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Beauford Owners Club

Spring 2012 Issue 90


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE

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THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE

Committee Members POSITION

NAME

ADDRESS

TELEPHONE

Chairman

Bill Buckley

18 Kelsey Lane Balsall Common, Coventry CV7 7GL

01676-534877

Treasurer

Mike Peachey

La Haute Rebiere, Payzac, 24270, France

Secretary & Membership Secretary

Liz Ovenden

17 Brooklime Drive, Boughton Vale, Rugby, Warwickshire CV23 0SF liz.ovenden@beaufordclub.org.uk

01788-547033

Member

Keith Woolfenden

Oak Tree House, Green Lane, Pamber Green, Hampshire RG26 6AD

01256-851406

Member

Chris Rudge

11 Honeybourne Road, Alveley, Nr. Bridgenorth, Shropshire WV15 6PR

01746-781529

Member

Michael Crozier

63 Laurel Grove, Tunstall, Sunderland SR2 9EE michael@jonhmichaelcrozier.fsnet.co.uk

0191-522-8410

Member

Dennis Murphy

27 Mote Avenue, Maidstone, Kent ME15 7SU dennismurphy1@tiscali.co.uk

01622-754126

Editor

Paul Hicks

Rosehill, Kellow, Looe, Cornwall PL13 1LE beauford.editor@btopenworld.com

01503 262069

Webmaster

Tony Ovenden

17 Brooklime Drive, Boughton Vale, Rugby, Warwickshire CV23 0SF

01788-547033

Beauford Cars Ltd.

David Young

Greenside Works, Thomas Street, Biddulph, Stoke on Trent ST8 6EE beaufordcarsuk@aol.com

Tel 01782-520086 Fax 01782-523724

Please Note: The inclusion of material in, or distributed with, this magazine does not imply the endorsement or recommendation of that material. Members are advised to evaluate for themselves the suitability of material for their own purposes. Please mention the Beauford Club Magazine when replying to adverts. 4


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE

The Chairman’s Page Well we are fast approaching another AGM and KIT CAR Show and hopefully the weather will be kind and we will have a good attendance. It is hoped that we will have a few new members Beaufords with us this year. I live in hope that we will have a full stand of Beaufords as we used to have in years gone by, I know that we shall be having at least two new cars [Liz & Tonys, & Dennis) Can you suggest some activities (not just car shows) that the club can get involved in, in the past we have tried treasure hunts, visits to places of interest, to name just a few. A few years ago it was suggested we combine with an air show but there did not seem to be much interest. Anyway, come up with some suggestions and we will discuss them at the AGM. Bill Buckley FORTHCOMING EVENTS

Kit Car Show, Stoneleigh

Sunday and Monday 6th and 7th May

Beauford Club AGM

3.00 pm Sunday 6th May at Stoneleigh

Kit Car Show, Detling

Saturday and Sunday 7th and 8th April (Easter)

Kit Car Show, Newark

Saturday and Sunday 16th and 17th June

Bath Pagent of Motoring

Saturday and Sunday 23rd and 24th June

Kit Car Show, Exeter

Saturday and Sunday 20th and 21st October

The first ever Bath Pageant of Motoring will be making its debut this summer on 23 – 24 June 2012 at Bath Racecourse. This charity event will appeal to families and enthusiasts showcasing a vast array of Vintage, Post-vintage, Pre-war, Veteran and Classic Carand Motorcyclesto marvel over. Plus Super Car Rides: Ferrari, Porsche, Lotus, Aston Martin, AC Cobra, Jaguar. A whole spectrum of Car Clubs, Trade Stands and Exhibits will also be on display. COME AND JOIN US! A whole host of exhibitors will be attending this premier and we’d like to invite you to come and take part.

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THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE

From the Editor So Spring is here already and another copy of the magazine is due for distribution. Firstly may I thank all those readers that sent me such very kind comments about the last edition. Modesty prevents me from including them in the letters page but I do appreciate them nonetheless. You will have noticed by now that this edition of the magazine has been printed by professional printers. I must admit that when I started as editor, I didn’t realize just how long it takes to print and prepare the finished article. We produce approximately 250 copies, each with 32 pages making some 8000 pages in total. Of course, we print on A4 which provides 2 pages per side. Nonetheless, my poor little printer thought all its Christmases had come at once! Hence the new approach having the magazine printed for us. I hope that you like it. So Spring is well and truly here and I think that it has been well captured in the beautiful cover picture provided by Dianne and Greg Shepherd at Beauford Belles in Suffolk. This is the time of year that we start pushing out the Beauford, dusting it off and seeing if it still starts – or at least, its what I do. I’ve dusted off my chauffeurs uniform (look at that smart chauffeur in the picture) and ‘bulled’ the boots so now its down to servicing the car. One of the first jobs is always to change the oil and filter so I also called down to see Tim from Opie Oils. As always, I asked his advice as to which oil and filter to use. I mentioned that I had often been asked by members which type of oil should they use and whether it was safe to use synthetic oil in older engines. This was like lighting a blue touch paper under Tim. The result was that Tim has kindly put together an article to help us choose the right oil for our pride and joy. In fact, he has provided so much

material that I have split his missive in two and I will include the second part in our next issue. Trevor has also provided the results of some research that he did a while ago with the Datsun Club of New Zealand into identifying the age of Nissan engines. As many of the Nissan engine Beauford owners may have found out, Nissan does not maintain a register of which engine blocks were used on which car – but now all is revealed. I found out that the L24 engine in Alfonso was built from a block that had been founded in 1974 even though it came from a 1984 Laurel! If I had known this before its SVA, I now wouldn’t have to put it through the emissions part of the MOT each year - such is life. As you may recall, I invited our overseas members to provide me with a ‘few’ words about their experiences and details on their cars in a ‘foreign’ land. I must thank you for your response. In fact, Chris Lewington has provided a superb article on how and why he has the ‘only Beauford in Oz’. Bryan Wilkinson has included some very interesting road signs that he has photographed during his travels in the 6


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE

Himalayas - I’ve used some of them as excellent page fillers. Dyane and Greg told me that they were taking a few days off in the Lake District before their wedding car season got started - I hope that they enjoyed the glorious weather. My wedding car season started in mid March, before the ‘heat wave’ started. My first wedding was in Bodmin at mid day. I left Looe quite early on a wonderful spring morning. There was blue sky and mist rolling down the Looe river and it was surrounding Looe island. As the sun rose it presented a story book picture. I arrived in Bodmin at 10:30 to collect the brides mum and take her to the bride. As I waited outside the hotel, the heavens opened. The rain was so hard that it started coming through the hood and I had to move the car under what cover there was. This was followed by a hail ‘shower’ which covered the hood in about an inch of ice. My poor polished Beauford! The rain and hail did eventually stop but the day remained freezing. Back home in Looe (15 miles away), the day remained perfect!

They are all heavily modified and not particularly pretty but I know from experience that they pass IVA and SVA before that. Contact me if you need them.

