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1994 to 2015

Greater Philadelphia Region Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation

PROJECT IMPACT REPORT

Made possible by the National Science Foundation Award #HRD-0903924 & #HRD-1408052


TABLE OF CONTENTS Message from the Project Management ........................................................... 1 Message from the Co-PI & Project Coordinator .............................................. 2 Alliance Overview ............................................................................................ 3 Leveraging of NSF LSAMP Funding ................................................................. 6 Metrics .............................................................................................................. 14 Economic Impact ............................................................................................ 22 Alliance Partners Cheyney University ................................................................................ 24 Community College of Philadelphia ...................................................... 26 Community College Connectivity .......................................................... 28 Delaware State University .................................................................... 30 Drexel University ................................................................................... 32 34 Lincoln University ................................................................................. New Jersey Institute of Technology ..................................................... 36 Temple University .................................................................................. 38 University of Delaware .......................................................................... 40 University of Pennsylvania .................................................................... 42 Other Cross-Alliance Activities ..................................................................... 44 Highlights of AMP Activities ......................................................................... 46 International Engagement ............................................................................. 48


MESSAGE FROM THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT PRESIDENT JOHN FRY Drexel University

Chairman, Governing Board of Presidents Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP

is honored to be the lead institution for the Greater Philadelphia Region Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation. One of the critical issues facing the nation, our ability to compete technologically on a global scale, is determined by the number and quality of the talented professionals that we graduate from our institutions of higher education. In light of the challenges faced by so many of the able students being educated in our large urban centers, the commitment of the institutions working together in the Stokes AMP alliance to identify and educate students talented in science, technology, engineering and mathematics has become even more crucial to our long term national strength and capacity to remain at the forefront in innovation. The success in bringing together nine institutions across three adjacent states, exemplifies the talent of the central AMP leadership team and the dedication of the Presidents and senior academic leaders of the partnering institutions. There is no more important work than providing a quality education in STEM for the students in the region and the nation-- particularly those students who have been traditionally underserved.

Drexel University

As an Alliance we are poised to continue to build on our past experiences and the importance of the work we do for deserving students and their nation. We remain committed to expanding opportunities for qualified underrepresented students, ensuring that they assume their rightful professional roles as leaders of the next generation of great American innovators, scientists, educators, and intellectual leaders.

M. BRIAN BLAKE, PHD

Drexel University Executive Vice President of Academic Affairs and Provost Distinguished University Professor of Systems and Software Engineering Principal Investigator Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP

we are enormously proud of the spirit engendered by the Greater Philadelphia Region Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation. It represents a closely-bonded consortium of higher education institutions dedicated to a common mission focused on significantly increasing the number of students who are traditionally underrepresented in the sciences, engineering, mathematics, and technology. This close collaboration and unique commitment to working cooperatively has fostered new relationships among institutions, faculty, and students. The net result is the enormously gratifying production of talented and qualified scientists for the region. Of course, our collaborative work has had a profound impact on the economy and wealth production for the tri-state region. Congratulations to the Presidents and senior management of the partner institutions as well as their academic leaders and faculty. Our LSAMP collaboration represents a model for the nation in meeting the challenges that face the region and nation and the world. Through it, we can overcome enormous obstacles through strategic planning and dedication to our task. Finally, we believe that this LSAMP model / mechanism could have significant impact on how we engage under-represented students in all disciplines throughout the nation. It is an honor to participate in this consortium and in helping educate able students in service to the nation.

At Drexel

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MESSAGE FROM THE CO-PI & PROJECT COORDINATOR STEPHEN R. COX

Director, Regional Alliance Office of the Provost Drexel University Co-Principal Investigator, Project Director Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP

The Greater Philadelphia Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) has established itself as a prototype for increasing the participation and advancement of underrepresented minority students, (i.e. African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, and Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islanders) in curricula and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The extraordinary dedication of our nine institutional partners, the presidents, provosts, faculty and administrators have made the concept of synergistic collaboration the strength of our success as an alliance. Our belief in the talent of our students and our ability to guide them through the academy has expanded to include excellence in STEM curricula, engagement in international research, and the pursuit of graduate studies through to terminal degrees. Our combined coalition of dedicated educators and scientific stakeholders has demonstrated that this mechanism that we have developed can guide the future of scientific education for all students in the region, the country and the international scientific enterprise. This impact statement will demonstrate the progression of this initiative, and the value of the collective dedication of our partners and the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP’s mission.

VENIECE KEENE

Senior Research Specialist Drexel University Project Coordinator Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP

The Greater Philadelphia Region Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) was founded on the belief that all students, with the appropriate support, possess the ability to be successful. As a direct result of this guiding principle, its students soar. I am honored to be a part of their professional journey.

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ALLIANCE OVERVIEW 25 years ago,

a consortium of dedicated educators and scientific stakeholders came together to discuss the dire state of affairs which existed in the region and the nation regarding the participation of underrepresented students in science, engineering, mathematics and technology (STEM) curricula and professions. In 1989, the consortium established The Comprehensive Regional Center for Minorities (CRCM) funded by the National Science Foundation. With input from all the participating stakeholders, a blueprint was developed, shaping a comprehensive pipeline from K through 16 that would mitigate the diminished scientific capacity of the region. This became the consortium’s operational plan for the next six years. In November 1994, the Greater Philadelphia Region Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (Philadelphia AMP) emerged from the focus and energy of the CRCM to sustain the increased baccalaureate degree productivity across this nine university consortium with geographic influences in three adjoining states: New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware. From that day to the present, in the fulfillment of the promise made by committed educators and community activists, who pledged to collaborate in the development of a consortium that would be dedicated to the improvement and increased inclusion of underrepresented students in the scientific enterprise in the Greater Philadelphia Region, intellectual, financial and material resources have been provided to achieve the stated objective. As a result of Philadelphia AMP’s efforts, a mechanism has been developed to catalyze changes in institutional, departmental, and organizational culture and the practices that have resulted in significant increases in recruitment, including 2yr – 4yr matriculation, retention, STEM degree production, and graduate school entry for underrepresented students, as well as for the benefit of all students.

Historical Perspective

Philadelphia AMP, now in its twenty-first year of operation represents a diverse tri-state partnership of public and private, 2- and 4-yr, research and non-research, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and majority institutions. The Alliance’s mission is to substantially increase the quantity and quality of African American, Hispanic and Native American students earning baccalaureate and advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The participating institutions include: • Cheyney University of Pennsylvania • Community College of Philadelphia • Delaware State University • Drexel University • Lincoln University of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania • New Jersey Institute of Technology • Temple University • University of Delaware • University of Pennsylvania Synergistic collaboration has been a unifying operational philosophy that informs practices across the Alliance with regard to minority undergraduate enrollment, retention and the promotion of graduate study. In addition, the Alliance continues to increase the involvement of tenured STEM faculty, academic department heads, and senior administrative personnel in the implementation of the Philadelphia AMP which has positively impacted STEM departments and minority student retention at partner institutions. This steady increase in participation has also attributed to the successful implementation of our LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate (Cohorts I-XII) programs. The Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP has centered its efforts on catalyzing changes in institutional, departmental, and organizational culture and practices in order to achieve sustainable and significant increases in recruitment, retention, and degree attainment in STEM disciplines for underrepresented students. The initial impact occurred at the institutional level. As we organized to facilitate the improvements in resources on campuses for underrepresented students, partner institutions reorganized their plans and operations utilizing the best practices of the regional partners.

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ALLIANCE OVERVIEW From 1994 - 98, the Alliance focused on short term or non-permanent ways to increase its annual minority STEM degree production immediately. It setup infrastructure to monitor and manage activities that were mainly supported by AMP funds. These activities were primarily support services in nature and resided outside of the learning environment or classroom. In addition, recruitment at the pre-college level was emphasized. As a result, LSAMP drop-in centers were established, student support services realigned, and extensive tutorial services were provided through the LSAMP drop-in centers. By June 1999, the Alliance increased its minority STEM degree productivity from 201 degrees to 475 degrees in 1999, thus achieving 81% of its 558 degree minority STEM degree production goal, and dramatically improved the retention rate of LSAMP minority STEM students. Based on the Alliance’s Fall 1994 freshman cohort study conducted in 1999, LSAMP minority STEM students were retained at a higher level (80%) than Non-LSAMP minority STEM students (40%) and than Non-minority STEM students (75%) over a four-year period. Additional analysis showed that the retention / graduation rate of LSAMP minority STEM students (74%) continued to exceed that of Non-LSAMP minority students (35%), and was similar to that of Non-minority students (72%) over a five-year period. The refinement of support programs and the success of the target population raised the interest of administrators and faculty that stimulated outreach to LSAMP administrators and created cross-alliance collaboration. During its development from 1999 - 2004, the Alliance focused on long-term or permanent ways to maintain the initial increase in its annual minority STEM degree production over time. Its purpose was to increase retention and performance of students within the learning environment or classroom. Activities included curricular modifications, institutional reorganization, shifts in teaching practices and operational practices which were supported by the colleges/universities as part of their general operating costs. In addition, retention and articulation, especially from Community College of Philadelphia (CCP) were emphasized. These efforts resulted in a sustained increase of the minority STEM B.S. degree productivity rate of 500+ degrees annually for eight years from 2000 - 2007. In addition, the Alliance increased the number of community college students involved in research, graduate school matriculation and doctoral STEM degree completion. From 2005 - present, the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP continues to integrate the cumulative knowledge base gained through its development to further strengthen the institutionalization of best practices, the preparation and transition of students from community colleges to 4-year institutions and from 4-year institutions to graduate study, and the participation of students in national and international research experiences. These efforts have resulted in increased undergraduate and graduate STEM degree productivity. From its inception to 2014, Philadelphia AMP has provided support to 14,740 students. Sustained increases in the quality and quantity of minority students in undergraduate and graduate STEM degree programs require not only a re-engineering of the educational system at all levels, but also a sustained mechanism which revisits the curricular adjustments to accommodate the demands of industry and the academy. These adjustments will result in permanent changes in the institutional learning environment, as well as in its policies and practices in terms of allocations of finances, personnel, recruitment, and admissions. As part of its institutionalization efforts, the infrastructure of the Philadelphia AMP Initiative has created such a mechanism, and as a result has substantially influenced the reengineering of the undergraduate and graduate educational system at partner institutions as it relates to the advancement and participation of underrepresented students in STEM education. This re-engineering has primarily occurred through the following: • Strategic leveraging of NSF funding to revamp STEM education, to bolster the research infrastructure of our HBCU institutions, to expand academic support and monitoring, and to increase scholarship funding and research opportunities for Philadelphia AMP students. • Shifting of NSF funded program operating expenses to institutional budgets, and the movement of AMP objectives to the strategic missions of partner institutions. • Expansion and diversification of institutional recruitment efforts at the undergraduate and graduate levels that broaden the opportunity for minority students to gain admission to the university. • Institutional realignments, and the creation of new administrative positions to manage institutional enrollment in support of diversity.

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• Adoption / replication of AMP program practices institution and Alliance-wide. • Reorganization and centralization of student support services, the creation of supplemental sections for gatekeeper courses, and enhanced / specialized tutoring and academic advising. • Reorganization and enhancement of STEM curricula, the creation of new BS/MS inter-institutional program offerings, and the realignment of 2-yr to 4-yr articulation agreements. • Expansion of undergraduate research activity, and the creation of inter-institutional faculty to faculty linkages and research partnerships. • Cross-Alliance sharing of research equipment and facilities, and technical expertise. The impact of this Alliance of nine institutions dedicated to increasing minority STEM student B.S. degree productivity has also increased the collective institutional consciousness and has informed methodologies for correction of previously existing barriers. Some of the “cultural dis-affinity” characterized in previous years, across this diverse Alliance, has now created opportunities for institutions to collaborate as full partners in all aspects of the educational enterprise. Looking at the Alliance in retrospect starting with the Community College of Philadelphia, each element of our consortium has created areas of intersection with the four-year institutions and the Research One institutions, supporting the seamless transition of students, and faculty working in collaboration to achieve the desired result, broadening the participation of underrepresented students in the STEM enterprise.

13th Annual Research Symposium and Mentoring Conference: Charles Owen, Cheyney University (right) presents his research to a fellow LSAMP student during the conference.

Philadelphia AMP STEM Transfer Fair: Dr. Douglas Baird, Temple University speaks to students from Community College of Philadelphia about STEM program offerings.

2010 LSAMP JAM Poster Session: (from left to right) Stephen Cox and Veniece Keene accompany Bridge to the Doctorate students, Yolanda Williams-Bey, Virginia Kocieda, and David Delaine as they present their research to members of Congress.

Bridge to the Doctorate Retreat 2010: Students from the Bridge to the Doctorate and HBCU STEM fellowship programs participate in professional development workshops during the retreat.

