, it may get worse when you take anti-HIV medicines like REYATAZ. � Kidney stones have been reported in patients taking REYATAZ. Signs or symptoms of kidney stones include pain in your side, blood in your urine, and pain when you urinate. � Some patients with hemophilia have increased bleeding problems with protease inhibitor medicines like REYATAZ.

www.R EYATAZ.com

� Changes in body fat have been seen in some patients taking anti-HIV medicines. The cause and long-term effects are not known at this time. � Immune reconstitution syndrome has been seen in some patients with advanced HIV infection (AIDS) and a history of opportunistic infection. Signs and symptoms of inflammation from previous infections may occur soon after starting anti-HIV treatment, including REYATAZ. ���Gallbladder disorders (including gallstones and gallbladder inflammation) have been reported in patients taking REYATAZ. Other common side effects of REYATAZ taken with other anti-HIV medicines include: nausea; headache; stomach pain; vomiting; diarrhea; depression; fever; dizziness; trouble sleeping; numbness, tingling, or burning of hands or feet; and muscle pain. You should take REYATAZ once daily with food (a meal or snack). Swallow the capsules whole; do not open the capsules. You should take REYATAZ and your other anti-HIV medicines exactly as instructed by your healthcare provider. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088. REYATAZ is one of several treatment options your doctor may consider.

Please see Important Patient Information about REYATAZ on the following pages.

REYATAZ is a registered trademark of Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners and not of Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. © 2012 Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ 08543 U.S.A. 687US12AB02203 06/12

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REYATAZ® (atazanavir sulfate)

Patient Information

REYATAZ® (RAY-ah-taz) (generic name = atazanavir sulfate) Capsules ALERT: Find out about medicines that should NOT be taken with REYATAZ. Read the section “What important information should I know about taking REYATAZ with other medicines?” Read the Patient Information that comes with REYATAZ before you start using it and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This leaflet provides a summary about REYATAZ and does not include everything there is to know about your medicine. This information does not take the place of talking with your healthcare provider about your medical condition or treatment. What is REYATAZ? REYATAZ is a prescription medicine used with other anti-HIV medicines to treat people 6 years of age and older who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HIV is the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). REYATAZ is a type of anti-HIV medicine called a protease inhibitor. HIV infection destroys CD4+ (T) cells, which are important to the immune system. The immune system helps fight infection. After a large number of (T) cells are destroyed, AIDS develops. REYATAZ helps to block HIV protease, an enzyme that is needed for the HIV virus to multiply. REYATAZ may lower the amount of HIV in your blood, help your body keep its supply of CD4+ (T) cells, and reduce the risk of death and illness associated with HIV. Does REYATAZ cure HIV or AIDS? REYATAZ does not cure HIV infection or AIDS and you may continue to experience illnesses associated with HIV-1 infection, including opportunistic infections. You should remain under the care of a doctor when using REYATAZ. Avoid doing things that can spread HIV-1 infection. �� Do not share needles or other injection equipment. �� Do not share personal items that can have blood or body fluids on them, like toothbrushes and razor blades. �� Do not have any kind of sex without protection. Always practice safe sex by using a latex or polyurethane condom to lower the chance of sexual contact with semen, vaginal secretions, or blood. Who should not take REYATAZ? Do not take REYATAZ if you: �� �are taking certain medicines. (See “What important information should I know about taking REYATAZ with other medicines?”) Serious life-threatening side effects or death may happen. Before you take REYATAZ, tell your healthcare provider about all medicines you are taking or planning to take. These include other prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. �� �are allergic to REYATAZ or to any of its ingredients. The active ingredient is atazanavir sulfate. See the end of this leaflet for a complete list of ingredients in REYATAZ. Tell your healthcare provider if you think you have had an allergic reaction to any of these ingredients. What should I tell my healthcare provider before I take REYATAZ? Tell your healthcare provider: �� �If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. REYATAZ use during pregnancy has not been associated with an increase in birth defects. Pregnant women have experienced serious side effects when taking REYATAZ with other HIV medicines called nucleoside analogues. You and your healthcare provider will need to decide if REYATAZ is right for you. If you use REYATAZ while you are pregnant, talk to your healthcare provider about the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry. � �����After your baby is born, tell your healthcare provider if your baby’s skin or the white part of his/her eyes turns yellow. �� �If you are breastfeeding. Do not breastfeed. It is not known if REYATAZ can be passed to your baby in your breast milk and whether it could harm your baby. Also, mothers with HIV-1 should not breastfeed because HIV-1 can be passed to the baby in the breast milk. �� If you have liver problems or are infected with the hepatitis B or C virus. See “What are the possible side effects of REYATAZ?” �� If you have end stage kidney disease managed with hemodialysis. �If you have diabetes. See “What are the possible side effects of REYATAZ?” �� �� �If you have hemophilia. See “What are the possible side effects of REYATAZ?” �� �About all the medicines you take including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Keep a list of your medicines with you to show your healthcare provider. For more information, see “What important information should I know about taking REYATAZ with other medicines?” and “Who should not take REYATAZ?” Some medicines can cause serious side effects if taken with REYATAZ.

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How should I take REYATAZ? �� �Take REYATAZ once every day exactly as instructed by your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider will prescribe the amount of REYATAZ that is right for you. �� �Always take REYATAZ with food (a meal or snack) to help it work better. Swallow the capsules whole. Do not open the capsules. Take REYATAZ at the same time each day. �� If you are taking antacids or didanosine (VIDEX® or VIDEX® EC), take REYATAZ 2 hours before or 1 hour after these medicines. �� �If you are taking medicines for indigestion, heartburn, or ulcers such as AXID® (nizatidine), PEPCID AC® (famotidine), TAGAMET® (cimetidine), ZANTAC® (ranitidine), AcipHex® (rabeprazole), NEXIUM® (esomeprazole), PREVACID® (lansoprazole), PRILOSEC® (omeprazole), or PROTONIX® (pantoprazole), talk to your healthcare provider. �� �Do not change your dose or stop taking REYATAZ without first talking with your healthcare provider. It is important to stay under a healthcare provider’s care while taking REYATAZ. �� �When your supply of REYATAZ starts to run low, get more from your healthcare provider or pharmacy. It is important not to run out of REYATAZ. The amount of HIV in your blood may increase if the medicine is stopped for even a short time. �� If you miss a dose of REYATAZ, take it as soon as possible and then take your next scheduled dose at its regular time. If, however, it is within 6 hours of your next dose, do not take the missed dose. Wait and take the next dose at the regular time. Do not double the next dose. It is important that you do not miss any doses of REYATAZ or your other anti-HIV medicines. �� If you take more than the prescribed dose of REYATAZ, call your healthcare provider or poison control center right away. What are the possible side effects of REYATAZ? The following list of side effects is not complete. Report any new or continuing symptoms to your healthcare provider. If you have questions about side effects, ask your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider may be able to help you manage these side effects. The following side effects have been reported with REYATAZ: �� �mild rash (redness and itching) without other symptoms sometimes occurs in patients taking REYATAZ, most often in the first few weeks after the medicine is started. Rashes usually go away within 2 weeks with no change in treatment. Tell your healthcare provider if rash occurs. �� �severe rash: Rash may develop in association with other symptoms which could be serious and potentially cause death. If you develop a rash with any of the following symptoms stop using REYATAZ and call your healthcare provider right away: � ������ ������������������� � ������ ������������������������������������������ � ������ ����� � ������ ��������������������� � ������ ������������������������������������������������������ � ������ �������� � ������ ����������� � ������ ��������������������� �� �yellowing of the skin or eyes. These effects may be due to increases in bilirubin levels in the blood (bilirubin is made by the liver). Although these effects may not be damaging to your liver, skin, or eyes, call your healthcare provider promptly if your skin or the white part of your eyes turn yellow. �� �a change in the way your heart beats (heart rhythm change). Call your healthcare provider right away if you get dizzy or lightheaded. These could be symptoms of a heart problem. �� �diabetes and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) sometimes happen in patients taking protease inhibitor medicines like REYATAZ. Some patients had diabetes before taking protease inhibitors while others did not. Some patients may need changes in their diabetes medicine. �� �if you have liver disease including hepatitis B or C, your liver disease may get worse when you take anti-HIV medicines like REYATAZ. �� �kidney stones have been reported in patients taking REYATAZ. If you develop signs or symptoms of kidney stones (pain in your side, blood in your urine, pain when you urinate) tell your healthcare provider promptly. �� �some patients with hemophilia have increased bleeding problems with protease inhibitors like REYATAZ.