The next week end it was almost too warm for a ‘vest’. Global warming I guess. The big event in the Club’s calendar is Stoneleigh and the AGM. Liz will tell you all about that in her missive and give you details about the agenda. I will be there with Elliot (the 280Z engined car). Liz assures me that she makes the finest cup of tea in the show ground and we may even get a biscuit or two.

Finally, a request to all our members for a letter, article or picture about you and/or your Beauford for our next magazine. Remember, we need a picture of a Beauford summer scene for the cover.... could it be yours?

What would be really nice is if we could have a display of many of our cars so that we can have a center spread of Beauford pictures in our next edition – and their owners of course. So polish off your pride and joy and bring it to the show. I’ll see you there! What may be of interest to our members who are looking forward to, or who are currently, building a new Beauford is that the Club does own a number of IVA compliant components. 7


OVENDEN’S OFFERING   Liz

Spring is officially here and just for a change the weather is exceptionally Spring like. I have joined the daffs by coming out in the garden and have cleared all the weeds and dug over my (small) veggie patch, broken most of my nails but enjoyed myself. Meanwhile the Spring weather has caused Tony to do some DIY (see below) by replacing our 22 year old bathroom. It only seems like yesterday when we moved into our new house but 22 years have gone by and the bathroom was looking a little tired, especially with its non white suite which although was one all the thing is sadly now dated. So far we have only had two water leaks which is pretty good for us as Tony and water pipes just don’t seem to get on. The ceiling in the utility room did need a fresh coat of paint anyway. The Beauford has not yet come out of winter hibernation, where it has spent the last four or five months snugly tucked up in its own little garage. We will try and wake it up for Detling in a couple of weeks time but Tony is hoping to get chance to do the petrol tank before then. It appears to be a fairly common problem that the gauge does not register properly. You can fill ours up and its shows half a tank, use all the petrol and its still shows half a tank, which is not very good when you don’t yet know how many miles to the gallon (or litre) it does. Tony thinks that the pick up may have caught inside the tank, so hopefully it’s nothing too drastic. Beauford Auto Jumble – Stoneleigh An amazing transformation has occurred in the Ovenden household. For the first time in many years you can now walk in our garage without taking your life in your hands. During my working years I did undertake to go on several health and safety courses and as part of the company’s ISO requirements I was one of those who had to carry out risk assessments. Since leaving work I have carried out many risk assessments in our garage, especially when I have gone in there and tripped over something. Mostly the response has been that I should not have been there in the first place! However, due to the fact that we are now revamping our

main bathroom we needed room to store the new bathroom suite and furniture and I absolutely forbade him to have it put in the conservatory. Now that the garage is tidy and Tony can’t find a thing without asking me where I think it may be (and I must confess I can usually remember), we have found that we have loads of “useful” bits which we have bought but not used when building the car. There are also some IVA compliant items which may be of use. As we are reluctant to take these to the local tip we thought that there might be members/ builders who could use them. Having spoken to Paul about this we have come up with the idea of a club Auto jumble to be held at Stoneleigh. If you have any unwanted items which may be of use to other builders then please bring them along to this show where we will display them and I am sure they will be snapped up. Amongst our bits are IVA compatible door handles, 2 back rack trays, spot lights etc. all of which can be used and then if not required afterwards can be passed on to other builders. Some items may be free whilst others may warrant a small charge. Subscriptions My thanks to all of you who have sent me your membership renewals, which I am sure is a record number received all in the space of a couple of weeks. I think our post lady wonders 8


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE what’s going on at number 17. For all of you who have not yet renewed don’t worry about being late you can still renew whenever you want to, but if you don’t then you may miss out on the latest magazine. I will send out reminders to those who have not renewed just in case you are not sure but do check your membership card – this year it is a sort of peachy colour. Don’t forget if you have a listing on the wedding site then you should really renew by the end of March, but again, don’t worry I won’t remove your listing until after I have sent out an email reminders. Apologies to New Members My apologies to any new member who has received a letter from me with either the wrong name on the “Dear …” line or the wrong membership number on the letter – the card I have sent you will be correct. My only excuse is that I have been inundated with membership renewals lately and couple that with the decorating which has been going on in our office come study, and chaos has been the order of the day. Most of the time things go ok, but occasionally it does all go wrong… Champagne in Wedding Cars I was talking to one of our members a few weeks ago when the subject of champagne for the bride and groom in their wedding car came up. Apparently to sell champagne or any alcohol to a member of the public you need to have a licence. It could therefore be interpreted that providing champagne to the bride and groom as part of their wedding car package could be classed as “selling” and therefore breaking the law. However, if the bride and groom provided the champagne themselves then this is perfectly acceptable. All sounds a bit of a grey area to me but thought I would let you know.

lot of members who do weddings decided to “give it a miss”, but have decided to go back this year. I have had a few tell us that they get a lot of business through the site whilst other say that they don’t get any because all their business comes from their own wedding web site, but I’m not sure where they think their customers get their web address from! I have also recently had an email from a member who said he did not want to belong to the club any longer as he only joined for the wedding business listing and he was not doing weddings any longer – at least he was honest with me. I think it is possibly an interesting exercise for businesses to see how much their business varies by using/not using our site. I do know that these days times can be hard and everyone has to think twice about spending money and I am amazed at how much some of these wedding fairs charge people to exhibit at them – I have been told that can be over £300. Perhaps if you intend to go to wedding fairs it may be a good idea to team up with say a photographer or a florist or some such to have a joint stand and thereby share the cost. Still, I must say, that £10 a year for our listing as opposed to £300+ for one day is not bad value for money! Registration

Web Site Wedding List

Every so often we mention about how your car should be registered as a Beauford with the DVLA. I recently had a phone call about a car which was registered as a Beauford Cortina and not only that it had two doors when the registration document said it had four! I had visions of the car having to go through IVA and all the problems that ensued, but no, the member concerned rang the DVLA and explained the situation and was told that provided they could get a letter from a suitably authorised person (me) then the registration documents would be changed to state that the car was a two door Beauford Open Tourer. My faith in the DVLA and bureaucracy is restored.

This is the second year in which we have been charging an extra £10 for members who wished to advertise on the wedding list and I have been receiving a lot of mixed reactions. Last year a

National Kit Car Show, Stoneleigh – Sunday and Monday 6th and 7th May As previously mentioned I have booked our usual spot at Stoneleigh and am now just keeping my fingers 9


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE

crossed for nice weather. As usual we will be setting up the gazebos on Saturday afternoon so if anyone is around then we welcome any assistance with this task. I know on the Monday there always seems to be people around to help us close up and pack everything away, but again help is always welcome. On Sunday evening there are several members staying at the Premier Inn on Kenpass

Highway, A45, Coventry (Harvester) so if anyone would like to join us for dinner that evening you are more than welcome. We can decide on a time to meet up on the day. Kit Car Show Newark, 16th and 17th June Again, as previously mentioned, a club pitch has been booked for this show, but Tony and I will only be there on the Sunday and we will only have the barest of facilities with us. If you


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE intend coming on the Sunday then please, if Hopefully by the next edition more information you have them, put a couple of camping chairs will have been received. in your car. You could also bring a flask of hot As you know the Club has its AGM on Sunday water for tea/coffee and we will provide the 7th May and it would be lovely to see as many actual tea and coffee, milk and sugar for you to of you there as possible. Please if you are use plus the odd biscuit or two. attending the show on that day, try to spare an Kit Car Show, Exeter, 20th and 21st October hour to attend the meeting. After all, it is your club and we would like to know if there is I have still not received any details from the anything we can change for the better. new organisers of this show so I’m afraid at this stage that I can’t tell you much about it.