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LEVERAGING OF NSF LSAMP FUNDING Between 1994-2014, the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP, has been awarded over $25 million in NSF funding to intensify its on-going efforts to substantially increase the quantity and quality of underrepresented minority students receiving baccalaureate degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), and subsequently, entering graduate school to attain doctoral degrees. Through synergistic collaboration, the Philadelphia AMP, as a tri-state, nine institution consortium, has utilized its operational infrastructure to increase the capacity of its partner institutions to recruit, retain and graduate more underrepresented minority STEM students by substantially expanding their capabilities to attract, develop and support STEM student talent by leveraging of the NSF LSAMP funding. Since its inception, as noted in Figure 1 below, the Alliance partner institutions have contributed over $16,936,815 in matching funds to the LSAMP initiative through the use of college/university, foundation, state government, and corporate funds. The Alliance also received $160,000 from the Department of Education (PA) for Gear UP funding between 2000 2001 to promote pre-college education, as well as $12,000 in 2003 from the United Negro College fund. Figure 1: Comparison of NSF and Matching Funds for the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP Between 1994 - 2014

The Alliance has also strategically used its LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate (BTD) program at Delaware State University (DSU) to help the institution successfully grow its graduate programs, as well as increase its research capacity. Historically, graduate enrollments at DSU, an HBCU institution, have been sharply limited by the lack of graduate assistantships. In addition, when BTD Cohort IV (2006) was formed, DSU had an established Ph.D. program in Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics degree and was planning to expand its Ph.D. offerings during the next two years. In Fall 2008, DSU introduced three new Ph.D. programs: in Optics; Neuroscience; and Applied Chemistry. The Alliance decided to support this HBCU Ph.D. development initiative with DSU with additional LSAMP BTD funding for BTD Cohorts VI (2008) and VII (2009), and simultaneously initiated a formal M.S. / Ph.D. program between DSU and Drexel University’s College of Medicine in Neuroscience. Through the program, students in DSU’s M.S. program pursue up to one full year of the graduate program’s core curriculum at Drexel; the courses are then transferred to DSU in a reverse articulation to fulfill the requirements of the M.S. degree. The BTD Cohort IV, VI and VII programs continued to allow the graduate programs at DSU to reach their potential to serve students by providing the needed financial resources. With the inclusion of Cohort VII (2009), BTD students represented more than 50% of the graduate students in some DSU departments such as Biology, Chemistry, and Applied Mathematics. The increased involvement of faculty and students in the research enterprise has also helped DSU attract additional research funding, enhance the quality of its minority STEM graduate students, as well as contribute to the advancement of scientific knowledge. BTD students in optics have contributed in the development of intellectual property which will be transferred from DSU to Photon Machines, Inc. in which a Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy-Tag Method (LIB-Tag) developed from DSU’s optics research work will be used in the creation of laser technology that can be used in hospitals and labs for diagnostic work.

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Also, the increased involvement of faculty and students in the research enterprise has helped DSU attract additional research funding, enhance the quality of its minority STEM graduate students, as well as contribute to the advancement of scientific knowledge.

Collaborations with NSF and Other Federal Agencies Funding from other HRD programs has also helped the Alliance to revamp STEM education, to bolster the research infrastructure of our HBCU institutions, and to increase scholarship support BTD Cohort VII student, Franz Delima, M.S. candidate, and research opportunities for Philadelphia AMP students. The Optics, Delaware State University (DSU) has contributed inclusion of both a community college and HBCUs in the Greater to the development of intellectual property which will be Philadelphia Region Alliance continues to contribute greatly to transferred from DSU to Photon Machines, Inc. A LaserInduced Breakdown Spectroscopy-Tag Method (LIB-Tag) the ability of partners to increase their diversity. Students from developed from DSU’s optics research work will be used these institutions are recruited for undergraduate and graduate in the creation of laser technology that can be used in study at partner institutions (especially the Alliance’s Bridge hospitals and labs for diagnostic work. to the Doctorate programs), and inter-institutional research collaborations have created faculty to faculty interactions which also benefit students. NSF and other government agencies continue to fund a number of intra- and inter-institutional collaborations. Other NSF collaborations involving Alliance partnerships have included: • Centers for Research Excellence in Science and Technology (CREST) • Collaborative for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP) • Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) • Integrative Biology and Neuroscience / Behavioral Science Program • Laboratory on Structure for Research Matter (LRSM) • Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) • Recognition Awards for the Integration of Research and Education (RAIRE) • Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) • Research Infrastructure for Science and Engineering (RISE) • Research in Undergraduate Institutions (RUI) • Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) In particular, STEM support and research activities for underrepresented students continued to be jointly coordinated across the NSF-funded LSAMP and Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) HBCU-UP programs. For example at Delaware State University, the HBCU-UP and LSAMP, during the 2014-15 organized an online peer mentoring program for incoming STEM freshmen. Similar coordination of the LSAMP and HBCU-UP programs also occurred at Cheyney and Lincoln Universities. Historically, the Alliance has also continued to leverage its NSF funds to obtain additional support from other non-NSF federally sponsored programs to further bolster its ability to provide research opportunities to its undergraduate student population, and to increase access to STEM education at all levels through interaction with the following agencies: • Federal Highway Administration • Federal Drug Administration (FDA) • National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) • National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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LEVERAGING OF NSF LSAMP FUNDING • National Institute of Health (NIH) • Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) • Office of Naval Research • U. S. Army Research Laboratories (ARL) • U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) • U.S. Department for Defense (DoD) • U. S. Department of Education • U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) For example, DSU and the University of Delaware partnered in a successful application for a grant from the NIH “Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence” program to start the Delaware Center for Neuroscience Research. In addition, based on the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP’s performance with the Bridge to the Doctorate Program, the Alliance Project Director was asked by the Educational Advancement Alliance (EAA) to help in shaping the proposal for funding the HBCU Graduate Fellowship program through the National Nuclear Security Agency. In 2009, the proposal was approved and resulted in tuition and stipend funding to support 41 graduate students annually in STEM graduate programs in Delaware, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey over a 10-year period. This opportunity paralleled the Alliance’s mission to broaden participation and allowed us to connect in a systemic fashion with the HBCU-UP Institutions across the country, as well as bring graduate candidates to the LSAMP institutions in our region. As noted in Table 1 below, the total number of students across the Alliance who have received funding for a two-year graduate program was 40 students with a $3.0 million allocation from EAA. These students attended all six of the graduate institutions in this alliance, many of which have been awarded M.S. STEM degrees, and transitioned to doctoral study or STEM employment. Table 1: Summary of Educational Advancement Alliance (EAA) HBCU STEM and National STEM Graduate Fellowships Awarded to Philadelphia AMP Partner Institutions from September 2009 to 2012.

As an outgrowth of the partnership of Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP and the Educational Advancement Alliance, in 2009, a pilot “Graduate Exploratory Learning Opportunity” EAA/University of Delaware (UD) Graduate Preparation Program was initiated and included 34 participants, all recent graduates or rising juniors or seniors at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). The summer program at UD was supported in 2009 by a $210,000 grant from EAA and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). UD continued to host the program through 2011 which has served 100 students since its inception. A summary of the number of students participating in the program per year is included below in Table 2. Through the collective vision of the UD and the Alliance partners, UD has become the model of a graduate prep feeder program with the potential of duplication at the partner institutions.

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Table 2: Summary of Student Participation in the Educational Advancement Alliance (EEA) / University of Delaware Graduate Preparatory Program (2009-2011).

Also, since October 2013, the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP has collaborated with Community College of Philadelphia (CCP)’s U.S. Department of Education Minority Science & Engineering Improvement Program (MSEIP) grant entitled “Raising Interest in STEM Education (RISE) for $660,388 over a 3-year period. The RISE program works synergistically with the AMP program to more readily move and academically prepare the developmental and pre-major students at CCP to critical juncture (AMP eligible) status, and provides services to sixty (60) students per year. Through the RISE program, Drexel University provides undergraduate research experiences and academic counseling to CCP students prior to their transition to AMP partner institutions. Philadelphia AMP provides peer mentorship to critical juncture students upon their matriculation to 4– year partner institutions, as well as continues tutorial support beyond their participation in the RISE program. For the past two years, RISE students have conducted summer research at Drexel University. In addition, AMP has also provided Critical Juncture students with additional opportunities to participate in research at the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Historically, CCP students have participated in research at UPenn in the SUNFEST: Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) in Sensor Technology program directed by Dr. Jan Van der Spiegel, Professor & Associate Dean for Education, UPENN, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), as well as at the Medical School. Through the Alliance’s relationship with Brookhaven National Laboratory, CCP students have also participated in the Mini-semester sessions, as well as the Community College Internship (CCI) and Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) programs. In addition, Philadelphia AMP continues to collaborate with TRIO funded programs sponsored with funding from the U.S. Department of Education, in particular, the Educational Opportunity Centers, and Student Support Services programs, to expand its academic support and monitoring of students eligible to participate in both programs, namely, first-generation and low-income minority STEM students. As in previous years, to assist the Philadelphia AMP with its graduate school preparatory activity and expand research offerings to students, the Alliance has further enhanced its partnership with the Ronald E. McNair Scholars Program also funded through the Department of Education at its partner institutions. The McNair Scholars program is currently being offered on the following Philadelphia AMP campuses: Delaware State University, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Temple University, University of Delaware, and the University of Pennsylvania.

Other Regional Efforts and Industry Collaborations In addition to the expansion of its cross - Alliance activities in research and graduate transition programs, the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP has also created new partnerships with corporations. The AMP/Sunoco Inc. -The Minority Pathfinder Awards was a concept developed by management from Sunoco Inc and the Alliance to identify and acknowledge minority engineers who have led the way in science engineering and technology in the Delaware Valley,

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LEVERAGING OF NSF LSAMP FUNDING achieved professional excellence and who are providing mentorship and career counseling in the engineering and scientific community. At the inaugural event on May 25, 2006 the attendance was in excess of 200 guests with representation from Alliance institutions and a dozen major corporations in the Delaware Valley.

on the ways in which Philadelphia, New Jersey and Delaware (Delaware Valley) institutions could partner with Historically Black Colleges and Universities nationally to develop innovative solutions to the “Grand Challenges for Engineering” enumerated by the National Academy of Engineering. The goals of the regional summit included the following:

In addition, the Alliance has actively participated in regional efforts to increase the participation of underrepresented students. On December 9-10, 2009, hosted jointly by the Deans of Engineering of both Temple and Drexel Universities, in partnership with the Urban STEM Strategic Group of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia AMP co-sponsored the first Engineering Deans’ Summit: “Partnering thru Diversity to Address Grand Challenges” which focused

a) developing strategic research and funding collaborations between HBCU and Delaware Valley Colleges of Engineering to ensure matriculation of minority undergraduates into graduate and post graduate degree opportunities. b) developing policy recommendations to promote sustainable education reform benefitting STEM education. c) fostering greater teacher/ educator/counselor/ parent/ student awareness of STEM education and regional needs. Dr. Jamie Bracey (center) presents a Lifetime Service Award to

In addition, Drexel’s rich history and expertise in Dr. Joseph Bordogna, former Deputy Director, National Science Foundation (left) and Dr. Eugene DeLoatch, Dean, College of cooperative education with industry also helped the Engineering, Morgan State University (right). Alliance to partner with the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (PUC) to launch an “Energy Summit” on November 2, 2012 with 30 companies in the region, in collaboration with Drexel University, and to the benefit of the Philadelphia AMP partner institutions. The summit focused on the careers in Energy (solar, wind, hydroelectric, fossil and nuclear) and Communications through participation of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC.) During the event undergraduate and graduate STEM students across our Alliance partner institutions, as well as other institutions in the region were able to hear firsthand from and network with industry leaders about careers in energy, information technology, data and telecommunications. Opportunities for attendees to talk directly with Human Resource officers of the companies present about current employment offerings were also provided; hence, in addition to STEM career awareness, this event helped to facilitate the movement of AMP students from across the Alliance to permanent employment in STEM industry positions. Featured guests included Mignon Clyburn, FCC Commissioner, and Robert F. Powelson, PUC Chairman, and over 200 Alliance students were in attendance. Due to the success of the “Energy Forum”, a permanent relationship has been developed with Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP, the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission and Drexel University to the benefit of LSAMP students

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across the Alliance. Our expectation was to make available the opportunities for the students to introduce and inform student’s decisions in the STEM disciplines. This Energy Forum created a model that extended to the Biological Sciences and a similar Forum was created at the University Science Center called the B2B Forum (Bench to Business) which represented companies in the Biomedical and Biological Sciences who were interested in identifying job opportunities and new product development opportunities for students, faculty and consortia consisting of universities, business and government research entities. In addition, the Alliance continues to expand its relationship with the National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for Minorities in Engineering and Science (GEM) to assist partner institutions with its graduate STEM recruitment efforts, as well as to assist students with support to continue doctoral study. On October 18, 2014, co-sponsored by the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP, University of Delaware (UD), Stony Brook University and Columbia University’s School of Engineering, the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) hosted a GEM GRAD Lab (Getting Ready for Advanced Degree Lab), a comprehensive, hands-on symposium designed to excite and encourage promising undergraduate and community college engineering and science students to consider Master and Ph.D. technical research programs. Alliance LSAMP students from NJIT, UD, Temple University, Drexel University, and the University of Pennsylvania were in attendance. During the symposium, students were given vital information on the importance of research and innovation, life-long career benefits and access to real-world role-model examples of success. The day-long event helped students envision their future as technology leaders, and provided information on how to successfully apply for a GEM fellowship and gain entry to a graduate program. On October 16-17, 2015, the Alliance sponsored the second regional GEM GRAD Lab which was co-hosted by: Drexel University, Carnegie Mellon University, University of Delaware, University of Pennsylvania, and University of Pittsburgh. The GEM GRAD Lab afforded local and national LSAMP, as well as non-LSAMP students, faculty and administrators the opportunity to participate in campus tours, to visit research laboratories, attend professional development workshops, and to interact with graduate students from both Drexel University in Engineering and the University of Pennsylvania in Robotics in their exploration of graduate study.

Collaborations with Industry One of the most important factors in providing competent technical scientific and engineering talent is the support and participation of the regional corporate stakeholders. The Philadelphia AMP has coordinated a tri-state consortium of corporations who will be the recipients of the students that we have produced. The following is a brief list of the corporations who have been involved: • Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. • Dupont Corporation • JPMorgan Chase and Co • Lankenau Medical Research Center • Lockheed Martin • Merck Company Inc. • Delaware International Trade and Development • Rohm and Haas • Sunoco, Inc.