Pub:

7/30/12 4:45 PM


PGN

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

REYATAZ® (atazanavir sulfate) c� hanges in body fat. These changes may include an increased amount of fat in the upper back and neck (“buffalo hump”), breast, and around the trunk. Loss of fat from the legs, arms, and face may also happen. The cause and long-term health effects of these conditions are not known at this time. �� immune reconstitution syndrome. In some patients with advanced HIV infection (AIDS) and a history of opportunistic infection, signs and symptoms of inflammation from previous infections may occur soon after anti-HIV treatment, including REYATAZ, is started. Other common side effects of REYATAZ taken with other anti-HIV medicines include nausea; headache; stomach pain; vomiting; diarrhea; depression; fever; dizziness; trouble sleeping; numbness, tingling, or burning of hands or feet; and muscle pain. Gallbladder disorders (which may include gallstones and gallbladder inflammation) have been reported in patients taking REYATAZ. What important information should I know about taking REYATAZ with other medicines? Do not take REYATAZ if you take the following medicines (not all brands may be listed; tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take). REYATAZ may cause serious, life-threatening side effects or death when used with these medicines. �� ������� ����������� ������������������� ������������ ������������ ���� methylergonovine such as CAFERGOT®, MIGRANAL®, D.H.E. 45®, ergotrate maleate, METHERGINE®, and others (used for migraine headaches). �� ����® (pimozide, used for Tourette’s disorder). �� ���������® (cisapride, used for certain stomach problems). �� ��������������������������������® (used for insomnia). �� ������������ ����� ������ ��� ������® (used for sedation), when taken by mouth. Do not take the following medicines with REYATAZ because of possible serious side effects: �� ���������® (irinotecan, used for cancer). ���������®� ������������ ����� ���� ���� ������������ ����� �������� ���� ��������� �� sometimes cause increased levels of bilirubin in the blood. �� ���������������������� ���������� �������® (lovastatin) or ZOCOR® (simvastatin). �� ���������® (alfuzosin, used to treat benign enlargement of the prostate). �� �������® (sildenafil, used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension). Do not take the following medicines with REYATAZ because they may lower the amount of REYATAZ in your blood. This may lead to an increased HIV viral load. ����������������������������������������������������������������������������� �� ����������������������������������®, RIFADIN®, RIFATER®, or RIFAMATE®, used for tuberculosis). �����������������(Hypericum perforatum), an herbal product sold as a dietary �� ��������������������������������������������������� �� ���������® (nevirapine, used for HIV infection). The following medicines are not recommended with REYATAZ: � ����������������® (salmeterol) and ADVAIR® (salmeterol with fluticasone), used to treat asthma, emphysema/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease also known as COPD. Do not take the following medicine if you are taking REYATAZ and NORVIR® together: �� �����® (voriconazole). The following medicines may require your healthcare provider to monitor your therapy more closely (for some medicines a change in the dose or dose schedule may be needed): �� �������® (tadalafil), LEVITRA® (vardenafil), or VIAGRA® (sildenafil), used to treat erectile dysfunction. REYATAZ may increase the chances of serious side effects that can happen with CIALIS, LEVITRA, or VIAGRA. Do not use CIALIS, LEVITRA, or VIAGRA while you are taking REYATAZ unless your healthcare provider tells you it is okay. �� ��������® (tadalafil) or TRACLEER® (bosentan), used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension. ��������® (atorvastatin) or CRESTOR® (rosuvastatin). There is an increased �� chance of serious side effects if you take REYATAZ with this cholesterollowering medicine. �����������������������������������������������® (amiodarone), lidocaine, �� �����������������������������������®����������®, and others). �� ���������® (rifabutin, an antibiotic used to treat tuberculosis). �� ���������®�� �������®�� ��������®, (buprenorphine or buprenorphine/ naloxone, used to treat pain and addiction to narcotic painkillers). �� ������® (bepridil, used for chest pain). ��

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REYATAZ® (atazanavir sulfate)

��������® (warfarin). ����������� ���������������� ����� ��� ������® (amitriptyline), NORPRAMIN® ��������������� ��������®� ����������� ���������® (trimipramine), TOFRANIL® (imipramine), or VIVACTIL® (protriptyline). �� ������������������������������������������������������������® or NEORAL® �����������������������® (sirolimus), or PROGRAF® (tacrolimus). �� �������������������������������������® and others). �� ��������������������������������®, FLOVENT®), given by nose or inhaled to treat allergic symptoms or asthma. Your doctor may choose not to keep you on fluticasone, especially if you are also taking NORVIR®. �� ������������ ��������®), used to prevent or treat gout or treat familial Mediterranean fever. The following medicines may require a change in the dose or dose schedule of either REYATAZ or the other medicine: �� ��������® (saquinavir). �� ������® (ritonavir). �� �������® (efavirenz). �� ������������������������������� �� �����® (didanosine). �� ������® (tenofovir disoproxil fumarate). �� ���������® (rifabutin). �� ��������� �������� ��������� ����� ��� ��������® or TIAZAC® (diltiazem), COVERA-HS® or ISOPTIN SR® (verapamil) and others. �� ������® (clarithromycin). �� ����������� ���� ������������� ����������� ��� ������� ����� ��� ����® (nizatidine), PEPCID AC® (famotidine), TAGAMET® (cimetidine), or ZANTAC® (ranitidine). Talk to your healthcare provider about choosing an effective method of contraception. REYATAZ may affect the safety and effectiveness of hormonal contraceptives such as birth control pills or the contraceptive patch. Hormonal contraceptives do not prevent the spread of HIV to others. Remember: 1. Know all the medicines you take. 2. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take. 3. Do not start a new medicine without talking to your healthcare provider. How should I store REYATAZ? �� ����������������������������������������������������������������������������� not store this medicine in a damp place such as a bathroom medicine cabinet or near the kitchen sink. �� ������������������������������������������������� �� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������� keep medicine that is out of date or that you no longer need. Dispose of unused medicines through community take-back disposal programs when available or place REYATAZ in an unrecognizable, closed container in the household trash. General information about REYATAZ This medicine was prescribed for your particular condition. Do not use REYATAZ for another condition. Do not give REYATAZ to other people, even if they have the same symptoms you have. It may harm them. Keep REYATAZ and all medicines out of the reach of children and pets. This summary does not include everything there is to know about REYATAZ. Medicines are sometimes prescribed for conditions that are not mentioned in patient information leaflets. Remember no written summary can replace careful discussion with your healthcare provider. If you would like more information, talk with your ��������������������������������������������������� What are the ingredients in REYATAZ? Active Ingredient: atazanavir sulfate Inactive Ingredients: Crospovidone, lactose monohydrate (milk sugar), magnesium stearate, gelatin, FD&C Blue No. 2, and titanium dioxide. �����® and REYATAZ® are registered trademarks of Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. ��������®� ���� �������® are registered trademarks of Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharma Company. DESYREL®� ��� �� ����������� ���������� ��� ����� �������� ���� Company. Other brands listed are the trademarks of their respective owners and are not trademarks of Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. �� ��

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Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

PGN


PROFILE PGN

Family Portrait

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

35

Suzi Nash

Lance Pawling: Creating artistic treasures from trash “We are not to throw away those things which can benefit our neighbor. Goods are called good because they can be used for good: They are instruments for good, in the hands of those who use them properly.” — Clement of Alexandria The statistics are grim. In today’s disposable society, Americans throw away approximately 4.6 pounds of trash each day. Every year, we trash enough paper and plastic cups, forks and spoons to circle the equator 300 times. We use approximately 1 billion shopping bags annually, which creates 300,000 tons of landfill waste, and 38,000 miles of ribbon are thrown away each year, enough to tie a bow around the Earth. Thankfully, there are people like Lance Pawling who are willing to take one man’s (or woman’s) trash and turn it into treasure. The Philly-based artist creates goods from found objects and revels in transforming often-broken and unwanted objects into new, unexpected pieces. PGN: So, tell me about yourself. LP: I grew up in Bucks County, in a small historical Quaker town called Fallsington that the suburbs tried to engulf. Up near the Oxford Valley Mall, Sesame Place, that area. PGN: What were you like as a child? LP: I didn’t talk much. I was a quiet, shy little kid. It wasn’t until years later that I discovered that, when I opened my mouth, sound could come out. PGN: Siblings? LP: I have an older brother, Eric, who made it his responsibility to pummel me at least once a day. We get along great now, but we didn’t really then. We’re about six years apart, so he was always bigger, always stronger. PGN: I was skinny with a lot of hair so my brother once tried to turn me upside-down to use me as a human broom. What was Eric’s worst stunt? LP: He would wedge me into the space between the wall and the refrigerator. One time, I was stuck in there until my mom got home from work. PGN: At least you could get something to eat. LP: [Laughs.] That’s true. PGN: And what did the parental units do? LP: My mother worked for the State of New Jersey, Department of Corrections, and my stepfather worked at a steel mill. PGN: Wow, they sound like they were both tough cookies. LP: Oh yeah.