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Notice is hereby given that the 2012 Annual General Meeting of the Beauford Club will be held at 3.00 p.m. on Sunday 6th May in the Warwick Hall Conference Centre, NAC Stoneleigh AGENDA 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Minutes of the 2011 Annual General Meeting to be approved Chairman’s Report Treasurer ’s Report Secretary/Membership Secretary’s Report Editor ’s Report Webmaster ’s Report Election/Resignation of Committee a. Chairman b. Treasurer c. Secretary/Membership Secretary d. Editor e. Web master f. Committee Members 8. Club Activities 9. Club facilities (improvements/changes) 10. Any other business Please note that the meeting can only last 55 minutes after which time we have to vacate the room the let the next club in.

Beauford Club Auto Jumble Is your garage cluttered with unwanted Beauford spares? Do you need parts for your new build? Bring them along or look for them at our auto jumble in the Beauford Club paddock at Stoneleigh Also - IVA compliant components available on loan from the Club - door handles, bonnet catches, mirrors and many more


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE

Accident in Malaysia Bryan Wilkinson This accident happened to my daughter in Kuala Lumpur.

still on UK prices where the cost of repair would be about ÂŁ400 plus. My daughter then rang the police. After a long wait two motor cyclist arrived and took a lot of notes. One would have thought that would be the end of it. Wrong! No we had to go to a police station to make a report. This is required by the insurance company. As we did not know the way to the police station the motor cyclist asked us to follow him. We passed more than one police station which puzzled us all. We found out that one must report to a traffic police station.

Driving her new car in the city for the first time she was not yet used to the way of driving here. Although the rules are the same as the UK they are not obeyed with the same respect. One has to drive close to the car in front and not leave space for another car to come in. If a car has its nose in front and starts to come into your lane let it, even if it does not signal, as this is the normal way of driving out here. Statements were taken, photos taken and more statements. This all took more than two hours. She also had to pay 150RM for the report and more for a copy to give to her insurance company. As she had made a report the other driver also had to do the same. If he did not then he would have been fined, not for the accident but for not making a report.

She left a gap and a car cut in from the right hand lane to turn left, no time to stop in time. The two cars met each other; my daughtersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; right hand front met the other car on his rear door. In the UK the other driver would have been in the wrong but not here. Her car was damaged in the front and she should have stopped in time. The other driver and my daughter had a long heated discussion about it. The other driver said that it would only cost about 300RM to repair. (ÂŁ60). But she was

She then found out that it would take a long time for the insurance company to settle the damage, she could not stand seeing her new car with this damage so she took it into a car repair shop which she had repaired for less than 300RM. By the way the car repair shop was called The Knocking Shop. 12


A Beauford in OZ Chris Lewington

“Australia - taking the Beauford with me was mandatory” I retired from British Telecom early at just fifty.

BT let me go with a very nice lump sum and a pension. I had long resolved to visit my sister in her West Australian home so, together with my father we set sail. That trip on the Arcadia is another story, but we were received very well

in Australia, and during the second week of our six-week stay, I applied for a visa to remain! Unfortunately, that didn’t work out. Sadly, may father died, about 18 months later which prompted me to begin thinking about my future very seriously. I was unattached, had a guaranteed income for life, owned my own home in Aspley, Nottingham, and my beautiful Beauford. I bought my Bofie, CUP 82S, second-hand from a man I met in a pub car-park. He had four of them, in a ramshackle barn, and two Princess limousines.

His wedding - hire business had failed, and I actually paid the money to a man from the Royal Bank of Scotland, as the vehicles had been used as security for a loan. My next application was for a "family" class visa under "sole remaining relative" subclass. With the death of my Father I became

technically, an orphan. My only blood relative being my sister, now an Australian citizen, so I bypassed the infamous "points pool system" that has caused would-be migrants so much grief. In the meantime, there is a medical to attend at an approved hospital (private of course), plus a chest x-ray and, if you have a tattoo or body piercing (I have both), an extra blood test. There are the usual things: birth certificate, parents’ marriage, parents’ death, UK passport plus extra photos, police clearance notice, the list seemed endless. 13


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE All this took over a year, but my passport finally came back to me with the Australian visa stamped in it on September 7th 2002. With it was a nice letter that told me I must enter Australia by October 3rd 2002! So off I went!

boxes of personal effects on it. At P. A. Freight (PAF) I was referred to "big Colin" who supervised the parking of the car and the stacking of my stuff. Handing over the keys was a traumatic moment. I had a lump in my throat as we left CUP 2S and drove off.

I returned to the UK later in the year with the intention of selling my house and finally moving to the land down under. Return to Australia was somewhat delayed after reading the rulebook for importing cars to Australia - taking the Beauford with me was

Arranging to ship the Bofie out had taken four months. However, just about 47 weeks after leaving her, I was hugging my sister again in the arrival hall of Perth International.

mandatory.

with 287,000km on the clock. I set off south to Mandurah, a small coastal town about 75km from Perth. We had visited there briefly on the trip with my Father, and it seemed ideal. I had long had a hankering to live, not by, but close to the sea. Mandurah is now one of the fastest expanding towns in Australia, and is at the mouth of the Peel Inlet, where four rivers flow into the sea. After a brief stay at Halls Head I bought my current abode, here in Falcon. The property has a long brick paved gated drive with a 40ft X 20ft

While I waited out the visa process, I had made some enquiries about taking my car to Australia. I found that a personal import was possible but very complicated. Reading the multi-page application form, I saw a section on importing vehicles over 15 years old. Suddenly, all obstacles fell away. By merely providing proof that the car was over 15, sending $50, and bingo, I was the owner of an import license. On Sept 16th, my pal Dave hitched his Peugeot to a trailer with my Bofie and 12

Soon after my arrival, I bought a Ford Falcon XF "Ute", dual-fuel, with a 4 liter straight-six,