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LEVERAGING OF NSF LSAMP FUNDING • Unisys • Ventures • W. L. Gore Corporation • Wistar Institute Philadelphia AMP continues to be recognized as a resource for minority talent in the STEM disciplines. Corporations have benefited from their participation with AMP, in securing intern and cooperative education students. Within the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP, collaborations between industry partners and Alliance institutions have also been: a) implemented through individual relationships with AMP faculty and administrators, b) facilitated through the Alliance’s Central management or LSAMP alumni who have transitioned to industry, and /or c) developed through the engagement of the Development / Institutional Advancement Offices of respective partner campuses.

Brian Manson, Cheyney University awaits judging of his research project conducted at the Wistar Institute on the “Augmentation of Vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell Responses to Influenza A Virus Nucleoprotein in Young and Old Mice through Blockade of an Immunoinhibitory Pathway.”

These industry collaborations / partnerships continue to benefit AMP students by: a) providing financial scholarship support, b) expanding national and international research opportunities, c) facilitating STEM co-op experiences and permanent employment in industry, d) providing support for professional development programs on partner campuses, and e) providing advisory support to programs servicing minority STEM students. Some specific examples of these collaborations are noted below: Drexel University has been a pioneer in cooperative education, operating one of the largest cooperative education programs in the nation. With the support of Drexel’s Office of Institutional Advancement and with the facilitation of its Career Development Center, over 1,500 business, industrial, governmental, and other institutions “cooperate” with Drexel in offering students the opportunity to acquire practical experience in employment related to college studies. Cooperative education at Drexel enables undergraduate students to balance classroom theory with practical, hands-on experience prior to graduation. Students alternate classes with full-time employment through University-approved employers. Generally, students are on co-op for a six-month period, alternating with six months of classroom study. Philadelphia AMP has worked collaboratively with the co-op program by leveraging its funds to support the participation of Drexel AMP students in international laboratory research and technical training experiences in Switzerland and England, respectively. Through Delaware State University’s (DSU) industrial partnership with the Office of International Trade and Development of the state of Delaware, with the support of DSU AMP PI, Dr. Alton Thompson, and DSU AMP Co-PIs, Dr. Fengshan Liu, and Dr. Mazen Shahin and State Director, Mr. John Pastor, DSU is provided $25,000 - $30,000 per year to support 10 AMP students to conduct undergraduate research at a university in China for one summer month. The funds received from the Office of International Trade and Development complements the NSF funds to support the International Research Experience for DSU AMP students. Through this collaboration and the leveraging of AMP funds, over the past five years, forty-night (49) DSU AMP students have participated in international laboratory research experiences, and this industrial collaboration is expected to continue. Also, through DuPont’s partnership with DSU, AMP students receive financial assistance to continue their studies; biology and chemistry AMP students also earn paid internships at DuPont. AMP students majoring in computer science and management information systems will continue to receive mentoring support through DSU’s industrial partnership with Barclays Bank. Under this partnership, STEM students will gain knowledge and transferrable skills relevant to the banking industry to include: 1) enhanced customer analytics; 2) utilizing large sets of data and framing the information to make evidence-based decisions; 3) working on projects and understanding the processes from beginning to end; and 4) preparing and familiarizing themselves with manipulating data using software programs. In addition, DSU and JPMorgan Chase and Co. will also continue to address the need for DSU AMP students to develop professional and career skills

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through participation in their mentoring program for computer science students. The University of Delaware (UD) also has three corporate relationships which work synergistically with UD’s Resources to Insure Successful Engineers (RISE) / AMP Program to the benefit of its students, and are expected to continue under the proposed project. Each academic year, funds are provided from Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. for UD’s RISE / AMP Program participants to receive tutorial services; study abroad funding, and upperclassmen scholarship awards. One to two paid internship positions to be filled by RISE/AMP Program participants each year are also offered. In-kind support from representatives who facilitate RISE/AMP Program workshop presentations, as well as financial support for the student organizations such as NSBE (National Society of Black Engineers) and SHPE (Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers) are also obtained. Most members in each of these minority professional organizations are also RISE/AMP Program participants. In addition, the RISE/AMP Program/Academic Advisement Office’s physical space was largely funded by support from Air Products. Through its partnership with JP Morgan Chase & Co., UD also receives various financial and in-kind support throughout the academic year. This partnership provides funding for the RISE/AMP Program banquet, the production of a student produced yearly newsletter, financial and in-kind support for various workshops and career development activities throughout the academic year, and financial support for the minority student organizations, mainly, NSBE (National Society of Black Engineers) and SHPE (Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers). In addition, this partnership provides the opportunity for one to two RISE/AMP Program participants to fill internship positions each year. In addition, through UD’s partnership with Merck, financial support for the RISE/AMP Program participants for winter session course work and study abroad is obtained. One to two internships and one fellowship position are also offered and expected to be filled by RISE/AMP Program participants. Financial assistance for the minority professional student organizations, NSBE (National Society of Black Engineers) and SHPE (Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers) whose memberships, as aforementioned, are mostly RISE/AMP Program participants, is also provided. At University of Pennsylvania (UPenn), alumni, Dr. Jesse Johnson, and Dr. Laura Stubbs, in collaboration with the University’s Development Office, worked to establish an endowed “Gifts to Cora Ingrum Fund” in 2003. Ms. Cora Ingrum has served as UPenn AMP PI and Director, Multicultural Programs, School of Engineering and Applied Science since Philadelphia AMP’s inception in November 1994. UPenn AMP alumni who have transitioned to industry to such companies as Apple, Inc., General Electric Company, Integrated Systems Analysts, Inc. and Lockheed Martin Corporation continue to contribute to the fund to the present day through personal pledges and contributions. Other UPenn AMP alumni (for example, those employed by Merck Company Inc. and Lockheed Martin Corporation) are also helping to grow the fund through their corporate matching funding programs. Revenues from the “Gifts to Cora Ingrum Fund” at University of Pennsylvania will continue to be leveraged with AMP funds to expand the number of undergraduate summer research opportunities available to UPenn AMP students. Lastly, Philadelphia AMP alumni from across partner institutions who have transitioned to industry are also being used as speakers to share information about the expectations of industry to current AMP students at our annual Research Symposium and Mentoring Conference, Bridge to the Doctorate retreats, and other on-campus partner institution career awareness / professional development activities including events held by the student chapters of our minority professional organizations such as the NSBE (National Society of Black Engineers). In short, the Alliance has brought together stakeholders in the STEM mission who can influence students regarding their careers and a future that is very positive. We look forward to making the relationships with industry be a continued element of our programmatic offerings as we have in the past. The relationships between school districts, higher education, corporate partners and regional STEM initiatives have shaped an alliance that has strengthened the economic status of the tri-state region.

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METRICS Highlight of Accomplishments The Philadelphia AMP has been responsible for the philosophical and strategic change in the productivity associated with the increase of underrepresented students majoring and graduating in STEM disciplines at the participating institutions and the larger higher education community in the region. While each institution has developed a programmatic strategy to improve the quality of STEM on their respective campuses, a specific plan driven by research and data has engaged the higher education community, government agencies, the regional school districts and major corporate interests to support this increasingly diverse science and engineering talent pool. Specific accomplishments are noted below:

Increased Enrollment of Underrepresented Undergraduate Students in STEM Disciplines: Currently, approximately 5,536 minority STEM students are enrolled at Alliance institutions, which constitutes approximately 20.6% of the Alliance’s total STEM population (26,858 students). The ethnic distribution of these students is as follows: 49% African American, 42% Hispanic, 1% Native American, 1% Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander, and 8% Multi-racial / More than One Race Reported Minority. In terms of gender, 62% are males, and 38% are females. As noted below in Figure 1, enhanced recruitment efforts have increased the minority STEM undergraduate enrollment at partner institutions. Between the 1994-95 and 2013-14 academic years, the Alliance’s minority STEM enrollment has increased by 135% (more than doubled). Figure 1: Philadelphia AMP Minority STEM Undergraduate Enrollment Between 1994 and 2014.

Change of 135%

Increased Support Services For Underrepresented STEM Students: As noted in Figure 2 below, between the 1994-95 and 2013-14 academic years, Philadelphia AMP has increased the number of minority STEM students it has supported from 349 to 2,159 students annually. The Alliance is now providing support to 39% of the Alliance’s total minority STEM population of 5,536 students. The ethnic distribution of the students served during these periods is included in Figure 3.

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Figure 2: Philadelphia AMP Students Who Received Direct Support Between 1994 and 2014.

(39% of Minority STEM Enrollment)

(15% of Minority STEM Enrollment)

Figure 3: Philadelphia AMP Students Who Received Direct Support Between 1994 and 2014, By Race / Ethnicity

From its inception through August 2014, Philadelphia AMP has provided support to 14,740 students. A summary of the number of students supported by institution is included in Figure 4 below. Figure 4: Philadelphia AMP Students Who Received Direct Support Between 1994-2014 by Institution

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METRICS Consistent with Tinto’s Model of Student Retention [Clewell, Beatriz, Clemencia Cosentino de Cohen, Lisa Tsui, and Nicole Deterding, “Revitalizing the Nation’s Talent Pool in STEM,” The Urban Institute, Washington, DC 2006, p.12], Philadelphia AMP continues to use the research-based LSAMP model which utilizes strategies and approaches that have a proven record of success in helping students achieve STEM academic and social integration in their preparation for movement into industry or academia. To improve student performance, progression, retention and graduation rates, and movement of students to graduate study, Philadelphia AMP provides the following services on partner institution campuses to its students: a) professional development workshops (on study skills, test-taking skills, time management and test-taking anxiety, etc.) to help students sharpen personal skills; b) technical training on research methodology and ethics, and laboratory process, procedure and instrumentation to help students develop competencies within their STEM discipline; c) tutoring to improve academic performance; d) seminar series on recent scientific and technological advances to boost the student’s knowledge-base in STEM disciplines and career pathways; e) peer and faculty mentoring support, as well as academic guidance and personal counseling; f) travel stipends to attend minority STEM professional conferences to expand their connectivity to the field; merit- based financial support; and regular student performance monitoring to aid in student retention; and g) national and international research opportunities to motivate students towards 2-year to 4-year B.S degree granting partner institutions, graduate STEM study, and to make them more globally competitive. Currently, over one hundred (100) students annually participate in undergraduate research activities on partner institutions campuses, national LSAMP and non-partner Research-one institutions, national research laboratories, and other research facilities, as well as internationally. Off-campus research sites have included the following entities: • Argonne National Laboratory • Brookhaven National Laboratory • NASA Glenn Research Center • NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory • U.S. Navy Research Center • Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University • Delaware EPSCoR Environmental Institute • Woods Hole Oceanography Institute • Wistar Institute • Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology • GlaxoSmithKline • Boston University • City College of New York • Discovery Bay Marine Laboratory (Jamaica) • L’Ecole Polytechnique Federal de Lausanne (Switzerland) • Technische Universitat Dortmund (Germany) • University of Chile, the University of Belgrade (Serbia) • University of Ningbo (China) • Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana (Brazil) • Universidad del Valle (Columbia) During the life of the project, eighty-three (83) students have engaged in international research experiences in the following locations: Brazil (4), China (54), Austria (2), Switzerland (1), Jamaica (10), Chile (1), Serbia (2), Madagascar (1), Africa (3), and The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago (5). In general, these programs help to improve the quality of our students and their preparedness for graduate study. In addition, the Alliance has also promoted its students’ development of leadership skills and community engagement through their participation in outreach activities to the K-12 community.

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Increased Annual Rate of Minority STEM B.S. Degree Productivity: Through the support of the National Science Foundation and the dedication of the presidents, faculty, students and industries in the region, the Alliance has more than tripled its annual minority STEM B.S. degree rate of production as noted in Figure 5: Figure 5: Comparison of Philadelphia AMP Minority STEM B.S. Degrees Awarded Between 1992-93 and 2013-14.

Since LSAMP’s Inception

Before LSAMP’s Inception

The aforementioned increases in minority STEM B.S. degree productivity can be greatly attributed to the retention efforts of Philadelphia AMP. In general, Philadelphia AMP students who receive support through its LSAMP program are being retained at 35-40% higher than Non-AMP minority STEM students. As noted in Figure 6, as of the 2013-14 academic year, Philadelphia AMP provided support to 44% of the total minority STEM B.S. degree recipients. Figure 6: Comparison of LSAMP Supported Graduates and Minority STEM B.S. Degrees Awarded Between 1994-95 and 2013-14.

LSAMP % of Minority STEM B.S. Degrees Produced in 2013-14: 44% LSAMP % of Minority STEM B.S. Degrees Produced in 1994-95: 10%

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METRICS Increased STEM Faculty Engagement in the Broadening Participation Agenda: Since its inception, Philadelphia AMP has continued to increase the involvement of tenured STEM faculty, academic department heads, and senior administrative personnel in the implementation of the Philadelphia AMP which has positively impacted STEM departments and minority student retention at partner institutions. As noted in Figure 7, of the 494 persons currently involved in this initiative, 393 hold a faculty rank position of Professor (129 persons), Associate Professor (97 persons), or Assistant Professor (167 persons). This steady increase in participation has also attributed to the successful implementation of our post-baccalaureate LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate (Cohorts I-XII) programs. Figure 7: Philadelphia AMP Involvement of STEM Faculty by Rank Between 1994-95 and 2013-14.

In addition, the increased involvement of faculty in the research environment with students has also stimulated the following: 1) faculty becoming mentor-role models in environments that had non-ethnic parity, and 2) faculty that have gained a new appreciation for the capacity and capability of underrepresented students to perform at the top of the class. As a result of the later, faculty are actively engaged in the recruitment and matriculation process of underrepresented students to graduate study in STEM disciplines, as well as their retention. The latter, as well as additional NSF funding through the LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate program have greatly contributed to increases in the Alliance’s M.S. and Ph.D. minority STEM degree productivity as noted below in Figures 8 and 9. Figure 8: Comparison of Philadelphia AMP Minority STEM M.S. Degrees Awarded Between 1994-95 and 2013-14.