PGN: What was school like for you? Favorite and least-favorite class? LP: Well, my favorite classes were always art classes. I always excelled working with my hands. I was never really good in, like, English. I never cared for gym class either, but I don’t know too many kids who did. PGN: Favorite teacher? LP: My favorite teacher was John Whiteknight. I was out in high school and it was not a very pleasant experience, but one great thing that came of it was that with the help of Mr. Whiteknight, we went to the school board and started the first Gay/ Straight Alliance in a Bucks County school. It’s still there today, and I’ve met people here in Philly who went to that school and joined that GSA. It’s a nice feeling. PGN: How appropriate that Whiteknight came to your rescue. How or why did you come out so early? LP: Yes, a great name. I realized that I was gay at a very young age and, as hard as they sound with their careers, my family was actually very, very supportive. My mother immediately became a PFLAG mom. I was kind of obvious: I was voted most “individualistic” at my school in my senior year. I had striped blond hair, and I would alter and make my own clothing. I mean, when I was walking down the hall, you didn’t miss me. So I stopped denying that I was gay and it wasn’t the easiest thing, but looking back I’m glad I did it.

PGN: I see they have a new Cy Twombly exhibit. [Laughs.] I have a sometimesstrained relationship with modern art. LP: Yeah, some of it can be a stretch, like, “Are you sure that’s art?” PGN: Tell me about your artistry. LP: Well, I do fine art and performance art. The fine art is made all out of found and donated objects. I’ve been in several shows throughout the area. It’s always changing; I’ll do things like make a collage work out of playing cards or, right now, I work a lot with lampshades that I find. I’ll put lace, or 35mm negatives or old movie reels that I found on the inside and cover it with cloth on the outside. That way when the light is off, you just see the fabric but when it’s turned on you see the shadow of the lace or the negatives or anything translucent that I’m able to get my hands on. It gives a warm glow that’s unique and interesting. I also do a lot of hand embroidering and I’m very good with sewing machines. For instance,

PGN: College? LP: Yes, I got a degree in photography at Antonelli Institute. PGN: What’s your day job now? LP: I work at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in the finance department. PGN: That’s cool. You’re surrounded by beauty all day. LP: And the people there are amazing — curators, all the staff. Everyone is wonderful. PGN: Finance seems so straight-laced. How did that happen? LP: I’m very organized and I have excellent time-management skills. I kind of like working in finance because it’s very routine. Every month, week, fiscal year, every audit, I know exactly what to expect. It gives me a sense of stability because the rest of my life is just ... everywhere. PGN: What’s your favorite section of the museum? LP: I love our costumes and textiles department. They just opened a new exhibition with the works of fashion designer Ronaldus Shamask. I love working with fabrics so it’s always intrigued me.

I found a T-shirt with Ben Franklin on it and I embroidered him into a drag queen. Right now I’m working on a commissioned piece that’s an embroidered family tree. PGN: When did your dumpster-diving career start? LP: When I was a kid, my mom found a 4-foot piece of tubing from a telephone pole. We cut it open and there were these brass wires in all different colors inside.

I started making anything and everything out of them. That was the start of making things from found objects. When I moved to Philly, there was just so much that people throw away in this town that, you know, I just had to collect it. [Laughs.] My house is completely packed full. I’m not quite ready to be featured on an episode of “Hoarders” but I’m getting there. PGN: What’s a favorite find? LP: A couple. There was an old mission church near where I live and so I have an 8-foot arched window with amber color glass. I also have a barber chair I found and an 8-foot cornice from the top of a row home. It was in a dumpster and a friend and I carried it for 15 blocks. PGN: You dumpster dive on foot? LP: Oh yes. I very happily got rid of my car years ago. I live on my bike now. PGN: Speaking of, I understand you have a lot of bike-work art? LP: Yes, I have a small garden in the back of my house. I’ve covered the entire yard in bike parts from the ground to the top. There are probably about 20 bicycles if you were to put them together. I’ve trained the vines that were back there to grow through the tire spokes. When I was taking the bikes apart, I noticed that the rear cogs made the most beautiful sound when they hit each other, so I started putting them aside and making wind chimes out of them. I love taking something we see every day and turning it into something new. A lot of time, people will come up to me and say, “Wow. I would never have even thought of that!” That’ll inspire them to put a twist on it which they’ll show me and then it will inspire me to look at it differently again and do a whole new piece. It’s a beautiful conPhoto: Suzi Nash stant flow of recreating and changing. PGN: And it’s good for the environment. LP: Aww, yeah! PGN: What about your performance art? LP: I’ve been with the Dumpsta Players for about 11 or 12 years and I’m in my second year with LICK, the Liberty City Kings. It’s so much fun; there’s no feeling quite like being up on PAGE 38


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Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

Outward Bound

TRAVEL PGN

Jeff Guaracino

Looking for a fall getaway? Go here! Fall is a great time to travel. Does summer seem a distant memory? Here are two travel ideas both close and far. Bottom line: Keep traveling!

lous programs of Historic Philadelphia Inc. For opening deals, visit www.monacophiladelphia.com.

Welcome, Converge Orlando Orlando has organized its first LGBT Welcome to the neighborhood convention and visitors bureau, called Philadelphia Hotel Monaco, a Kimpton Hotel, opened Converge Orlando. It is dedicated this month to promoting Orlando, Fla., as a in Historic year-round destination for LGBT Philadelphia. travelers. As part of the organizaThis is the tion’s mission, Converge Orlando closest hotel to hosted a press trip to the themeIndependence park-dominated resort destination, Hall and the which is preparing to bid on the Liberty Bell. Gay Games 2018. In fact, guests Orlando is solidly known as a are just steps family destination and Gay Days Orlando has become among the away from where Betsy biggest — if not the number-one Ross could — annual LGBT event in the have sewed country.But is it a year-round destination for our the rainbow flag. (That is, community? if you believe Everything the Greater always starts Philadelphia with the locals. Tourism and HOTEL MONACO According to organizers of Marketing the press trip, Orlando is Corporation advertisements for the nowhome to a large internalegendary Philadelphia “Get Your History tional LGBT population Straight and Your Nightlife Gay®” campaign.) Located at Fifth and Market streets, base — many of whom the luxury hotel is in the iconic Lafayette work in the hospitality Building built in 1907 and named in honor industry. (Read: Orlando of war hero, General Marquis de Lafayette. is a gay magnet for those in the service and The well-known LGBT-friendly hotel hospitality industries. is super close to the Pennsylvania historical marker commemorating the Annual Throw in all the creative geniuses needed Reminders, organized from 1964-69. Also in the neighborhood, besides Independence to entertain straight Hall and the Liberty Bell, are the National America — well, Museum of American Jewish History, the Orlando is gayer than National Constitution Center and the fabu- you might think year-

round.) After you have had enough of SeaWorld, Epcot and Universal, it’s time to get your gay on in downtown Orlando — where the local gays convene. Hamburger Mary’s is a downtown Orlando staple. Weekends draw a crowd for live entertainment. There is the CONVERGE ORLANDO HAS OPTIONS FOR A DIVERSE RANGE Parliament House OF LGBT TRAVELERS. and Revolution Nightclub and luxury properties. Shuttles take you to many other nightlife options for both Walt Disney World Resort, Universal lesbians and gay Orlando Resort, SeaWorld and shopping men. It is best to at the outlets. With so much to do outside pick up the local of the hotel, you need to get out of the LGBT publicaroom, but you will be very happy when tion for up-to-theyou get back. This hotel, which is often minute listings of host to LGBT events, is close to all of the weekly events and nightlife options at Downtown Disney. happenings. There are many hotels to choose from Here are some downtown, including the DoubleTree great insider tips by Hilton Downtown Orlando. Well, for your next visit who could resist a cookie at check-in? to Orlando: Another great perk about this hotel is its Stay at the location. The Orlando airport is far from Holiday Inn Lake the theme parks — almost a 60-minute Buena Vista ride— but this hotel gets you closer to resort, located your Orlando departure. ■ right on Disney property. It is a Jeff Guaracino is the author of “Gay and value property Lesbian Tourism: The Essential Guide for with all the accesMarketing.” He is also the vice-chair of sibility of the the International Gay and Lesbian Travel higher-priced Association.