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE tin shed at the end - a perfect place to store the Bofie ! I received confirmation that the car was on it's way the next day. No precise arrival date was available, but transit time is about 5 - 7 weeks, so I got on with finding somewhere to live. That done and Christmas over I was given the name and address of the Australian agents in Fremantle - Warranted Safe Arrivals (WSA) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; what a reassuring name. A call to the number supplied resulted in finding that they were no longer there, having closed the office and

moved to Adelaide! The address was now used by another shipping firm - International Cargo Services (ICS). A delightful lady by the name of Mervina assured me that they could handle all the details for me, just give her the information about ship name, arrival date, container number, Bill of Lading number, etc. Only I didn't have any of that! It turned out that PAF knew but wouldn't tell me until I paid. Andy at PAF had been a bit offhand about paying, pointing out that the final bill depended on the length of time the car was in storage, but now payment was due. New Year got in the way of that but Internet banking is a

wonderful thing and eventually enough info was released to track my container down. CUP was in container GATU0437704 on the NYK Pride. The arrival date was 5th Jan 2004. On the 5th, I got a call from Merv at ICS. There was a delay and the ship would be about 7 - 10 days late. The next day I got another call saying that the container was on the quay at Fremantle ! Now, the Australians are very protective of their own car industry and there is a jungle of Import Tariffs and the Quarantine Regulations

to be navigated. As Beaufords don't appear in Glass', it fell into a rare category that required a valuer to estimate a commercial (trade) value "as landed" for duty determination. 15% of the "Landed Value" is charged as Import Duty and I had sweaty palms as I waited to hear the valuer's verdict. $5000 - about as low as I could have hoped for. But wait, in this category and in this one only, shipping cost is deducted from the "Landed Value" for Duty purposes. Including Insurance, storage and shipping, and the specially certified pest-free timber framework to secure the car within the container, the bill was ÂŁ2110. So converting to


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE A$ and deducting meant the car was DutyFree ! Nonetheless, I couldn't escape the General Sales Tax (GST) the equivalent of VAT and at 10% that was $500. It didn't end there. My only real grouse was that I had to pay the unloading fee; a fee for using the port; for the container to be moved into the Quarantine compound; overnight storage of the car; similar for my boxes of personal effects; plus ICS's fees, and the Valuer - another $1900 in all. If that had been deductible too, the Customs would have paid me. I had to go to the Quarantine Compound to sign some paperwork for the car and pick up

my personal effects from Customs. I hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t anticipated any trouble with Quarantine but when they took me to inspect the car there was thick dirt encrusted with birdlime, scrapes on the scuttle and wings and the front nearside tyre totally flat. The Customs man said, 'It wasn't flat when we drove it in yesterday. Must have gone down overnight." I pointed out the skid-mark across the yard, proving the car had been moved with the tyre flat. There was an inflator bottle on the seat, left for just such a case. He shrugged and moved off. Inspection was a joke. The serial numbers were checked and that was it. The inspection of my personal effects was a little

more stringent. A couple of boxes were opened at random and the contents compared with my lists supplied to Customs. No problems, so with help from a dock worker, I loaded the ute with the boxes and set off back to Mandurah. The car was held, pending payment of the bill, but by the next afternoon I was back with a trailer. My bank in Mandurah faxed a transfer to ICS's bank and Merv called Customs to confirm the bill was paid, a form to sign and CUP was mine again ! Loading the car onto the trailer was a nightmare. The handbrake was seized on and the footbrake was seized off! Someone had twisted open one of the throttle stop screws

distorting the carburetor linkage, presumably because they couldn't understand a manual choke. I had brought a new battery with me to ensure that the car started first time. However, because a Rover V8 with auto, idling at 2000 rpm is a bit of a beast when you have no brakes and the fact that no-one would help guide me, I thought it best to put the car onto the trailer by using the hand winch. Car loaded, the Falcon behaved beautifully and once on the freeway, towing at 120kph was no trouble. Back home, I had a chance to sort things enough to drive the Bofie into its new home.


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE So, now I have my Bofie in the shed and can clean it up, polish - out the scrapes, get the tyre fixed at the local Tyrepower depot. All I have to do now is register it. Australia is a Commonwealth of seven states. Movement between states is entirely free and the borders are notional. But if you move permanently to another state, and take a vehicle with you, it must pass an inspection of roadworthiness before it is issued with a registration plate for the new state and the old ones surrendered. Australians are a restless people and so there are any number of these inspection stations, commonly called the Pit. There is a small licensing office in Mandurah. I'd been there several times before to renew the road tax ("Reggo" for my Falcon Ute) and to take the three driving tests (all in one go) to get a full WA driver's license. I went again and asked about getting the Bofie on the road. "You’ll have to take it to the Pit for Inspection" the man said. "OK, can I make an appointment please?" "No appointment needed. Just turn up 7am to 3.30pm. But we don't have a Pit here, you'll have to go to Stockdale Road" (He didn’t mention it was about 60km away or the $140). To drive an unregistered vehicle to and from the Pit you need a Movement Permit ($15.40) valid for 48 hours from a specified time including Third Party insurance. So I paid up, specifying a couple of days hence. The car had only been up the driveway. So setting off I was a bit nervous about getting there but once the tank was filled (LRP), the car was running sweetly. So I set off, deciding to stay off the freeway. I had been told at Mandurah to expect "a few simple safety checks - that's all"- not even a brake Dynamometer or emissions check. Well, the guys at Stockdale had never seen anything like a Beauford before and frankly, it took them two hours to admit that they were lost. There were muttered words like "unsafe"; "against Regulations"; "doesn't comply"; and many more. It took four of them to take it for a 15-minute test run and to return with a grudging "it drives ok, anyway”. The report form was covered in notes when they handed it to me with the comment, "Take this over to

the Technical Department at Welshpool and see Reno". Another 20km run to Welshpool, 30 minutes waiting to see Reno, and at last some hope. "That isn't needed; not applicable; don't know what they mean by that; look, get in the queue and show this form to the Inspector”. I left the car in the car park and went to a local cafe for some lunch. Refreshed, I joined the now much shorter queue, and when my turn came, went through the whole story again. The reaction here was much better - Reno was called in again, and finally I was let into the secret. The Engineer's Report, It dawned on me that these chaps had no idea what they were doing. None of them were actually qualified in any form of engineering. Unlike SVA, there is no formal procedure and there are no gauges or test articles. The only piece of equipment they use is crowbar, with which they try to rip parts from the underside of your car and the Inspectors are very shy about taking the responsibility for allowing such a radically different-looking vehicle like a Beauford out on the roads. However, a written report by an acceptably-qualified engineer saying the car was ok, would open all doors. Back in Mandurah, enquiries at a local parts store revealed that my suspicions were correct and after calling Welshpool twice, I was faxed a list of approved engineers. None were near Mandurah. One said he'd retired two years ago and the one nearest to the Welshpool station said he couldn't take the job for at least a month and $1000 was his basic fee. He was good enough to recommend another man who just happened to live 200m from my sister. This gave me a good excuse to visit her - in the Bofie. This chap, Romeo the Romanian, was brilliant. An appointment in a couple of day’s time saw me outside his home by 9.30am, the Bofie having this time coped with the freeway traffic no problem. A thirty-minute chat as we went through a list of regulations over a cup of coffee, convinced me he knew his stuff. Like taking a driving test, there is a technique for getting approval. A very short inspection of the car on his drive and some pictures for his files, and I was off to my sister's - with an even