Change of 569%

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Figure 9: Comparison of Philadelphia AMP Minority STEM Ph.D. Degrees Awarded Between 1994-95 and 2013-14.

Change of 900%

Increased Post Baccalaureate Activity / LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate Program: Since 2003, the LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate (BTD) program funded by the National Science Foundation has played a major role in the embedding of the Philadelphia AMP philosophy at institutions and in the organization of complex strategies to support and sustain graduate students in completing the PhD. Between 2003-2015, one hundred and fifty-nine (159) students have been admitted into the program. BTD programs have been hosted by the following Philadelphia AMP institutions: University of Delaware (Cohorts I and IX), New Jersey Institute of Technology (Cohorts II and X), Drexel University (Cohorts III, VIII and XI), Delaware State University (Cohorts IV, VI, VII and XII), and Temple University (Cohort V). The grant provides a substantial fellowship for candidates and covers their tuition and the cost of education, including health benefits. Intrinsic in the BTD fellowship is the identification of the LSAMP candidates who possess the skills for and drive to succeed in doctoral study. Philadelphia AMP’s practice of utilizing the feedback it gains from its survey of BTD program participants, as well as from faculty research mentors and advisors, BTD Site Managers, and Central AMP personnel has allowed the Alliance to improve its BTD Cohort (I-XII) programs’ effectiveness over time. The utilization of the AMP model supplemented with the unique preparation for graduate education has proven to be very successful in our Alliance. In addition, with strong senior level administrative commitment and vision across the Alliance, Philadelphia AMP has leveraged the Bridge to the Doctorate awards with partner institutional funding, obtained funding from other federal programs (i.e. IGERT, GK-12 and GAANN awards), and assisted students with obtaining other graduate fellowships such as the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) to complete their doctoral study beyond their BTD program participation.

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METRICS To date, the following BTD students have received the distinguished honor of being GRFP award recipients: • Dr. David Delaine, Ph.D. Electrical Engineering, Drexel University, 2012; NSF GRPF Recipient 2007; Current Position: J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship to Brazil recipient, Polytechnical School at the University of Sau Paul in Brazil. • Dr. Jefferson Cuadra, Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering, Drexel University, 2015; NSF GRPF Recipient, 2012. Current Position: Postdoctoral Researcher at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. • David Diaz, Ph.D. Candidate, Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University; NSF GRPF Recipient, 2012. • Andrew McDonald, Ph.D. Candidate, Computer Science, Drexel University; NSF GRPF Recipient 2012. As noted in Figure 10 below, as of June 2015, one hundred and thirty-three (133) of the one hundred and fifty-nine (159) students (or 84%) from the BTD Cohorts I - XII programs persisted, and one hundred and eighteen students (or 88%) have committed to complete the PhD degree. Figure 10: Philadelphia LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate Productivity Rates and Commitment to Ph.D. Degree Attainment for Cohorts I-XII as of June 2015.

Of the students retained, eighty-three (83) students (or 63%) have been accepted into Ph.D. programs, fifty-two (52) students have already passed their Ph.D. qualifier examination, and twentythree (23) students have been awarded their Ph.D. degree and have moved on to professoriate, federal agency, and military appointments, respectively. Additional students are on track to complete their Ph.D. degree in the near future. Efforts are underway to transition additional students into Ph.D. programs. The BTD candidates exemplify the spirit of a new breed of technically competent and creative minority scientist and engineers who will lead the nation in cutting edge research. The Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP takes great pride in being the launch site for talent which will have a national, as well as an international impact on the scientific enterprise.

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Summary of Impact In short, the NSF LSAMP funding has resulted in the following impacts: • Enabled partner institutions to retain and graduate more underrepresented minority STEM students by substantially expanding their capabilities to develop and support STEM student talent, and to better identify potentially talented students; • Enhanced the institutional capability of partner institutions to boost STEM student productivity by providing a systematic, wider, and more targeted array of technical training, academic support and professional development programs; • Enhanced the integration of research and education through undergraduate student engagement in both national and international research; • Influenced changes in institutional culture by facilitating changes in faculty perception of underrepresented minority student capability through their program participation; and • Promoted community building amongst the underrepresented minority student STEM population through participation in supportive social networks. As a result, students: a) became advocates of change, b) participated in pre-college recruitment, and c) facilitated the development of professional / leadership skills workshops / seminars for other students, and d) established undergraduate and graduate clubs and organizations which have helped to fend off student isolation.

LSAMP alumni, Dr. Richard Able, Cheyney University, Dr. Samuel Laurencin, Drexel University and Amaryllis Gonzalez, Ph.D. Candidate, Temple University converse with current Alliance students after speaking as panelists of the “Men of Honor / Women of Distinction” session held during the annual Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP Research Symposium and Mentoring Conference.

DR. QUINCY BROWN Ph.D., Computer Science, Drexel University, 2009 Current Status: Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Bowie State University Quincy Brown presenting at a hearing for the PA House Education Committee Meeting for Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Education.

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ECONOMIC IMPACT During the last 20 years, there has been a significant attempt to improve the scientific and mathematics literacy of the Greater Philadelphia Region. Through the support of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and a sequence of initiatives that engaged the stakeholders in academia, industry, professional technical organizations and government agencies, a pipeline strategy was developed that would produce, in significant numbers, a new generation of technical talent to carry the nation into the next millennium. In order to create a population of scientific talent, it was necessary to identify the best practices and programs that would create a foundation for a pipeline mechanism that would not only develop prime talent, but sustain the growth and interest in STEM careers and add to the regional economic growth and development. In large urban centers in America there exists a significant portion of the population of students who are underrepresented in the technical disciplines, specifically African American, Hispanic and Native American students. Forty to sixty percent of the urban populations do not have either access to or opportunities to participate in technological experiences. As we started to shape a strategy, the major stakeholders were joined by teachers, parents and community organizations. Initially, the Comprehensive Regional Center for Minorities (CRCM) model, established with NSF funding, focused on engagement from kindergarten through to graduate school and professional careers. This strategy included simultaneously the introduction of STEM to students in grades K through 12 with teacher staff development in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and computer technology. The university community supported the staff development initiatives, and the corporate community provided role models and access which changed the scientific environment for both parents, teachers and families. This foundation pipeline integrated seamlessly into the LSAMP and the Bridge to the Doctorate Programs and has produced the impact that was anticipated in its initial stages of development. Once we had developed the pipeline strategy, the process of implementation began. With a sustained team of academicians, from senior university administrators to STEM faculty and support staff at each partner institution, we have produces B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. minority STEM scientists and engineers who are contributing to the economic wealth of the region. The Alliance’s midlevel and senior-level strategic plan is included in Figure 1 below. Figure 1: Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP Mid-Level and Senior-Level Strategic Plan (Recruitment, Retention, and Articulation)

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By calculating the earning potential of the Alliance’s minority B.S. STEM degree recipients at partner institutions, based on disciplines and time in-service, using the median salaries by STEM disciplines data obtained from the NSF’s National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics, National Survey of Recent College Graduates from 1994-2010, we were able to establish human capital income capacity over time which was calculated to be over $3.5 billion through June 2014.

$25.1 million in NSF Funding + LSAMP’s Mechanism + Corporate Mentoring < $3.5 billion in Human Capital Income Capacity Of the latter, the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP can take personal credit for $1.2 billion of the total $3.5 billion in human capital income capacity produced through the direct LSAMP services it provided to 3,820 of the Alliance’s total 10,141 B.S. STEM degree recipients through June 2014. Even more revealing are the minority STEM M.S. degree recipients and those who have completed their STEM Ph.D. have not been included in the calculation and would further enhance the income potential of the region. These recipients have become vested in the region and in many circumstances are in research academic fellowships or mainstream laboratories, private for-profit laboratories and employed in junior and senior faculty positions, regionally and nationally. Based on the NSF’s National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics, National Survey of Recent College Graduates from 1994-2010) which provides the median salary of full-time employed M.S. degree recipients by discipline, the human capital income capacity of the Alliance’s minority M.S. degree recipients is calculated to be over $1.2 billion. While our internal survey of the Alliance alums was based on a good statistical sampling the impact on the local economy has been much more dynamic and significantly enhanced by the NSF’s investment. Housing acquisitions, automobile purchases, growing families, and new entrepreneurial ventures that have produced new businesses in pharmaceutical, telecommunications, biomedical engineering devices, arial pathogen detection systems, and military surveillance products have made this region of the country a growing source of economic promise for the nation. The total impact of the this Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP effort has far greater impact on the region because of the return of these alums who are now influencing the minds and visions of a new generation of talented, technically advanced contributors to the national scientific enterprise.

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CHEYNEY UNIVERSITY DR. SAKKAR EVA

Professor and Chairperson Dept. of Science and Allied Health Director, Center for Biotechnology and Applied Sciences Cheyney University of Pennsylvania Office: (610) 399-2349 or 2019 Fax: (610) 399-2076 seva@cheyney.edu

Impact Statement Established in 1837, Cheyney University of Pennsylvania cherishes its legacy as one of America’s oldest Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Its mission is to prepare confident, competent, reflective, visionary leaders and responsible citizens. The University upholds its tradition of academic excellence as it maintains its historical commitment to opportunity and access for students of diverse backgrounds. The institution offers baccalaureate degrees in more than 30 disciplines and the master’s degree in education. Cheyney University continues to be a valuable resource, contributing to the intellectual, social, economic and cultural development of the Greater Philadelphia region, the Delaware Valley, and beyond. During the last 20 years, Dr. Sakkar Eva has been the link to the scientific innovation occurring at Cheyney University. Her background in Physics and vision in understanding the fundamentals to strengthen the growth of underrepresented students in the sciences and engineering have led to many changes in the landscape of the university. Under her leadership, the LSAMP program has served as a critical change agent for Cheyney University on several fronts, with the support of the former current presidents, Dr. George Covington and Dr. Michelle Howard Vital, current president, Dr. Frank G. Pogue, former and current deans, School of Arts and Sciences, Dr. Bernadette Carter, and Dr. Donna Parker, Natural and Applied Sciences. Firstly, the LSAMP funding provided direct support to attract students to STEM programs, retain and progress STEM students toward graduation, and advance them toward graduate study. The Cheyney LSAMP project funded book awards, peer tutors, technology integration into STEM course curriculum, tuition assistance, research training, and travel to professional conferences. Secondly, the Cheyney LSAMP program helped preserve most of the university’s STEM programs that are intrinsically expensive and therefore were seen as a burden in the small HBCU and state institution. One of the main impacts of LSAMP at Cheyney University, where STEM constituency is very small, is that its continual support has upheld the importance of STEM education in the university community. As a result, strengthening STEM programs remained one of the priorities in the strategic plan of the University for the last six years. Thirdly, the LSAMP program helped the University gain significant momentum over the last twenty years in building relationships with other institutions, as well as seeking external funding to expand and enhance its STEM programs. The development of collaborations with LSAMP partner institutions in the areas of Environmental Science, Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Radio Chemistry, Nanotechnology and science education, have increased the opportunities of students and faculty to expand the University’s scientific profile. Through research fellowships at national laboratories (Brookhaven and Los Alamos, etc.), as well as the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Woods Hole

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Oceanography Institute, University of Delaware, Boston University, Drexel University, and University of Pennsylvania, young scientist have also been able to identify how they can contribute and influence their communities and the world. In addition, among the fourteen universities in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, Cheyney University, which is the smallest institution in the system, is ranked second in external grant acquisition. The University has also synergistically leveraged LSAMP with its other NSF awards to recruit, retain, train, and graduate underrepresented minority students, and strengthen faculty teaching and research activities, in particular, its Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate (HBCU-UP) Program grant.

Dr. Eva is accompanied by her undergraduate and graduate students that she has supported from B.S., M.S. and through to Ph.D. achievement.

Simone Waters and Nicole Jackson (right) conduct research.

DR. RICHARD ABLE JR. is a dedicated and persistent individual who

has proven to be passionate about the advancement of science. A native of Philadelphia, PA, Dr. Able graduated with a B.A. in Biology from Cheyney University of Pennsylvania in 2004. Integrative in his approach toward problem solving, Dr. Able recognized early on the importance of acquiring the skill sets of various disciplines. During the summer of 2003, he was certified in Nanofabrication Manufacturing Technology through the Engineering Department of Pennsylvania (Penn) State University. The knowledge acquired at Penn State qualified him to accept a NASA funded research position, which led to the design and utilization of a nanotechnology laboratory at Cheyney. After graduating from Cheyney in 2004, Dr. Able was selected as a NASA-NAFEO Ames Academy Scholar under the supervision of Dr. R.H. Rubin. The focus of his research involved the investigation of spacecraft obtained astrophysical data and contributed to one of NASA’s primary goals: “Determining the Origins of Life”. Dr. Able successfully defended his graduate research work entitled “Real-time measurement of glial progenitor chemotactic migration,” under Dr. Maribel Vazquez, Department of Biomedical Engineering, City College of New York, and received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry in February 2012. Dr. Able has been employed by Genzyme since 2012 and currently holds the position of Associate Medical Director, U.S. Medical Affairs.