Scott A. Drake Photography

267-736-6743

scottdrakephotos@gmail.com


PGN

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

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38

PGN

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

Q Puzzle Sesame Street Fight Across

1. Funny Mabley 5. Memorial Day race, briefly 9. Erect member 14. Roasting place 15. “Brothers & Sisters” matriarch 16. Angelou poem, “And Still ___” 17. Hacienda room 18. Fly like an eagle or a falcon 19. Exasperates 20. With 38Across, cutting support to PBS on the campaign trail 23. Got ready for porking? 24. Reel 28. Battery term. 29. Scott of “Beautiful Thing” 32. Come out

33. Former NFL player Tuaolo 35. Lion protest 37. “Viva, Las Vegas” middle name 38. See 20-Across 41. Island of Diamond Head Beach 44. American follower? 45. “Siddhartha” writer 49. Uranus, for one 51. Interstate rumbler 53. Beret or beanie 54. Ball whackers, in Ping-Pong 56. Have the attention of 58. Same sex couple effected by cracking down 61. Potpourri scent 64. Gave a pink slip to

PORTRAIT from page 35

stage and hearing the applause and having everyone laugh when you do something funny. It’s so wonderful. It’s my favorite thrill. I’ve played a wide assortment of characters over the years with a number of different groups. PGN: I read the Dumpsta’s bio, which said, “We are a themed theatre experience that parodies society’s joys and ills in an irreverent and over-the-top style.” Do you do much political work? LP: It varies— not in every show— but we just did a show recently called “Silence of The Shams,” which has a little more political stuff in it. I’m playing Michelle Bachman. PGN: What’s a key theme in your performances? LP: I’m very big on hair and merkins. So I’ll put three or four wigs together into one massive headpiece that will rise 3 or 4 feet high towards the ceiling. It can be adorned with a wide assortment of stuff. I’ve had Santa Claus riding in a sleigh with Jesus in my hair, Easter baskets, birdcages, pretty much anything I can get my hands on. A merkin is a Victorian faux hairpiece for your [He whistles.] I’ll use them to flash the audience, give them a little thrill. PGN: Working in the film industry, I’m familiar with the term merkin. We used one when shooting the nude scenes in “Beloved.” They’re so silly. LP: [Laughs.] No one would ever dispute that point. I don’t know why they ever needed them, but I’m glad they’re there. I’ve also recently started making paper outfits, so from head to toe — well, not the shoes — my outfit is made

65. “No” voter 66. Not quite erect 67. What either bride may wear 68. They come between Mauresmo and opponents 69. Necrophiliac’s bedsheets? 70. “She” to Cocteau 71. “Nuts!”

Down

1. George once of San Francisco 2. They’re essential for breeders 3. Hodgepodge 4. Eat between meals 5. Like some pitched balls 6. Common lunch time 7. Subject of “Wigstock” 8. Online exaggeration?

9. Home on the range 10. Fruity drink 11. Squeak silencer 12. Broadband connection, briefly 13. “Thumbs up!” 21. “Let the Dead Bury the Dead” author Randall 22. “SNL”’s Cheri 25. Warning from Toto 26. Id partner, to Frasier Crane 27. Stimpy’s boyfriend, perhaps 30. Wanting water 31. Shirt alligators 34. Sue Wicks’ game, in slang 36. Ready and willing partner 39. Risky fellatio partner? 40. European white wine 41. Straight to gay (abbr.) 42. The Crimson

Tide’s st. 43. Was in bed with 46. Supermarket checkout item 47. John Henry Mackay’s pen name 48. Olympian who makes points by touching the body 50. Succeeds a la Log Cabin 52. Stick your nose where it doesn’t belong 55. Prevent, with “off” 57. Thou 59. Jump for Doug Mattis 60. “Chicago” producer Meron 61. Race unit 62. Suffix that changes Juan’s gender 63. Like Abner, before Viagra?

of paper. Since I’ve been with LICK, I’ve been learning burlesque and boylesque. So in my act now, I rip the outfit in pieces as I go. For instance, I’ve been doing Joan Jett’s “Do You Want to Touch Me?” and keep ripping off parts of the outfit until I’m down to paper pasties with paper tassels and a paper merkin. PGN: What would be of chief concern to you if you were picking the theme? LP: One thing that really bothers me is how badly some groups are treated. A lot of people aren’t accepting of the trans community, for instance. Definitely in the hetero community, but even in the gay community it’s still treated as taboo and that irritates me a lot. When I hear people that I respect and that I enjoy being around make transphobic remarks, it’s very hard for me to understand. We should accept people for who they are regardless of who they become. PGN: One of my upcoming interviews is with Chaz Bono and we touch on that a bit. He said that, surprisingly, it was the Republican side of the family that accepted him more readily than the Democratic “liberal” side of the family. LP: Wow! Can’t wait to read that. PGN: Are you single or dating? LP: I’m dating a guy named Eric. I’m actually at his place in New York right now while he’s at church for choir practice. PGN: Are you a religious person? LP: Not really. I’m agnostic at best. [Laughs.] If you have to give it a label. Though my grandfather was a Northern Baptist minister, not to be confused with Southern Baptist, and he’s probably

PAGE 27

the most amazing man I will ever have known. Hands down. A kind and wonderful person. So was my grandmother and all of my great-aunts and uncles. I spent a lot of time with them growing up. They all lived in Philly and then they all moved to Cape May together. I spent my summers with them. My grandmother and a wonderful assortment of blue-haired great-aunts were the ones who taught me how to sew and embroider. PGN: Was your biological father in the picture? LP: Not really. My parents got divorced when I was young and he pretty much abandoned my brother and me. He passed away two years ago of liver failure. I did forgive him at the end, which he was grateful for. PGN: Did you ever come out to him? LP: Not officially, but if he ever Googled my name, I’m sure he would have figured it out. Plus, his mother used to call me “the gay one,” so I think they had a pretty good idea. PGN: OK, now for some random questions. Ever been in a parade? LP: I have. I’ve been in several parades. In fact, we were just on the Tabu float in the Pride Parade and won the grand prize fruit bowl. PGN: What natural element would you be? LP: I would be water, because it flows and finds its way down the path to where it wants to go. It can be hard or soft: it also freezes and evaporates. It does it all! But it’s always still the same element.

PGN: Worst stage mishap? LP: Oh, ho ho. To narrow it down ... I work a lot with reveals that are unexpected. I’ll come out in a mini-skirt and take that off to reveal a full-length gown. When you’re doing that type of performance art, it’s easy to get stuck — no matter how many times you rehearse it or how much thought you’ve put into it. Sometimes you can get a laugh out of it, but it’s still terrible when the number is playing and you’re still singing but your costume is stuck in a knot that you can’t undo. It’s the worst. PGN: Have you heard of Freeganism? It’s the practice of recycling food that’s been thrown away. LP: Oh, when it comes to food I’m worthless. I hate to cook. I have one dish that I make, crock-pot chili, and it’s all I eat. I eat the exact same thing every day for lunch, day after day, year after year. It drives my coworkers insane. PGN: Finally, what painting would you want to be able to enter? LP: There’s a Frida Kahlo painting called “The Two Fridas” that’s a selfportrait of her in Native garb holding the hand of herself in more Western garb. I believe her father was European and her mother was Spanish and Indian. In the painting, her heart is exposed and dripping blood and she’s holding a pair of forceps clamped on to the vein but there are spatters of blood on her dress. I’d love to get in there and talk to her because I know that struggle of having two halves. Like my drag half and my male half, my work half and my artist half. I’d like to talk to her about life and duality. ■


TELEVISION PGN

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

Worth Watching RETURN OF THE QUEENS: The top queens from “RuPaul’s Drag Race” seasons one through four are back to determine which all-star will walk away with $100,000 and a spot in the Drag Race Hall of Fame on “RuPaul’s All-Stars Drag Race,” premiering 9 p.m. Oct. 22 on Logo. Photo: Mathu Andersen

L.A. STORIES: From the executive producer of “The L Word,” “DTLA” depicts the relationships and sex lives of eight friends with varied ethnic, cultural and sexual orientations who work and live in the community of downtown Los Angeles. The show stars Darryl Stephens (“Noah’s Arc”) and a cavalcade of notable supporting cast, including Golden Globe-winning and Academy Award-nominated Melanie Griffith, Sandra Bernhard and Leslie Jordan. Catch the premiere 11 p.m. Oct. 24 on Logo. Photo: Ryan Forbes SOMEBODY GET ME A DOCTOR: When an unfortunate accident lands Penny in a full body cast, out character Max (Adam Pally) nurses her back to health. But after he meets her hunky physical therapist, he starts “miserying” her so her fast recovery won’t put the brakes on his new crush, on the season premiere of “Happy Endings,” 9 p.m. Oct. 23 on ABC. Photo: ABC/Carin Baer

MARS ATTACKS: Pop singer Bruno Mars is the host and musical guest this week on a new episode of “Saturday Night Live,” 11:30 p.m. Oct. 20 on NBC.