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE longer list of Things to be done. Included in this list were two items that completely flummoxed me at first. I was required to provide two mounting points on the rear deck for child seats, and the steering shaft was to be cut in the middle and re-joined with a 90 degree twist in it in order to place the universal joints in said shaft into alignment. Now I would regard as pure insanity any attempt to strap a small child into the back of an open car, but the regulations said one mounting per rear seat position without regard for the vehicle type. So be it. Romeo and I had come up with a way I could do it. The steering was "fundamentally unsound practice", and had to be done by a certificated welder. I had been told, despite my protests that the vehicle was bespoke and that the seats were fixed in the right position for me alone - to make the front seats adjustable and fit headrests. The best answer to both these problems seemed to be to purchase and fit new front seats. Local speed shops only had bucket seats for boy-racer types, so I turned to the same local breaker's yard I had visited before. There I found a pair from a Hyundai that didn't look too horrid and the passenger seat sprang forward when the backrest was released, making rear access easier. When I got them home, I found that on both seats, and their adjusters were hopelessly worn out and full of sand. So I took them straight back. The seats were returned for credit without any arguments and my inquiry about a welder was met with "go see Russell up the back end". Russell up the back end was another great guy. Self-employed, he was renting space at the back of the workshop in which he seemed to be building a half scale model of the Sydney Harbour Bridge from aluminium tubing. In the corner was a fifties car half turned into a stretch limo - I had come to the right place. Russell said he would come over and do the welding at my home at the weekend. So I bought an angle grinder and cutting blade on the way back, and a large steel bolt. Back in my shed I swallowed hard as the the grinder bit into the steering tube. I cut through

the tube easily, leaving a small gap between the ends. These I chamfered, and, having cut both the thread and head from the big bolt, I pushed the shank into one half of the tube. Then I worked it back up into the other half where it acted as a guide to hold the tube aligned and, as it was solid, Russell could weld the tube without fear of burning through. This he did as arranged and also welded nuts to the rear cross member for seatbelt mountings. The quarter-turn introduced into the steering shaft resulted in the steeringwheel now being out of kilter which I corrected. Over a coffee, he seriously suggested that if I strapped a piece of wood to each of the front seats and put on some foam and a seat cover - the Inspectors would accept it as a headrest. In the event, I think he would have been right. A day or two later, I got a call from Romeo, saying that he'd had word that the goalposts were going to move at any time and I'd better get the modifications done and the car reinspected soonest. After a pretty hectic weekend, I had the Bofie back at Romeo's, everything done as per our list bar the darned headrests. I'd even gone on the local radio station to beg anyone who had the clip-on type to loan them to me, to no effect. Romeo was satisfied with everything that I'd done and was even surprised that I'd got so much finished so quickly. We went inside to finalize his report. Meanwhile, I promised that headrests would be fitted in time for an inspection in two days and, after having arranged to meet him at Welshpool, I waved goodbye to Romeo and swung over to my sister's for tea. The trip back to Mandurah that night was great. It's a long while since I've driven at speed at night and the road was empty, inviting a little limit breaking but reminding me that I'd not worn warm enough clothing! The next morning I removed the leather covers from my seats and took the frames over to the breakers yard. So very helpful again - we soon found a pair of rests from a Mazda 929 in pristine condition which wiped out a chunk of my credit. Russell again came up trumps, by welding them expertly to my


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE seat frames on the spot - for free. It was after midnight before I had the covers re-sewn and the seats fitted back in the car, now with adjustment. I found that the original seats still had all the mechanis but it wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work with the seats bolted directly to the floor. So I introduced lengths of 20mm square tube under the seat runners and with longer bolts, all was well. My appointment at the Pit was at 11am the next day which meant a start at around 9.30am. Driving in glorious sunshine, the top not just down, but left in the shed, I knew that whatever happened, I would not give up until my Bofie was passed, no matter how big the

fence, we'd jump it. The car ran faultlessly up the freeway, despite the hot day, and I parked at Welshpool in good time. Lazing in the back seat, I was all but asleep when Romeo arrived, just a little late. He gave approval to the headrests, and then went to find Reno for a discussion. It was nearly midday when he came back, smiling, and handed me the paperwork. "Just get in the queue, and if you have any trouble, tell them to call Reno, but it'll be ok " he said, and then left.

The queue was much shorter, and soon it was my turn. The inspector waving me forwards, I rolled the Bofie over the pit, set the brake, and switched off. "Oh, you've been here before, have you?" the Inspector said as I handed him the papers with the words "Work your way through that lot!" He did, walking over to sit in one of a row of seats next to a couple of nervous guys surrounded by cigarette butts, much like the waiting room for expectant fathers in a hospital! Finished with the reading, he took a tour round and under the car, asked for all the extra lights to be demonstrated, then went off to see Reno. He was back in about 10 minutes, signed the bottom of the form and handed it to me. "Is

that it?" I asked. "Yep, take these papers to the registration office in Mandurah, and get your plates, good luck". And that's all there was to it, this guy had never even sat in the car. I was giggling all the way home. As I wanted custom plates, B04D, they took about three weeks to arrive, and cost another $275, but who cares, I can take the Bofie out whenever I want now.

So my friends, for a mere $7000, I am the proud owner of the only Beauford in Australia!


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all a been a misunderstanding ........ This is a story as told by Hillary Clinton at a dinner for world leaders...... Some years ago President Clinton was hosting a state dinner when, at the last minute, his regular cook fell ill and they had to get a replacement on short notice. The fellow arrived and turned out to be a very grubby-looking man named Jon. The President voiced his concerns to his Chief of Staff but was told that this was the best they could do on such short notice. Just before the meal, the President noticed the cook sticking his finger in the soup to taste it and again complained to the Chief Of Staff, but he was told that this man was supposed to be a very good chef. The meal went okay, but the President was sure that the soup tasted a little funny. By the time dessert came, he was starting to have stomach cramps and nausea. It was getting worse and worse until finally the President had to excuse himself from the dinner to look for the bathroom. Passing through the kitchen, he caught sight of the cook, Jon, scratching his rear end, which made him feel even worse. By now, the President was desperately ill with violent cramps and was so disorientated that he couldn't remember which door led to the bathroom. He was on the verge of passing out from the pain when he finally found a door that opened. As he unzipped his trousers and ran in, he realized to his horror that he had stumbled into Monica Lewinsky's office with his trousers around his knees. As he was just about to pass out, she bent over him and heard the President whisper in a barely audible voice........ "For christ sake Monica sack my cook ."

And that is how the whole misunderstanding occurred...