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COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA DR. LINDA POWELL

Professor and Department Head, Biology 1700 Spring Garden Street Room W2-7C Philadelphia, PA 19130 Office: (215) 751-8242 or 8554 Fax: (215) 751-8937 lpowell@ccp.edu

Impact Statement Community College of Philadelphia (CCP) is an open-admission, associate-degree-granting institution that provides access to higher education for all who may benefit. Programs of study in the liberal arts and sciences, career technologies and basic academic skills provide a coherent foundation for college transfer, employment and lifelong learning. The College serves Philadelphia by preparing students from a wide range of ages and backgrounds to be informed and concerned citizens, to be active participants in the cultural life of the city, and to be able to meet the changing needs of business, industry and the professions. Founded in 1964, with an enrollment of over 31,000 students, CCP is the largest institution of higher education in the city of Philadelphia and the sixth largest in the state of Pennsylvania. CCP is also the single largest point of entry into higher education for minorities in Pennsylvania, and approximately 75% of its students are minorities. Dr. Linda Powell is the Co-PI and Project Director for the LSAMP initiative at Community College of Philadelphia. After an extraordinary career in medicine, Dr. Powell decided to bring her talents to the classroom, and for the last 20 years has been the driving force for the LSAMP initiative on CCP’s campus with the support of the former President, Dr. Stephen Curtis, current President, Dr. Donald Generals, Vice President for Student Affairs, Dr. Samuel Hirsch, and the Dean, Division of Mathematics Science, and Health Careers, Dr. Maryanne Celenza. Through the CCP LSAMP program students receive mentoring, academic counseling, career advising, and financial support, as well as engage in undergraduate research activities at national laboratories, research institutes, and Research-One institutions. Dr. Powell, who is a brilliant scientist, also encourages students to participate in minority professional organizations, as well as leadership activities. Through her mentorship, which continues beyond student matriculation at CCP, Dr. Powell has supported LSAMP students’ movement from 2-year to 4-year institutions, as well as to B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. STEM degree completion. In addition, many of her former students are also working in local scientific laboratories, hospitals and pharmacies. In addition, under Dr. Powell’s leadership, the CCP LSAMP program has accomplished the following: • Served 2,000+ minority STEM students by leveraging LSAMP funds with Raising Interest in STEM Education (RISE) and Predominately Black Institution (PBI) grants from the US Department of Education which provide support for speakers, academic research, and faculty-led workshops, and awarded more than 800 book stipends to date. • Established AMP supplemental instruction classes for gatekeeper courses from 1995-2001 in Biology, Chemistry and Physics. • Moved 6 CCP AMP students to graduate study; three students have received their Ph.D. degree and have moved to industry, educational research, and a postdoctoral appointment, respectively; two students additional students are currently enrolled in doctoral programs, and one has been awarded an M.S. degree.

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• Two LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate students are currently employed in the CCP’s Biology department, and one has moved into a tenure track position in CCP’s Foundations of Mathematics department.

Alumni Achieving Educational Goals with AMP DR. STEVEN JONES

• Attended, Community College of Philadelphia, 1994-1996 • B.A., Psychology / Neuroscience, Temple University, 2001 • Ph.D. Neuroscience, Drexel University, 2011 • LSAMP Bridge to Doctorate Fellowship Recipient Current Status: Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Pennsylvania, Dept. of Biology

MARCELLA STOKES

• Seven years of distinguished military service during war and peacetime • A.S., Engineering Science, Community College of Philadelphia, 2004 • B.S., Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, 2008 Current Status: Technical Manager / Mechanical Engineer, General Services Administration

DR. ANDRO-MARC PIERRE-LOUIS completed

an A.S. degree in Computer Science in 2004 from Community College of Philadelphia (CCP), and a B.S. degree in Chemistry from Temple University in 2007. He entered the LSAMP program at CCP in 2002 and continued his involvement throughout his undergraduate and post baccalaureate years. Through participation in the LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate Cohort V program, Andro-Marc was able to transition to graduate study as a doctoral student in Chemistry at Temple University and conducted research on “Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) with Theory and Applications of the Technique.” In 2014, Andro-Marc was awarded a Ph.D. degree in Analytical and Physical Chemistry for his “Studies of the Surface Reactivity of Metal Oxyhydroxides and Sulfides with Relevance to Environmental Chemistry.” Prior to obtaining his current position as an R&D Chemist at W. R. Grace & Company, he was also employed as an Assistant Laboratory Manager at CCP and provided mentoring support and technical laboratory training to LSAMP chemistry and biology students.

DR. YOLANDA WILLIAMS-BEY is a molecular biologist with a dedicated commitment to

improving the quality of health in this country and the world. She entered Community College of Philadelphia and became an LSAMP academic scholar, earning honors until transferring to Cheyney University of Pennsylvania in 2001. During this period, Yolanda was working part-time and participated in the astronomy club, the Student National Medical Association, the National Organization for Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers, and also managed to be involved in sports as captain of the basketball team. She completed her undergraduate studies in three years at Cheyney University of Pennsylvania, earning a B.A. in Biology as an LSAMP scholar, and was accepted to Drexel University as a Bridge to the Doctorate (Cohort III) Fellow as a doctoral student in Biology. In 2010, she was awarded a Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from Drexel University. Her dissertation illuminated “The Effect of Regulatory T cells on an Age-altered Specific CD8 T Cell response following Influenza Infection”. Several studies have demonstrated that both aged mice and humans have a reduced CD8 T cell response due to influenza infection. Further, it had been demonstrated that these alterations result from both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Dr. Williams Bey’s hypothesis focused on the major contribution to the extrinsic changes that T cell responses in aged mice could be influenced by Treg cells. Subsequently, she was awarded an Intramural Research Training Award (IRTA) and continued conducting research as a Postdoctoral Associate, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the National Institute of Health until July 2014, and was also employed as an Adjunct Assistant Professor, Biology at Northern Virginia Community College and served as Co-Chair of Postdoc Teaching Fellows Committee of the Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences (FAES). As of October 2014, Dr. Williams-Bey has been employed as the Education Program Manager, Delaware EPSCoR, Delaware Environmental Institute at the University of Delaware.

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COMMUNITY COLLEGE CONNECTIVITY The Alliance has continued its support of Community College students by accomplishing the following: • Leveraged LSAMP funds to establish partnerships with other entities and programs to bolster Community College of Philadelphia (CCP)’s ability to provide research opportunities for students and to increase access to STEM education: Brookhaven National Laboratories, Monell Chemical Science Center, Wistar Institute, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, University of Delaware, Drexel University, Temple University, National Institute of Health’s Bridges to the Baccalaureate, William Penn Foundation EMC2 program, and National Science Foundation’s Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation. As an example, since October 2013, Philadelphia AMP has collaborated with CCP’s U.S. Department of Education Minority Science & Engineering Improvement Program (MSEIP) grant entitled “Raising Interest in STEM Education (RISE). The RISE program works synergistically with the AMP program to more readily move and academically prepare the developmental and pre-major students at CCP to critical juncture (AMP eligible) status, and provides services to sixty (60) students per year. Through the RISE program, Drexel University provides undergraduate research experiences and academic counseling to CCP students prior to their transition to AMP partner institutions. Philadelphia AMP provides peer mentorship to critical juncture students upon their matriculation to 4–year partner institutions, as well as continues tutorial support beyond their participation in the RISE program. Between June 1 – August, 31, 2015, seven (7) of the eight (8) RISE students will conduct summer research at Drexel University. • Held six Philadelphia AMP STEM Transfer Fairs between 2010 – 2015. During the events, students had direct access to admission’s officers and AMP STEM faculty and administrators from partner institutions to help them more readily navigate the matriculation process and transition into the AMP programs at 4-year and 5-year partner institutions upon transfer. The fairs were held on CCP’s campus, and over one hundred students annually have attended the events. • Provided tutoring support for students enrolled in the following upper division classes of CCP’s Engineering Science curriculum: Dynamics, Calculus III, Statics and Physics. Tutorial staff was provided by Drexel University. • Supported STEM career awareness activities: Historically, University of Pennsylvania (Penn) provided CCP with speakers for its Science Speakers Series from its alumni which have included Mr. Charles Wardlaw, Vice President, U.S. Fuels Chain Procurement, BP Oil and Dr. Jonathan Essoka, Environmental Scientist, Environmental Protection Agency came to CCP and talked to students about their career paths and the employment trends in their industries. Other Alliance partners and Bridge to the Doctorate alumni have also supported this activity.

Dr. Linda Powell, CCP shares a moment with her students who are conducting research at the Philadelphia AMP Research Symposium.

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Community College Transfer Fair

CCP RISE Summer Research Program at Drexel University

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DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY DR. MAZEN SHAHIN

Professor, Department of Mathematical Sciences Director of LSAMP, HBCU-UP, and Bridge to the Doctorate (BTD) Projects 1200 N. Dupont Highway Dover, DE 19901 Office: (302) 857-7055 Fax: (302) 857-7050 mshahin@desu.edu

Delaware State University (DSU) has a long and proud history as one of America’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Founded in 1891 as the State College for Colored Students, DSU takes pride in its heritage as one of the country’s first land-grant educational institutions, rooted early on in agriculture and education. DSU’s focus on cutting-edge research, technology and business practices have brought the University into modernity and made it a member of the scientific, solution-seeking community. Today, it remains well in the vanguard of other four-year institutions throughout the region and country. The University offers 52 undergraduate, 25 Master’s, and 5 doctoral degree programs which includes an interdisciplinary Ph.D. program in applied mathematics and mathematical physics, optics, neuroscience, and applied chemistry. DSU currently serves as a welcome center for learning for people from many cultural backgrounds who speak several different languages and dialects. Dr. Mazen Shahin, Professor of Mathematics is the DSU LSAMP Project Director and also directs several other externallyfunded, student-centered funded projects including the LSAMP Bridge to Doctorate (BTD) program, the HBCU-UP program “Changing the Equation for Science and Mathematics Learning”, and “Technology Academy for Residence Scholars” (STARS). The LSAMP program has had a very positive impact on DSU STEM undergraduate and graduate programs. Since 2003, DSU has obtained substantial external funds for several STEM projects. The DSU LSAMP Director, Dr. Shahin, has also served as the Director of the NSF-funded HBCU-UP projects “Seeds of Success …,” 2003-2009, and “Science and Mathematics Initiative for Learning Enrichment (SMILE),” 2009-2015, and currently, “Changing the Equation for Science and Mathematics Learning”, 2015 to the present. Under his leadership, DSU integrated all LSAMP and HBCUUP activities and provided funds and space to establish a Science Resource Center which has become the main support center for all STEM students. In addition, over the past five years (2011-2015), through the leveraging of LSAMP funds with funding from the Office of International Trade and Development, forty-night (49) DSU AMP students have also been afforded the opportunity to participate in the one summer month International Research Experience in China. In short, the LSAMP activities and strategies have helped to increase the University’s retention and graduation rates of underrepresented STEM students, and move them to graduate school matriculation. The integrated activities for STEM undergraduates include the following programs: summer training camp for incoming freshmen, peer mentoring, learning communities, mathematics workshops in the gatekeeper mathematics courses, undergraduate research, and workshop/seminar series, graduate preparation activities, and travel to regional/national conferences and professional meetings. It is worth noting that the mathematics workshops utilized the Peer Led Teal Learning (PLTL) approach and materials were developed by the Math Forum at Drexel University. In addition, the Learning Communities offered integrated mathematics and English courses for STEM students.

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The LSAMP program also greatly impacted the quality and quantity of STEM graduate education at DSU. Through its Bridge to the Doctorate (BTD) Cohort IV, VI, VII, and XII funding, it helped the institution successfully grow its graduate STEM programs, as well as increase its research capacity. With the inclusion of BTD Cohort XII, BTD fellows represented more than 50% of the graduate students in some departments such as Biology and Chemistry. The workshops/seminars and mentoring programs developed for BTD participants have also become the models for STEM graduate programs. The stronger STEM graduate programs and increased importance of research at DSU helped set the stage for the introduction of a Neuroscience PhD program at DSU. The program produced its first three graduates in 2015, and two of the graduates were African-American. In addition, partnerships in the LSAMP program helped support development of the NIH-supported Delaware Center for Neuroscience Research. The goal of the Center is to create infrastructure to support the research and career development of neuroscientists at Delaware State University and the University of Delaware.

DR. TIARA TURNER states that “The AMP program has enabled me to have a

rewarding career as an Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. As an undergraduate AMP student at University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES) I had my first experience conducting research in the Undergraduates Delaware Research Experience in Applied Mathematics (U-DREAM) program at Delaware State University, where I developed a true desire to pursue a terminating degree. Upon graduating with a bachelor’s degree in Mathematics from the UMES, I was accepted into the Bridge to the Doctorate Program at Delaware State University. Thanks to the support I received from the Bridge to the Doctorate Program, I was able to obtain my master’s degree and doctoral degree in Applied Mathematics from Delaware State University.”

DR. DENZIL ROBERTS is a Senior Process Technology Development Engineer at

Intel Corporation. He began his educational career at DSU with a B.S. degree in Physics and Pre-Engineering in 2003, and M.S. degree in Physics in 2005. He served as an LSAMP tutor while an undergraduate at DSU for Algebra, Calculus and Physics I & II, as well as an a mentor during the HBCU-UP Summer Programs. Dr. Roberts received his Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Missouri-Columbia. His efforts as a research assistant helped develop two state of the art fully functional laboratories dedicated to III-V semiconductor device design and material science thin film growth via molecular beam epitaxy. Aside from Research while at Mizzou, he was granted a teaching fellow and taught full semester courses in Electrical and Computer Engineering. Dr. Roberts also currently serves as a manager for a Network of Intel African Americans while continuing efforts in community leadership and mentorship.

RACHELL GARNER has fond memories of DSU because of her involvement in the

LSAMP and SMILE (The Science and Math Initiative for Learning Enrichment) Programs. In Fall 2010, she was a member of the first SMILE Peer Lead Team Learning Team. She served as a Peer Leader for the College Algebra and Trigonometry workshops, and underwent extensive preparation, including online training with Drexel University, as well as training in New York, her home state. In Summer 2011, Rachell participated in the LSAMP International Research Experience in China. Rachell graduated Cum Laude from Delaware State University with a B.S. in Mathematics in Fall 2012. In December 2015, she will graduate with a Master of Actuarial Science from Georgia State University.