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Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

PGN

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Get Out and Play

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

Scott A. Drake

41

Food & Drink

A new playing field for LGBT athletes and allies Inspired by programs like April’s Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Sports Conference hosted by Texas A&M and Nike’s LGBT Sports Summit in June, Drexel University professor Dr. Ellen Staurowsky has spent months working with members of athletic communities across the country on a project designed to fill a void in LGBT athletics. With the assistance of more than 20 contributors, Drexel’s Goodwin College this month launched a new blog aimed at athletes, coaches, media, researchers and policymakers to provide better public access to and dialogue about issues impacting LGBT athletes. Blog updates rotate through contributors so that there are almost daily additions on topics such as progress on state laws, student-athlete programs like GO! Athletes, Jerry Sandusky or new book releases. Staurowsky said she hopes the blog will serve as “the premier online location to share research information and resources regarding LGBTQ issues in sport.” The blog launched last week and has already garnered wide attention in the Philadelphia athletic community. Staurowsky also hopes to expand the range of con-

TAKING IT TO THE MATS: The Philadelphia Spartan Wrestling Club hosted an OutFest weekend tournament that drew nearly a dozen wrestlers from New York and Washington, D.C. Photo: Scott A. Drake

tributors and their audience over the next few months as the site evolves, and is considering a formal launch event with locally or nationally known athletes. The blog can be found at stream.goodwin.drexel.edu/ lgbtsportresearchnet/. Dr. Staurowsky is a professor in the Department of Sports Management at Drexel University and served as a director of athletics at the college level for nine years. She is internationally recognized as an expert on social-justice issues in sport. She is co-author of the book “College Athletes for Hire: The Evolution and Legacy of the NCAA Amateur Myth.”

BRINGING HOME THE SILVER: Members of the Greater Philadelphia Flag Football League competitive team The Revolution spent Oct. 6 at Westbury celebrating their second-place trophy from the Gay Bowl in Denver last month and presented the bar with the trophy, now on display in Westbury’s trophy case. Photo: Scott A. Drake

Artistic athletes Team Philadelphia is looking for artists to create a new logo to launch the organization into 2013 and on to the Gay Games in 2014 in Cleveland/Akron. The logo should represent the city, its LGBT diversity and sports overall. All entries received by Nov. 9 will be reviewed, and the top three will be brought to all of the organizations for selection. The winning artist will have his or her Gay Games IX registration fee paid, so get to work and show them your love. Attach your PDF in an email to scott@epgn. com. Rugby down under The International Gay Rugby Association and Board announced that the 2014 Bingham Cup will be hosted by the Sydney Convicts in Sydney, Australia. The Bingham Cup is a bi-annual tournament named for Mark Bingham, a rugby player and one of the heroes of Flight 93 on Sept. 11, 2001. The Gryphons Rugby Football Club plays its first fall season playoff game at home Oct. 20 at George Pepper Middle School and, providing a win, the team will play again the following Saturday. The Gryphons are in the planning stages for winter events; philadelphiagryphons.org.

Short stops • Greater Philadelphia Flag Football League is at the fall midpoint with only one undefeated team so far. Navy Seals have a record of 5-0-1 going into the second half. The league is also in the early stages of work to bring the 2014 Gay Bowl to Philadelphia. ■

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Countdown to Gay Games IX: 658 days. If your team, league, group or organization has a game, practice, fundraiser or event for Get Out and Play, email scott@epgn.com.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT LISTINGS PGN

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

Sat. 10/20

OUT & ABOUT The week ahead Fri. 10/19 A Reading with Rey Drew The author and other contributors to “The Collection: Short Fiction from the Transgender Vanguard” host a reading 5:30 p.m. at Giovanni’s Room, 345 S. 12th St.; 215-923-2960. Marilyn Manson & Rob Zombie The shockrock bands perform 8 p.m. at Susquehanna Bank Center, 1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, N.J.; 856-3651300. Melissa Etheridge The out singersongwriter per-

forms 8 p.m. at Caesars Circus Maximus Theater, 2100 Pacific Ave., Atlantic City, N.J.; 609 348-4411. The Misfits The ghoulish punkrock band performs 8 p.m. at the Trocadero Theatre, 1003 Arch St.; 215922-6888. The Pietasters The ska-punk band performs 8 p.m. at World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St.; 215-222-1400. Psychedelic Furs and The Lemonheads The alt-rock bands perform 8 p.m. at Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave.; 215-5727650.

Auditions: La Cage Aux Folles Actors, singers and dancers needed for all roles including Les Cagelles (drag performers, each with strong individual characterization), 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Steel River Playhouse, 245 E. High St., Pottstown, by appointment; casting@steelriver. org. Alanis Morissette The rock singer performs 8 p.m. at The Electric Factory, 421 N. Seventh St.; 800745-3000. Asia The classic rock band performs 8 p.m. at Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave.; 215-572-7650.

Rick Springfield The rock singer and guitarist performs 9 p.m. at the Borgata Hotel, Casino & Spa Music Box, 1 Borgata Way, Atlantic City, N.J.; 609-317-1000. Where the Wild Things Are The hit film is screened 2 p.m. at Colonial Theatre, 227 Bridge St., Phoenixville; 610917-0223. The Rocky Horror Picture Show The cult film is screened 10 p.m. at Colonial Theatre, 227 Bridge St., Phoenixville; 610917-0223.

Sun. 10/21 Dead Ringer and Sisters The two drama

goes mobile Now you can read your favorite local LGBT news site on your Android or iPhone/iPad Just go to epgn.com on your mobile device

MUSIC THAT MATTERS: Out pianist, vocalist and producer Andy Kahn performs a benefit show for Metropolitan Area Neighborhood Nutritional Alliance 6 p.m. Oct. 24 at Jacob’s Music Steinway Recital Hall, 1718 Chestnut St. MANNA prepares and delivers meals to individuals battling cancer, HIV/AIDS and other life-threatening illnesses. Kahn will perform works form The Great American Songbook and proceeds from the show benefit MANNA’s “Meals That Matter” campaign. For more information, call 215-568-7800.

films are screened 2 p.m. at Colonial Theatre, 227 Bridge St., Phoenixville; 610-917-0223.

Mon. 10/22 Groove Night Local musicians join forces to bring the R&B, soul, jazz and funk, 7 p.m. at World Cafe Live at the Queen, 500 N. Market St., Wilmington, Del.; 302-9941400. David Sedaris The out humorist performs 8 p.m. at Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave.; 215-572-7650. Lipstick Mondays A weekly drag show featuring a changing roster of queens takes the stage 9 p.m. at The Raven, 385 W. Bridge St., New Hope; 215-862-2081.

Tue. 10/23 Unlabeled: The Acoustic/ Electric Open Mic for Up-andComers Sign up and play 7 p.m. at World Cafe Live at the Queen, 500 N. Market St., Wilmington, Del.; 302-994-1400.

Wed. 10/24 4W5 Blues Jam Local musicians get down 7 p.m. at World Cafe Live at the Queen, 500 N. Market St., Wilmington, Del.; 302-994-1400.

Bob and Barbara’s, 1509 South St.; 215-545-4511.

Fri. 10/26 Michael J.P. Williams The author of “Baptism by Green Fire, Baby Crib, and Evolution: Dissolution: Revolution” hosts a reading 5:30 p.m. at Giovanni’s Room, 345 S. 12th St.; 215-923-2960. Queer Fear Cabaret A series of provocative and engaging music events

is sure to thrill, 7:30-10 p.m. at William Way LGBT Community Center, 1315 Spruce St.; 215-732-2220. Aimee Mann The singer-songwriter performs 8 p.m. at Union Transfer, 1026 Spring Garden St.; 215-232-2100. Burlesque Showcase: Halloween Edition The live performances start 9 p.m. at Sisters Nightclub, 1320 Chancellor St.; 215-735-0735.

Thu. 10/25 Janis Ian The out singersongwriter performs 8 p.m. at Sellersville Theatre 1894, 24 W. Temple Ave., Sellersville; 215-257-5858. Bob and Barbara’s Drag Show The outrageousness begins 11 p.m. at

Notices Also check out our digital “flipbook” of the full print edition at issuu.com/philagaynews with issuu’s Android app.

Send notices at least one week in advance to: Out & About Listings, PGN, 505 S. Fourth St., Philadelphia, PA 19147 fax: 215-925-6437; or e-mail: listings@epgn.com. Notices cannot be taken over the phone.