A six-year-old goes to the hospital with her mother to visit her Grandpa. When they get to the hospital, she runs ahead of her mother and bursts into her Grandpa's room. "Grandpa, Grandpa," she says excitedly, "as soon as my mother comes into the room, make a noise like a frog!" "What?" said her Grandpa. "Make a noise like a frog because my mum said that as soon as you croak, we're all going to Disney World!â&#x20AC;? 20


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE

Let’s Look  at  Oil Tim  at  Opie  Oils What does an Engine Oil Do? LUBRICATE Motor oil must lubricate engine components so that they will easily pass by one another without a significant loss of power due to friction. At start-up, this is especially true. As an engine sits, oil tends to run down into the oil sump. Therefore, when the engine is started, the oil must be quickly pumped throughout the engine to provide sufficient cranking speed for the engine to turn over. Once the engine is running, engine oil must create a film between moving parts to make them "slippery" which i n c r e a s e s p o w e r, performance and e f f i c i e n c y. E a c h different type of engine requires a certain viscosity range in order that the oil will provide an adequate film between moving parts while still flowing quickly and easily enough throughout the engine. Some people mistakenly believe that if an SAE 30 oil provides good protection, an SAE 50 oil must provide greater protection. That's not necessarily true. If your vehicle was not designed to take an SAE 50 oil, using one may not cause more engine wear, but it will likely cause an increase in engine temperatures. This can be just as bad for the longevity of your engine as engine wear. PROTECT The film that an engine oil provides between metal surfaces does more than just lubricate. By keeping engine components from coming in contact with each other, a motor oil also provides protection against wear. However, there is another way in which an oil protects. Engine oil must protect against corrosion of

engine components. Oxidation of the oil and contamination via condensation and combustion by-products all cause acids within an engine oil. If these acids are allowed to come into contact with engine components, corrosion occurs and premature component failure is the result. Engine oils are designed to combat these acids. Functions of an Oil CLEAN If an engine does not remain clean, it does not remain efficient. Deposits within an engine gum up the works and reduce fuel efficiency while robbing your engine of performance. In addition, contaminants within a oil that are left "unguarded" can cause incalculable wear within an engine. Any particle larger than 5 to 20 microns in size (depending upon the vehicle) will seriously damage an engine if not removed or contained. To give you an idea of how small this is, a human hair is 100 microns thick. Although filtration plays a big role in this area, the oil also has to play it's part by keeping deposits from forming within the engine and by holding contaminants in suspension until they can be removed by the oil filter. COOL Engine oil is responsible for a large percentage of the cooling that takes place within your engine. Your radiator is only responsible for cooling the upper portion of your engine. The rest, crankshaft, camshaft, timing gears, pistons, main and connecting rod bearings and many other critical engine components are cooled mainly by the motor oil within your engine. Heat is generated within an engine from both 21


the combustion process and the friction caused by the motion of engine components. As oil passes through the system it is directed onto these hot surfaces in order to carry the heat away to the oil sump. From here the heat is dissipated to the air surrounding the sump. One of the disadvantages of using an overly thick oil is that the oil may not flow as quickly as the engine would like, leading to less heat transfer and higher engine temperatures. The Basics When it comes to choosing oil for your car, this information may seem like going back to basics, but we at www.opieoils.co.uk are constantly surprised by the amount of people who do not understand what is written on a bottle of oil and therefore have no idea of what they are buying or using. This article should help most car owners as a basic guide, for more detailed information you can always contact us at www.opieoils.co.uk and will be happy to help you. So, to be blunt about the subject, if a bottle of oil does not contain the following basic information then DO NOT buy it look for something that does! 1) The purpose for which it is intended (i.e. engine oil, gear oil, ATF etc) 2) The viscosity (i.e. 10w-40, 5w-30 etc for engine oils and 80w-90, 75w-90 etc for gear oils) 3) The specifications that it meets (should contain API and/or ACEA ratings) 4) The OEM Approvals that it carries and the codes (i.e. MB229.5, VW504.00, FORD 913A, BMW LL04 etc)

“Multigrades”, which simply means that the oil falls into 2 viscosity grades (i.e. 10w-40 etc) Multigrades were first developed some 50 years ago to avoid the old routine of using a thin oil in winter and a thicker oil in the summer. In a 10w-40 for example the 10w bit (W = winter, not weight or watt or anything else for that matter) simply means that the oil must have a certain maximum viscosity/flow at low temperature. The lower the “W” number the better the oils cold temperature/cold start performance. I.E. 5w is better than 10w etc The 40 in a 10w-40 simply means that the oil must fall within certain viscosity limits at 100 degC. This is a fixed limit and all oils that end in 40 must achieve these limits. Once again the lower the number the thinner the oil, a 30 oil is thinner than a 40 oil at 100 degC etc. Your handbook will specify whether a 30, 40 or 50 etc is required. Specifications Specifications are important as these indicate the performance of an oil and whether it has met or passed the latest tests or whether the formulation is effectively obsolete or out of date. There are two specifications that you should look for on any oil bottle and these are: API (American Petroleum Institute) and ACEA (Association des Constructeurs Europeens d’Automobiles).

Ignore the marketing blurb on the label, as in many cases it is meaningless and we will explain later what statements you should treat with some skepticism.

All good oils should contain both of these and an understanding of what they mean is important.

So, what does the above information mean and why is it important?

This is the more basic of the two specs as it is split (for passenger cars) into two catagories.

The Purpose

S = Petrol and C = Diesel, most oils carry both petrol (S) and diesel (C) specifications. The following table shows how up to date the specifications the oil are: PETROL SG Introduced 1989 has much more active dispersant to combat black sludge.

All oils are intended for an application and in general are not interchangeable. You would not for example put a Automatic Transmission Oil or a Gear Oil in your engine! It is important to know what the oils intended purpose is. Viscosity Most oils on the shelves today are

API Specifications

SH - Introduced 1993 has same engine tests as SG, but includes phosphorus limit 0.12%, together with control of foam, volatility and shear stability. 22


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE Manufacturers on the bottle, the most common in the UK being VW, MB, BMW, Ford or Vauxhall but do not be misled into SL - Introduced 2001, all new engine tests thinking that you are buying top quality oil reflective of modern engine designs meeting because of this. SJ - Introduced 1996 has the same engine tests as SG/SH, but phosphorus limit 0.10% together with variation on volatility limits

current emissions standards

SM - Introduced November 2004, improved oxidation resistance, deposit protection and wear protection, also better low temperature performance over the life of the oil compared to previous categories. If you want a better more up to date oil specification then look for SL, SM, CH4, CI4

ACEA Specifications This is the European equivalent of API (US) and is more specific in what the performance of the oil actually is. A = Petrol, B = Diesel and C = Catalyst compatible or low SAPS (Sulphated Ash, Phosphorus and Sulphur). These specs are more commonly found on European oils and in many respects are more important than API for European Manufactured cars. Unlike API the ACEA specs are split into performance/application catagories as follows: A1 Fuel economy petrol A2 Standard performance level (now obsolete) A3 High performance and/or extended drain A4 Reserved for future use in certain direct injection engines A5 Combines A1 fuel economy with A3 performance B1 Fuel economy diesel B2 Standard performance level (now obsolete) B3 High performance and/or extended drain B4 For direct injection car diesel engines B5 Combines B1 fuel economy with B3/B4 performance C1-04 Petrol and Light duty Diesel engines, based on A5/B5-04 low SAPS, two way catalyst compatible. C2-04 Petrol and light duty Diesel engines, based on A5/B5-04 mid SAPS, two way catalyst compatible. C3-04 Petrol and light duty Diesel engines, based on A5/B5-04 mid SAPS, two way catalyst compatible, higher performance levels due to higher HTHS.