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DREXEL UNIVERSITY MS. MARISOL RODRIGUEZ MERGENTHAL Director, Drexel LSAMP 3210 Chestnut Street 050 Creese Student Center Philadelphia, PA 19104 Office: (215) 895-1641 Fax: (215) 895-1321 mr444@drexel.edu

Impact Statement Founded in 1891 in Philadelphia, Drexel is a top-ranked, comprehensive university recognized for its focus on experiential learning through co-operative education, its commitment to cutting-edge academic technology and its growing enterprise of use-inspired research. With approximately 25,000 students, Drexel is the nation’s 15th largest private university, ranked third among national universities in the most recent U.S. News & World Report list of “Up-and-Comers,” and is a leader in creating technological solutions to societal problems of the 21st century. The University’s research enterprise has increased expenditures for sponsored projects from $15M in 1996 to approximately $110M today. With its focus on “use-inspired” research, the University is poised to respond to novel opportunities for research, scholarship, and technological development. Dr. Constantine Papadakis, former President, Drexel University and Chairman, Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP, led the Alliance through unprecedented STEM growth in its minority STEM degree productivity from 1996 – 2009, with the support of the Alliance partners and LSAMP central management personnel. The Drexel LSAMP program was initially administered by the former Director, SUCCESS program, Dr. Stephen Jones, and former Director of the Drexel Center for Learning and Academic Excellence (DCLAE), Ms. Sheila Graves. Since 2006, Ms. Marisol Rodriguez Mergenthal, has continued and expanded upon the LSAMP legacy created by her predecessors through her industry experience and knowledge gained from advising, mentoring, and tutoring students in meeting the rigors of STEM curricula and courses as former Director, Drexel Learning Center. Under her leadership, the Drexel LSAMP program partners with student groups, community-based organizations as well as University departments to: (1) promote academic excellence for undergraduates, (2) link students to scholarship and other funding opportunities, (3) identify professional development opportunities/internships (both research and non-research) and (4) encourage students to pursue advanced degrees. The Drexel LSAMP program provides students with access to activities that foster a sense of academic and social responsibility, personal accountability and professional growth which include: a pre-freshmen bridge program, academic coaching and counseling, supplemental instruction in mathematics and physics, faculty and peer student mentoring, undergraduate research, graduate school preparation, professional development seminars and workshops, social and cultural activities and financial counseling. By immersing the students into spheres of activities and behaviors that encourage academic excellence for undergraduates, linking them to scholarship and other funding opportunities, preparation for internships and research experiences, and pursuit of advanced degrees, the LSAMP program has helped to change the scientific culture for underrepresented minority students at Drexel and make it the type of environment where they can achieve success. With the support of President John Fry, the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, Dr. M. Brian Blake, the former Provosts, Dr. Mark Greenberg and Dr. James Herbert, current

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Dean of the Graduate College, the Senior Vice Provost, Academic Affairs, Dr. N. John DiNardo, Drexel University, and the Associate Dean of Students, Dr. Rebecca Weidensaul continues to build on its record of success that has resulted from its institutional commitment to diversify through the LSAMP, as well as other NSF-funded programs. The LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate Program (BTD) has catalyzed Drexel Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to increase diversity in STEM at the graduate level and has informed new practices in undergraduate research and minority inclusion in cuttingedge research engagement. As of June 2015, of the 40 fellows enrolled in the BTD Cohorts III (2005), VIII (2010) and XI (2013) programs, thirty-five (35) fellows or 88% have been retained. Of the thirty-five fellows remaining, thirty-two (32) fellows have completed M.S. degrees or equivalent and thirty-one (31) fellows have enrolled in Ph.D. programs; of the latter, twenty (20) fellows have already passed their Ph.D. qualifying examination, and eleven (11) fellows have completed their doctoral degree with generous funding from Drexel University as well as agencies such as the NSF, NIH, DoE among others. To date, four Drexel BTD fellows have received NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) awards. Moreover, additional growth also occurred at the graduate level as a result of grant-funding partnerships with entities such as the Educational Advancement Alliance which administered the National Minority STEM Fellowship funded by the US Department of Energy and the HBCU STEM Fellowship funded by the National Nuclear Security Agency.

DR. QUINCY BROWN

DR. NON YOK

Current Status: Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Bowie State University AAAS Science and Policy Fellowship Recipient

Current Status: Project Manager, SUDD Petroleum Operating Co. LTD

Ph.D., Computer Science, Drexel University, 2012 Bridge to the Doctorate Fellowship Recipient

DR. MANUEL FIGUEROA Ph.D., Bioengineering and Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University, 2012 Bridge to the Doctorate Fellowship Recipient NSF GK-12 Fellowship Recipient

Ph.D. Electrical Engineering, Drexel University 2011 Bridge to the Doctorate Fellowship Recipient B.S., Electrical Engineering, Drexel University

PAUL LACHAUD

B.S., Mechanical Engineering, 2015, Drexel University Current Status: Combuster Design Engineer, GE Aviation

Current Status: Assistant Professor, School of Engineering, The College of New Jersey

DR. ANGEL LUCENA

Ph.D., Biological Sciences / Neuroscience, Drexel University, 2011 Bridge to the Doctorate Fellowship Recipient B.S., Biology, Drexel University Current Status: Clinical Operations Analyst, Department of Behavioral Health and Development Services

AJA CARTER

B.S. Biology with Paleontology Specialization, Minor in Spanish, Drexel University Current Status: Ph.D. Candidate, Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania

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LINCOLN UNIVERSITY DR. ROBERT LANGLEY

Professor, Chemistry & Physics College of Science and Technology 1570 Old Baltimore Pike Lincoln University, PA 19352 Office: (484) 365-8074 Fax: (610) 932-1054 or 1883 langley@lincoln.edu

Impact Statement Founded in 1854, Lincoln University of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is a nationally acclaimed institution of higher learning that provides the best elements of a liberal arts and sciences-based undergraduate core curriculum and selected graduate programs to meet the needs of students living in a highly technological and global society. Lincoln University was one of the charter members of the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP. As one of the three HBCUs in the Alliance, Lincoln University has a vested interest in preparing and developing talented STEM majors capable of succeeding in graduate school. The LSAMP program has had a tremendous impact in this endeavor. Dr. Robert Langley has guided the LSAMP program at Lincoln University for many years. Supporters have included former presidents, Dr. Ivory Nelson and Dr. Robert Jennings, current President, Dr. Richard Green, Dr. Derrick Swinton, Dean College of Science and Technology, and Professor, Chemistry, Dr. Suligrama Subbarao, former Chair of Chemistry, and later Vice President of Academic Affairs, Dr. Willie Williams, Professor, Physicist and former Chair of the Department of Physics, Dr. Amar S. Tung, Associate Professor, Chemistry, and Dr. Monica Gray, Assistant Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering. Historically, the University was very instrumental in the development of Alliance-wide criteria for inspiring students to pursue and excel in science, engineering, mathematics and technology (STEM). As a result of Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s successful tradition of providing inspiration for African American students through pre-college and pre-freshman bridge activities, continual interaction with minority professional scientist and engineers, and exposure to research experiences, these program components were instituted as normal Alliance practice. In the early years, the LSAMP program assisted in providing the financial resources needed for STEM majors to succeed at Lincoln. In collaboration with the NASA-funded LASER (Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Advanced Science & Engineering Reinforcement) program, the LSAMP program provided students with stipends, book supplies, and merit-based fellowships. Through the LASER program, students participated in a 10-week summer pre-freshman bridge program which provided Calculus, Physics, English and Computer Science preparation for which they received college credit, and were given general academic counseling and advising. Through both programs students were able to access research opportunities on campus and at the national laboratories, NASA, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense and other federal agencies. The second phase of the Lincoln LSAMP program is equally important, student graduation from Lincoln and successful entry into graduate programs leading to a STEM Ph.D. and related degrees. In this aspect, LSAMP has been extremely successful. Over 50% of the students from the Physics and Chemistry departments have attended graduate or professional school as a result of support from the LSAMP program. Many are proudly continuing the legacy induced by the spirit of the LSAMP program. These two departments are among the top producers of minority

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Chemistry and Physics majors in the State of Pennsylvania, thereby making LSAMP an integral part of the institution. As the Alliance has matured, the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP and Lincoln University have adjusted to provide even better opportunities for STEM students. Historically, Dr. Langley, with the support of Dr. Chikwem and Dr. Swinton, have created new opportunities to support the LSAMP mission through synergistic collaboration with other NSF-funded initiatives, in particular, its HBCU-UP and Lincoln’s Excellent Academic Program (LEAPS) grants, as well as the expansion of its various STEM research-based initiatives. Most recently, with LSAMP funding and the support of Dr. Gray, five Lincoln LSAMP students were able to conduct research in The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago from June 27-July 12, 2015. Students were initially introduced to environmental and conservation concepts through a series of field visits and lectures here in the US. The Study Abroad research component consisted of an intensive 14‐day research experience at The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine campus which was designed as the second phase of Lincoln University’s 6 credit comparative research course in natural resource management.

RENE OATS

B.S., Physics, Lincoln University M.S., Civil Engineering, Temple University Current Status: Ph.D. Candidate, Structural Engineering, Michigan Technological University

NANDIMA KOROMA

B.S., Mathematics / Math Education, Lincoln University M.S., Applied Mathematics, Delaware State University LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate Cohort VI Recipient Current Status: Adjunct Instructor, Foundational Mathematics, Community College of Philadelphia

DR. KRYSTAUFEUX WILLIAMS

B.S., Physics, Lincoln University B.S., Mechanical Engineering, Drexel University M.S., Materials Science, Pennsylvania State University Ph.D., Materials Science, Pennsylvania State University

DR. JAMES ARTHUR COOPER, JR. Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute B.S., Biology, Lincoln University Ph.D., Biomedical Science, Drexel University

“The AMP program has shaped my career by providing funding to programs which have given me the time and attention to develop my maturity as a scientific researcher. I first came into contact with an AMP funded program at Lincoln University, PA which showed me the attention and devotion I would have to place on my studies in order to succeed. Since then, whenever I have had hard and stressful times in my studies or my research, I look back on the AMP programs which have influenced my career path and become motivated to succeed. I am thankful that I was a part of the AMP program and hope to continue to contribute to its legacy in helping minorities achieve their academic goals.”

Current Status: Materials Engineer, Center for Corrosion Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory

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NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MR. LAURENCE HOWELL

Executive Director Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) University Heights Campbell Hall, 3rd Floor 110 Summit Street Newark, NJ 07102 Office: (973) 596-3690 or 3686 Fax: (973) 596-6490 howell@adm.njit.edu

Impact Statement Founded in 1881, the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) is New Jersey’s science and technology university. NJIT offers 92 undergraduate and graduate degree programs in six specialized schools instructed by expert faculty, 98 percent of whom hold the highest degree in their field. Since the mid 1970s, NJIT has become home to nearly 50 laboratories, centers, and business incubators, resulting in hundreds of breakthroughs such as new methods for producing carbon nanotubes, techniques for monitoring the earth’s climate using measurements of earthshine, approaches to use membrane separation technology to desalinate water and algorithms for wireless telecommunications and signal processing. Research funding has surged to more than $75 million, and promises to keep rising. Since 1997, under the leadership of Mr. Laurence “Tony” Howell, and support from Dr. Joel Bloom, former Vice President of Academic Affairs and current Interim President, and Dr. Robert A. Altenkirch, former President, the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP program has made substantial contributions to NJIT’s STEM culture. Managed in concert with the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) funded through the U.S. Department of Education, the LSAMP program helped NJIT to expand its academic support and monitoring of students eligible to participate in both programs, namely, firstgeneration and low-income minority STEM students, and most recently, community college transfer students. In addition, the LSAMP program assisted NJIT in expanding the financial assistance to students, specifically to upper-level minority students who needed additional finances to: 1) pay down university bills that prevent continuation of education, 2) allow students to take critical classes to progress to graduation, and 3) establish a process in which upper-level students received more assistance than lower-level students in order to increase the retention-to-graduation rate of minority STEM students. The LSAMP program also helped NJIT expand the opportunity for faculty and students to conduct research at national facilities such as the Brookhaven National Laboratory through NSF’s collaborative agreement with the Department of Energy (DoE). In collaboration with NJIT’s Ronald E. McNair Scholars Program funded through the U.S. Department of Education, the LSAMP program has also facilitated students’ increased participation in STEM conferences. The LSAMP has also enhanced NJIT’s partnerships with feeder county colleges. Although NJIT has long had standing collaborations / transfer agreements and joint academic programs with all 21 New Jersey county colleges, the LSAMP program enhanced those relationships by facilitating additional articulation programs for minority STEM students that streamlined the transfer process while connecting students with professional organizations like the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) and the Society of Women Engineers (SWE). The LSAMP program has also contributed to the increase and retention of NJIT’s minority STEM graduate student population through its hosting of the LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate Cohort II program.

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Because of NJIT’s relationship with LSAMP, the NSF funds were strategically integrated into and, actually expanded, the institution’s desire to increase the number of minority STEM students and eventually, graduates from NJIT. NJIT has won national acclaim (21st in the nation) for graduating large numbers of STEM minority engineering students (Diverse Magazine, 2010). That standing would not have been possible without the financial and programmatic assistance from the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP program.