WRY OBSERVATIONS: Out humorist David Sedaris is back in the area to make audiences laugh 8 p.m. Oct. 22 at Keswick Theatre, 291 N. Keswick Ave. For more information or tickets, call 215-572-7650. Photo: Anne Fishbein


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT PGN LISTINGS

Opening Bell, Bernstein, and Brahms The Philadelphia Orchestra performs Oct. 25-27 at Kimmel’s Verizon Hall, 260 S. Broad St.; 215-790-580

Continuing Cooking With the Calamari Sisters The all-singing, all-dancing, all-cooking hit musical comedy, through Nov. 4 at Society Hill Playhouse, 507 S. Eighth St.; 215-923-0210. Cy Twombly: Sculptures Philadelphia Museum of Art presents an exhibition of works from the Swiss sculptor, through March, 26th Street and the Parkway; 215-763-8100.

Learning from Frank Furness: Louis Sullivan in 1873 Philadelphia Museum of Art presents an exhibition of drawings and furniture by the famed architect, through Dec. 30, 26th Street and the Parkway; 215-763-8100. On My Honor: 100 Years of Girl Scouting The National Constitution Center presents an exhibition highlighting the history, contributions and traditions of Girl Scouts, including entrepreneurship, environmental awareness and civic engagement, through Dec. 31, 525 Arch St.; 215-409-6895. Presidential Artifacts The National Constitution Center presents an exhibition of artifacts from collections around the country, through Dec. 31, 525 Arch St.; 215-409-6895.

Enchanted Exchanges: Chirps and Chatter ArtStar Gallery presents a solo exhibition by Jordan Elise Perme of Horrible Adorables, through Nov. 18, 623 N. Second St.; 215-238-1557.

Prom Philadelphia Museum of Art presents an exhibition of photographs by Mary Ellen Mark, through Oct. 28, 26th Street and the Parkway; 215-763-8100.

Giselle The Pennsylvania Ballet performs the classical show choreographed by Marius Petipa, through Oct. 28 at Kimmel’s Academy of Music, 240 S. Broad St.; 215790-5800.

Ronaldus Shamask: Form, Fashion, Reflection Philadelphia Museum of Art presents an exhibition of drawings and sketches by the fashion designer, through March 10, 26th Street and the Parkway; 215-763-8100.

MONSTERS BALL: We must be closing in on Halloween because shock rockers Marilyn Manson and Rob Zombie are teaming up for the Twins of Evil Tour, which rampages through town 8 p.m. Oct. 19 at Susquehanna Bank Center, 1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, N.J. For more information or tickets, call 856-365-1300.

Hairspray Media Theater presents the musical based on the classic John Waters film, through Nov. 4, 104 E. State St., Media; 610-8910100.

Shipwreck! Winslow Homer and The Life Line Philadelphia Museum of Art presents an exhibition of 33 paintings by American artist Homer, through Dec. 16, 26th Street and the Parkway; 215763-8100. Stars of David Philadelphia Theatre Company presents the musical adaptation of Abigail Pogrebin’s best-selling book, through Nov. 11 at Suzanne Roberts Theatre, 480 S. Broad St.; 215-985-0420. This is the Week That Is 1812 Productions presents a special election edition of its smash political satire, through Nov. 4 at Plays and Players Theatre, 1714 Delancey St.; 215-592-9560.

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

To Stir, Inform and Inflame: The Art of Tony Auth The James A. Michener Art Museum hosts an exhibition exploring the work of the noted Philadelphia Inquirer editorial cartoonist, through Oct. 21, 138 S. Pine St., Doylestown; 215-340-9800.

Closing Loni Love The comedian seen on “Chelsea Lately” performs through Oct. 20 at Helium Comedy Club, 2031 Sansom St.; 215-496-9001. Angels in America, Parts 1 and 2 Wilma Theater presents the Tony Award-winning epic play, offering both parts on select dates, through Oct. 21, 265 S. Broad St.; 215-546-7824. Collab: Four Decades of Giving Modern and Contemporary Design Philadelphia Museum of Art presents an exhibition that includes some of the finest examples of European, American and Japanese design, until Oct. 21, 26th Street and the Parkway; 215-763-8100. Love Story, The Musical Walnut Street Theatre presents an adaptation of the popular novel, through Oct. 21, 825 Walnut St.; 215574-3550. ■

ALL DRESSED UP: Philadelphia Museum of Art presents “Ronaldus Shamask: Form, Fashion, Reflection,” an exhibition of drawings and sketches by the acclaimed fashion designer, through March 10, 26th Street and the Parkway. For more information, call 215-763-8100.

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CLASSIFIEDS PGN

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

Classifieds Real Estate Sale

Real Estate Sale

Real Estate Sale

Real Estate Rent

SOUTH PHILA., 19TH & MIFFLIN All new T/H, magnificent. 2 BR, bath, everything new. $470/mo. 215-292-2176. ________________________________________36-43 New York Hunters Base Camp Special 5 acres w/1 room log cabin-$19,995. FREE LIST! Over 100 land and camp bargains, large acreage, camps, and waterfront. Call 1800-229-7843 or visit landandcamps.com ________________________________________36-42 Lake Property, NY: 6 acres Salmon River Lake $29,900. 7 acres 100’on bass lake $39,900. 8 acres Waterfront Home $99,900. 20 lake properties. www.LandFirstNY. com 1-888-683-2626. ________________________________________36-42

12TH & DICKINSON AREA Furnished Townhouse for rent: 3 levels. Living Room, Dining Room, Kitchen, 2 bedrooms, bath. Very Unique. 1500. mo plus util. (negotiable). Call 215 468-9166 after 6 pm. or 215 686 3431 daytime. ________________________________________36-49 HADDON TWP, NJ Safe, sunny 2 BR apt. 2nd fl owner occ. duplex. 1000 sq.. ft., A/C, D/W, W/D, new carpet & paint. Pvt. ent. Close to speedline, bus, walk, bike to shops, parks, lakes, library. $900/mo. Call Brian, 12 PM-7 PM, 856-858-8620. ________________________________________36-44 2 brm apt. 8XX Bainbridge St. $975+ utils. No pets. Contact Larry at 215-687-5629. ________________________________________36-42 SOUTH PHILA., 19TH & MIFFLIN All new T/H, magnificent. 2 BR, bath, everything new. $470/mo. 215-292-2176. ________________________________________36-43 FOR RENT-$1775 PH Apt in lux Beaver Hill in Jenkintown- fab vw fr balc. 3 br/2 b Updated kitch w/granite ctr tops-newer apps. Huge walk in closet. Conv. to CC train. Quaint little town, w/ great restaurants and shopping. dooorman, lush lobbies. Swimming pool and fitness available for a fee; NO PETS! NO SMOKING! Rent incl ALL utilities; Call Lydia at Quinn & Wilson, 215-885-7600. ________________________________________36-42

Real Estate Rent COLLINGSWOOD RENTAL Large second floor 2 Bedroom Apt. Brand new kitchen complete with new dishwasher and new microwave. All new air conditioners, hardwood floors, private deck and laundry facilities in basement. $1250.00 monthly + plus utilities. Call 856-858-3079 or 609-519-5288. ________________________________________36-43 KING OF PRUSSIA AREA 1 BR, 2nd floor apt. available. Newly renovated bath. Heat and hot water included. $900/mo. 610-265-9386. ________________________________________36-42

Placing Classifieds Liner Ads In Person: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday, By Phone or on the Web: 24 Hours, 7 Days

Deadline for Line Advertising is Friday at 3 p.m. for the following Friday’s issue. You may place your ad via our secure voicemail system, fax or e-mail at any time, or on our Web site. Please have the following information ready to place your ad:

YOUR AD COPY • YOUR NAME AND MAILING ADDRESS DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER • CREDIT CARD INFORMATION PHONE: 215-625-8501 ext. 200 OR 215-451-6182 (DIRECT) • FAX: 215-925-6437 • E-MAIL: don@epgn.com

GENERAL INFORMATION

All classified advertising must be in our office by 3 p.m. Friday for the next Friday’s paper. Ads arriving after that time will be held for the next available issue. PGN reserves the right to edit or rewrite ads as needed, to refuse any ad for any reason and to determine the final classification. Ads determined to be in bad taste, directed to or from persons under the legal age of consent or containing racially or sexually discriminatory language will be refused. We need your full name, mailing address and daytime phone number on the insertion order form for you ad. This information is confidential and will not appear in the paper. Any ads received without full information will be destroyed. Sexually explicit language will be edited or refused at the discretion of the management.

PAYMENT AND PLACEMENT

Classified ads may be placed online or by mail, fax, e-mail or in person at the PGN offices at 505 S. Fourth St., Phila. Phone, fax and e-mail orders are accepted with credit/debit cards only. A $10 minimum applies to all charges. If you are paying in person with cash, please have the exact change as we cannot make change at the office. All ads must be prepaid for their entire run. NO EXCEPTIONS! DO NOT SEND CASH THROUGH THE MAIL; IT’S NOT SAFE AND CANNOT BE GUARANTEED.