Note: SAPS = Sulphated Ash, Phosphorous and Sulphur. Put simply, A3/B3, A5/B5 and C3 oils are the better quality, stay in grade performance oils. Approvals Many oils mention various Car

Oil Companies send their oils to OEM’s for approval however some older specs are easily achieved and can be done so with the cheapest of mineral oils. Newer specifications are always more up to date and better quality/performance than the older ones. Latest OEM specifications are listed here if you are looking for a quality high performance oil: VW – 503.00, 503.01, 506.00 VW504.00 and VW507.00 specifications. MB – 229.5, and 229.51. BMW – LL01 and the latest LL04. Finally Above is the most accurate guidance we can give without going into too much depth however there is one final piece of advice regarding labeling. Certain statements are made on labels that are meaningless and just marketing hype; here are a few to avoid! Recommended for use where............... May be used where the following specifications apply............... Approved by.............................(but with no qualification or specification) Recommended/Approved by (some famous person, these endorsements are paid for) Racing/Track formula (but with no supporting evidence) Also be wary of statements like “synthetic blend” if you are looking for a fully synthetic oil as this will merely be a semi-synthetic. Like everything in life, you get what you pay for. The cheaper the oil the cheaper the ingredients, lower the performance levels and older the specs it meets so beware! In the next magazine, I will have a look at some of the many oil myths ..... synthetic oils can be used in older engines to really good effect! 23


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE

ONLY IF IT CAN DO WEDDINGS Dianne Shepherd

Back in 1995 Greg suggested he might like to build a kit car, preferably a sports car. Having seen quite a few out on the road I was not particularly interested in what I called "roller skates on wheels" and as a throwaway remark said "if he could find one that we could use for Weddings I might be interested". Within less than half an hour he came back with an article on the Beaufords and a picture of one taken on a beach. Well that was just the start. Following our move to Suffolk in 1987, we were Wedding Photographers with a 1939 25/30 Rolls Royce, followed by a 1935 Hillman Minx and a 1957 Daimler Conquest. We felt that these

off for a drive in their demonstrator and this tipped the balance. We travelled back to Suffolk and started to do some calculations, as it just fitted the bill. It was now time to look into the practicalities of where we could build it and finding the money to buy the whole kit. The Stafford Kit Car Show was coming up so we made arrangements to go along, place our order and pay the deposit to Hilary. This was just the beginning and we eagerly awaited a call to say our first kit was ready for collection. After arranging for a transit van and trailer we set off once again from Suffolk to Up Holland. When we arrived Arthur Goldstraw was there and

three cars supplemented our photographic business quite well. Having limited the mileage these cars covered owing to their age, we were very restricted in the area we could cover and it soon became very apparent we needed to expand our horizons. With this in mind we arranged to visit Beaufords at Up Holland and received a very warm welcome from Gordon and Hilary, with their customary hospitality. Greg had made up his mind before we went on this trip he wasn't going to be pushed into something he wasn't happy with. We were sent

helped us load the kit and tie it down securly. Later on in the build Arthur's knowledge proved invaluable and Greg was very grateful for his help. Approximately three quarters through his first build, Greg and I were having a coffee in a little beach side cafe on the coast at Kessingland in Suffolk, when a Beauford sailed past the window. Spluttering in to my coffee I exclaimed "there's a Bea-Bea-Beauford". This was the first Beauford we had actually seen on the road, apart from Up Holland and Stafford. 24


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE We were so excited by this that we decided to do a bit of sleuthing, and guessed that, as it had driven out of a caravan park there was a possibility it would be around for a few days. Very early the next morning we drove to the nearest park and EUREKA there was this gorgeous Ivory and Dark Green four door Beauford. Greg immediately wanted to roll under it and see where the hydraulic pipes had been routed, but managed to refrain until we had met the owners, whom we pounced on when they emerged from the site shower

To cut a long story short, Peter very kindly let Greg and I borrow his car to do a Wedding when it became obvious that our car would not quite be ready for a booking we had rashly taken, and on returning the car Peter made the casual remark that he was thinking of selling it because he had his eye on a boat. This sowed the seed. Gorgeous car, great for Weddings, can't afford it - but we'll have it. Shortly after, our first car was ready and the following season the two Beaufords proved

blocks with wet hair, towels over their shoulders and wash bags in their hands, totally amazed that we had seen them and arrived so early to look at their car. The owners were a charming couple, Peter and Mary Keeble, whom some longer serving members may remember. Some years back Mary was the Membership Secretary to the Club. We immediately struck a friendship and invited them back to our bungalow about 3 miles inland to see our incomplete car.

that if you want to make a successful Wedding Business these are the cars to have. It quickly became apparent that we needed another one due to the number of Weddings we were turning away, and as Greg was reluctant to start on another build we looked for a complete car, but as others have no doubt found, really nice well finished four door cars are snapped up by Wedding operators before the ink has dried on the advert. Greg was left with no option but to


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE bite the bullet and start again. We ordered our second Kit from David and Jayne, again at Up Holland, and another two years passed before the car was completed. We now have two matching cars in Ivory and Dark Blue. The second car had to be submitted for an SVA test, and as most people have found they almost always fail on niggling minor points, ours was no exception - hinges not rounded sufficiently, no E mark on interior and so on add nauseum. Once again we had to tow the chassis behind the Ivory and Green Beauford to our local testing station, pay another ÂŁ30 come away and carry on.

Design) single seat plane with a VW engine from someone in York, and for the last few years, whilst it needed some supposedly "minor" work it languished in a trailer in our front garden. Last year it was time to make some progress and we have finally been able to take it to the airfield at Seething, very close to Norwich. FRED has folding wings so we could tow it behind a vehicle, and the only car we have with a tow bar is the Ivory and Green Beauford. Very carefully we made our way along a planned route and arrived safely at the airfield. Attached is a photograph of the car and plane arriving behind our "multi purpose vehicle". We have taken the first

We now only run the three Beaufords and have passed the dubious pleasure of chasing obsolete parts, pitted chrome and rust patches to someone else. Not long after our first meeting, Peter and Mary moved to this area and they often see our cars passing by on their way to and from Weddings. While they owned their Beauford they used to tow a very small caravan behind it, we have found yet another use. Greg has a Private Pilots Licence and decided some ten years ago he would like to have another single seater aeroplane. We purchased a FRED (Flying Runabout Experimental

Beauford Greg built on some holidays to the Lake District and Cornwall, once travelling overnight and having breakfast on the side of the road out of the trunk - which has a picnic table flap and is just the right height for sitting at. As they are the mainstay of the business we are sadly reluctant to take them away now, but hopefully as we will both be retired soon we will give it a little more consideration. In closing, just in case they get to read this, Greg and I would like to say a heartfelt thanks to Gordon and Hilary for designing such a great car, and to David and Jayne for all their subsequent help.