DR. SHIVON BOODHOO

Director of Special Programs at the Albert Dorman Honors College Bridge to the Doctorate (Cohort II) Fellowship Recipient Dr. Shivon Boodhoo received her B.S. degree in Industrial Engineering from NJIT. As a participant of the LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate (Cohort II) program, she was able to attain an M.S. degree in Industrial Engineering / Engineering Management also from NJIT. After a few years in the pharmaceutical industry, Shivon returned to NJIT and obtained a PhD in Industrial Engineering and now works as the Director of Special Programs at the Albert Dorman Honors College, NJIT. As she reflected, Dr. Boodhoo stated: “As a first generation in college, minority, immigrant, female engineer, I am exceedingly grateful to the NJIT Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) and for its years of support and ‘family’ atmosphere that supported and nurtured my interest in STEM. The LSAMP Program, in particular, has been pivotal in my development as a professional. The Bridge to the Doctorate program facilitated my Master’s degree and in so doing, eased the financial burden of a graduate degree, which was a major barrier to entry into graduate work because of my family’s financial realities. The program also revealed to me to the joys research. The coaching and exposure to graduate work that I received during the program laid the groundwork for my later application to and completion of my engineering doctoral degree. Today, as a Director of the Honors College, I work hard to “pay forward” the benefits that I received from the program. I tirelessly encourage other minority students to persevere in their undergraduate studies and to go on to pursue graduate education, apply for and win National Fellowships.”

DAVID DIAZ

Ph.D. Candidate, Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University Just before his freshman year in high school, David Diaz’s family left their homeland, the Dominican Republic, for America. When he entered Perth Amboy High School, David had to master both English and American culture – two major obstacles. He worked hard to overcome those obstacles and was soon excelling in math and science, his two favorite subjects. During his senior year in high school, David got lucky. During a college career fair at his school, Perth Amboy High, he met Carlomanga Ontanada, the recruiter for NJIT’s Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) who saw his potential and recruited him to NJIT. EOP helps minority students from humble economic backgrounds attend college. David’s father works two bluecollar jobs, and his mother works as a clerk in a curtain factory. They came to America so that David and his three siblings could attend American schools, get good jobs and live better lives. Through EOP, David was subsequently recruited into the LSAMP program. David has taken full advantage of the opportunities offered to him. At NJIT, he did so well academically that he transferred into the Honors College. He served as vice-president of Students Affairs for the Student Senate at NJIT, as well as vicepresident of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers. During his freshman year, he was also inducted into the Phi Eta Sigma Honor Society. Upon graduation, David was selected for participation in the LSAMP Bridge to Doctorate (Cohort VIII) Program fellowship (2010-2012) at Drexel University, to pursue a Ph.D. degree in Biomedical Engineering. He later received the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Program Fellowship (GRPF) award (2012-2015) to continue his doctoral studies. He is also the Founder and President of the Latino Interdisciplinary Graduate Association (LIGA) at Drexel (2010-Present). Currently, David is working in Drexel’s Optics Lab on developing non-invasive technologies for skin characterization and correlation of spectroscopic and imaging information to skin chemistry, specifically, on the construction, testing, and development of near infrared spectroscopy devices for the characterization of wounds and assessment of healing. The non-invasive devices emerging from his laboratory aims to aid in the assessment of wound healing, helping to reduce treatment time and cost of care. He is expected to graduate in 2016.

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TEMPLE UNIVERSITY DR. SUSAN JANSEN VARNUM Associate Dean for Science Education & Professor of Chemistry Gladfelter Hall Room 628 (025-28) 1115 W. Berks St., Phila., PA 19122 suebee@temple.edu Office: (215) 204-4073 Fax: (215) 204-2654

MS. TIFFANY GILLES, M.ED.

Science Education Programs Manager Gladfelter Hall Room 628 (025-28) 1115 W. Berks St., Phila., PA 19122 tgilles@temple.edu Office: (215) 204-3379 Fax: (215) 204-2654

PROFESSOR KATHLEEN MCKINLEY

TUteach Mathematics Master Teacher Gladfelter Hall Room 631 (025-28) 1115 W. Berks St., Phila., PA 19122 Kathleen.mc.kinley@temple.edu Office: (215) 204-9252 Fax: (215) 204-2654

Impact Statement Temple College, founded in 1884 by Dr. Russell Conwell, became Temple University in 1907 and has evolved into a comprehensive urban research and academic institution. With more than 300 academic programs, the institution offers something for everyone â&#x20AC;&#x201C; rigorous courses, innovative research opportunities, outlets for creative expression and much more. Temple University has the distinction of being the lead institution of the Greater Philadelphia Region Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation at the inception of the initiative. With extraordinary leadership from Dr. James England, former Provost, programmatic support from Dr. Antonio Goncalves, Professor of Chemistry and former Associate Vice Provost for Science and Technology, and Dr. Allan Thomas, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, we launched the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP initiative which over 20 years later is still having a major impact on the region. The LSAMP program at Temple provided academic advising, a pre-freshmen bridge program, tutoring, faculty and peer student mentoring, learning communities, undergraduate research, preservice teacher preparation, and supplemental instruction in gatekeeper courses. In the Summer of 1997, the LSAMP also supported the development of COW (Calculus on the Web), an internet utility for learning and practicing calculus which was designed at Temple by two members of the Temple University Mathematics Department, Gerardo Mendoza and Dan Reich. COW is still operational today. Through the years, the Temple LSAMP program continued to thrive under the guidance of Dr. Bruce Conrad, Professor of Mathematics and former Senior Associate Dean for the College of Science and Technology Dr. Douglas Baird, former Assistant Dean for Science Education & Special Projects for the College of Science and Technology, Dr. Jamie Bracey, Director of STEM Education, Outreach and Research for the College of Engineering,

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Dr. Emily Moerer, Assistant Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies, and Dr. Peter R. Jones, Senior Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies. Currently, the leadership of the grant is being managed by Professor Susan Varnum, Associate Dean for Science Education in the College of Science and Technology, in concert with Ms. Tiffany Gilles, Science Education Programs Manager for the College of Science and Technology and Ms. Kathleen McKinley, Mathematics Master Teacher for the TUteach program. Collectively, they have expanded the influence of Temple University and the LSAMP initiative to enhance the opportunities for underrepresented students to complete B.S. degree requirements and promote movement to graduate studies and terminal degrees. LSAMP services were expanded to include student engagement in minority professional organizations and conferences, and entrepreneurial training. During the term of the LSAMP initiative, Temple has increased its number of undergraduate minority B.S. STEM degrees annually, and hosted a Bridge to the Doctorate Cohort V program (13 fellows) which has a 92% program retention rate and an 84% M.S. degree completion rate.

Temple University Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Richard Englert, U.S. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead and Dr. Jamie Bracey cut the ribbon to officially launch the Pennsylvania Math Engineering Science Achievement (MESA) initiative during a ceremony at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.

A significant addition to the Temple AMP initiative has been the variety of academic camps and programs designed to build interest and enhance STEM skills among middle and high school students. This includes, but is not limited to, the ExxonMobil Bernard Harris Summer Science Camp in the College of Science and Technology, Pennsylvania’s MESA (Mathematics, Engineering and Science Achievement) initiative in the College of Engineering, The Women’s Engineering Exploration (WE2) summer program, and the College of Science and Technology’s Let’s Get Ready SAT Prep Program. All of which create a vital mechanism and feeder to the LSAMP initiative for all of the Philadelphia AMP institutions. In addition to grooming new minority scientific talent through undergraduate research and its promotion of entrepreneurism, Temple University has expanded the scope of its programs and their regional impact by connecting the technical capabilities of excellent science and engineering graduates with industry.

JENNIFER BULLOCK

received her BS degree in Mechanical Engineering from Temple University in 2011, and an MS degree in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering from Rutgers University in 2015. She was awarded an LSAMP research fellowship to work with Dr. Judy Zhang to study “Heteroaggregation of Oxide Particles and the Impact on the Oxide Reactivity.” Jennifer, who also held the former positions of President of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) from 2010-11, and Vice President of the National Society of Black Engineers from 2009-2010 while at Temple, is currently employed by the Philadelphia Gas Works as an Environmental Engineer.

DR. VIRGINIA KOCIEDA received her

B.S. degree in Biology from Temple University in 2007. Through her participation in the LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate Cohort V program at Temple, Virginia was able to enroll as a Ph.D. candidate in Microbiology and Immunology. In 2010, she served as Vice President of Temple’s Graduate Student Association and continued her doctoral study as a National Institute of Health (NIH) Training grant recipient. In 2013, Virginia received a Ph.D. degree in Microbiology and Immunology and was awarded an IRTA Postdoctoral Fellowship as a Researcher at the Rocky Mountain Laboratories of Intracellular Parasites, Salmonella Host-Cell Interactions Section, NIAID through the National Institute of Health which she later completed in July 2014. From September 2014 -August 2015, she was assigned to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water, Office of Science and Technology, Health and Ecological Criteria Division as an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science and Technology Policy Fellow. Currently, she is employed as a Senior Research Associate at Thought Leader Select, a Chapel Hill, NC-based private consulting firm serving the biopharmaceutical, medical device, and diagnostics industries. Virginia ultimately desires to pursue a career in higher education and research where she wants to help “train the next generation of scientists.”

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UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE MR. MICHAEL VAUGHAN

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs College of Engineering 102 DuPont Hall Newark, DE 19716 Office: (302) 831-2403 Fax: (302) 831-8179 vaughan@udel.edu

Impact Statement The University of Delaware (UD) has a long tradition of excellence, from its founding as a small private academy in 1743, to the research-intensive, technologically advanced institution of today. The University received its charter from the State of Delaware in 1833 and was designated one of the nation’s historic Land Grant colleges in 1867. Its first class included three signers of the Declaration of Independence and one signer of the U.S. Constitution. Today, UD is a Land Grant, Sea Grant, Space Grant, Urban Grant and Carnegie-designated Community Engaged institution. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching classifies UD as a research university with very high research activity. UD ranks among the nation’s top 100 universities in federal R&D support for science and engineering. A state-assisted, privately governed institution, UD offers a broad range of degree programs: 3 associate programs, 147 bachelor’s programs, 119 master’s programs, 54 doctoral programs, and 15 dual graduate programs through our seven colleges and in collaboration with more than 70 research centers. Our student body encompasses more than 17,000 undergraduates, more than 3,600 graduate students and nearly 800 students in professional and continuing studies from across the country and around the globe. Dean Michael Vaughan is one of the original collaborators in the development of the Greater Philadelphia Region LSAMP, and with the support of former presidents, Dr. David Roselle and Dr. Patrick Harker and current acting president, Dr. Nancy Targett, continues to play a key role in the success of the Alliance. With the direction and inspiration of Dean Vaughan the LSAMP has become a vital part of the pipeline strategy to provide diverse scientific professionals to compete and support the national technical enterprise. The University of Delaware has benefitted greatly from its involvement in the Greater Philadelphia LSAMP effort for over two decades. This effort has helped to create a unique platform, within the UD environment, to build on the institution’s recognized strengths in STEM education and research in support of its recruitment and retention initiatives. It is very important for any institution to build and maintain a critical mass of underrepresented scholars within its ranks in order to promote long-term sustainability in its global diversity agenda. The LSAMP program has provided this baseline of support and continuity over time to inform and guide these efforts. The natural follow on to this activity has been a substantial and sustained increase in the overall STEM pipeline and degree production on UD’s campus. In the past decade, UD’s global Campus STEM support programs, namely the RISE Program, the NUCLEUS Program and the Academic Enrichment Center Program, have been redesigned and fueled by lessons learned from its involvement in LSAMP. Administrative support, staffing, and other resources have evolved as the emphasis has shifted toward providing students with integrated support to meet their academic goals. UD’s programs

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have leveraged LSAMP resources and expertise to develop and implement activities and policies that positively impact underrepresented STEM students, and a full range of these supportive services that have now been institutionalized. The University also retains these students at a rate consistent with all students. In addition, LSAMP has supported UD faculty and student participation in research at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in collaboration with funding from the Department of Energy. It remains UD’s expectation that by further refining and broadening the LSAMP coverage on its campus that UD will have increased success in graduating larger numbers of underrepresented students with STEM degrees. UD has been involved in all Alliance-level Bridge to the Doctorate (BTD) cohorts in the past decade, and these efforts have served as a wonderful mechanism to broaden the pool of non-traditional graduate aspirants in STEM disciplines. In addition, these efforts along with the other LSAMP activities have inspired many of its undergraduates to pursue graduate school at UD and beyond. UD hosted BTD Cohorts I and IX which began in 2003 and 2011, respectively. The BTD program complements numerous synergistic efforts at UD to broaden participation in STEM; increase student success, retention and graduation rates; strengthen research diversity, capacity and productivity; and foster interdisciplinary collaborations. It is clear that the BTD Cohort IX program leveraged UD’s existing successful track record in broadening participation in STEM disciplines and the partnerships. Further, this effort has promoted increased research capacity in Delaware, in support of our designations as an EPSCoR state. Building on its previous experience as host to Cohorts I and IX, UD intends to continue to offer diversity graduate aspirants with high-quality educational experiences which lead to success. With connections made via LSAMP, UD has continued the development of strategic partnerships with other institutions to organize articulation relationships and other activities. UD continues to work with other institutions to align curriculum in several disciplinary areas and to develop M.S. / Ph.D. arrangements. Further, UD has built mutually beneficial partnerships with HBCU institutions and others internal and external to the Alliance. LSAMP has been a great partner in UD’s ongoing success.

DR. MARLYSE WILLIAMS-WHITE addresses

LSAMP students at an end of year banquet. Dr. WilliamsWhite earned her B.S. in Environmental Engineering in 2004 and M.S. in Civil Engineering with a concentration in Environmental Engineering in 2006 from UD as an LSAMP scholar and Bridge to the Doctorate Fellowship recipient, respectively. Following graduation, her Master’s thesis was published as a textbook in 2007. She earned her Ph.D degree in Agricultural and Biological Engineering from the Pennsylvania State University in 2010. Today, Dr. WilliamsWhite is a commissioned officer in the US Air Force and serves on the faculty at the U.S. Air Force Academy.