TERM DISCOUNTS - BASED ON THE NUMBER OF ISSUES PREPAID 4 weeks, 5% • 8 weeks, 10% • 16 weeks, 15% • 26 weeks, 20%

CANCELLATION POLICY All PGN Classified ads are cancelable and refundable except for “FRIENDS” ads. Deadline for cancellation is 3 p.m. Friday. The balance will be credited to your credit/debit card. Checks take two weeks to process. The date of the first issue the ad appeared in, along with the classification, your name, address and daytime phone number is required to cancel your ad.

All real-estate advertising is subject to Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 (Fair Housing Act), as amended. Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 (Fair Housing Act), as amended, prohibits discrimination in the sale, rental and financing of dwellings, and in other housing-related transactions, based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status (including children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under the age of 18), and handicap (disability). PGN will not knowingly accept any real-estate advertising that is in violation of any applicable law.

PGN does not accept advertising that is unlawful, false, misleading, harmful, threatening, abusive, invasive of another’s privacy, harassing, defamatory, vulgar, obscene, hateful or racially or otherwise objectionable, including without limitation material of any kind or nature that encourages conduct that could constitute a criminal offense, give rise to civil liability or otherwise violate any applicable local, state, provincial, national or international law or regulation, or encourage the use of controlled substances.


CLASSIFIEDS PGN

Real Estate Sale

Real Estate Sale

Shirlene Tucker-Goff Office Location: 1033 N. 2nd Street 5th Floor (Rialto Building) Philadelphia, PA 19123 Office: (215) 400-2600 Cell: (215) 219-9257 E-Mail: SSGOFF@aol.com

If you or someone you know is looking to buy, sell, or rent a home, I can help!

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Adoption

EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV Certified. Call 888-220-3984. www.CenturaOnline.com ________________________________________36-42 AIRLINE CAREERS Begin here-Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified-Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-834-9715 ________________________________________36-42 Tractor Trailer Training Classes Forming Now. If qualified train daily or weekend. Financial Aid, Pell Grants, Post 911 GI Bill, Job Placement Assistance. National Tractor Trailer School Liverpool and Buffalo NY (Branch) 1-800243-9300 www.ntts.edu ________________________________________36-42

Are you pregnant? A married couple (in their 30s) seeks to adopt. Full-time mom & devoted dad. Financial security. Expenses Paid. Ann & Michael. 1-800-505-8452. ________________________________________36-42

Jewelry Jewelry bought, sold, repairs, estates, custom deisgn, 707 Sansom. 215-925-3822. ________________________________________36-49

Legal Notice Court of Common Pleas for the County of Philadelphia, July Term, 2012, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on July 25, 2012, the petition of Kevin Bostic was filed, praying for a decree to change her name to Eva Jahnai Monroe. The Court has fixed October 26, 2012, at 11:30 a.m., in Room No. 691, in Philadelphia City Hall for hearing. All persons interested may appear and show cause if they have, why the prayer of the said petitioner should not be granted.

Services

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Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

45

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PGN

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

Friends Men LOOKING FOR ROMANCE Attractive GWM, warm, sensitive, caring, 48 y.o. with a smooth gymnast build looking for other GWM, 30-50, who is also in good shape. I live in NE Phila. I’m looking for guys who are also sensitive, caring with a fun personality. If this sounds interesting to you feel free to call me, David, 215-698-0215. ________________________________________36-49 BM, 60 looking for British gent, 35-45 for intimate encounters. 215-763-3391, 6PM-Midnight. ________________________________________36-49 WM, NE Phila. If you’re looking for hot action, call 215-934-5309. No calls after 11 PM. ________________________________________36-44 WM, 66 ISO WM, 18-40 for mutual gratification. Compensation offered. Page at 610-418-1485 w/call back no. or text to 6104181485@archwireless.net ________________________________________36-45 Gay male, 65 seeks same. John, 570-624-8538. ________________________________________36-43 I’m looking for a very well endowed top who is looking for a very nice white butt. 215-732-2108 8-11 PM. ________________________________________36-43

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-Join PANG for an afternoon of Naked Socializing & Fun-

Guys Ages 18-27 Years Of Age, Day Pass Waived for Students Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday-

6hr Rooms (2am to 8am) Members/Students: $15.00 and Non-Members: $25.00 (Special Not Effective During Party Nights)

SATURDAY: AFTERNOON DELIGHT

4 hour Lockers (8am – 4pm) Members/Students: $5.00 & Non-Members: $15.00

SUNDAY RELIEF

Half Price Rooms (6am Sunday till 8am Monday) Members/Students: $12.50 & Non-Members: $22.50

MANIC MONDAY

5 for 5 ($5 Lockers for 5Hrs) Members/Students: $5.00 Non-Members: $15.00 (4pm to 12 )

Check out our website for our HOT NEW WEEKLY SPECIALS & JOIN OUR e-mail List to get the latest information on upcoming events.... Also, RENOVATIONS are being done, So swing by & Check Out The Transformation!

Don’t forget to visit the Adonis Cinema right next door!! 2026 Sansom St/ PH: 215-557-9319


PGN

12-step programs and support groups Al-Anon

Pennsylvania Al-Anon Alateen Family Groups: Events, meeting times and locations at pa-al-anon.org

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

■ Acceptance meets 7:30 p.m. on Fridays at

Episcopal Church, 22nd and Spruce streets.

■ Community meets 8 p.m. on Thursdays at

Holy Communion Church, 2111 Sansom St. Gay and lesbian, but all are welcome. ■ Early Night Out meets 5:30 p.m. daily at Washington West Project, 1201 Locust St., second floor; 215-985-9206. ■ GLBT Alcoholics Anonymous meets 7 p.m. on Sundays and 8 p.m. Wednesdays at St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, 100 W. Windsor St., Reading; 484-529-9504. ■ Living Sober meets 8:30 p.m. Saturdays at the William Way Center. ■ No Other Way Out meets 11 a.m. Sundays at the William Way Center. ■ Night Owl meets 11:30 p.m. daily at the William Way Center. ■ Stepping Stone meets 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the William Way Center. ■ Sober and Gay meets 8:30 p.m. SundayFriday at the William Way Center. ■ Young People’s meets 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays at St. Mark’s Church, 1625 Locust St.

Crystal Meth Anonymous (CMA)

■ Meets 7 p.m. on Sunday, Tuesday,

Wednesday, Friday and Saturday at the William Way Center.

Emotional Support

■ Pink and Blues, a free peer-run mental-health

support group for LGBT people, meets 7 p.m. Wednesdays at St. Luke and The Epiphany Church, 330 S. 13th St.; 215-627-0424. ■ Survivors of Suicide Inc. meets 7:30 p.m. on first Tuesday of the month at 3535 Market St., Room 2037; 215-545-2242; www.phillysos. tripod.com. ■ Survivors of Suicide Inc., Chester County, meets 7:30 p.m. on the second Wednesday of the month at Paoli Memorial Hospital, Willistown Room, Medical Office Building; 215-545-2242; phillysos.tripod.com.

HIV/AIDS

■ Strength In Numbers

Visit http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ SINPhiladelphia.

Mondays: ■ Positive Brothers, a support group for men of color living with HIV/AIDS, meets 6 p.m. at 112 N. Broad St., 11th floor; 215-496-0330. Tuesdays: ■ A support group for HIV-positive men and women meets 1:30-3 p.m. at BEBASHI — Transition to Hope, 1217 Spring Garden St., first floor; 215-769-3561. bebashi.org. ■ Encuentros, a group for HIV-negative Latino men who have sex with men, meets 6 p.m. the first and third Tuesday of the month at 1201 Locust St. ■ “Feast Incarnate,” a weekly ministry for people affected by HIV/AIDS, meets 5 p.m. at University Lutheran Church, 3637 Chestnut St. Bible study follows at 6 p.m.; 215-3872885. ■ A support group for people recently diagnosed with HIV/AIDS meets 6:30-8 p.m. at the Mazzoni Center; 215-563-0652 ext. 235. ■ Youth Outreach Adolescent Community Awareness Program’s Voice It Sistah, a support group for HIV-positive women, meets 11 a.m. every first and third Tuesday at

YOACAP, 1207 Chestnut St., Suite 315; 215851-1898. Wednesdays: ■ AIDS Services in Asian Communities’ weekly volunteer work group meets 6-8 p.m. at 340 N. 12th St., Suite 205; 215-629-2300. ■ Project Teach, a peer-education and empowerment program for people living with HIV/AIDS, meets at Philadelphia Fight, 1233 Locust St.; fight.org. ■ Positive Effect, for HIV-positive people 18 and over, meets 5-7 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays at Camden AHEC, 514 Cooper St., Camden, N.J.; 856-963-2432. Thursdays: ■ A support group for HIV-positive men and women meets 6-8 p.m. at BEBASHI — Transition to Hope, 1217 Spring Garden St.; 215-769-3561. ■ Diversity, an HIV/AIDS support group for all infected or affected, meets from 7-9 p.m. at Arch Street United Methodist Church, 55 N. Broad St.; call Zak, 215-848-4380; azaklad@craftech.com. Saturdays: ■ AIDS Delaware’s You’re Not Alone youth support group meets during the school year. Call 800-810-6776 for meeting location and time.