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE

NISSAN L Series Engine Serial Number History Trevor and the Datsun Owners Club of New Zealand Car Model

Engine

Year

Production Date

Serial Number

240z

L24

1970

10/69 - 5/70

000013 - 021000

240z

L24

1971

1/71 - 8/71

021001 - 046000

240z

L24

1972

9/71 - 6/72

046001 - 120000

240z

L24

1973

7/72 - 7/73

120001 - 172732

260z

L26

1974

8/73 - 8/74

000001 - 060000

260z

L26

1975

9/74 - 11/74

060001 - 200000

260z 2+2

L26

1974

10/73 - 8/74

0000001 - 015000

260z 2+2

L26

1975

9/74 - 11/74

015001 - 060000

280z

L28

1975

12/74 - 7/75

200001 - 270000

280z

L28

1976

8/75 - 7/76

270001 - 350000

280z

L28

1977

8/76 - 7/77

250001 - 420000

280z

L28

1978

8/77 - 6/78

420001 - 470009

280z 2+2

L28E

1975

12/74 - 7/75

000001 - 030000

280z 2+2

L28E

1976

8/75 - 7/76

030001 - 060000

280z 2+2

L28E

1977

8/76 - 7/77

060001 - 110000

280z 2+2

L28E

1978

8/77 - 6/78

110001 - 124742

280ZX

L28E

1979

8/78 - 7/79

100000 - 162096

280ZX

L28E

1980

8/79 - 6/80

190024 - 226930

280ZX

L28E

1981

7/80 - 2/81

250021 - 275472

280ZX 2+2

L28E

1979

6/78 - 7/79

100000 - 128537

280ZX 2+2

L28E

1980

8/79 - 6/80

150032 - 168714

280Z 2+2

L28E

1981

7/80 - 2/81

180040 - 192543

280ZX

L28E

1981

3/81 - 8/81

400001 - 415604

280ZX

L28E

1982

8/81 - 8/82

430014 - 466411

280ZX

L28E

1983

7/82 - 6/83

550006 - 575494

280ZX 2+2

L28E

1981

3/81 - 8/81

400001 - 409544

280ZX 2+2

L28E

1982

8/81 - 8/82

420007 - 437226

280ZX 2+2

L28E

1983

7/82 - 6/83

500006 - 509930

280ZX TURBO

L28ET

1981

3/81 - 8/81

600001 - 606102

280ZX TURBO

L28ET

1982

8/81 - 8/82

620008 - 629090

280ZX TURBO

L28ET

1983

7/82 - 6/83

750006 - 757691

280ZX TURBO 2+2

L28ET

1982

8/81 - 8/82

600015 - 604211

280ZX TURBO 2+2

L28ET

1983

7/82 - 6/83

700012 - 703627

300ZX

VG30E

1984

7/83 - 7/84

000019 - 029692

300ZX

VG30E

1985

8/84 - 8/85

060005 - 101427

300ZX

VG30E

1986

9/85 - 8/86

130295 - 167592

300ZX

VG30E

1989

7/88 - 2/89

290001 - 293149

300ZX TURBO

VG30DETT

1993

7/92 - 6/93

535000 - 536896 27


For Sale Beauford 4 Door Long Body in Old English White, 2.0 Ltr Pinto Engine, Cream leather interior, piped with royal blue, Royal blue carpets, Wallnut dash & door cappings, Wallnut picnic tables to rear of front seats, 12months MOT, 6 months tax, I had it built by

5 Beauford white Wheel Disks (see the disks on the front cover ed). £85 plus carriage at cost Cortina Engine. Fully reconditioned. £450 John

Arthur Goldstraw, Excellent Condition inside & out

Brand new luggage trunk as supplied by

offers over £20,000 Contact Ged Peters on 0191 536 2865

Beauford, not used on my build. Pair of fiberglass headlamp shells, unused. Best offer secures. Peter Cornwell peter_cornwell@lineone.net

Quality 1930 Chauffeurs Uniform. Complete with leather boots. Cost over £800 when new. £325 John 01689 861106

Long bodied hardtop new £600 ono Front badge bar £35.00 Pair new horns ,one has very slight pitting but should polish out £85.00 Pair of stainless side wheel securing rings with protective layer still on £35.00 Bonnett sides to accept side exit exhausts new £140.00 Set of five smooth wheel trims £60.00 Complete new 4 piece set of side glass £80.00 2 new 7" headlamp buckets £15.00 Nosecone with as new mesh fitted £150.00 Contact Graham on 01503220837

28


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE

And Finally As we approach the end of the tax year, this actual letter from the Tax Man (printed with their permission) might be of interest to our members considering writing to the Inland Revenue. Dear Mr Smith, I am writing to you to express our thanks for your more than prompt reply to our latest communication, and also to answer some of the points you raise. I will address them, as ever, in order. Firstly, I must take issue with your description of our last as a "begging letter". It might perhaps more properly be referred to as a "tax demand". This is how we at the Inland Revenue have always, for reasons of accuracy, traditionally referred to such documents. Secondly, your frustration at our adding to the "endless stream of crapulent whining and panhandling vomited daily through the letterbox on to the doormat" has been noted. However, whilst I have naturally not seen the other letters to which you refer I would cautiously suggest that their being from "pauper councils, Lombardy pirate banking houses and pissant gasmongerers" might indicate that your decision to "file them next to the toilet in case of emergencies" is at best a little ill-advised. In common with my own organisation, it is unlikely that the senders of these letters do see you as a "lackwit bumpkin" or, come to that, a "sodding charity". More likely they see you as a citizen of Great Britain, with a responsibility to contribute to the upkeep of the nation as a whole. Which brings me to my next point. Whilst there may be some spirit of truth in your assertion that the taxes you pay "go to shore up the canker-blighted, toppling folly that is the Public Services", a moment's rudimentary calculation ought to disabuse you of the notion that the government in any way expects you to "stump up for the whole damned party" yourself. The estimates you provide for the Chancellor's disbursement of the funds levied by taxation, whilst colourful, are, in fairness, a little off the mark. Less than you seem to imagine is spent on "junkets for Bunterish lickspittles" and "dancing whores" whilst far more than you have accounted for is allocated to, for example, "that box-ticking facade of a university system." A couple of technical points arising from direct queries: 1. The reason we don't simply write "Muggins" on the envelope has to do with the vagaries of the postal system; 2. You can rest assured that "sucking the very marrow of those with nothing else to give" has never been considered as a practice because even if the Personal Allowance didn't render it irrelevant, the sheer medical logistics involved would make it financially unviable. I trust this has helped. In the meantime, whilst I would not in any way wish to influence your decision one way or the other, I ought to point out that even if you did choose to "give the whole foul jamboree up and go and live in India " you would still owe us the money. Please send it to us by Friday. Yours sincerely, H J Lee Customer Relations Inland Revenue

29


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE

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30


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE

31


THE BEAUFORD OWNERS CLUB MAGAZINE

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32

2012 Spring Beauford Owners Club Magazine v1  

2012 Spring Beauford Owners Club Magazine v1 published by Paul Hicks v1

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