Dr. Robert Opila, Professor, Material Science and Engineering conducts research with LSAMP students, Saka Okyere-Asiedu, Civil Engineering, and Christopher Dixon, Computer Engineering as part of the Physics – Electronic Detection Group at the Brookhaven National Laboratory.

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UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA MS. CORA INGRUM

Director, Multicultural Programs School of Engineering and Applied Science 125 Towne Building Philadelphia, PA 19104 Office: (215) 898-7084 or 1378 Fax: (215) 573-2949 ingrum@seas.upenn.edu

Impact Statement The University of Pennsylvania (Penn) has a long and proud tradition of intellectual rigor and pursuit of innovative knowledge, begun by Benjamin Franklin in 1740. That tradition lives today through the creativity, entrepreneurship, and engagement of its faculty, students, and staff. Academic life at Penn is unparalleled, with an undergraduate student body of 10,000 from every U.S. state and around the world. The University’s geographical unity, in which 4 undergraduate and 12 graduate schools connect on a single urban campus, is unique among Ivy League schools, fostering its integrated approach to education, scholarship, and research. Penn is one of the world’s most powerful research and teaching institutions, with a research budget last year topping $851 million and more than 4,000 active faculty members. The institution is committed to creating a community of scholars, students and staff that reflects the diversity of the world in which we live. This range of perspectives and dialogue contributes to educational excellence and an inclusive, dynamic campus environment. Ms. Cora M. Ingrum, Director, Office of Multicultural Programs, School of Engineering and Applied Science has served as a leader in developing programs and initiatives that create opportunities for underrepresented students in STEM for many years, with the strong support of Dr. John Keenan, former Director of Faculty Advising and Professor, Civil Engineering, Dr. Jan Van der Spiegel, Associate Dean for Academic Education and Professor, Electrical Engineering, Dr. Beth Winkelstein, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education and Professor, Bioengineering, and the former and current Deans, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Dr. Joseph Bordogna, Dr. Eduardo Glandt, and Dr. Vijay Kumar, respectively, as well as other STEM research faculty and administrators. As Co-PI and Project Director of the Penn LSAMP program for the past 20 years, with the aid of the previously noted individuals, as well as her Administrative Assistant, Ms. Donna Hampton, Ms. Ingrum provides academic advising and counseling, mentoring, national and international research experiences and BS/MS sub-matriculation opportunities to students from diverse backgrounds and cultures. In her words, “we enable students to optimize their talents, capitalize on their cultural perspectives, realize their intellectual potential, and fulfill their career aspirations. Students receive advising, counseling and mentoring. They build relationships that help them contribute to the culture of Penn Engineering and the University.” Ms. Ingrum has received many honors for her accomplishments including the 1997 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring during President William Clinton’s administration, and a Lifetime Devotion and Commitment to the Graduate Engineering Consortium (GEM) Award in 2011. Under her leadership, in 2004, Penn graduated 14 minority Ph.D.s in engineering (8 African Americans and 6 Hispanics), ranking them third in the country. Penn LSAMP program graduates have also contributed to the advancement of scientific and technical knowledge, both nationally and globally in the United States, Germany, France, England, South Africa, China and many other countries, received

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numerous tenure-track appointments at Research-One institutions and prestigious awards including the NSF Graduate Research fellowship, and have been recognized annually at the National Society of Black Engineers conference. In addition, Penn LSAMP graduates continue to contribute to the economy as CEOs of their own companies, vice presidents of numerous corporations, doctors, lawyers, research scientists, etc.

DR. JAMOL PENDER joined the faculty at Cornell University

in July 2015 as an Assistant Professor in the School of Operations Research and Information Engineering. He received his PhD from the Department of Operations Research and Financial Engineering at Princeton University in 2013, and his B.S.E and M.S.E in Electrical and Systems Engineering through his participation as an LSAMP scholar at the University of Pennsylvania in 2008. Before coming to Cornell, he was a Visiting Scholar in the Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research at Columbia University. His research interests include queueing theory, applied probability, Markov processes, control theory, and mathematical finance.

MR. OLADAYO ADEWOLE is a Ph.D. Candidate, Bioengineering at the University of

Pennsylvania (UPENN), and an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) award recipient. Most recently, Oladayo presented his current research paper entitled “A Computer Model of the Human Arm: Predictive Biomechanics for the TheraDrive Rehabilitation System” at The 14th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, August 11-14, 2015 in Singapore in collaboration with Dr. Michelle J. Johnson, Assistant Professor, Rehabilitation Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He received a B.S.E. degree in Bioengineering and a B.S.E. degree in Mechanical Engineering & Applied Mechanics in 2014, as well as an M.S.E. degree in Robotics in 2015 from UPENN. As an undergraduate LSAMP scholar, he conducted research on an environmental control system for axon stretch-growth bioreactors.

MS. ELAIDA DIMWAMWA is a senior at the University of Pennsylvania majoring in

Bioengineering with a minor in Engineering Entrepreneurship. She is also dually enrolled in a Master’s in Robotics and plans to pursue a PhD in Biomedical Engineering. Elaida was invited to present a paper on her LSAMP-funded research project entitled “Kinematic Analysis of Unilateral and Bilateral Drinking Task after Brain and Periphery Injuries” along with her research mentor, Dr. Michelle Johnson, Assistant Professor, Rehabilitation Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania at The 37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC’15) in Milano, Italy in August 2015. The National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) has also been a strong driving force in Elaida’s life. Starting off as a TORCH Committee member as a freshman, she has since served on the UPENN chapter executive board as TORCH Chair, Senator, and Vice President. Over the years, she has developed numerous programs, strengthened their involvement in the community, and increased the awareness of the UPenn NSBE chapter both regionally and nationally, allowing her to win National TORCH Member of the Year (2014) and Regional Chapter Executive Board Member of the Year (2015), and her chapter to win National TORCH Chapter of the Year (2013 & 2014), Regional Small Chapter of the Year (2015), Regional Chapter of the Year (2015), and National Retention Chapter of the Year (2015).

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OTHER CROSS-ALLIANCE ACTIVITIES Annual Research Symposium and Mentoring Conference: The 17th Annual Philadelphia AMP Research Symposium and Mentoring Conference was held on April 11, 2015. The theme of the conference was “Research: The Global Scientific Enterprise,” and 154 STEM faculty, administrators, undergraduates, and graduate students from the Philadelphia and New York City LSAMP Alliances were in attendance. During the event, LSAMP students showcased their research in poster competition sessions, and attended a graduate school fair. Special professional development activities and an oral research competition were also held for the LSAMP Bridge to the Doctorate (BTD) program participants. Dr. Claude Brathwaite, Project Administrator, New York City LSAMP, City University of New York (CUNY) hosted a workshop on “Effective Science and Engineering Communications,” and Dr. Francoise Sidime, Activity Coordinator, New York City LSAMP, CUNY conducted a workshop on “International Research Opportunities in Austria and Morocco.” Also, during the “Men of Honor / Women of Distinction” workshop, students were afforded the opportunity to interact with BTD alumni who have completed their doctoral degree and transitioned to STEM careers. GEM GRAD Lab (Getting Ready for Advanced Degree Lab): The Alliance continues to expand its relationship with the National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for Minorities in Engineering and Science (GEM) to assist partner institutions with its graduate STEM recruitment efforts, as well as to assist students with support to continue doctoral study. On October 16-17, 2015, the Alliance sponsored the second regional GEM GRAD Lab, a comprehensive, hands-on symposium designed to excite and encourage promising undergraduate and community college STEM students to consider M.S. and Ph.D. technical research programs. The event which was co-hosted by: Drexel University, Carnegie Mellon University, University of Delaware, University of Pennsylvania, and University of Pittsburgh. The GEM GRAD Lab afforded students the opportunity to participate in campus tours, to visit research laboratories, attend professional development workshops, and to interact with graduate students from both Drexel University in Engineering and the University of Pennsylvania in Robotics in their exploration of graduate study. Inter-Institutional Student Research Activities: STEM training and professional development opportunities were offered to Alliance students on partner institution respective campuses through inter-institutional collaborative arrangements. During Summer 2015, LSAMP students from Community College of Philadelphia, Cheyney University, Lincoln University, and University of Delaware participating in these collaborative arrangements with Drexel University and the University of Pennsylvania, respectively.

Research Symposium

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GEM Grad Lab

Inter-Institutional Research

Breauna Branch – Lincoln University (BS’16, Biology): Shown holding tow propanotroph bacteria cultures. One culture contains growth, while the other has yet to show any growth as part of her research training conducted jointly by the University of Pennsylvania’s (UPENN) NSF LSAMP Summer Research Program and Drexel University.

Rudolph Allen, Community College of Philadelphia (AS, ’17, Mathematics): Working on program demos related to the programming of the originally proposed haptic glove, to get an understanding of what needs to be considered dealing with haptics, as well as to how the glove would work as part of his participation in the UPENN NSF LSAMP Summer Research Program.

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HIGHLIGHTS OF AMP ACTIVITIES PUC Energy Forum Friday, Nov. 2, 2012 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. Drexel University Bossone Research Center Mitchell Auditorium 3140 Market Street Philadelphia, PA Students heard firsthand from and network with industry leaders about careers in energy, information technology, data and telecommunications. They learned more about industry leadership, opportunities that are available to engineering students and what employers are looking for in the engineers of tomorrow.

Students meeting reps from different utilities companies for career opportunities and valuable information regarding what employers are seeking.

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A group photo of LSAMP Project Director, Stephen Cox, with David Hixon (PUC Office of Communications), Derrick Hamilton (Global Talent Accquisition Dresser-Rand Director), Wayne Gardner (PUC Commissioner), Kim Barrow (PUC).


CCP NSBE at Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum In 2013, the Community College of Philadelphia’s National Society of Black Engineers and Science Club visited the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) headquarters and the National Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C., as well as the Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA, where Jim Schier, chief systems engineer of the International Space Station, gave them a tour. Right: CCP student, Luciano Drummond, being fitted to see what it feels like to be astronaut!

BEYA Conference in Washington, D.C.

Students attending the 28th BEYA STEM “Global Competiveness” Conference held from February 6-8, 2014 in Washington, D.C.

Mr. Stephen Cox receiving the Black Engineer of the Year Award from former Drexel University Provost, Dr. Mark Greenberg.

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INTERNATIONAL ENGAGEMENT ARGENTINA

NON YOK, Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, Drexel University (left) reviews his presentation along with fellow students presenting their research at the 32nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;10) in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

RODRICK EVANGELIST,

AUSTRIA

Ph.D. Candidate, Civil Engineering, in collaboration with the New York City LSAMP, conducted research as an exchange student of Graz University of Technology in Austria at the Institute of Steel Structures and Shell Structures under the supervision of the Deputy Director of the Institute from June 1August 2011.

SOUTH KOREA

DANNIELLE SOLOMON FIGUEROA,

Ph.D. Candidate, Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University (BTD Cohort III) (center) socializes with other participants of the NSF East Asia and Pacific Summer Institute (EAPSI) 2010 in South Korea.

48 | Philadelphia AMP

CHINA

DR. MAZEN SHAHIN, DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY (lower right) with

University personnel and students participating in research activities at the Grassland Research Institute (GRI) of the Northeast Normal University in Changchun, China from May 23, 2011- June 21, 2011.


ITALY

ELAIDA DIMWAMWA, University of Pennsylvania, was invited to present a paper on her LSAMP-funded research project entitled “Kinematic Analysis of Unilateral and Bilateral Drinking Task after Brain and Periphery Injuries” at The 37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC’15) in Milano, Italy in August 2015. Ms. Dimwamwa’s research was conducted in the Rehab Robotics Lab, and supported by the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and UPENN NSF LSAMP Summer Research Program.

FIVE LINCOLN STUDENTS

TRINIDAD & TOBAGO

from Philadelphia AMP conducted research in The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago from June 27 to July 12, 2015 as a part of the LSAMP funded “International STEM, Environmental & Entrepreneurship Research Program.” The Study Abroad research component consisted of an intensive 14-day research experience at The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine campus. Here are the students at Pitch Lake at La Brea, Trinidad--the largest natural deposit of asphalt in the world.

BRAZIL & COLOMBIA

Through Philadelphia AMP’s collaborative partnership with the New York City LSAMP, MELIKA RILEY, Drexel University, as an undergraduate, was afforded the unique opportunity to conduct research in water quality, access and security assessment in two countries, Brazil and Colombia at the Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana (UEFS) and Universidad del Valle as a participant in the 2015 International Summer Research program offered by the City College of New York from June 11 – August 2, 2015. Currently, Melika is continuing her studies as a Master’s student in Modeling in Science of Land and Environment at UEFS in Brazil.

THE BIG PICTURE During the life of the LSAMP project, eighty-three (83) students have engaged in international research experiences in the following locations: Brazil (4), China (54), Austria (2), Switzerland (1), Jamaica (10), Chile (1), Serbia (2), Madagascar (1), Africa (3), and The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago (5).

2015 PROJECT IMPACT REPORT | 49


Philadelphia AMP Drexel University 3141 Chestnut Street Building 1, Room 012 Philadelphia, PA 19104

GPR - 121514

(P) 215-895-2203 (F) 215-895-2098 (E) myk28@drexel.edu www.philadelphiaamp.org

| Editor: Veniece Keene | Graphic Designer: Maria Kim

|

Photography: Ron Allen

2015 Philadelphia AMP Project Impact Report  
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