Debtors Anonymous

■ Meets 7-8 p.m. Monday and Thursday at the

William Way Center.

Overeaters Anonymous (OA)

■ Open meeting, Tuesdays, 5:45 p.m., and

7 p.m. Fridays, at Hahnemann University Hospital, 245 N. 15th St.; call Troy for floor/ room number, 215-514-3065; www.oa.org. ■ Meets 11 a.m.-noon at the William Way Center.

S.A.R.A.

Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

47

Community Bulletin Board Community centers

■ The Attic Youth Center: For LGBT and questioning youth and their friends and allies. Groups meet and activities are held 4-8 p.m. MondayFriday; case management, HIV testing and smoking cessation are available Monday-Friday. See the Youth section for more events. 255 S. 16th St.; 215-545-4331. ■ Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Center at the University of Pennsylvania 3907 Spruce St., 215-898-5044; center@dolphin.upenn.edu. Hours: 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday.

and Allies Youth Center: 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays: Doylestown Planned Parenthood, The Atrium, Suite 2E, 301 S. Main St., Doylestown; 215-957-7981; rainbowroom@ppbucks.org

■ William Way Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center: 1315 Spruce St.; 215-732-2220; www.waygay.org. Hours: 9 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday-Friday, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Peer counseling: 6-9 p.m. Monday through Friday Library hours: 12-9 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 12-3 p.m. and 6-9 p.m. Friday; 126 p.m. Saturday. Volunteers: New Orientation: First Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m.

■ Rainbow Room — Bucks County’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning

■ AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania: 215-587-9377

Key numbers

■ AIDS Law Project of Southern New Jersey: 856-933-9500 ext. 221

■ Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgendered Peer Counseling Services: 215-732-TALK

■ AIDS Library: 215-985-4851

■ Mayor’s Director of LGBT Affairs: Gloria Casarez, 215-6862194; Gloria.Casarez@phila.gov; Fax: 215-686-2555

■ ACLU of Pennsylvania: 215592-1513 ■ AIDS Treatment Fact line: 800662-6080 ■ Barbara Gittings Gay and Lesbian Collection at the Independence Branch of the Philadelphia Free Library: 215-685-1633 ■ The COLOURS Organization Inc.: 112 N. Broad St., third floor; 215-496-0330 ■ Equality Pennsylvania: 215731-1447; www.equalitypa.org ■ Equality Forum: 215-732-3378

■ Mazzoni Center: 215-563-0652; www.mazzonicenter.org. Legal Services: 215-563-0657, 866-LGBTLAW; legalservices@mazzonicenter. org ■ Mazzoni Center Family & Community Medicine: 215-563-0658 ■ Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (Philadelphia): 215-572-1833

■ Philadelphia Lesbian and Gay Task Force: 215-772-2000 ■ Philadelphia Police Department liaison — Deputy Commissioner Stephen Johnson: 215-683-2840 ■ Philadelphia Police Liaison Committee: 215-760-3686; ppd. lgbt@gmail.com ■ Philly Pride Presents: 215875-9288 ■ SPARC — Statewide Pennsylvania Rights Coalition: 717-9209537 ■ Transgender Health Action Coalition: 215-732-1207 (staffed 3-6 p.m. Wednesdays and 6-9 p.m. Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays)

■ Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations: 215-686-4670

■ Substance Abuse – Risk Assessment; day and

evening hours; 215-563-0663 ext. 282.

Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous

■ Meets 7:30 p.m.Thursdays at All Saints

Church, 18 Olive Ave., Rehoboth Beach, Del.; 302-542-3279.

SEPCADD

■ Safe space to meet and discuss substance

abuse problems at the William Way Center.

Health

Alder Health Services provides LGBT health services on a sliding-fee scale; 100 N. Cameron St., Ste. 301 East, Harrisburg; 717-233-7190 or 800-867-1550; www.alderhealth.org. Anonymous, free HIV testing with Spanish/ English counselors, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. MondayFriday at Congreso de Latinos Unidos, 3439 N. Hutchinson St.; 215-763-8870 ext. 6000. HIV treatment: Free HIV/AIDS diagnosis and treatment for Philadelphia residents available 9 a.m.-noon Mondays and 5-8 p.m. Thursdays at Health Center No. 2, 1720 S. Broad St.; 215685-1803. HIV health insurance help: Access to free medications and confidential HIV testing available at 17 MacDade Blvd., Suite 108, Collingdale; Medical Office Building, 722 Church Lane, Yeadon; and 630 S. 60th St.; 610586-9077. Philadelphia FIGHT provides HIV primary care, on-site lab services, clinical trials, case management, mental-health services and support groups for people living with HIV regardless of insurance status or ability to pay; 1233 Locust St., fifth floor; 215-985-4448; www. fight.org.

Anonymous, free, confidential HIV testing Spanish/English counselors offer testing 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday at Congreso de Latinos Unidos, 3439 N. Hutchinson St.; 215-763-8870 ext. 6000.

Health

AIDS Services In Asian Communities Provides HIV-related services to Asians and Pacific Islanders at 340 N. 12th St., Suite 205; 215-629-2300. www.asiac.org. Gay and Lesbian Latino AIDS Education Initiative Free, anonymous HIV testing from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday at 1207 Chestnut St., fifth floor; noon-6 p.m. Tuesdays at the Washington West Project, 1201 Locust St. 215851-1822 or 866-222-3871. www.galaei.org. Spanish/English HIV treatment Free HIV/AIDS diagnosis and treatment for Philadelphia residents are available from 9 a.m.-noon Mondays and 5-8 p.m. Thursdays at Health Center No. 2, 1720 S. Broad St.; 215-685-1803. HIV health insurance help Access to free medications and confidential HIV testing ■ Gay and Lesbian Lawyers of Philadelphia GALLOP holds board meetings at 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of the month at 100 S. Broad St., Suite 1810; GALLOP also provides a free referral service; (215) 6279090; www.galloplaw.org. ■ Greater Philadelphia Professional Network Networking group for area business professionals, self-employed and business owners meets monthly in a different location throughout the city, invites speakers on various topics, partners with other nonprofits and maintains a Web site where everyone is invited to sign up for email notices for activities and events; www.gppn.org.

available by appointment at 13 S. MacDade Blvd., Suite 108, Collingdale; Medical Office Building, 722 Church Lane, Yeadon; and 630 S. 60th St.; 610-5869077.

Mazzoni Center Free, anonymous HIV testing; HIV/AIDS care and treatment, case management and support groups; 21 S. 12th St., eighth floor; 215-563-0652. www.mazzonicenter.org. Mazzoni Center Family & Community Medicine Comprehensive primary health care, preventive health services, gynecology, sexual-health services and chronic-disease management, including comprehensive HIV care, 809 Locust St.; 215-563-0658. Washington West Project Free, anonymous HIV testing. Walk-ins welcome 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Friday except for noon-1 p.m. and 5-6 p.m., and 1-5 p.m. Saturday; 1201 Locust St.; 215-985-9206.

Professional groups ■ Independence Business Alliance Greater Philadelphia’s LGBT Chamber of Commerce, providing networking, business development, marketing, educational and advocacy opportunities for LGBT and LGBT-friendly businesses and professionals. Visit www.IndependenceBusinessAlliance.com for information about events, programs and membership; 215-557-0190; 1717 Arch St., Suite 3370. ■ National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association The Philadelphia chapter of NLGJA, open to professionals and

students, meets for social and networking events; www.nlgjaphiladelphia.org. ■ Philadelphia Gay Tourism Caucus A regional organization dedicated to promoting gay and lesbian tourism to the Greater Philadelphia region holds meetings every other month on the fourth Thursday (January, March, May, July, September and the third Thursday in November), open to the public; P.O. Box 58143, Philadelphia, PA 19102; www.philadelphiagaytourism.com. ■ Philly OutGoing Professionals Social group for gay, lesbian and bisexual professionals meets for social and cultural activities, 856857-9283; popnews19@yahoo. com.


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Philadelphia Gay News www.epgn.com Oct. 19-25, 2012

PGN

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The Philadelphia Gay News covers news and entertainment serving the LGBT community in the greater Philadelphia region and beyond

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